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Suzzz
10-20-2016, 16:13
I'm getting ready for a section hike in July 2017 and plan to experiment with different food options during the winter. I won't be cooking for breakfast and lunch but I want a warm meal at the end of the day. Being a pasta afictionado chances are most of those meals will be pasta-something. I will be bringing a variety of dehydrated vegetables but what about meat? I don't eat meat every day but I like to have a serving of either beef/pork/chicken about once or twice a week. I know I can get the nutritional value of meat elsewhere but I like the taste. Does anyone here have experience with meats on the trail? Is there a way of dehydrating it without turning it into jerky? And what about re-hydrating it? Is it a huge pain in the ***?

Also I'm debating on whether I should buy dehydrated food from a supplier or if I should buy a dehydrator and do it myself. I'm leaning towards option #2 because I like doing my own stuff but since those machines can be expensive, I wonder if option #1 wouldn't be the smarter way to go from a financial stand point. How much food do you need to dehydrate before the machine pays for itself?

Thanks all for your immense and very pertinent knowledge!

LuckyMan
10-20-2016, 16:23
I have had good success dehydrating lean ground beef to make stroganoff etc. Lean ground turkey was so lean it had a rubbery texture and wasn't so appealing. I've made big batches of pulled pork (tenderloin) or chicken (breasts) barbecue with cabbage, carrots, red peppers, onions and garlic - rehydrated, they are good hot or cold. I also eat a lot of pepperoni and summer sausage, and it has not gone bad on me.

ADVStrom14
10-20-2016, 16:23
I'm working on the menu for my first big trip and I am planning to work on take meat with me. Buying from someone else is convenient but can be expensive. You can get a good dehydrator for $50. I have 2 Nesco dehydrators and they work great. Plus they are expandable for larger preps. I hvae been reading the Backpacking Chef and he has some great recipes along with directions for dehydrating a variety of your own foods.

http://www.backpackingchef.com/

AfterParty
10-20-2016, 16:25
Dehydrators are great If you have a cabelas around they stock refurbished ones in the Bargin cave area. And you can do a lot of food in one run and probably one of the best for the money.

Sandy of PA
10-20-2016, 16:29
I use freeze dried meats in my dinners. Available from Packit Gormet, mountain house, Be-prepared.com etc. Heavier options are Tuna and Salmon in foil packets and Spam singles, hard boiled eggs, and cheese for protein sources.

Trailweaver
10-20-2016, 16:31
A lot of meat options now in the grocery store are packaged in Mylar (?) packages so they are sealed really well. Some are single serving Spam (and recipies abound on their website), tuna (old standby), and salmon. The fish come in many flavors too. Also available is shelf stable bacon. Gotta get creative. You can buy (or make) the ground beef "gravel" to rehydrate & add to all kinds of creations. Check out the many on-line suppliers of dehydrated meals & either buy from them or make your own from their ideas.

Spirit Walker
10-20-2016, 17:30
As Trailweaver said, there are a lot of options at the grocery. Adding protein to meals helps muscle healing and helps you feel full longer. We mostly eat cheese, tuna, salmon, spam, sausage, and cold cuts. For first night out of town, you could buy chicken strips or canned chicken or even some hamburger if it's cold enough. I've carried big deli sandwiches out of town too. My husband used to like canned anchovies and jerky. I've tried the hamburger in foil packets but didn't care for it much, but I wasn't doing a long hike when I ate it. Hunger makes a difference in what you find tasty.

Starchild
10-20-2016, 18:36
Precooking the meat will help reduce excess water while not dehydrating it.

rocketsocks
10-20-2016, 18:43
...also it dose t have to be all of nothin' you can get the dehydrator, do your pastas and veggies or what have you, then buy some free dried meats or proteins to add to your meal bags. Dehydrating is a great way to get rid of a lot of crap that's in food.

Wil
10-20-2016, 18:56
I dehydrate browned ground beef with onions, garlic, salt, pepper. All floured. I use 80 or 85% because it's lots tastier. I do drain the fat while browning and keep in foodsaver bags or zip locks with the air strawed out. Kept in the freezer until I leave and it's fine for at least a couple of weeks (I think I've gone as long as 3 in fairly warm weather with no sign or any indication of going bad. Mixes with lots of stuff. Optimal is to re-hydrate the meat for a few minutes in boiling water before adding the other meal ingredients (in my case usually just veggies mix with pasta or rice & spices) but if you don't want the extra step it's OK just jumped together, brought to a boil for a minute, then cozied for 1-15 minutes. Or just simmered for a several minutes if you don't mind using the fuel.

