PDA

View Full Version : Hiking in hot and humid weather



JLorenzo77
07-22-2016, 10:04
Hey guys - Planning on doing a 7.5 mile day hike from Pen Mar to Old Forge next Wednesday. If anyone lives in the mid-Atlantic, they are well aware of the disgusting weather we are getting. I was wondering if anyone had some good tips for hot temperature/high humidity hiking? I know that section is under a pretty thick canopy and the obvious ones like water and skin coverage are important. Just seeking some tips from some experienced hikers.

Thanks!
Josh

Uncle Joe
07-22-2016, 10:14
You kinda have to embrace the sweat. I hike in GA so I feel your pain. I take extra dew rags to keep the sweat out of my eyes. I also pack at the least an extra shirt for changing into at the trailhead upon return. (Sometimes a towel!) Other than that, drink a lot of water.

Ktaadn
07-22-2016, 10:17
I find that dumping a cup or so of water on my head feels great. Even when the water is the same temperature as the air. If you can stop and do that once an hour or so, it really helps both physically and mentally.

Also, you should probably adjust your time expectations. You just aren't going to move as fast as you would in cooler temps.

illabelle
07-22-2016, 10:25
Hike early and late. When possible, plan to spend midday hours napping, reading, playing in a creek, studying ants, pondering the meaning of life, etc.

burger
07-22-2016, 10:27
Wear a hat. Every time you get to a stream, dunk it in the water and put it back on your head.

Otherwise, start early, take a long break in mid-afternoon if you can, and drink plenty of water.

Tipi Walter
07-22-2016, 10:29
A short dayhike doesn't sound like a struggle no matter the temps. Now stretch that dayhike into a 15 day backpacking trip and "hot and humid" weather really gets serious.

I spend a lot of time backpacking in the Southeast where the humidity and temps have been outlandish for the last two months. Don't trip over the rattlesnakes. Here are some of my techniques---

** Wet ballcap and t-shirt repeatedly in cold creek water and wear while hiking. (As Ktaadn and Burger says). I like to take an off-pack break and remove my t-shirt and rinse it out repeatedly to remove salt and put back on.

** Camp next to mountain creeks as much as possible and get into the water often. Here's what happens: You arrive in camp a hot steaming sweatlodge mess and set up camp and get crap arranged. You jump into whatever swimming hole you can find and stay submerged for 10 or 15 minutes. Return to camp and your whole system is "refrigerated" and everything feels great. In 3 hours you're back to steaming and so return to the swimhole and repeat procedure.

** And as Jpolk84 says, you just have to embrace the heat and you will get acclimated to it eventually. After backpacking for 10 days at 90F+ degrees, an 85F day seems like late Fall.

** The worst aspect for me is climbing a tough mountain on a hot trail with no shade and my usual 80 lb pack. It will remove all appendages and you'll arrive at the top as an involuntary eunuch.

** The hottest conditions are those with absolutely still air and no wind. The only wind I generate is the breeze passing over my body as I move forwards. This sucks. The best thing in the summer is to set up high on a mountain top in the shade during a windstorm. You'll enjoy whatever wind chill there is.

MuddyWaters
07-22-2016, 10:49
Its not the hiking, its the sleeping.

I run 4-5 miles most evenings. Its 95F and high humidity. Im use to sweating , dont bother me. Actually good for you to sweat profusely now and then , I think. But I like to sleep, and its often miserable before 2am in hot weather. I get sticky itchy damp

JLorenzo77
07-22-2016, 10:56
Thanks everyone! I truly appreciate it. I know we will cross a few streams and that is a wonderful idea to dip my hat in it. This hike shouldn't take long, no more than a few hours. I'm going with someone who isn't as experienced as I am (and obviously I am not that experienced or I wouldn't be asking). Anyway, should be a nice adventure.

