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lobster
01-08-2006, 13:41
What are the favorites for around camp or stream crossings, etc. ?

HikerHobo
01-08-2006, 13:56
What are the favorites for around camp or stream crossings, etc. ?

http://www.sprintaquatics.com/prodinfo.asp?number=901&variation=&aitem=4&mitem=10

These are my favorite camp shoes. The weight per pair is only 2 oz.
They dry out quickly. I wear 'em with wool socks in cold weather.

Alligator
01-08-2006, 15:59
What do you wear Lobster?

lobster
01-08-2006, 17:08
<TABLE id=HB_Mail_Container height="100%" cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0 UNSELECTABLE="on"><TBODY><TR height="100%" width="100%" UNSELECTABLE="on"><TD id=HB_Focus_Element vAlign=top width="100%" background="" height=250 UNSELECTABLE="off">Usually just wear my trail-runners so don't carry an extra pair for around camp. Just got a pair of Crocs for Christmas. Very comfortable!</TD></TR><TR UNSELECTABLE="on" hb_tag="1"><TD style="FONT-SIZE: 1pt" height=1 UNSELECTABLE="on">
</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
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toeknee
01-08-2006, 17:20
just got a pair of crocs for christmas. haven't worn them in nature yet but swear i think they're the most comfortable shoes i've ever worn.

LostInSpace
01-08-2006, 22:43
I found a pair of injection molded Reebok sandals at Discount Shoe Warehouse for $10. They weigh 8 oz. There is nothing to absorb water, so they dry in no time. I can wear socks with them. The only down side is they do not have a heel strap, so they are not as secure as Crocks for creek crossings.

I quit carrying my Chacos. They are very comfortable, but they weigh tooooooooo much! I tried using Teva Proton water shoes. They are light, but the sole is not very thick so they are not comfortable on rocky ground. Also, I find the Protons take way too long to dry in cool weather.

Footslogger
01-08-2006, 22:44
I carried a pair of Waldies on my thru in 2003. They still have a lot of life left in them and I'd carry them again.

'Slogger

SavageLlama
01-08-2006, 23:08
I used a simple pair of flip-flops through NH and Maine this past fall and they worked great.. weighed just a few Z's and I found you can easily wear socks with them around camp if its cold.

Lone Wolf
02-07-2008, 09:25
what the hell are "camp" shoes?

dixicritter
02-07-2008, 09:26
Shoes someone changes into in camp maybe?

Lone Wolf
02-07-2008, 09:27
what's wrong with the shoes they got to camp with? :-?

dixicritter
02-07-2008, 09:31
but those are hiking shoes... duhh. ;)

Tin Man
02-07-2008, 09:32
Actually, I used to ask myself the same question, why do I need these (received Crocs as a gift). Then I tried them and, in addition to the comfort of being out of a damp boot for a while, I found my boots dried a lot quicker and felt more comfortable when I put them on again.

Mrs Baggins
02-07-2008, 09:40
At a town stop in Helen GA we discovered Nothinz........look like Crocs but are even lighter and more comfy. Crocs creep me out and feel too weird on my feet. My 83 yr old mom has a hard time with all sorts of shoes but she can wear Nothinz all day long. We bought the Nothinz and ditched our Tevas in the hotel room. Sad parting with them but necessary to get rid of the weight. I've since bought a new pair of Tevas but I'll always take the Nothinz with me now.

Mocs123
02-07-2008, 10:06
Mrs Baggins: Do you know what your Nothinz weigh? I am a croc user here, and have hiked hundreds of miles with my crocs as camp shoes, but my Mens 8-9 Crocs weigh 10.4 ounces and I would like a lighter option.

Cannibal
02-07-2008, 10:12
Found one website that said "less than 8 oz".

Mrs Baggins
02-07-2008, 10:47
Mrs Baggins: Do you know what your Nothinz weigh? I am a croc user here, and have hiked hundreds of miles with my crocs as camp shoes, but my Mens 8-9 Crocs weigh 10.4 ounces and I would like a lighter option.