Commercial freeze dried chicken (I use larger chunks) is pretty good so I don't bother drying chicken.

I dry boiled large shrimp cut in thirds lengthwise (or smalls cut in half lengthwise).

Diced corned beef dries well; I mix it with Hormel CB hash and dry the whole batch. Add a raw egg when almost reconstituted (carried cracked and sealed in a food saver bag, tricky to seal because of the liquid, never kept these on the trail for longer than a few days, no idea how long the eggs stay good.)

Wil
10-20-2016, 18:57
In the ground beef above I forgot to mention I add Gravy Master or Bovril liquid.

Dogwood
10-20-2016, 19:44
With the rise in Paleo interest many more options are available than just super hard super chewy jerky which is similar to meat leather or a leather belt.

https://epicbar.com/bars-overview Becoming more widely available. I even see it a Sporting Good Store chains. Added to a meal by breaking up taking into consideration human sized, even hungry hiked sized meat portions needed with the meal not centered around mass consumption of meat, AS YOU SAY YOU WANT, with the other non meat based ingredients being the primary ingredients and. Doubles also eaten as is as a bar. Could be all you need in different varieties or perhaps mixing it up with chicken foil packs or various fish in foil packs. Getting your carnivore on need not be complicated on trail! Don't over think it!

http://www.tankabar.com/cgi-bin/nanf/public/product-tankabar-intro.cvw?sessionid=195ffaa58ab2e21290875fdb629311 53b89d832effd60f OK, like the mixes that include other items.

http://www.bricksbars.com Never ate one. I don't see them that often.

All jerky is NOT THE SAME super hard super chewy meat leather either.

I can tell you Krave Basil Citrus and Lemon Garlic versions are soft turkey jerky. I don't know about the other meats. I see this at a wide range of stores. https://www.kravejerky.com/shop/krave-jerky#?offset=0&limit=100&includeUnavailable

Perky Jerky Turkey is soft and flavorful jerky where you will not dislodge teeth attempting to tear apart. Although I don't eat it the other meat varieties all looked soft and less chewy too. Find at Wally World and widely elsewhere. http://perkyjerky.com/buy-4-get-1-free

Lorissa's Kitchen Ginger Teriyaki Chicken jerky is soft and easily consumed as is out of the bag or added to meals. Target, Krogers, prolly elsewhere is where you'll locate it. http://lorissaskitchen.com/what-we-make/

There will be some disagreement but for all the work and possible initial expense dehydrating these meats perhaps if you are accurate in saying you will not eat meat on trail as often as you say buying any of these might be more acceptable. It seems to me, and I could be wrong, dehydrating and then rehydrating often equates with rehydrating jerky/jerky like products anyway.

Dehydrating food means also mailing out resupply boxes rather than buying all these on the AT as you go. When not consuming meat in mass quantities as you say you will on trail you have to start weighing different option depennidng on your situation.

Hosh
10-21-2016, 00:14
I use a Nesco dehydrator for all my backpacking meals. If you want to do chicken, use canned chicken it is much easier to re-hydrate. I use 90%+ ground beef and rinse it repeatedly under hot water before drying. You can keep the beef gravel separate and add some cold water hours before meal prep.

I don't have any experience with pork, but would suggest ground pork, since it will be easier to re-hydrate.

Engine
10-21-2016, 06:02
Tuna, Salmon, Chicken, and other options in the foil packs from Wally World. They are inexpensive and often available pre-seasoned with some flavors better than others. These options are slightly heavier than freeze-dried, but much less expensive and you don't have to rehydrate them.

MtDoraDave
10-21-2016, 07:16
Dry sausage. Cured, smoked, salted... it kept back in the old days before refrigeration.

I can (and do) eat just about anything without ill effects, though some people are more sensitive. However, hand and fingernail cleanliness should be considered when preparing food on the trail, so pre-sliced and pre-portioned foods seem like a good idea for days or weeks out on the trail.

