PDA

View Full Version : Wow



skinnbones
10-23-2016, 20:38
Just purchased my MSR pocket rocket stove today. After $1,100.00 spent, I only lack buying a pair of trekking pants and a few minor items. This is a very expensive hobby, yet I know the Appalachian Trail will live up to the hype. Hurry up April, I want a real honest challenge. Starting from ground zero, I'm sure I'm within the normal range for gear. But wow, over a grand just to go walking for half a year.

Old Hiker
10-23-2016, 20:43
Just me, I'm thinkin' $1100 is a tad much for a pocket rocket.

Just sayin'.

skinnbones
10-23-2016, 20:51
Just me, I'm thinkin' $1100 is a tad much for a pocket rocket.

Just sayin'. LOL. And I bought it on sale.

Sandy of PA
10-23-2016, 20:53
Hiking is a cheap hobby. My Z-Packs Solplex cost less than 6 nights in a decent hotel. You could blow more on a one week cruise, only this stuff will allow you to spend 6 months outdoors. And you will still have it after. Trekking pants can be found at Goodwill or Walmart. I have not spent anything close to my husbands HAM radio hobby or my sisters horse. What kind of hobby are you comparing hiking with?

Old Hiker
10-23-2016, 20:53
Sorry - couldn't resist. $1100 sounds pretty reasonable. I don't even want to start adding up what I've bought and re-bought and .......etc.

skinnbones
10-23-2016, 21:03
Hiking is a cheap hobby. My Z-Packs Solplex cost less than 6 nights in a decent hotel. You could blow more on a one week cruise, only this stuff will allow you to spend 6 months outdoors. And you will still have it after. Trekking pants can be found at Goodwill or Walmart. I have not spent anything close to my husbands HAM radio hobby or my sisters horse. What kind of hobby are you comparing hiking with?I understand your point. All hobbies are expensive, but a thousand dollars is still a lot of money to me.

skinnbones
10-23-2016, 21:04
Sorry - couldn't resist. $1100 sounds pretty reasonable. I don't even want to start adding up what I've bought and re-bought and .......etc. Still a lot of money to a poor man.

MtDoraDave
10-23-2016, 21:10
I wouldn't have believed you a couple years ago if you had told me I would have over a thousand bucks in hiking equipment. .. but I do.
But unlike most other hobbies, this one can be broken up over time if you aren't getting outfitted for an immediate thru hike departure.

saltysack
10-23-2016, 21:25
If you buy good gear starting out you shouldn't have to buy for a lil awhile....yea light weight gear doesn't last as long as the heavy stuff. The expensive part you will soon learn are the annual trips when you use that expensive gear! Airlines, hotels, shuttles etc....it's over $1,100 for my yearly hiking trip out west....For me AT trips are cheap.....I travel the southeast with a company car and gas.......hard part is getting permission from the wife.......good luck......


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

PennyPincher
10-23-2016, 21:27
the best part is you can use the same gear over and over again. you don't get the hotel stays over and over without paying for them.

Wise Old Owl
10-23-2016, 21:34
Wow where did you go REI? otherwise this owl is stumped

http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg275/MarkSwarbrick/__OWLq.gif

jgillam
10-23-2016, 21:37
I'm in a similar boat to you (OP) and have been buying gear for the last 6 months and am down to a few clothing and miscellaneous items. I was thinking about it being expensive then realized, that compared to the world of competitive archery I had in for 20 years, this new hobby was relatively affordable.

Puddlefish
10-23-2016, 21:55
Hiking is a bit like kayaking, a single expensive outlaw of cash, but then cheap to continue. You can certainly choose to spend big money backpacking, by traveling far to exotic destinations, and staying in expensive bed and breakfasts in trail towns. You can also likely hike more locally, avoid towns and you just have to pay for some food, which you'd pay for even if you stayed home.

Hikingjim
10-23-2016, 22:35
$1,100 is very little as an investment for a 5 or 6 month activity.
If you were doing a 3 day hike and then not much in the future, then a pocket rocket etc would be a big waste of money. When I first started backpacking my total kit cost very little, and I added good gear over time, but I started with 5 day type hikes

Everything that I've added has been of use to me for many many years (except a few items that got returned or crashed and burned)

andsoshewalks
10-24-2016, 00:18
beats payin' rent


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

rocketsocks
10-24-2016, 02:18
beats payin' rent


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Now that's funny!

