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stag3
12-29-2005, 10:20
I got a new Olympis F 110 digital camera and it came with two AA batteries-alkalyne type. Well, these lasted for a few days, and a maximum of 40 pictures. Tried another brand and this time 2 days and 30 pictures. At this rate I'll have to exhaust the entire AT supply of AA batteries.

I read about the NiMH (nickle metal hydride) rechargable batteries and these are supposed to be much better, but a bit pricey.

So, the question is do I need a new camera or just a better set of batteries? If just batteries, any suggestions on brand?

K-Man
12-29-2005, 11:05
I use energizer rechargeable NiMh batteries for my camera and GPS and headlamp. These do last significantly longer than standard alkaline batteries and are much better for the environment since you are not throwing them away after one use. When purchasing rechargeables you need to look at how many mAh they are rated for. The higher the mAh rating the longer the battery will last, though it will take a bit longer to charge. I use 2500mAh and I can take about 300 pics (that's an estimate, but I know I can fill up my 512 memory card before the batteries run out) with my cannon A95 though it uses 4 AA's not two. You definitely don't need a new camera. Try the NiMh batteries. Best buy sells a 15 min charger that comes with 4 2500mAh AA's for about $25.

icemanat95
12-29-2005, 11:10
In my experience NiMH rechargeables don't last as long as good quality alkalines, but you can recharge them. Lithium's last a lot longer, but are pricey and disposable.

Just Jeff
12-29-2005, 11:12
Camera brand can make a difference, but so can how you use it. Leaving the LCD display on for a long time while you set up your pictures, then review them later, drains batteries like mad. Your camera might have an option to take pictures using a viewfinder instead of the display - that'll help save a lot on the trail. Also, keep reviewing pics to a minimum.

What temps were you using the camera in? Using batteries while they're cold will drain them quickly. Warm them up before using them (by storing them in an inner jacket pocket or something) and they'll last longer. I sleep with my electronics to keep them warm when it's cold overnight.

Some battery types work better in the cold, too. Like these lithium batteries: http://www.ambientweather.com/enaaliba4pa.html

Kerosene
12-29-2005, 11:35
I'm feeling better about the proprietary battery for my Pentax Optio that lasts for several hundred snapshots between charging. Plus I can bring a second battery (less than one ounce) to replace it when it runs down. Granted, it's not easy to recharge on an extended hike, but it is ideal for a 2-4 week section.

Alligator
12-29-2005, 12:00
I'll just echo what Kerosene has mentioned. I too have a Pentax Optio (an S). The batteries do last a very long time. I don't remember needing to change the battery on my week long section, but had another just in case. At home, I take a lot of flash pictures, and don't really pay a lot of attention to the number between chargings, but it still seems to last quite a while.

While the battery is "proprietary" I did find another company that made it. I'm pretty sure the extra battery cost about $10.

Any other folks have good battery life with other cameras having proprietary batteries?

Footslogger
12-29-2005, 12:27
I started off with the AA sized NiMH rechargeables. Went through several sets trying to get the highest output/longest life brand. Finally gave up on the rechargeables and locked in on the AA Lithiums. Doubt that I'll ever go back to the rechargeables. Easier to just carry a back-up set of Lithiums.

'Slogger

neo
12-29-2005, 14:02
i use 2 AA ENERGIZER LITHIUM BATTERIES they are excellent in my fuji digital cam:cool: neo

Two Speed
12-29-2005, 14:48
. . .Any other folks have good battery life with other cameras having proprietary batteries?Got an Olympus 300, I think. Proprietary battery, great life. Usually can do a week plus section w/o swapping the battery and I don't have to scrimp on taking photos. I do use the LCD screen, but usually have the flash disabled. I do carry a spare battery, though. I like to run the battery completely out, then swap. So far, so good.

Mother Nature
12-29-2005, 14:53
I echo all those that have switched to Lithium AAs. They are fairly easy to find. I bought in bulk as a matter of fact at SAMS and saved $$$. I started with rechargables but found Lithiums lasted longer and weighed 1/2 as much!

I have had to search as they aren't easy to find living in the boondocks Lithium AAA for my radio. (Found them in Orlando visiting Grandchildren for Christmas).

Mother Nature

K-Man
12-29-2005, 15:14
I hope you are all recycling those disposable batteries and not throwing them in with your regular trash!!!

dla
12-29-2005, 22:00
I hope you are all recycling those disposable batteries and not throwing them in with your regular trash!!!

Why? There's no mercury in the chemistry. No cadmium. Why should someone be concerned about tossing disposable batteries into the regular trash?

Doctari
12-30-2005, 11:01
All my stuff for hiking is AA powered (sept for the photon light) so I got a charger with 4 bateries from big lots for $8.00, 4 extra batts are only $6.00 so I can carry 8 batts, only need 3 for my headlamp, so that allows me to buy a digital camera that needs 4 & I'll have a spare for whatever. The inital charge time was 24 hours the copy says it should fully charge 4 dead cells in less than 6 hrs. At about 1 Oz for the charger, & I carry 3 "spare batteries" anyway the weight diff ain't that much.
Havn't used it on the trail yet, but here at home, it has powered a video game (4 cells, attaches to the TV) for about 4 hours play time with no signs of going flat, sooo,,,
The plan is: charge in town at wherever I stay. Probably can quietly charge in resturants too, as the instructions say that you can do a partial charge with no harm, supposedly the cells have "No memory" like ni-cads.