Rain Man
07-22-2016, 11:11
Hiking in really hot weather is similar to climbing a really steep mountain. It slows you down and wears you down. Specifically, I cut my daily mileage in half in hot, humid weather. Even then, it's tough. And take electrolytes to put in all that water you'll be drinking.

tiptoe
07-22-2016, 11:28
It's a good idea to take some extra salt, either in the form of food (chips, etc.) or medicinally (from a little vial). The latter has helped me more than once.

Tipi Walter
07-22-2016, 11:37
We used to get salt tablets in 1969 during Air Force basic training so I guess they were useful. We had salt dispensers attached to walls in the barracks. More research needed on this if it's still currently done. I rarely add any salt to my food on my camping trips because my dehydrated meals are loaded with it, although I do add some to my cooked oatmeal.

CalebJ
07-22-2016, 12:40
Salt tablets are still very common in endurance racing, and easily available online.

tiptoe
07-22-2016, 12:40
And I rarely add any salt to my meals, dehydrated or not. So that's why the extra salt comes in handy for me.

yaduck9
07-22-2016, 12:49
Wear a hat. Every time you get to a stream, dunk it in the water and put it back on your head.

Otherwise, start early, take a long break in mid-afternoon if you can, and drink plenty of water.

i would humbly suggest adding 2 large bandana, soaked in a nearby stream.Drape one around your neck and wear one on your head w/hat on top.

You will, almost, get to the point where you can soak the bandanas without stopping.

It will look a bit comical.

Deadeye
07-22-2016, 12:53
All of the above, plus I add diluted Gatorade in hot weather, or just have one sip of Gatorade followed by a cup of water. Works for me. I also soak a bandana and wrap it around my neck... really helps cool the brain down. If you have enough water, bathe before bed.

ChuckT
07-22-2016, 13:04
You are going to sweat, get past it. For Florida hot and humid weather this is what I'd recommend.
Water up before you hike. "Drink till ya slosh", works and don't think you can drink as you go to keep your hydration up. It takes a while for water to get into your system. You can try the *ade drinks, I like them but there's a lot of hype there. I wear an over-sized long sleeve shirt, SPF something-or-other (but breathable fabric) shirt, a hat with a neck drape and long bill, and a hobo hankie for mopping my sweaty face. Whatever you do don't fborget bug spray, DEET is your friend.
I am currently auditioning fingerless solar gloves but they're tight where the fabric ends.
Mostly enjoy a good rhythm if you push too much you're courting disaster.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk

Bronk
07-22-2016, 13:42
Hike wearing only a speedo. There's no shame in it. You'll see lots of fat old guys walking the trails that way this time of year.

Traveler
07-22-2016, 15:31
Hike wearing only a speedo. There's no shame in it. You'll see lots of fat old guys walking the trails that way this time of year.

I probably could have gone the rest of my life without that mental image.....

swjohnsey
07-22-2016, 15:35
When is Naked Hiking Day? I would get an early start, first light and have my miles in before noon.

daddytwosticks
07-22-2016, 15:49
All good info stated above. This time of year, I tend to stick to day hikes so I can shower and sleep in the comfort of my air conditioned home at the end of the day.

Take care of your skin! Try to clean up in the evenings using water (use LNT techniques) or wet wipes. Especially the crotch area. Use powder down there too (Dr. Bonners). Consider using some sort of body glide product BEFORE you have issues around the crotch area. Finally, both my packs have trampoline type suspensions. This keeps my back from sweating and keeps the monkey butt at bay. :)

AfterParty
07-22-2016, 16:46
Water for sure and a sun hat even a dress shirt can be nice to have. Light and long sleeves keep the Skeeter's at bay..

JLorenzo77
07-22-2016, 18:26
You guys are awesome. I will do most of what you suggested. I can't do the speedo thing. No one, not even animals want to see that.

JC13
07-22-2016, 20:40
Nuun Active electrolyte tabs saved our section hike. Sassafras kicked my butt.

