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Strummystick
03-22-2016, 19:55
I bring one of two different instrument setups when I hike ....
44.0oz 6 string Martin Backpacker ($200) wrapped in Bubble Wrap and placed in my 12"X 40" "custom made pack liner" which ZPacks.com made for me ($50)
[2.1oz Accessories Pack with extra e,b,g,d strings, 2 picks, aluminum capo, jute ribbon strap, song list in zip lock bag]
(For the first time, I'm taking the above guitar setup onto the AT for a long section hike next week. It's a bit heavier than the strumstick setup below, but I'd really like to have a full guitar with me.)

22oz. 3 string McNally Soprano Strumstick[13oz] in the stock case from the website. It is tuned like a backwards mountain dulcimer with the high string away from the player (GDG), but I tune it in the lower "alto" tuning of (DAD). It's amazing how many chords you come up with for this instrument after a few weeks.
[1.8oz Accessories Pack with extra d,a,d strings, 2 picks, aluminum capo, jute ribbon strap, song list in zip lock bag]
Here's a youtube where I play the strumstick setup https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ae-r6YCtH8E

Smoky Spoon
03-22-2016, 19:56
I am from outwest, so spirit flute.....though I am not very good.

Strummystick
03-22-2016, 20:21
Nice and light, though, Smoky Spoon. :sun

rafe
03-22-2016, 20:26
I don't play much of anything but this dude (a former AT thru-hiker) was playin' ukelele at Priest Shelter when I passed by. No, actually, he was napping when I passed by. He re-animated, drank some wine, and played. Good times.

Odd Man Out
03-22-2016, 20:41
I have not carried an instrument but have considered it. But which one? I'm am somewhat proficient on three onstruments - cello, string bass, and recorder. Can't quite decide which would be best to carry on a hike....

Odd Man Out
03-22-2016, 21:06
I have not carried an instrument but have considered it. Biut which one? I'm am somewhat proficient on three onstruments - cello, string bass, and recorder. Can't quite decide which would be best to carry on a hike. Hmmm?

rocketsocks
03-22-2016, 21:23
Yet to bring it on trail, but me nylon 6 string (adgcea) Yamaha guitlele is a real good time...fer me.

Slo-go'en
03-22-2016, 21:23
I have not carried an instrument but have considered it. Biut which one? I'm am somewhat proficient on three onstruments - cello, string bass, and recorder. Can't quite decide which would be best to carry on a hike. Hmmm?

I'd like to see you carry the cello :) I would think the recorder would be a bit more practical...

bigcranky
03-22-2016, 21:45
I carry a pick and hope to find the occasional guitar at a hostel in town. :)

swjohnsey
03-22-2016, 22:47
No stringed instrument will do well on the trail although someone was carrying a full size cello in '11.

SkeeterPee
03-22-2016, 23:13
I bought a harmonica Saturday with the hopes of practicing for a couple years before doing a thru. Certainly one of the more practical instruments when hiking.

rocketsocks
03-22-2016, 23:22
No stringed instrument will do well on the trail although someone was carrying a full size cello in '11.I was of the same opinion, but spoke to a member here who carried a Martin backpacker while doing a long hike an said it did just fine.

Miel
03-22-2016, 23:26
Auto harp. Not the most practical or weightless thing to carry but really sort of magical with just instrument and (someone else's voice) in the woods.

rocketsocks
03-22-2016, 23:30
Auto harp. Not the most practical or weightless thing to carry but really sort of magical with just instrument and (someone else's voice) in the woods.in addition to the auto harp, dulcimer and the strum stick offers pretty notes to anyone, regardless of thier abilities, no musical background required, just a couple don't touch here and yur playing songs, beautiful

archie
03-22-2016, 23:57
My musical instrument set up is a set of earplugs. I need my beauty rest.

I do appreciate good music if it is early though, so play on minstrels! If it gets late I will just sleep right through it. Just kick me if my snoring interferes with your songs.