I found a website selling them that gives the weight as 6 oz. I'd say that's about right. They have a much more "air pillow" feeling than Crocs and you will forget you even have them on.

take-a-knee
02-07-2008, 11:00
If you feel the need for "camp shoes", maybe you need better hiking shoes. Just loosen the laces a bit. As for stream crossings, remove your socks and put your boots back on and go for it.

Roots
02-07-2008, 11:01
That's what I wear. I bought them in Damascus a few years ago. They make great camp shoes.

Lilred
02-07-2008, 11:18
If you feel the need for "camp shoes", maybe you need better hiking shoes. Just loosen the laces a bit. As for stream crossings, remove your socks and put your boots back on and go for it.

It's not a question of how the hiking shoes fit. When I get to camp, I want something drier on my feet. It's nice to get out of wet boots and wet socks and put dry socks on. Don't want to stick dry socks in wet boots, hence, camp shoes. It's important to take care of your feet. Keeping them as dry as possible is always a good idea.

Funny how this logic seems to escape people.....

Pennsylvania Rose
02-07-2008, 11:19
I don't usually take camp shoes with me backpacking. When I do, I take surf socks or sandals. And, I know I'd never rely on my (knock-off) crocs. They're very comfy to slip on to take the dog out or check the mail, as long as I wear them with a thick pair of socks. Sockless, they give me blisters on the top of my foot. And, I'll never get how people can hike or cross streams in crocs. I've about broken my ankle creek walking or just going down the steps off my deck when the steps are wet. I slide all over the place.

rafe
02-07-2008, 11:22
It's important to take care of your feet. Keeping them as dry as possible is always a good idea.

Funny how this logic seems to escape people.....

I agree. I managed to live w/o "camp shoes" once I switched to lightweight trail runners last summer -- but I wasn't walking on a wet muddy trail, either. Camp shoes are a nice "luxury." Ya gotta take care of your feet, and that means getting them warm and dry at night.

bigcranky
02-07-2008, 11:30
I go back and forth on camp shoes. I have a pair of Waldies that I bought at Neel Gap in 2003, and they're still in great shape. Waldies are softer and more comfortable than Crocs, IMO. But they're 11 ounces in my size. But they are soooo comfortable in camp and in town. But they're 11 ounces. And bulky. But it's so nice to put on dry shoes in camp. But they're 11 ounces. But they're so much easier to slip on for those middle-of-the-night trips to the woods.

So, yeah, I'm of two minds. But here's the thing -- when I bring them, I'm happy, and when I don't bring them, I wish I had. So they usually end up in my pack.

MtnBikerGuy
02-07-2008, 12:31
My Croc's go with me on all trips, including backpacking and vacations. Even wore them on the long flight to Paris last year. Croc's and a pair of Smartwool socks and my feet are confortable and warm.

dessertrat
02-07-2008, 12:37
I have some skechers croc knockoffs that are lighter and smaller, and more comfortable too, I think. They are ccf. I would not take them with me unless I knew I would be doing a lot of stream fording.

Green Bean
02-07-2008, 12:41
I love my CROCS :)

take-a-knee
02-07-2008, 12:52
It's not a question of how the hiking shoes fit. When I get to camp, I want something drier on my feet. It's nice to get out of wet boots and wet socks and put dry socks on. Don't want to stick dry socks in wet boots, hence, camp shoes. It's important to take care of your feet. Keeping them as dry as possible is always a good idea.

Funny how this logic seems to escape people.....

Why did you let your feet get wet in the first place, didn't you change your sox and powder your feet during the day? If it is raining and you are wearing trail runners, goretex socks work fine. If it is well below freezing, VBL socks are the ticket, under those conditions I would (and have) carried some polarguard booties. I see camp shoes as a comfortable solution to a non-existent problem.

wahootom
02-07-2008, 13:19
I use a pair of scuba diving "booties" - lightweight, flexible, dry quickly when turned inside out, and great in water. Any scuba diving shop carries them.

rafe
02-07-2008, 13:35
I use a pair of scuba diving "booties" - lightweight, flexible, dry quickly when turned inside out, and great in water. Any scuba diving shop carries them.