Tipi Walter
07-22-2016, 22:03
Nuun Active electrolyte tabs saved our section hike. Sassafras kicked my butt.

I'm a recent fanatic of Nuun fizz tablets. Took them on my last two backpacking trips.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Backpack-2016-Trips-171/19-Days-in-a-Rattlesnake/i-jXhNZGM/0/L/Trip%20175%20361-L.jpg

saltysack
07-23-2016, 00:12
Hiking season starts in sept and ends in May!!! I stick to water sports in the heat.....in the south that is...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

misprof
07-23-2016, 02:10
Go for a loose fitting shirt. It will make a little shade for your body. If there is little canopy go for a using an umbrella. The air under an umbrella is 5 to 10 degrees cooler than in the sun. It is one reason they were first invented and now used in the South Pacific. Also take a tip from people who live in this kind of weather year round. Rest during the hottest part of the day. Remember the poem of Rudyard Kipling, "Mad Dogs and Englishmen go out in Noon Day Sun."

garlic08
07-23-2016, 07:43
It's not all about comfort. Nobody's mentioned the medical aspects of heat injuries yet. You should/must learn the signs, symptoms and treatment of heat exhaustion and heat stroke. If you start getting dizzy in the heat, that's your brain shutting down.

If you're exerting in temperatures greater than your body temperature, compounded by high humidity when sweat evaporates less effectively, you could do irreparable heat damage to your core organs and brain.

In the backcountry, you must use evaporative or conductive cooling to lower body temp, and that takes water/sweat/shade/wind. If bodies of water are not available to dunk in or wet your clothing, you must use and support your sweat mechanism. The body needs drinking water and salt to continue sweating productively.

Electrolyte balance has been mentioned. I know a guy in Arizona who spent a summer day out golfing, thinking all would be well if he stayed hydrated. The last thing he remembered when waking up from a coma was that his sweat was slick--no salt left. He drank so much water he suffered from hyponatremia and it almost killed him.

MtDoraDave
07-23-2016, 08:02
For just a one day section hike of 7.5 miles, as others have said, start well hydrated. The water you bring with you - bottle one filled with ice water, bottle number 2, start with it frozen. If it isn't thawed when you get to it, put it inside your shirt; that will help thaw it and cool you down a bit.

I did an overnighter a few years back in the mid 90 degree Florida mugginess, utilizing my new filter to get water from ponds. 12 miles out, 12 miles back. 95 degree filtered pond water tastes just like it sounds: nasty. The nausea from being on the brink of being overheated makes it really hard to drink nasty tasting water... but drink you must. Drink or die. Even adding drink mix didn't help make it taste "good".

Traveler
07-23-2016, 08:02
Hiking season starts in sept and ends in May!!! I stick to water sports in the heat.....in the south that is...

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Agreed, and I'm in New England. Cooler weather is much more enjoyable for me to hike in as opposed to my off-season now when the temperatures are reaching into the high 90s in northwestern CT.

MuddyWaters
07-23-2016, 08:08
Some people are more predisposed to heat issues. Older people fall in this group.
A friend of mine 65, ended up in hospital ....working in a stadium concession stand.

My dad at 70 was mowing yard , not overly hot day, and had to go to ER, didnt know who he was or others, and no memory.

But at the same time, most people are unnaffected in far , far more serious conditions. Just really need to especially be cautious over age 60 or if your not in good shape.

fiddlehead
07-23-2016, 10:26
Cotton. Now's the time to wear it.
Potato Chips.
Start 4:30-5 AM: hike till noon, stop (near water if you can) and cook your main meal of the day, take the next 3 hours or so to eat it. (and drink lots of that water)
Head back out around 4 PM and hike till dark.
Towel is good.
Headband is good.
Remember: Pee clear twice a day.