Hangfire
10-24-2016, 02:38
You'll understand better when you are happily hunkered down in your tent/hammock in the middle of a raging storm and you look around at your gear and think "damn I'm glad I didn't buy the cheap stuff".

AfterParty
10-24-2016, 03:33
Don't switch to hammock it can get expensive

jjozgrunt
10-24-2016, 08:00
I thought $1100 was very reasonable. My tent, pack and quilt cost more than that so I think you did very well. But I didn't just buy them for a one off walk so they have been a great investment.

garlic08
10-24-2016, 08:14
My AT gear cost about $750, and most of that was on sale. If I didn't have the patience to wait for sales, it would easily have cost over $1000. But as everyone has said, it was a good investment for a multi-month trip, and most of it was barely worn after the trip and has been on many long trips since.

Remember, many of those purchases can be used on day hikes, car camping trips, etc. That gear can support a different way of life.

Try buying a decent bicycle for under $1000, or setting up any kind of hobby room or work shop. Look how much amateur chefs spend on kitchen gadgets!

For many, technology is little more than a hobby. Think of how much is spent on computer, smartphone, and internet set-up.

FreeGoldRush
10-24-2016, 09:09
Just purchased my MSR pocket rocket stove today. After $1,100.00 spent, I only lack buying a pair of trekking pants and a few minor items. This is a very expensive hobby, yet I know the Appalachian Trail will live up to the hype. Hurry up April, I want a real honest challenge. Starting from ground zero, I'm sure I'm within the normal range for gear. But wow, over a grand just to go walking for half a year.

The opportunity cost is likely far higher. Taking six months away from productive activities is quite expensive.

Bronk
10-24-2016, 09:14
Its like anything else, you can spend as much or as little as you want and still have a good time. A friend of mine has as much as you spent tied up in fishing gear...my entire setup for fishing cost around $25. When we go fishing he doesn't catch any more or less or any larger or smaller fish than I do. For him, shopping for the gear is just as much a part of it as the fishing is.

A wise old fisherman once told me "Some lures are designed to catch fish. Others are designed to catch fisherman."

Ktaadn
10-24-2016, 09:33
Expensive hobby compared to what? Golf, skiing, drinking Scotch? Now those are expensive hobbies.

Another Kevin
10-24-2016, 09:38
The most expensive thing about hiking gear is buying and re-buying it to fine tune the system. This is one of the reasons I can't understand the people who jump in with both feet and start out on a Big Hike with expensive gear before they even know whether they like it.

It's possible to spend about $300 (http://www.pmags.com/300-gear-challenge) and get yourself outfitted to try the hobby in safety and comfort in summer. It'll last long enough to learn your hiking style, and learn how to choose stuff so you don't get taken. Then when you do spend the big bucks, you at least know what you're buying, and more important, you know you're going actually to use it. I got back into backpacking eight years ago with a 1970s-vintage pack, a sleeping bag from the REI garage sale, a blue foamy from XYZ-mart, a blue tarp and Coughlan's bug net with gutter spikes for stakes, a Grease Pot and popcan stove, mostly clothing that I had at home already. I looked absolutely ridiculous and had some wonderful times.

The pack was badly deteriorated, and the first thing to be replaced - with a $70 special from the REI sale. (The frame is sitting around waiting to be repurposed, likely as a tool rack for trail maintenance.) I have my eye on a young man without very much money who will grow into the REI pack in a couple of years. The blue foam got kind of torn up, but I still have about a third of it for a sit pad on day trips, and I've cut up pieces for other things. A few bits sit under the corners of my dehumidifier to make it quieter. I'm still using the sleeping bag, Grease Pot, and alky stove - although the stove is about the fourth incarnation. I stepped on one while exploding my pack one Sunday evening, and have given a couple away. I don't sleep under the blue tarp any more, but a tarp is always useful.

I have upgraded into 'mid-range' gear - a Granite Gear pack, a TarpTent Notch, some Marmot clothing, and so on, but that's happened over several years of weekend trips and short sections. One advantage to the 'weekender' style over jumping right in on the Big Hike is that you don't have to start with a complete kit up to dealing with six months of everything Mother Nature can throw at you, and light enough to bash out the 20+ mile days.