Nylon mesh shoes (like these (http://www.sprintaquatics.com/prodinfo.asp?number=901)) do the job, sorta, and are very light (about 2 oz for the pair.) Trouble is, the soles are so thin that twigs and sharp stones can poke through. Ouch.

Lilred
02-07-2008, 13:40
Why did you let your feet get wet in the first place, didn't you change your sox and powder your feet during the day? If it is raining and you are wearing trail runners, goretex socks work fine. If it is well below freezing, VBL socks are the ticket, under those conditions I would (and have) carried some polarguard booties. I see camp shoes as a comfortable solution to a non-existent problem.

Why did I let my feet get wet?? Didn't I change my socks and powder my feet during the day?? when and how would I do that when it could very well be raining all day. Have you done any hiking on the AT??

The Appalachian range is the second largest rain forest in the world. It rains, a lot. Your very first question tells me you either don't hike very much, or you don't hike on the AT much.

gungho
02-07-2008, 13:45
My Croc's go with me on all trips, including backpacking and vacations. Even wore them on the long flight to Paris last year. Croc's and a pair of Smartwool socks and my feet are confortable and warm.
mr crocs are definetly like my american express card "I don't leave home without them":D

rafe
02-07-2008, 13:55
Anyone actually had good luck with Goretex socks or other types of "waterproof" socks on the AT? Strikes me as improbable, but I wouldn't mind being wrong about that.

Mocs123
02-07-2008, 13:57
My boots are always hot and sweaty at the end of the day and I always change into crocs when I get to camp so my boots can dry out. It isn't that my boots are uncomfortable, but I hate putting on wet (or frozen) boots in the morning. If I wore quicker drying trail runners it might not be as big of an issue.

Lilred
02-07-2008, 13:58
Anyone actually had good luck with Goretex socks or other types of "waterproof" socks on the AT? Strikes me as improbable, but I wouldn't mind being wrong about that.

Ya that's what I thought. So your feet sweat and stay wet from sweat? Why would you want to do that to your feet?

take-a-knee
02-07-2008, 14:05
Anyone actually had good luck with Goretex socks or other types of "waterproof" socks on the AT? Strikes me as improbable, but I wouldn't mind being wrong about that.

Yes, when it is cold enough to matter if your socks get soaked. If it is warm enough to not matter if your socks are wet, then you didn't need the goretex anyway. They work well with trail runners, as the day warms you can take them off if your feet heat up, can't do that with goretex boots. Sgt Rock has said that he's had good luck with Sealskin socks in similar conditions, I've not tried those yet, though I have a pair I was issued. I've used the goretex socks on a couple of freefall trainups in Yuma AZ in January and I was the only guy there with warm feet.

take-a-knee
02-07-2008, 14:09
Why did I let my feet get wet?? Didn't I change my socks and powder my feet during the day?? when and how would I do that when it could very well be raining all day. Have you done any hiking on the AT??

The Appalachian range is the second largest rain forest in the world. It rains, a lot. Your very first question tells me you either don't hike very much, or you don't hike on the AT much.

The AT, what is that, how do I get there?

Have you ever heard of building a fire and drying your gear at night? That worked in the "Pre-Croc" era, and it doesn't weigh anything. I just don't see the logic in buying UL gear so you can carry "camp shoes". To each his own.

Mrs Baggins
02-07-2008, 14:31
Ya that's what I thought. So your feet sweat and stay wet from sweat? Why would you want to do that to your feet?

I love getting out of my boots and socks at the end of the day, wiggle the toes, let the feet breeeeeeeathe. Feels soooo good. And since I have to bush wee at least once, maybe twice, during the night it's just so easy to slip on my Nothinz and go....no putting on boots that I have to shake out first to make sure no one else has moved in in the dark, tripping on laces, clomping around in the night........and in town I can let the boots have a good dry out while I wear my Nothinz and let my feet have a good airing out.

mystic
02-07-2008, 14:59
Don't know anything about these but it is cool website (http://www.havaianasus.com/index.html).

Tin Man
02-07-2008, 15:02
Don't know anything about these but it is cool website (http://www.havaianasus.com/index.html).

Wow, all that coding for ... flip-flops.