MtDoraDave
10-21-2016, 07:29
... since this section hike is 9 months away, it would be relatively painless to spread out the cost of buying enough Mountain House meals for one per day on the trail. -But to me, a section hike means a week - the op didn't say how long their section hike will be.

I just re-read the original post - and to eat meat just once a week, logistically it makes more sense just buying it rather than making your own... unless its something of a personal challenge, then do what you enjoy. :)

DuneElliot
10-21-2016, 10:05
I found a decent dehydrator for $50 (I think) at Walmart. That's not exactly expensive. I haven't tried it yet because I have no space for it, but it had good reviews

Feral Bill
10-21-2016, 12:41
Dry sausage. Cured, smoked, salted... it kept back in the old days before refrigeration.

I can (and do) eat just about anything without ill effects, though some people are more sensitive. However, hand and fingernail cleanliness should be considered when preparing food on the trail, so pre-sliced and pre-portioned foods seem like a good idea for days or weeks out on the trail.
A couple ounces a day of dry sausage does wonders. Having it separate helps when hiking with vegetarians.

RockDoc
10-21-2016, 22:02
We make paleo beef jerky using grass fed ground beef, a strip extruder, and our dehydrater. Easy peasy.

We also carry Landjaeger sausage, which does not need to be refrigerated.

Suzzz
10-22-2016, 00:49
Thanks guys for all your valuable input!

MtDoraDave I set aside 2 weeks for my section hike. And yes making my own trail food myself would be a nice challenge but it needs to be tasty. I can't imagine being stuck on the trail with horrible food. That's why I want to experiment at home during the winter. If I see that I have the talent to dehydrate and then rehydrate food without making it look like goo and taste like crap, I'll be more than happy to hit the trail with my own concoctions. It must be very rewarding to be able to do that. But if I can't, I'll gladly buy whatever I need. I'd rather pay for something I know will be good that being in a bad mood for most of my hike because my food isn't good.

MuddyWaters
10-22-2016, 05:47
All jerky not equal. Nor hard and tough.
I have local near me that is great. $$$. Had to change name to kippered beef sticks because moisture level too high to be called jerky.

The Krave chipotle is awesome. Soft, tasty. Seriously, try thus stuff. Walmart carries now.

Some jerky out west in texas, nm, is like crusty old cardboard. Terrible.

tabman4113@gmail.com
10-22-2016, 06:17
I use a Nesco dehydrator and it works great. I like to dehydrate pasta sauce without the meat. It turns into a "brittle like" substance. about a 3rd of a jar makes a good portion. Then rehydrate and add no boil pasta and vacuum packet of pepperoni. And you have an awesome spaghetti dinner on the trail.

Mouser999
10-22-2016, 07:50
Tyson has cooked chicken (7,5 ounces) in bags. A little too much for me. Tried I t once neede spices. Should keep over night .

Venchka
10-22-2016, 10:36
Tyson has cooked chicken (7,5 ounces) in bags. A little too much for me. Tried I t once neede spices. Should keep over night .

Try this stuff at home first. I bought the Grilled Chicken variety. The fake smoke additives gave off an aroma and taste that made me gag. Normally, I'm known as the guy who eats anything. The Tyson Grilled Chicken disproved that claim. 7 ounces was way too much chicken for a single serving as well.
Krave Jerky rocks!
Wayne


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Deacon
10-23-2016, 08:49
Suzzz,
Each year I dehydrate several dishes that contain either ground pork or ground beef. I begin dehydrating in January for the upcoming season.

I still have a couple of six ounce ziploc bags of "barbecued spaghetti with pork" in my hiking drawer that I dried last January, and is still good.

I would be comfortable with dried meat up to a year if kept in a dark, not too warm place.

Hosh
10-23-2016, 17:12
I use glass mason jars that are vacuum sealed with an attachment to my FoodSaver sealer. I then store in a freezer and get 2-3 years shelf life.

Wise Old Owl
10-23-2016, 18:43
Most here are making the same season for same year of use. Reconstituting gravel and Jerky IMO doesn't have a good outcome... but if that's what you want to do that's great. There is a trick that is spelled out in the Nesco instructions.Take time to soak the meats overnight in an acid of choosing, a good low sodium teriyaki, or Vinegar, and bring the meat to a soft dry. I set a separate electrical timer and have a cut off in four hours or adjust accordingly.