JC13
07-23-2016, 11:24
I'm a recent fanatic of Nuun fizz tablets. Took them on my last two backpacking trips.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Backpack-2016-Trips-171/19-Days-in-a-Rattlesnake/i-jXhNZGM/0/L/Trip%20175%20361-L.jpg
These are the ones! i just ordered a case to get us through weekend hikes and the like, testing them on gym days as well.

Tipi Walter
07-23-2016, 14:44
I too ordered a case in several flavors---grape, orange and watermelon. Some have caffeine which I avoid.

ChuckT
07-23-2016, 14:50
Apparently the "new" Nunn Fizz tablets have the Caffeine. The older ones were processed with (thru?) some sort of a plastic additive that in quantity is not a good thing.
But what quantity? Usually that limit is set by body mass but nobody's saying what the limit might be. Hmmmm.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk

AfterParty
07-23-2016, 15:00
I would also add if you start getting a headache chug down a liter if h20.

martinb
07-23-2016, 20:16
Go slow, break often, and make sure you have plenty of H2O or a close source.

chknfngrs
07-23-2016, 20:44
A cold mountain stream on a hot day is the alltime berries

-Rush-
07-24-2016, 02:54
All good info stated above. This time of year, I tend to stick to day hikes so I can shower and sleep in the comfort of my air conditioned home at the end of the day.

Amen brother

Moosling
07-24-2016, 07:31
Hike wearing only a speedo. There's no shame in it. You'll see lots of fat old guys walking the trails that way this time of year.

That's a type of hammocking isn't it?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

MtDoraDave
07-24-2016, 08:28
I did about 6 miles yesterday, in the hot part of the day (when I had time to do something). It was 94 degrees. There is a nature preserve in town (so I don't have to drive over an hour to hike) that is 1.5 miles around the perimeter and has several trails inside the perimeter that drop down to the bottom. It's only about 80 ft in elevation change, but at least there are some shaded ups and downs to help get the blood pumping and help the leg muscles remember what they will need to do in the mountains.
I drank a full glass of water before I left the house, then drank periodically as I hiked. I started with the 1.5 mile perimeter hike to warm up and get the blood flowing, then I went up and down the inner trails for an hour, ending on another perimeter lap. I did the 1.5 mile perimeter hike in under 30 minutes - so over 3mph.
Yes, I got hot and sweaty, but drank about a liter of water in the two hours I was hiking. If I were hiking longer, I probably would have stopped and taken a break in a shady spot at the 2 hr mark to cool down a bit.

So, if a person is in half decent physical condition, a 7.5 mile hike in hot/ humid conditions shouldn't be an issue.

garlic08
07-24-2016, 12:49
That's a type of hammocking isn't it?

Well played.

jeffmeh
07-24-2016, 13:48
Well played.
Yes, we have no ______s.

TexasBob
07-24-2016, 18:58
Hey guys - Planning on doing a 7.5 mile day hike from Pen Mar to Old Forge next Wednesday. If anyone lives in the mid-Atlantic, they are well aware of the disgusting weather we are getting. I was wondering if anyone had some good tips for hot temperature/high humidity hiking? I know that section is under a pretty thick canopy and the obvious ones like water and skin coverage are important. Just seeking some tips from some experienced hikers.

Thanks!
Josh

You need to get acclimated to hot weather. Just because a person lives in an area that gets hot and humid doesn't mean you are acclimated to the heat. Most of us spend our days inside air conditioned buildings with brief forays into the heat. That makes weekend warriors more likely to suffer bad consequences from the heat. Check this link out.

http://www.tradoc.army.mil/surgeon/Pdf/HeatAcclimatizationGuide1.pdf

MuddyWaters
07-24-2016, 21:04
Cotton. Now's the time to wear it.


Cottons OK in some areas, but not in humid SE in my experience
Clothing get soaking wet, clingy, and chafe the daylights out of you.
I still wear synthetic, its hotter, but bettter soaked with sweat. It holds less.

marilandica
07-25-2016, 11:04
I did a 14.5 day hike in SNP 7/17. It was hot and humid although not as bad as this past weekend. I have a high tolerance for heat and sweat, I brought extra water and I started very early. However, I moved fast, probably too fast for the day in retrospect. Even with an extra effort to keep myself hydrated, I had a headache by the time I was done and my muscles were crampy and sore all week. Slow down. Rest. Listen to your body. Give yourself time to recover when it's over.