Lilred
02-07-2008, 15:11
The AT, what is that, how do I get there?

Have you ever heard of building a fire and drying your gear at night? That worked in the "Pre-Croc" era, and it doesn't weigh anything. I just don't see the logic in buying UL gear so you can carry "camp shoes". To each his own.

I don't understand how you don't see the logic. If it's been raining for days, which I hike in every year I've gone out, how is it logical to dry my boots by the fire? Am I to walk in mud barefoot while they dry? That'll be real nice for the bag....

I seriously don't get your blindness to the fact that there just might be a need for camp shoes, crocs or otherwise, on the AT.

Tin Man
02-07-2008, 15:15
I don't understand how you don't see the logic. If it's been raining for days, which I hike in every year I've gone out, how is it logical to dry my boots by the fire? Am I to walk in mud barefoot while they dry? That'll be real nice for the bag....

I seriously don't get your blindness to the fact that there just might be a need for camp shoes, crocs or otherwise, on the AT.

I agree, but sometimes you need to let others HYOH. ;)

rafe
02-07-2008, 15:15
Building a fire isn't always an option on the AT, alas. It ain't like the old days.

1azarus
02-07-2008, 15:36
I agree, but sometimes you need to let others HYOH. ;)

right. but actually, i think we need to call that HTOH (hike their...)

Tin Man
02-07-2008, 15:42
right. but actually, i think we need to call that HTOH (hike their...)

I think that was understood without getting all in a knot over grammar. :)

take-a-knee
02-07-2008, 15:54
I don't understand how you don't see the logic. If it's been raining for days, which I hike in every year I've gone out, how is it logical to dry my boots by the fire? Am I to walk in mud barefoot while they dry? That'll be real nice for the bag....

I seriously don't get your blindness to the fact that there just might be a need for camp shoes, crocs or otherwise, on the AT.

Please don't let me stop you from totin' your shoes Red. Maybe if you'd lighten up a bit you could coax a foot rub out of a pal, that'll do more for you than Crocs ever will.:)

Bare Bear
02-07-2008, 16:01
Crocs absolutely. The more you get out of your boots the better. I found even taking them off for a half hour at lunch made a major difference in my feetsw health. I used generic Crocs (Walmart $10) and they were lighter but wore out (I used them for four miles of real walking on the Florida Trail around Ockeechobee paved section which is what wore them excessively) and I got a thorn thru one once that I do not think would have gone thru the thicker soled real Crocs. You do need to wear something crossing streams (sharp roacks, glass, sticks) I had two or three good tears in my boots from sharps that would have eaten my feet alive if not wearing anything. The barefoot hikers amaze me. HYOH.

Lilred
02-07-2008, 16:56
Please don't let me stop you from totin' your shoes Red. Maybe if you'd lighten up a bit you could coax a foot rub out of a pal, that'll do more for you than Crocs ever will.:)

I'll take you up on that offer, thanks...;)

swellbill
02-07-2008, 18:05
Don't know anything about these but it is cool website (http://www.havaianasus.com/index.html).

$20, $50, & even $60 for flip flops?? Wow. I'll have to take up dumpster diving (http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?t=32701) to be able to afford them.:)

AT-HITMAN2005
02-07-2008, 18:23
i use the crocs that don't have holes. they are drier in wet weather. when i get to camp i'll leave my hiking shoes on to get water(because some of those water trails are treacherous) then take them off. also its nice to not have to put the hiking shoes on to go to the privy in the middle of the night. if its been raining or my shoes are already wet i'll just leave them on to ford. otherwise crocs it is.

margo
02-07-2008, 18:41
I wear lightweight SAS when I want to give my feet a break. I forget the exact model.

hikermiker
02-07-2008, 19:11
I use fake crocs from Walmart. Much cheaper.