Ground beef should be browned prior to any process, I have tried it without a soak in an acid, appears OK. The basic idea of soaking is to prevent mold growth.

Good idea with the Ball Jars - avoids Botulism, for backpacking - I would still use a vac sealer. Do not hang on to the meat after one year.

I too use HB eggs, Home made Jerky, Sausage (Salami and Pepperoni) hard block cheese and small tubs of Cream Cheese for bagels and landjaeger sausage.

Suzzz
10-23-2016, 21:50
I too use HB eggs.

How long are they good for once they're boiled? Is it the only/best way to bring eggs on the trail? Are there companies who make dehydrated or freeze dried eggs? I know you can find ready made breakfast meals, i.e. bacon and eggs, omelets, etc. but what about just eggs? My reason for asking is for situations when you'd want to add eggs to a recipe on the trail.

slbirdnerd
10-24-2016, 08:12
I'm working on the menu for my first big trip and I am planning to work on take meat with me. Buying from someone else is convenient but can be expensive. You can get a good dehydrator for $50. I have 2 Nesco dehydrators and they work great. Plus they are expandable for larger preps. I hvae been reading the Backpacking Chef and he has some great recipes along with directions for dehydrating a variety of your own foods.

http://www.backpackingchef.com/

+1 for Backpackingchef.com! I learned how to dehydrate ground beef from him, and I do plan ground beef to put in with pasta and marinara, and also seasoned taco meat to make soft tacos or "walking tacos" on the trail. Lots of options! Also check out http://www.trailcooking.com/.

Sandy of PA
10-24-2016, 08:21
How long are they good for once they're boiled? Is it the only/best way to bring eggs on the trail? Are there companies who make dehydrated or freeze dried eggs? I know you can find ready made breakfast meals, i.e. bacon and eggs, omelets, etc. but what about just eggs? My reason for asking is for situations when you'd want to add eggs to a recipe on the trail.

I got freeze dried scrambled eggs from Mountain House thru Beprepared.com. I had to buy the #10 can to get just plain eggs, pre-cooked ready to eat. If you don't rehydrate they are like eating egg flavored Styrofoam, I eat them this way about half the time. Overall not too bad, go great in mashed tators or Ramen.

Suzzz
10-24-2016, 09:23
Egg flavored styrofoam... yeah, really looking forward to that. Haha. That sounds terrible but then again, what might be considered to be terrible in a ''normal'' setting can quickly become very acceptable when you're tired and hungry on the trail.

Thanks for all your input guys, I'm taking notes. My kids don't know it yet but they're about to become my guinea pigs. I'll be testing all this on my family before hitting the trail in July. If it's not tasty they won't be shy about letting me know.

swisscross
10-24-2016, 10:05
Egg flavored styrofoam... yeah, really looking forward to that. Haha. That sounds terrible but then again, what might be considered to be terrible in a ''normal'' setting can quickly become very acceptable when you're tired and hungry on the trail.

Thanks for all your input guys, I'm taking notes. My kids don't know it yet but they're about to become my guinea pigs. I'll be testing all this on my family before hitting the trail in July. If it's not tasty they won't be shy about letting me know.

My wife is my guinea pig.
I really enjoy cooking so dehydrating came naturally for me.
I have only had a couple of things that did not turn out as I had wished.

Shrimp, fish, ground beef, ground pork and chicken all dehydrate well.
I find meat takes longer to rehydrate than most ingredients.
Found it helpful to not package the meat with other ingredients and add a little water to the meat of choice a couple of hours before cooking the rest.

Suzzz
10-24-2016, 10:48
I find meat takes longer to rehydrate than most ingredients.
Found it helpful to not package the meat with other ingredients and add a little water to the meat of choice a couple of hours before cooking the rest.

I was thinking about bringing an empty peannut butter or similar jar (plastic - not heavy) to put food and a little water to rehydrate while walking the last leg of the day and have it ready to cook once I stop for the evening.

egilbe
10-24-2016, 13:50
Alton Brown has an episode on good eats where he makes jerky. You can check it out on Netflix.

Pastor Bryon
10-24-2016, 17:43
I have purchased cuts of dried beef from our local Amish store and it has worked great. It will keep for a couple of days easily without refrigeration. Also, at the store, I can give them an idea of how I want it cut and then they will wrap it twice to keep it nice and fresh.