Secondmouse
07-25-2016, 11:30
I would also add if you start getting a headache chug down a liter if h20.

this is a symptom of heat exhaustion and you want don't mess around with that. it's the first stop on the train to heat stroke, which can really ruin your day.

and it's too late to chug water at that point because your body cannot absorb water fast enough to overcome once symptoms appear. lots of people have guidelines for how much water they drink while hiking but that all goes out the window in hot/humid conditions. rule of thumb - if your mouth is dry, drink more water.

if you feel the onset of a headache, weakness, or slight disorientation, look for a cool shady spot with a breeze and sip cool water or a drink with electrolytes. you can also bring your body temperature down by bathing your skin with a wet rag/towel. don't just do your head and neck but also your arms and legs as these are large surface areas and the evaporation can cool you down quickly...

LittleRock
07-25-2016, 11:40
Hiking season starts in sept and ends in May!!! I stick to water sports in the heat.....in the south that is...

Yup - the most I will do outdoors in the summer heat is mow the lawn... bugs are a god awful nuisance too

Tipi Walter
07-25-2016, 11:59
if you feel the onset of a headache, weakness, or slight disorientation, look for a cool shady spot with a breeze and sip cool water or a drink . . .

These symptoms are all I feel when I'm backpacking in the summer. Weakness? Always. Disorientation? Totally.

On a recent 24 day backpacking into Pisgah NF in North Carolina I was into my 10th day of the trip (or so) and crossed Lost Cove Creek and started up the nutbusting Timber Ridge trail in a summer furnace. At the top of a particularly nasty hill I dumped the pack like a red-headed step-turd and drank a half quart of Nuun fizz water. Afterwhich I got up and strapped on the red hippo pack and immediately went back the way I came, thinking I was headed in the right direction.

Causes for such disorientation? Possible answers---The heat-disintegration of important body appendages? All my white brain tissue descending into my prostate and therefore thinking with my crotch? Classic signs of heat frustration? Starting the day with a ken doll crotch?

Anyway, since I was going the wrong way but thought it right I stayed "lost" for 3 hours going back and forth on a scrub furnace ridge. Sucked.

c.coyle
07-25-2016, 13:09
10 before 10, 5 after 5.

Secondmouse
07-25-2016, 14:59
10 before 10, 5 after 5.

his name was Robert Paulson.

ChuckT
07-26-2016, 05:01
That reference is lost on me.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk

ChuckT
07-26-2016, 05:04
Fight club?
That enough to know that I don't want to know any more.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk

Secondmouse
07-26-2016, 22:13
That reference is lost on me.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk

it wasn't for you...

hikehunter
07-26-2016, 23:21
I work out side 89% of the day 99% of the week, in Texas 98plus deg. heat with 60%plus humidity. I carry 2.5 gal. of water, 24oz. can of sun screen, and a bandanna. I ware a brimmed hat and work my ass off. Some days I change my shirt 3 or 4 times. I am well trained for "HOT HIKING".....

Engine
07-27-2016, 06:55
Cottons OK in some areas, but not in humid SE in my experience
Clothing get soaking wet, clingy, and chafe the daylights out of you.
I still wear synthetic, its hotter, but bettter soaked with sweat. It holds less.

Exactly, cotton is awesome for the first 15-20 minutes and then I start rubbing parts off...

peakbagger
07-27-2016, 07:53
I use Nuun and carry a tube of it while hiking. A lot of folks think salt is enough for electrolyte replacement but potassium is just as important. If someone is having headaches, sore neck or muscles cramps during and after hiking they need to work on their electrolyte balance. I end up giving away a lot of Nuun tablet when I go on group trips in hot weather as many folks don't factor electrolytes into their plan.