CrumbSnatcher
02-07-2008, 19:24
i hike in chacos. usualy bare foot in the sandel. sometimes socks(smartwool, sealskins,and outdoor research low cut gaiters.) i could stand in a creek and not get wet feet. and in camp my feet were so comfortable i would not even think about my feet! i could sit around camp all night with the same shoes i hiked in all day, still on.never any blisters. your feet will dry out sometimes,and you need strong ankles. my first thru i wore montrail moraines,good boots but i was tired alot more often dragging those boots around. i think they say every pound on your feet is like 5 pounds on your back with smartwool you do not need liner socks. good hiking

Terry7
02-07-2008, 19:29
"Holey Soles"

Ender
02-07-2008, 20:04
Wow, all that coding for ... flip-flops.

Not just flip-flops... fifty dollar flip-flops.

gumball
02-07-2008, 20:10
I wear a generic brand of crocs.

Cosmo Rules
02-07-2008, 22:10
Tevas..

Capt.Scott
02-07-2008, 23:20
Slack Tide Thong:banana

booney_1
02-07-2008, 23:28
Cross country racing flats are very light (6-8oz), yet provide protection for the toes and soles of the feet. They are about $50 bucks,unless you already have them. There are other "racing" shoes that are very light also that might be cheaper.

I think it is important to air out your boots and feet when you get to camp. When I've gotten blisters, it's always been in the summer when it was very hot and I had a long day on the trail.

I used to use flip flops, but as a boy scout leader I felt I was setting a bad example since scouts are required to wear footwear that protects the toes.

wakapak
02-07-2008, 23:39
i hike in chacos. usualy bare foot in the sandel. sometimes socks(smartwool, sealskins,and outdoor research low cut gaiters.) i could stand in a creek and not get wet feet. and in camp my feet were so comfortable i would not even think about my feet! i could sit around camp all night with the same shoes i hiked in all day, still on.never any blisters. your feet will dry out sometimes,and you need strong ankles. my first thru i wore montrail moraines,good boots but i was tired alot more often dragging those boots around. i think they say every pound on your feet is like 5 pounds on your back with smartwool you do not need liner socks. good hiking


I'm with Crumb on this one!! I hiked in Chacos on the thru I did and haven't hiked in anything since!! You can wear em all day, cross streams in them, and still be comfy in them at nite. They rock!!

fiddlehead
02-08-2008, 00:27
just google "croc liners"

Gary-G
02-08-2008, 00:53
I just bought some pretty nice shoes. I didn't buy them for the AT ... I just wanted them. I think they would be too cold most of the time, but a great summer shoe! "Five Fingers" by Vibram. They really do feel like you're barefoot, however, they are pretty pricey. So far I love them! Check them out guys and see what you think!
http://www.vibramfivefingers.com/

Jim Adams
02-08-2008, 01:55
I use crocs and love them...have 3 pairs...1 for backpacking, 1 for down time at work and 1 for home.
I did try very light moccosins in the past and they worked great also.

geek

Tinker
02-08-2008, 02:01
In the past, old running shoes (past their prime, but still in one piece) worked best for me. If I got blisters I could hike in them, they didn't come off in mud or fast water stream crossings, they dried quickly, and, of course, I KNEW that they would fit well.
Section hiking for 20+ years has shown me that, as long as I have light, quick drying footwear, I really don't need camp shoes. I just wring out my wet socks, wear them around camp, and change into dry ones for bed.

Erin
02-08-2008, 02:09
Crocs. I resisted them for a while relying on my old tevas. Then I folded like a cheap table when I tried them. I hang them on my pack with a caribiner for water crossings. A comfy campsite shoe. A nice break for my boots which need the break. Boots are comfortable, but I have sweaty feet...embarrassing, and those boots need a breather and so do my feet. ,Easy to slide into for those night bathroom trips. Expense? For the 29 bucks....they never wear out. Mine have been to Mexico, Katrina relief trip (why I bought them) two big hikes including AT and Grand Canyon, house shoes, yard shoes, gym shower shoes at at the gym , hotel rooms since I travel alot because of my employment, and they are still the same as the day I got them over two years ago. I am hard on foot wear too. With socks, they are pretty warm when the weather is cold. And they are lighter than my 90's era Teva's. Offer more support and comfort than a flip flop. So I consider that 29 bucks well spent.None of my other shoes that I wear daily last this long. And now that I have them, I am too cheap to try the Chaco's which folks are raving about also.

highway
02-08-2008, 07:43
I would think that if one's hiking footwear were sufficiently comfortable, then there would be no further need to carry the additional weight of some other footwear to use when one stopped for the night. For me, the time span between when I stop and I am in my bag is often far to short to ever consider changing my shoes!

amigo
02-08-2008, 11:21
Crumbsnatcher and Wakapak:

What model of Chacos do you have? There are a bazillion models, and I'm thinking of getting a pair that are suitable for actual trail mileage, not just camp shoes, and I'd appreciate your thoughts. Would they be suitable for walking through mud and slop?