And you know what? I learnt during the time I spent on 'training trips' that the Big Hike doesn't appeal that much to me. So I saved spending an awful lot on ultralight gear - and spent it instead on gear that was appropriate to winter weekends, weekend bushwhacks, Northeast peak-bags, and so on. The ultimate saving is in not getting stuff!

I think my biggest single outlay on gear has been my snowshoes - because I knew that where I was going, I'd need good ones. By the time I got them, I also knew where I was going - and that I'd need a pair smaller than what the catalogs would call for on a man my size. In the dense vegetation around here, what would be important was manoeuvrability on wet snow. Flotation on fresh powder could be relegated to dreams of the Rockies. I got the kind with the snap-off tails so I do have an option when I start to wallow. I live Up North, so a lot of my winter gear sometimes gets used off trail. I've walked to work in my facemask and goggles.

My most expensive "gear that doesn't get used" is my ice axe and crampons. No regrets there! I've racked them maybe 6-8 times (other than practice jaunts to the canyon in a local nature preserve), and actually used them only a couple or three times. But when you need them, there is no safe alternative. Including, possibly, turning back, if the weather goes bad fast enough. I've been in the Catskills in an unforecast ice storm of epic proportions - with just Microspikes on my feet, which taught me a lesson. (I have to concede that the drive home was even scarier than the trip down the mountain.)

In short: Get cheap gear. Have fun. Build your skills. By the time it gives out, you'll be wise enough to make better choices about the expensive stuff and have a good idea where you can cut corners.

skinnbones
10-24-2016, 10:12
The most expensive thing about hiking gear is buying and re-buying it to fine tune the system. This is one of the reasons I can't understand the people who jump in with both feet and start out on a Big Hike with expensive gear before they even know whether they like it.

It's possible to spend about $300 (http://www.pmags.com/300-gear-challenge) and get yourself outfitted to try the hobby in safety and comfort in summer. It'll last long enough to learn your hiking style, and learn how to choose stuff so you don't get taken. Then when you do spend the big bucks, you at least know what you're buying, and more important, you know you're going actually to use it. I got back into backpacking eight years ago with a 1970s-vintage pack, a sleeping bag from the REI garage sale, a blue foamy from XYZ-mart, a blue tarp and Coughlan's bug net with gutter spikes for stakes, a Grease Pot and popcan stove, mostly clothing that I had at home already. I looked absolutely ridiculous and had some wonderful times.

The pack was badly deteriorated, and the first thing to be replaced - with a $70 special from the REI sale. (The frame is sitting around waiting to be repurposed, likely as a tool rack for trail maintenance.) I have my eye on a young man without very much money who will grow into the REI pack in a couple of years. The blue foam got kind of torn up, but I still have about a third of it for a sit pad on day trips, and I've cut up pieces for other things. A few bits sit under the corners of my dehumidifier to make it quieter. I'm still using the sleeping bag, Grease Pot, and alky stove - although the stove is about the fourth incarnation. I stepped on one while exploding my pack one Sunday evening, and have given a couple away. I don't sleep under the blue tarp any more, but a tarp is always useful.

I have upgraded into 'mid-range' gear - a Granite Gear pack, a TarpTent Notch, some Marmot clothing, and so on, but that's happened over several years of weekend trips and short sections. One advantage to the 'weekender' style over jumping right in on the Big Hike is that you don't have to start with a complete kit up to dealing with six months of everything Mother Nature can throw at you, and light enough to bash out the 20+ mile days.

And you know what? I learnt during the time I spent on 'training trips' that the Big Hike doesn't appeal that much to me. So I saved spending an awful lot on ultralight gear - and spent it instead on gear that was appropriate to winter weekends, weekend bushwhacks, Northeast peak-bags, and so on. The ultimate saving is in not getting stuff!