Odd Man Out
03-23-2016, 00:16
They now make carbon fiber guitars, violins, celli, etc that are completely waterproof and practically indestructible. The quality is such that professional musicians use them as their instrument of choice. A bit too pricy for your average thru hiker, however. My cello decidedly not waterproof. It was made by Gibson Guitar in K'zoo MI about 75 tears ago. Bit of a novelty.

Miel
03-23-2016, 07:51
in addition to the auto harp, dulcimer and the strum stick offers pretty notes to anyone, regardless of thier abilities, no musical background required, just a couple don't touch here and yur playing songs, beautiful

I love the dulcimer!

And why not bring instruments and songs related to parts of the trail one is hiking? See for example, ethnomusicologists John and Alan Lomax. Or the great film "Songcatcher."

Traveler
03-23-2016, 07:58
A kazoo or duck call tends to work well.... though they are refined tastes.

Odd Man Out
03-23-2016, 08:05
Historically the harmonica has been the quintessential campfire instrument and very portable, but you don't see them much anymore.

rocketsocks
03-23-2016, 08:05
I love the dulcimer!

And why not bring instruments and songs related to parts of the trail one is hiking? See for example, ethnomusicologists John and Alan Lomax. Or the great film "Songcatcher."dig it!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MXh8SDp0H-E

Traillium
03-23-2016, 09:07
Wonderful!


Bruce Traillium

rafe
03-23-2016, 09:16
There's a bit about "Song Catcher" at the visitors center in Hot Springs NC.

Puddlefish
03-23-2016, 09:41
I used to play the trombone fairly well, but no one wants to hear more than 15 seconds of a trombone solo.

chknfngrs
03-23-2016, 10:08
Alan Lomax for the win! That's awesome and thanks for sharing

greensleep
03-23-2016, 10:46
Ocarina, mouthharp, penny whistle, will be carried thru, maybe my small banjo. I made a hammered dulcimer last year, but probably a bit large to carry.:)

Odd Man Out
03-23-2016, 11:56
I used to play the trombone fairly well, but no one wants to hear more than 15 seconds of a trombone solo.

The highland bagpipes were also designed to be played outside.
But you know the difference between a bagpipe and an onion?
No one cries when you cut open a bagpipe.

Miel
03-23-2016, 12:37
Oh thank you, rocketsocks! You're the best!

Miel
03-23-2016, 12:38
Thank you, rafe!

rocketsocks
03-23-2016, 16:16
Oh thank you, rocketsocks! You're the best!no, thank you, great music.

sbhikes
03-23-2016, 19:05
I'm bringing my strumstick. It's a D Grand. I wish I had the C Alto, it's much smaller. I dragged my strumstick through 200 miles of Glacier National Park and never had any trouble with it. I usually bring a pennywhistle but honestly those are just too darn loud. I thought about bringing my kalimba but the strumstick won.

Another Kevin
03-23-2016, 21:46
I've occasionally been known to bring a recorder or a tin whistle. I once hiked with a guy who brought whittle-and-dub. That was ... interesting.

Traillium
03-23-2016, 23:11
I once hiked with a guy who brought whittle-and-dub.

Geez I'm wondering about carrying one of mine!

(Whittle-and-dub, also known as pipe and tabor, is a medieval dance instrument, still used for Morris dance among other forms. The pipe/whittle is like a three-holed penny whistle and can be very shrill and loud. The dub/tabor is a small drum hung from the wrist. I play pipe with left hand, and drum with right. I have a quiet pipe that I would take, and just drum on a log Actually, I'm likely to bring a harmonica.)


Bruce Traillium

squeezebox
03-24-2016, 03:04
Alan Lomax for the win! That's awesome and thanks for sharing
IMHO Alan Lomax did more for American Folk music than everyone else combined, because he recorded it.

squeezebox
03-24-2016, 03:08
Anyone know about any water proof Button boxes??