ChuckT
07-27-2016, 09:07
Tried the New Nuun Lime flavored tablets. Ugh, stay far away.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk

Tipi Walter
07-27-2016, 09:22
I like the watermelon and grape flavors, never tried lime. It's amazing how a little bit of carbonated fizz water quenches my thirst on a hot day of backpackaging. It's something we don't usually get while hiking---a soda-type sensation, a step below ginger ale. Anyone make a ginger ale fizz tablet?

JC13
07-27-2016, 10:41
Tried the New Nuun Lime flavored tablets. Ugh, stay far away.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using TapatalkLime or lemon-lime? I have the lemon-lime and although I normally steer clear, these are actually good IMO. I usually dissolve them in my mouth and not water though. I only use 1/2 a tablet at a time.


I like the watermelon and grape flavors, never tried lime. It's amazing how a little bit of carbonated fizz water quenches my thirst on a hot day of backpackaging. It's something we don't usually get while hiking---a soda-type sensation, a step below ginger ale. Anyone make a ginger ale fizz tablet?I tried grape and they were less fizzy then the lemon-lime. I will give watermelon a go next, I usually like that flavor.

ChuckT
07-27-2016, 11:06
Lemon-lime.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk

JC13
07-27-2016, 11:15
Lemon-lime.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using TapatalkA matter of personal taste for sure then. The guy that actually gave us half a tube on the trail said they tasted horrible but worked. I tried an orange yesterday and was not impressed.

ChuckT
07-27-2016, 11:28
Mine is the "new & improved" variety. Trying the Wild Berry today.http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160727/565772e016560c8c96ec3f63e631f1f7.jpg

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk

Tipi Walter
07-27-2016, 11:49
There are two types of Nuuns, regular flavor and "energy" flavor with caffeine. I prefer the non-caffeine blend.

jeffmeh
07-29-2016, 12:33
From the Amazon reviews, the new Nuun tablets are very sweet from stevia. Emergen-c electrolyte mix changed formula as well and added sweetener. Anyone know of a good unsweetened electrolyte mix?

One could do a diy mix, from http://paleoleap.com/all-about-electrolytes/

" teaspoon of lite/low-sodium salt* + teaspoon of regular salt + 1-2 teaspoons of Epsom salts, dissolved in as much water you need to make it palatable.


*Low-sodium salt is basically a type of salt that replaces some of the sodium with potassium; it’s there as a cheap and easy potassium supplement.


That recipe will give you 325mg of potassium, 833mg of sodium, and a decent amount of magnesium, depending on how much Epsom salts you use (start lower and work up; Epsom salts can give you nasty diarrhea if you go too high too fast). You can add the juice of one lime for the cost of about 3.5 grams of carbohydrate, if that makes it taste better."

I wouldn't object to a bit of sugar or powdered juice for flavor, but I prefer to control the sugar intake. :)

Tipi Walter
07-29-2016, 12:43
I just ordered several Nuuns and here are the ingredients of Nuun Active---(not the energy caffeine one)---

Citric acid, dextrose, natural flavors (?? cow juice??, MSG??, dog meat?, fish eggs?, fish eyes??,), calcium carbonate (the FIZZ), stevia leaf extract, monk fruit extract (hallucinogenic??), avocado oil, beet juice powder, riboflavin.

What the heck is dextrose? A simple sugar identical to glucose (blood sugar) and comes from corn. What the heck is Monk fruit? It's another sweetener and 200 times sweeter than sugar. Yawn I bore myself. Onto another topic.

jeffmeh
07-29-2016, 17:20
I just ordered several Nuuns and here are the ingredients of Nuun Active---(not the energy caffeine one)---

Citric acid, dextrose, natural flavors (?? cow juice??, MSG??, dog meat?, fish eggs?, fish eyes??,), calcium carbonate (the FIZZ), stevia leaf extract, monk fruit extract (hallucinogenic??), avocado oil, beet juice powder, riboflavin.