I think my biggest single outlay on gear has been my snowshoes - because I knew that where I was going, I'd need good ones. By the time I got them, I also knew where I was going - and that I'd need a pair smaller than what the catalogs would call for on a man my size. In the dense vegetation around here, what would be important was manoeuvrability on wet snow. Flotation on fresh powder could be relegated to dreams of the Rockies. I got the kind with the snap-off tails so I do have an option when I start to wallow. I live Up North, so a lot of my winter gear sometimes gets used off trail. I've walked to work in my facemask and goggles.

My most expensive "gear that doesn't get used" is my ice axe and crampons. No regrets there! I've racked them maybe 6-8 times (other than practice jaunts to the canyon in a local nature preserve), and actually used them only a couple or three times. But when you need them, there is no safe alternative. Including, possibly, turning back, if the weather goes bad fast enough. I've been in the Catskills in an unforecast ice storm of epic proportions - with just Microspikes on my feet, which taught me a lesson. (I have to concede that the drive home was even scarier than the trip down the mountain.)

In short: Get cheap gear. Have fun. Build your skills. By the time it gives out, you'll be wise enough to make better choices about the expensive stuff and have a good idea where you can cut corners. Always enjoy reading your posts and responses. I "WANT" to jump in with both feet. To venture into the unknown is part of the thrill. And you are correct, I have purchased other items after buying it once already (mostly clothes). That's what's rookies do. After waiting 30+ years the window of opportunity is finally open. Kids are grown and have job freedom. And finally, if I find that I dislike lugging a pack over mountains, I will have 2100+ miles to ponder the thought, "what was I thinking". Thanks for your response!

Hikingjim
10-24-2016, 10:16
Always enjoy reading your posts and responses. I "WANT" to jump in with both feet. To venture into the unknown is part of the thrill. And you are correct, I have purchased other items after buying it once already (mostly clothes). That's what's rookies do. After waiting 30+ years the window of opportunity is finally open. Kids are grown and have job freedom. And finally, if I find that I dislike lugging a pack over mountains, I will have 2100+ miles to ponder the thought, "what was I thinking". Thanks for your response!

No doubt, if the time is right, give it a go! You will have plenty of opportunity to swap out a piece or two a gear that you HATE after 50 miles. Just save a bit of budget for that

peakbagger
10-24-2016, 11:06
I expect there are more than few folks who more into the planning then the actual trip. They potentially are planning an AT event to get away from something and gear investment allows to the make a firm physical commitment now to the future endeavor. I wonder how many of the majority who get off the trail after a short time end up with pile of gear they never use. I know of one potential thruhiker who was sick of his job and went out an bought all the major gear within days of particularly stressful event at work, the gear has sat unused for at least 15 years.

The other financial surprise I expect more than few hikers have is starting the trail with all new gear and then decide after just a few days that they need to buy new gear at Mountain Crossings and ship it home. I ran into one potential thruhiker that had bought some new gear at Mountain Crossings and then a lot of new gear at Mt Rogers Outfitters. I ran into him a day later with his brand new ultralight gear shivering with every warm thing he had on his back as the unusual warm spring weather pattern has shifted into the more traditional cold damp and rainy.

trailmercury
10-24-2016, 16:34
The opportunity cost is likely far higher. Taking six months away from productive activities is quite expensive.
Bingo
Especially if you are taking time of from a high paying career...

allmebloominlife
10-24-2016, 16:46
I know it was sticker shock for me when I outfitted me and my daughter last year for a trip to Yellowstone NP. Now I'm a gear junkie lookin for the next great deal. Can't......stop......buying.......gear. :-)

allmebloominlife
10-24-2016, 16:49
Don't switch to hammock it can get expensive

So true!! I'm currently a ground dweller and seriously considered switching to a hammock but I have to sell some gear before I can swing paying $170 for a WBBB.....and a tarp.....and an underquilt. Sheesh.

chiefiepoo
10-24-2016, 16:51
Don't know who said it first but, "beware of any endeavor that requires new shoes". Like back packing boots, trail runners, hiking shoes, Keen water shoes, golf shoes, gym shoes, dance shoes, tennis shoes, camp shoes, riding boots, ski boots, snow shoes, etc. Shoes are the gateway to runaway expenditures for fun things.

Another Kevin
10-24-2016, 17:31
Bingo
Especially if you are taking time of from a high paying career...

Even more so if the time off will leave a suspicious gap in your résumé, so that you have trouble getting back in the door.