Thanks.

whiterockjock
02-08-2008, 12:07
I used to carry Chacos or Tevas as "camp shoes". That was before I became hooked on going light as possble. Now I carry Chaco Z1's for hiking, creek crossing,camp wear, shower shoes,town shoes, whatever. My feet have never felt so good! I wear Injinji toes socks in cooler weather with a Warmers 2mm Neoprene bootie in cold/wet weather.....I cannot believe I used to hike in boots (on established trails only)!

StepChld
02-08-2008, 16:38
Cheap Payless Airwalks (read as knock-off Crocs). I hated the way they looked when wife and kids got theirs...I refused to even try them on for about a year. Finally did while I was waiting on my wife...OMG! They feel great! Now I wear them on every hike/campout/backpacking trip etc. I use a caribiner to clip them to the outside of the pack and throw them on when crossing streams and walk till feet are dry, then switch over to my boots. Nice change of pace for my feet.
I've used them whilst canoing, rafting etc... and have never lost them off my feet. They are great for slipping them on for midnight runs to the nearest tree, etc.
I still think they're ugly as sin though. Look like something Mickey Mouse would wear.:D

Kirby
02-08-2008, 18:44
I am a crocs fan myself, I will buy a new pair right before I leave for the trail at the end of the month.

Kirby

CrumbSnatcher
02-08-2008, 18:55
Crumbsnatcher and Wakapak:

What model of Chacos do you have? There are a bazillion models, and I'm thinking of getting a pair that are suitable for actual trail mileage, not just camp shoes, and I'd appreciate your thoughts. Would they be suitable for walking through mud and slop?
AMIGO,I'D HAVE TO CHECK TO REMEMBER WHAT THEY WERE CALLED. EVERY YEAR THEY ARE DIFFERENT NAMES. WHAT YOU WANT IS THE ONES WITHOUT THE BIG TOE LOOP. AND THE BOTTOMS THAT SAY VIBRAM ON THE BOTTOM. AND IN THE TREAD DEPARTMENT YOU WANT THE TIRE LOOKING TREAD. IF YOU WANT TAKE A FEW PHOTOS OF THE DIFFERENT ONES YOU LIKE AND POST A PHOTO AND I'LL ANSWER YOU. I DONT DO PUTORS VERY MUCH. COMPUTOR ILLITERATE! IF YOU HAVE DECENT STRENGTH IN THE ANKLES YOU WILL LOVE HIKING IN CHACOS. AND DONT LET PEOPLE TELL YOU YOU CANT DO BIG MILES IN SANDELS EITHER. I DO 30 AND 40 MILE DAYS IN THEM, THIS MAY OR NEXT MAY I'M DOING A 60-80 DAY THRUHIKE IN CHACOS... GOOD HIKING
Thanks.:banana

CrumbSnatcher
02-08-2008, 18:57
Crumbsnatcher and Wakapak:

What model of Chacos do you have? There are a bazillion models, and I'm thinking of getting a pair that are suitable for actual trail mileage, not just camp shoes, and I'd appreciate your thoughts. Would they be suitable for walking through mud and slop?

Thanks.
AMIGO, MUD AND SLOP NO PROBLEM, I HIKE NAKED FOOT IN SANDEL OR I USE A COMBINATION OF SANDEL,SMARTWOOL SOCK, SEALSKINS, AND OUTDOOR RESEARCH LOW CUT GAITERS. ON COLD OR VERY WET DAYS. COMPLETELY DRY...

turtle fast
02-08-2008, 19:08
I have been using Tevas Hurricane II simple sandals and with my hiking soocks when its cold.....i have to admit that I havent tried the Crocks yet....look too much like cartoon shoes for me....but....