Doctari.

Lilred
12-30-2005, 11:25
Gotta echo all the comments about lithium batteries. I went on a five week section last summer one pair lasted the whole trip. I took close to 300 photos.

K-Man
12-30-2005, 11:33
Why? There's no mercury in the chemistry. No cadmium. Why should someone be concerned about tossing disposable batteries into the regular trash?

uhhh alkaline...lead acid...other heave metals! Also, some shady battery manufacturers do not comply with US laws for mercury free. If recycling programs are in place we might as well use them. Right?

stag3
01-08-2006, 12:31
I tried the disposable Li ion bateries,. You guys and gals are right on--they are lots better than alkaline or NiMH. Any experience with the battery life between disposable and recharge Li ion? My concern is spending big $$ for a recharger and finding that the recharged batteries are not as good as the fresh disposables.

LostInSpace
01-08-2006, 15:52
Li-ion (lithium-ion) batteries have long shelf life and high energy density; but in AA, AAA, C, and D forms they are not rechargeable. These non-rechargeable lithium batteries do last from one and a half to 2 times longer than NiMH batteries (per charge cycle for NiMH); but, as with alkalines, lose in cost-effectiveness as they must be disposed of. Lithium-ion (or lithium) is not environmentally friendly and requires special disposal.

NiMH (nickel metal hydride) batteries are the battery of choice for high drain applications. They have a long life and can last from 500-1000 charge cycles. Per charge cycle, NiMH will run one and and one half to two times longer than alkaline and will not develop a memory as do NiCad batteries. Because there is no measurable memory effect, NiMH batteries can be recharged whenever it is convenient. Nickel metal hydride is environmentally friendly, requires no special disposal procedures and contains no toxic metals. Finally, NiMH comes in standard battery sizes-AA, AAA, C, D, and 9V-as well as proprietary batteries and battery packs.

You can get good info about batteries and digi-cams from these sites:

http://www.imaging-resource.com/ACCS/BATTS/BATTS.HTM (http://www.imaging-resource.com/ACCS/BATTS/BATTS.HTM)
http://www.steves-digicams.com/digi_accessories.html (http://www.steves-digicams.com/digi_accessories.html)

You can find good prices and selection of rechargable batteries, and also information if you dig around, here:

http://www.thomas-distributing.com/rechargeable-batteries.php (http://www.thomas-distributing.com/rechargeable-batteries.php)

CamppamC
01-09-2006, 04:40
Lithium Ion (rechargeable) do come in AA and AAA actually, but these are 3.6 volts and not the standard 1.5 volts, so they are not replacements of alkalines.

LostInSpace is right about the NiMh's. They are actually excellent replacements for alkalines. Although they are stated to be 1.2v, they can actually charge to 1.45v and have a better discharge curve than alkalines.

Sanyo 2500 NiMh's and Energizer (OEM Sanyo) are the best around. GP is also pretty good.

frieden
01-09-2006, 07:54
I use the rechargeable batteries, and was debating on what to bring on the hike. Question: How do you recharge them? Mine fits in my hand, has two spaces in the back, and two in the front, the plug-in prongs fold down.....and it weighs a bleeding ton! Do you keep your charger in a bounce box, or do you really hike with that extra weight?

Peaks
01-09-2006, 09:00
I use the rechargeable batteries, and was debating on what to bring on the hike. Question: How do you recharge them? Mine fits in my hand, has two spaces in the back, and two in the front, the plug-in prongs fold down.....and it weighs a bleeding ton! Do you keep your charger in a bounce box, or do you really hike with that extra weight?

I suggest:

First, maximize battery life by turning off the preview screen, not previewing photos, and not editing photos.

Second, figure out how many pictures you should expect from a set of batteries.

How many photos do you plan to take anyway? Assuming 4 per day, that will be perhaps 600 for the entire hike. If your battery life is 100 photos, then you will go through 6 sets of batteries. I'd recommend that you buy replacement batteries as you go.

icemanat95
01-09-2006, 09:52
I suggest:

First, maximize battery life by turning off the preview screen, not previewing photos, and not editing photos.

Second, figure out how many pictures you should expect from a set of batteries.

How many photos do you plan to take anyway? Assuming 4 per day, that will be perhaps 600 for the entire hike. If your battery life is 100 photos, then you will go through 6 sets of batteries. I'd recommend that you buy replacement batteries as you go.

Some of us take A LOT of photos. In particularly scenic areas I might burn through a roll of film per day, where in the long green tunnel it might be only a few a day.

So don't go by anyone else's estimations of numbers of pictures per day, I shot upwards of 45 rolls of film in 1995, never less than 24 shots per roll, most as many as 36 exposures. As a conservative extimate, I would say I easily shot over 1200 pictures during my hike, probably more.

Peaks
01-09-2006, 18:28
Some of us take A LOT of photos. In particularly scenic areas I might burn through a roll of film per day, where in the long green tunnel it might be only a few a day.

So don't go by anyone else's estimations of numbers of pictures per day, I shot upwards of 45 rolls of film in 1995, never less than 24 shots per roll, most as many as 36 exposures. As a conservative extimate, I would say I easily shot over 1200 pictures during my hike, probably more.

Right on Iceman. Certainly don't go anyone else's estimate. My point is to figure out what your own habits are.