I've used this to make a beef mac and cheese that turned out pretty darn good. Also good with wheat thins and colby jack cheese.

swisscross
10-24-2016, 17:59
Alton Brown has an episode on good eats where he makes jerky. You can check it out on Netflix.

Didn't he use home air filters and a box fan?
Watched an episode of him smoking salmon in a cardboard box using an alum. pie pan to hold the wood chips.

Venchka
10-24-2016, 18:08
How long are they good for once they're boiled? Is it the only/best way to bring eggs on the trail? Are there companies who make dehydrated or freeze dried eggs? I know you can find ready made breakfast meals, i.e. bacon and eggs, omelets, etc. but what about just eggs? My reason for asking is for situations when you'd want to add eggs to a recipe on the trail.

Ova Easy Eggs. 12 eggs / package. REI stocks them. I've also seen them at well stocked outfitters.
Wayne


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saltysack
10-26-2016, 21:17
Nothing better than Krave chili lime jerky....I buy it in large quantities off Amazon....Cabot seriously sharp cheddar on wheat thins or Hawaiian sweet rolls with pepperoni is also the bomb..


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atraildreamer
10-27-2016, 11:18
...Some jerky out west in texas, nm, is like crusty old cardboard. Terrible.

That is because it was made for crusty, old cowboys!

36723

You got a problem with that Pilgrim? :D

Wheezy
10-27-2016, 11:35
Imitation crab meat dries/rehydrates really well. Goes great in a Pasta Side.

swisscross
10-27-2016, 12:01
Imitation crab meat dries/rehydrates really well. Goes great in a Pasta Side.

Never been a fan of imitation crab meat but this makes me want to try trail crab cakes.

Wheezy
10-27-2016, 12:03
I don't normally eat it either, but tastes great after 14-15 miles!

Wil
10-27-2016, 15:48
Imitation crab meat dries/rehydrates really well.I've had bad results with real crab, horrible smell & taste so I'd look to make sure the imitation crab is all imitation and not a mix including real crab.

The_Captain
10-31-2016, 23:48
Check out Trail Chef! I've got the app and the book! So much to choose from. As for the dehydration station. Got mine at Walmart and it's perfect. Think I spent $70 on it. If you get one of your own, get a dehydrator that has a digital temperature gauge and a timer! It will make life easier.

Greenmountainguy
11-30-2016, 20:18
Best scenario for two weeks is 28 lbs. of food. For me, even if pinching, it would be more like 32lbs. On my more indulgent trips I do more like 2.5 lbs. a day. Admittedly, I am a former four star chef and seriously into food, but the point is still valid.
That is one pile of weight, plus equipment, plus water. I would think about resupply mid-trip. If there is a decent grocery store, get the dried, sealed Italian sausages like D'Abruzzi and the like. For the first few days, regular hard salami is good. Let's face it though, all these choices are mostly fat calories. If you are only eating meat four times on the trip, how about just getting packets of freeze dried chicken or beef?
I have done jerky in the past, but plan this winter to seriously get into my food dehydrator.
Try a site called: http://www.backpackingchef.com/dehydrating-food.html
The food they make sure looks good, I am anxious to try drying chili.
Oh...how about textured vegetable protein?

Suzzz
11-30-2016, 20:27
I am a former four star chef and seriously into food

Let me know if you need a hiking partner. Lol!!!

Greenmountainguy
11-30-2016, 22:06
Let me know if you need a hiking partner. Lol!!!
Any time and I'll bring the food. Your job will be to keep me walking.
I remember a period in my life when I stopped as early as 4 p.m. to indulge a desire for multi-course gustation. For what it is worth, I now tend to one pot meals with a hot drink.
Am I getting wiser or just older?

Greenmountainguy
11-30-2016, 22:22
How long are they good for once they're boiled? Is it the only/best way to bring eggs on the trail? .
An old early 19th century thing aboard ships was to oil the outside of the raw egg. It greatly extended the life of the egg, generally weeks or more. I presume that you could do the same thing with HB eggs, could you not? It seems logical: reduce the oxygen permeability of the shell to reduce oxidation.