Over Yonder
02-08-2008, 22:04
I love both my pink chacos and my pink crocs very much. Heck I wear both of them with socks in below 0* temps. When it comes to hiking I love my crocs as my "camp" shoe.. and depending on the trail and the distance there is nothing like hiking in my chacos.. So sadly I am torn for my thru on what to wear. ALthough the chacos weigh a bit much I still love them and can see myself happily hiking the trail in them... :p

hurryinghoosier
02-08-2008, 22:16
Has anyone ever tried indoor track shoes for camp shoes. Here is a site for shoes that weigh 7.8 ounces. http://www.eastbay.com/catalog/productdetail/cm--GLOBAL%20SEARCH%3A%20KEYWORD%20SEARCH/supercat--home/model_nbr--61676/sku--749656/node--0/ I saw some that weighed 6 ounces. Just a thought.

wakapak
02-08-2008, 22:21
Crumbsnatcher and Wakapak:

What model of Chacos do you have? There are a bazillion models, and I'm thinking of getting a pair that are suitable for actual trail mileage, not just camp shoes, and I'd appreciate your thoughts. Would they be suitable for walking through mud and slop?

Thanks.

Hey Amigo!

Like Crumb, i can't remember the exact model either, but like he said, the best ones for hiking are the ones without the big toe loop. I tried hiking in those type one day and it bothered me alot!! The ones without the toe, that do have the vibram soles as he says are the best for it. And mud, slop, rain and even light snow have been no problem for me!!!
I felt like my ankles actually got stronger while hiking in them, and I didn't twist or turn them as much as I had in trailrunners or boots!!
I did use socks with them, even in summer, because my feet were drying out big time and cracking alot, however i know others, including Crumb hiked withouth socks. So it's whatever works best for you!!
Good luck trying them out if you do!! I think you'll love them!!:)

wakapak
02-08-2008, 22:23
I love both my pink chacos and my pink crocs very much. Heck I wear both of them with socks in below 0* temps. When it comes to hiking I love my crocs as my "camp" shoe.. and depending on the trail and the distance there is nothing like hiking in my chacos.. So sadly I am torn for my thru on what to wear. ALthough the chacos weigh a bit much I still love them and can see myself happily hiking the trail in them... :p

Over Yonder, I'd give a try in the Chacos if you like them already!! They don't weigh anymore than most boots or even some trailrunners, they probably weigh less actually!! And it will eliminate the need to carry something else as a camp shoe!!
Whatever you decide, have a wonderful time out there!!

River Runner
02-08-2008, 23:11
I found Chacos give me blisters in the forefoot area if I don't use socks with them. Also, I've found they are fine in mud and slop as long as you don't mind having the mud and slop drying on your feet... Which I do, so I don't hike in Chacos, but they are great river rafting shoes.

Sometimes I take Crocs as stream crossing and camp shoes, sometimes I do without camp shoes. It depends on the trip, the number of stream crossings, and the time of year. I do like that my socks will tend to dry out faster in camp if I wear my crocs than if I leave on hiking shoes (depending on weather of course).

Hotrod
02-09-2008, 01:46
Has anyone done any surgery on there Chacos? I have one foot bigger than the other and one foot slips a little too much for serious hiking. I am thinking of cutting out the back strap, cut and restitch. However, I am a little worried it will not hold up.

Landshark
02-10-2008, 18:39
I have keen sandals, the original kind with the covered toe and a toggle on top to tighten them. They are a little expensive but they were a present! They are good for camp shoes and for stream crossings. They are very squashy inside, very comfy, and good with or without socks.

They are also good to put on for the drive home (I HATE driving in flip flops).

wakapak
02-10-2008, 21:34
Has anyone done any surgery on there Chacos? I have one foot bigger than the other and one foot slips a little too much for serious hiking. I am thinking of cutting out the back strap, cut and restitch. However, I am a little worried it will not hold up.

no, can't say i've done any surgery on my Chacos Hotrod! your foot slips even with tightening the straps down good? Hmmm, not sure what to tell ya on this one....