What the heck is dextrose? A simple sugar identical to glucose (blood sugar) and comes from corn. What the heck is Monk fruit? It's another sweetener and 200 times sweeter than sugar. Yawn I bore myself. Onto another topic.

Yep, dextrose, monk fruit, and beet juice are all sugars, and the stevia is an herb that has zero carbs but a sweetening effect. Not surprising that most commercially sold preparations would be very sweet, but not for me.

martinb
07-29-2016, 17:28
Last weekend, I did a ~10 mile day hike on the FL. trail in upper 80s heat along with typical FL humidity (AKA sweatbox). All I had was H2O, no problems.

Tipi Walter
07-29-2016, 20:50
Last weekend, I did a ~10 mile day hike on the FL. trail in upper 80s heat along with typical FL humidity (AKA sweatbox). All I had was H2O, no problems.

How many nights were you out? Warm water is okay for a day or two, afterwhich I start hankering for something with taste. My options:

**Morning ritual of morning brewed peppermint tea with copious honey. Pour into water bottle. Hike. Cold sweet mint tea on the trail by noon.
**The mentioned Nuun fizzies.
**Various drink powders etc etc etc. Frontier Co-op used to make a nice fruit powder.
**Another trick: I always take 100% fruit jam/jelly on my trips (don't worry folks, it lasts 15 days even in this heat)---use it on my peanut butter sandwiches. Tip: Mix a couple tablespoons of jam into cold mountain spring water, shake. Voila! Fruit juice drink.

** I used to take my fave, cans of Knudsen ginger ale soda. Saved them for Day 8 or 10 or whatever. That is until a yellow jacket hornet flew into one and it got in my mouth and stung me on the inner lip. OW.

MuddyWaters
07-29-2016, 21:25
How many nights were you out? Warm water is okay for a day or two, afterwhich I start hankering for something with taste.
.


I drink more if I got a little flavor.
Nuun is nasty. At least one i tried several yrs ago was. And stupidly overpriced. Your paying for....fizz. And it takes too long to dissolve.
EmergenC sucks too

Imo, that is . ymmv.

saltysack
07-29-2016, 23:31
Last weekend, I did a ~10 mile day hike on the FL. trail in upper 80s heat along with typical FL humidity (AKA sweatbox). All I had was H2O, no problems.

I can't get excited about day hikes....period.....especially in the Fl heat! Miserably hot!!!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Tipi Walter
07-30-2016, 10:48
I can't get excited about day hikes....period.....especially in the Fl heat! Miserably hot!!!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I agree 100% with you---I never get excited about dayhikes and I never want to do them. Why go to all the work of driving to a trailhead and starting the day in your car and then hiking a little bit and returning to the trailhead and ending your day at . . . wait for it . . . the blasted car. It's like you're eating a fruit salad but you can have only one grape.

There are hiking clubs all around my area but these folks never can seem to turn a one day hike into an overnighter and come out the next day. It's mind boggling.

Uncle Joe
07-30-2016, 10:58
There are two types of Nuuns, regular flavor and "energy" flavor with caffeine. I prefer the non-caffeine blend.

Is it "habit" forming? :D:banana

Tipi Walter
07-30-2016, 11:03
Is it "habit" forming? :D:banana

Nothing is habit forming on a backpacking trip, except maybe oatmeal. I likes me my oats. Every consumable including Nuuns gets old fast.

rocketsocks
07-30-2016, 13:28
I think Nuun is one of those "squired taste" things, at least it was for me.....to expensive for the return for me anyway, I'd rather eat a tomato.

rocketsocks
07-30-2016, 13:29
Ackwired.....sheesh!

Tipi Walter
07-30-2016, 13:50
Tomatoes do not pack well. Except dehydrated.