Suzzz
12-01-2016, 00:30
I now tend to one pot meals with a hot drink. Am I getting wiser or just older?

I'd say you're getting efficient.

Engine
12-01-2016, 06:57
An old early 19th century thing aboard ships was to oil the outside of the raw egg. It greatly extended the life of the egg, generally weeks or more. I presume that you could do the same thing with HB eggs, could you not? It seems logical: reduce the oxygen permeability of the shell to reduce oxidation.

You can carry eggs for days without any issue, even longer if they are fresh and not store bought.

In temps below 80* eggs have a shelf life of weeks without any treatment, as long as they aren't washed. Washing the shell removes the bloom, a natural protectant laid down as the egg is laid. Eggs from the store have been washed, so you are forced to refrigerate them or they will go bad. We keep chickens and the fresh eggs can be lightly rinsed (not scrubbed) and left out for weeks with no ill effect, although we do rinse and refrigerate them. Pioneer families would keep a bowl of eggs on the table for daily use and often the eggs near the bottom would go a LONG time before they were finally used.

Maydog
12-01-2016, 08:50
This guy has some really good looking homemade backpacking food: https://www.youtube.com/user/MrBabelfish5/videos

trailmercury
12-01-2016, 11:11
This guy has some really good looking homemade backpacking food: https://www.youtube.com/user/MrBabelfish5/videos
I have made most of his meals:
BBQ Spaghetti, Chili-Mac, Red Beans and Rice, Ghoulash, and Creamy Stroganoff are top notch delicious!
I wasn't a fan of the Chicken and Rice with Vegetables or the Aztec Chicken Stew

Henry8
12-01-2016, 11:57
I have good luck dehydrating/re-hydrating the following meats:
Ground beef, chicken, turkey and imitation crab.

Started by using my oven on lowest baking temp and propping the door open with a wooden spoon. Used the meat to supplement other freeze dried meals and ramen noodles. Eventually I purchased a cheap dehydrator from Bass Pro Shop. Now I'm dehydrating whole meals (spaghetti, jambalaya, chili, shepherds pie...) and vacuum sealing for long term storage. Its fun, I'm saving money over freeze dried meals, I think it tastes better than Mountain House and I always have meals on hand for short notice trips.

Henry8
12-01-2016, 12:03
Tried dehydrating scrambled eggs with polenta/grits (all good days begin with eggs). The polenta is suppose to help them re-hydrate. I did not care for the results and now leave eggs to the commercial freeze drying experts.

Greenmountainguy
12-02-2016, 17:23
I was thinking about bringing an empty peannut butter or similar jar (plastic - not heavy) to put food and a little water to rehydrate while walking the last leg of the day and have it ready to cook once I stop for the evening.
I have read of people using a Thermos jar (they used to make a fairly light all plastic one that held like 12 oz.). They put the food in followed by boiling water and the food is either cooked or nearly so by lunch time. I have looked around and cannot find a insulated container that is not absurdly heavy.

Dogwood
12-02-2016, 18:37
"I know I can get the nutritional value of meat elsewhere but I like the taste."

Do you know where the "taste" in meats comes from? Research it. It can put your "taste" into a different perspective.

Every eat Kosher meats? Very different "taste", some say very bland tasting, because the blood isn't left in abundance in the meat. Now research what's commonly found in the blood that gives it "taste."

Suzzz
12-02-2016, 22:23
"I know I can get the nutritional value of meat elsewhere but I like the taste."

Do you know where the "taste" in meats comes from? Research it. It can put your "taste" into a different perspective.

Every eat Kosher meats? Very different "taste", some say very bland tasting, because the blood isn't left in abundance in the meat. Now research what's commonly found in the blood that gives it "taste."

Never had Kosher meat. Interesting... never thought about it that way. Will look it up.

Greenmountainguy
12-03-2016, 14:05
I'd say you're getting efficient.
Thank you. I feel better.

Dogwood
12-03-2016, 19:37
What's the texture like of dehydrated imitation crab meat which is primarily pollock that I have on off occasion with the version I buy that has only four ingredients with pollock by the far as the main ingredient.