Montego
02-10-2008, 21:39
Just picked up a pair of 'Crocs' knock-offs from Waly-World yesterday for only $6.00. My first pair and sooooo comfortable. Should make good camp/stream shoes, though the sizing is a bit wierd.

Mikereisner
02-10-2008, 23:15
:welcome I used to use merrel sandals until I saw other hikers using crocs. So I got myself a pair and now I will never take sandals on the trail again

Hotrod
02-11-2008, 11:55
no, can't say i've done any surgery on my Chacos Hotrod! your foot slips even with tightening the straps down good? Hmmm, not sure what to tell ya on this one....

I am fine hiking in them except for uphills, when my foot slids back. One foot is nearly a whole size larger than the other that makes shoe fittings interesting. When I purchases them in PA, I made the mistake of fitting them based upon the toe room from the front of the Chaco (for fear of stubbing my toes on rocks/roots). I should have paid a little more attention to the fit between the heel on the back strap to the ball on the front strap. I wish you could buy two different sizes.

When I was hiking with them in PA, I padded the back strapped and wrapped in pink duct tape. (Yes I know the pink adds a manly feel, but it was Grace's duct tape, I swear)

wakapak
02-11-2008, 12:48
I am fine hiking in them except for uphills, when my foot slids back. One foot is nearly a whole size larger than the other that makes shoe fittings interesting. When I purchases them in PA, I made the mistake of fitting them based upon the toe room from the front of the Chaco (for fear of stubbing my toes on rocks/roots). I should have paid a little more attention to the fit between the heel on the back strap to the ball on the front strap. I wish you could buy two different sizes.

When I was hiking with them in PA, I padded the back strapped and wrapped in pink duct tape. (Yes I know the pink adds a manly feel, but it was Grace's duct tape, I swear)


Suuurrrreee it was Grace's pink duct-tape!!! ;) (just kidding!)

Yeah, it is too bad you can't buy two different sizes! It's interesting to me that you can't pull the straps tight enough to make the back strap shorter, since they are one continuous strap thru-out.....I'm not sure either how they would hold up if you cut and re-stitched them.
Good luck with it all! Wish i could help more!!

Hotrod
02-11-2008, 13:06
Suuurrrreee it was Grace's pink duct-tape!!! ;) (just kidding!)

Yeah, it is too bad you can't buy two different sizes! It's interesting to me that you can't pull the straps tight enough to make the back strap shorter, since they are one continuous strap thru-out.....I'm not sure either how they would hold up if you cut and re-stitched them.
Good luck with it all! Wish i could help more!!

The two vertical straps on either side of the ankle keep the back strap from stationary.

I may be playing this up a little bit too much. I did hike the Grand Canyon in them. It would just be more comfortable if I could adjust the back strap.

jeremiah j
02-13-2008, 01:16
I like flip flops but how do you wear them with socks?

GGS2
02-13-2008, 01:16
I like flip flops but how do you wear them with socks?

Get Japanese socks, or make them.

Rockhound
02-13-2008, 01:31
what's wrong with the shoes they got to camp with? :-?
after hiking 20 miles its nice to slip into something a little more comfortable & let the hiking boots/shoes dry out/air out. for me crocs rock. they weigh nothing, are extremely comfortable. come in a wide variety of colors, strap easily to your pack and are all the rage with the younger set and older folks alike. for river/stream crossings nothing beats em. as for the cost, the brand names may be a little pricey (as much as $30), but you can buy knockoffs for as little as $6 or $8 bucks. also they prove to be very durable. a single pair can last years (the knockoffs maybe not quite as long)

hootyhoo
02-13-2008, 21:17
Has anyone done any surgery on there Chacos? I have one foot bigger than the other and one foot slips a little too much for serious hiking. I am thinking of cutting out the back strap, cut and restitch. However, I am a little worried it will not hold up.


Waldies sells a strap and the attchement pins for 5.00 . You could cut your straps off and reattach using the Waldies kit - it is actually a retro kit for strapless shoes.