Greenlight
07-30-2016, 16:07
I've seen so many hikers out with bandanas tied to one of their pack straps. Simple, brilliant, useful. YOu're right about skin coverage. Just keep eating and drinking at intervals. You need to replace the salt you're losing so salty snacks help. Last, I've never gone wrong with wearing UnderArmor basic compression T to get the sweat off your skin quick. Wear a layer over it, and it does a decent job of getting the sweat out of the space between the layers. Your outer garment will get quite "chalky" from dried sweat, but that is part of the experience.


Hey guys - Planning on doing a 7.5 mile day hike from Pen Mar to Old Forge next Wednesday. If anyone lives in the mid-Atlantic, they are well aware of the disgusting weather we are getting. I was wondering if anyone had some good tips for hot temperature/high humidity hiking? I know that section is under a pretty thick canopy and the obvious ones like water and skin coverage are important. Just seeking some tips from some experienced hikers.

Thanks!
Josh

Greenlight
07-30-2016, 16:10
Oh and... I look for (and wear) light and medium colored poly button down shirts. Long or short sleeve depending on mosquitos, heat, and the like...look for something with pit vents, back flaps and the like for the most versatility. Goodwill, Salvation Army, bargain bins...

rocketsocks
07-30-2016, 19:33
Tomatoes do not pack well. Except dehydrated.i know a fella that brings a full cheese cake, but yeah, they bruise easy.

Traveler
07-31-2016, 10:21
Is it "habit" forming? :D:banana

HAH! Perhaps the better Nunn product would walk behind you three paces and carry a meter stick wrapped in black electrical tape...

MuddyWaters
07-31-2016, 10:32
Tomatoes do not pack well. Except dehydrated.

Or in tupperware containers....

One time I met a guy at a shelter, huge pack, with guitar and dog. Like a 95L pack

For dinner he had a loaf of bread in a tupperware container, ground meat, and lettuce , onion, tomatos in containers
Bottles of seasonings, etc.

He fried the hamburger patty on a skillet over his stove, sliced the tomato and onion, etc and made a hamburger.

He said he was thru hiking.

I wasnt so sure he was telling truth....

But it might have been his first day or something.

Uncle Joe
08-01-2016, 10:57
Nothing is habit forming on a backpacking trip, except maybe oatmeal. I likes me my oats. Every consumable including Nuuns gets old fast.

It was more a play on "NUUNS" (Nuns). :p

Odd Man Out
08-01-2016, 14:40
I did a three day section in SNP in mid June, which was as expected hot and humid. At the end of my first day I pulled in to Elkwallow Wayside around 5:15 PM. I'm sure I was getting a bit dehydrated (low energy, having some leg cramps). Not bad, but I knew I had to take a break for dinner and hydration. First I slammed a blackberry shake. Dairy is a good potassium source, not that I really need to rationalize having a blackberry shake in SNP. Then I drank a 24 oz bottle of water with a NUUN tablet (lemon lime). I do not find these to be overly sweet or flavored (like lemonade would be). However, the NUUN tablet is supposed to be dissolved in 16 oz so I am making it a bit more dilute than the instructions. I suppose I'm going to die. No they don't taste great, but then again, you are drinking salt water. It's not supposed to taste that great. I should have had another shake.

You can get Gatorade powder that uses sugar rather than artificial sweeteners, but it is quite heavy. I would rather get my calories and electrolytes from real food when possible and supplement the electrolytes without the extra calories when necessary. I then had dinner of homemade rice and lentils with salt and curry (lentils are also a good source of potassium). Probably drank another bottle of water. Camped nearby (didn't push myself when feeling dehydrated on the first day). Drank at least another full bottle of water overnight (kept waking up thirsty). Felt better in the morning. Camped near Elkwallow spring so I could camel up and refill water bottles before heading out. Did not feel so dehydrated the next day (hiked 15 miles, which is a lot for me). It did rain a bit (a lot, actually), which helped.