Gabigabs
01-02-2017, 22:19
Dave and I hiked John Muir Trail in 2014. We were little hesitant to rely on Mountain House and them alike to cater to our dietary needs for a variety of reasons and decided to experiment with dehydrating our own meals. We loved it. When it comes to meat, the most hassle was dehydrating ground beef as the meat has to be cooked and rinsed before dehydrating to ensure the oil is washed away; otherwise, the meat could spoil. Rehydrating was not a problem. Poured hot water in the package and let it sit for 15 - 20 minutes.

Ground turkey is also a possibility, it's leaner than beef so you do not need to rinse as carefully as beef after it gets cooked, but it did not rehydrate as well and remained little crunchy.

Canned or pouched chicken, on the other hand, was very easy to prepare, just opened the package, spread its content on dehydrator's tray and let it do its job. It was also easy to portion. One can or pouch fit on one tray and that's what we used for one final serving. It rehydrated very well on the trail.

Hard sausage or salami is also a good source of protein. It has a good shelve life and you can add it to many meals, including pasta, mashed potatoes, and soups.

For your first day out of town, you can get fresh sausages. We cooked ours on fire and it was delicious. They are too heavy and on hot summer days could spoil easily if carried longer but the taste of real meat is worth it.

Hope this helps.

CELTIC BUCK
01-03-2017, 00:58
I have a buddy that makes Venison jerky for me. Add a summer sausage that will last several days and was perfect in Oct on the Long Trail for my Black Lab and I. We had some meat and hot meal every lunch & evening

Hoofit
01-03-2017, 06:57
Hi Suzzz,
Back to your original inquiry, how to get occasional meat into your diet for a two week hike.....
Consider Mountain House Pro packs, in particular :
Chili Mac with Beef
Lasagna with meat sauce
Beef Stroganoff
Spaghetti with meat sauce
They come freeze dried, easy to pack and pretty darn delicious!
They claim it is a double serving which equates to one ' hungry hiker' serving !!
I'd still recommend a dehydrator and vacuum dealer, under a hundred bucks for both, to experiment with other foods such as veggies and fruit but these four in particular are excellent , in my humble opinion.
They also can be resealed, handy for packing out your trash.
Enjoy!

NoChance
02-09-2017, 22:37
I own several large Excalibur dehydrators, but in reality, its so much easier to but a packet or container of Freeze Dried chicken, beef, turkey or ham and just add it to a meal.

gracebowen
02-10-2017, 00:34
Im planning on taking 3oz bacon bits from Hormel. Also tuna and chicken pouches and small summer sausages.

Hikes in Rain
02-10-2017, 21:44
Sure miss the clams and shrimp in the foil pouches!

RestingBface
03-07-2017, 12:26
We (my mother for ME) dehydrates everything for my trips! I end up with venison, chicken, turkey even quail. I've seen others here have issues with dehydrating eggs. Wild mushrooms...veggies, fruits, fruit leather and of course scrambled eggs!

Since I see so many of you guys have issues with dehydrating eggs I will ask her what her process is. I will say that when I do dehydrate and when she does as well we typically keep in mason jars (with lid obviously) but I have accidentally kept some in Ziploc for close to a year and they've been fine.

RestingBface
03-07-2017, 12:30
Also buying the fruit leather sheets off Amazon then cutting to fit your dehydrator will help you substantially! I have been able to dehydrate almost anything. What I'll do is after cooking dinner for the family is take a bit of leftovers in my $40 cheapo dehydrator and try a small sheet worth watching carefully to see how it does. It typically does well!!

Voila new trail nomnoms :D

Wildtowner
03-08-2017, 18:29
I make my own freeze-dried dinners using miscellaneous ingredients. The meat (usually chicken or ground beef, freeze-dried) I get from Packit Gormet or mountain house, and the veggies/rice/potatoes/noodles are from various sources (my own dehydrated, Amazon, Packit Gourmet). This way, I can create "custom" meals based on recipes I make at home, but using dehydrated/freeze-dried ingredients. Amazing things are available like powdered vinegar, soy sauce, wine powder (or use the little packets at minimus.biz). If you wanted to make your own chili mac, for example, you could use meat from Packit Gourmet, some taco spices from the grocery store, some various dehydrated veggies/beans, some hot sauce (Chollula packet), and some chopped sundried tomatoes. Put it all together in a ziplock, preferably vacuum seal it, and just add hot water on the trail. Voila! Instant yum. Adapt any recipe you would want to eat.