Sarcasm the elf
10-24-2016, 18:06
The opportunity cost is likely far higher. Taking six months away from productive activities is quite expensive.

One could argue that the opportunity cost of not hiking is quite high as well.

saltysack
10-24-2016, 19:28
One could argue that the opportunity cost of not hiking is quite high as well.

Agree life's potentially short and full of unknowns....if you have the means then I'd go and not look back! I'm envious as many like myself get caught up in life's commitments....one day I'll break free! With two kids 16 and 10 it'll be a few more years!!!!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

penny b
10-24-2016, 20:10
I am planning on gathering things little by little over then next couple a years to do my AT hike ..... i have looked at many different things and once I think i got my game plan it changes ... I think you did very well on your preperation.

garlic08
10-24-2016, 20:35
Don't know who said it first but, "beware of any endeavor that requires new shoes"...

That's one of my favorites, and I believe it was Mark Twain. A couple of decades ago I became distressed at the number of special-use shoes I had in my closet, and since then I have been working on that. I switched back to old fashioned toe clips and straps on my bike. I work on a trail crew that allows me to wear my hiking shoes. If I ever need new ski boots, I think I'll switch to snowshoeing instead so I can use my hiking shoes. I bought some microspikes so I can wear my hiking shoes on many winter hikes. I have an active social life, but I stay away from events where I can't wear my hiking shoes (surprisingly few, as it turns out). The only work I do, I can wear my hiking shoes. I apologize for the drift.

MuddyWaters
10-24-2016, 20:37
The opportunity cost is likely far higher. Taking six months away from productive activities is quite expensive.

Maybe , maybe not.
What counts really for many, in the long term, is are you able to afford it, and still be prepared to retire one day.
The actual difference that 6 months makes is pretty small in the grand scheme of things
And can be made up and then some by working 1 more year when one does the math.

Of course life never goes according to the way you plan it, so its all a wildcard anyway. We arent really in control, we just have an innate desire to believe and pretend we are. This applies to man and everything he concerns himself with.

Slo-go'en
10-24-2016, 21:09
In the end, it all boils down to how much you use the stuff. It could work out to be a bargain or an expensive lesson.

The Cleaner
10-24-2016, 21:12
I hope you have at least another $1000 for trail expenses while hiking.Hostels,motels,restaurants ect.One thing you can't buy is good weather. Hikers with little cold weather camping/hiking experience are the first to quit after a bit of unseasonably cold & nasty late spring weather.Just a few miles north of Hot Springs NC it snowed 15" on April 17th many years ago.In 2010 the temp got down to 36* with 40mph winds on May 10th crossing the extensive balds in the Roan Highlands area. :eek:

saltysack
10-24-2016, 21:49
I think I've posted before...cold arse late February trip few years ago Roan highlands....do yourself a favor go prepared for the worst!




http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20161025/8ed884cfda15566780da185f39971fb5.jpghttp://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20161025/f394b422f8d5df5d5e9e3b478da6cdf8.jpg


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

saltysack
10-24-2016, 22:04
I think I've posted before...cold arse late February trip few years ago Roan highlands....do yourself a favor go prepared for the worst!




http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20161025/8ed884cfda15566780da185f39971fb5.jpghttp://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20161025/f394b422f8d5df5d5e9e3b478da6cdf8.jpg


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Oops wrong post location....


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

AfterParty
10-24-2016, 22:11
That's like my watch!! I do like it so far.

Roamin
10-25-2016, 13:31
Amazing pictures

MtDoraDave
10-29-2016, 08:26
Maybe , maybe not.
What counts really for many, in the long term, is are you able to afford it, and still be prepared to retire one day.
The actual difference that 6 months makes is pretty small in the grand scheme of things
And can be made up and then some by working 1 more year when one does the math.

Of course life never goes according to the way you plan it, so its all a wildcard anyway. We arent really in control, we just have an innate desire to believe and pretend we are. This applies to man and everything he concerns himself with.

This. Right. Here.

I want to do a thru hike. I have a mortgage and a business partnership. Convincing the partner to let me take off for 5 months hasn't happened yet. He thinks I should wait until I retire. My knees may not be able to wait that long. What has happened is that I started putting $35 a week into a savings account for my thru hike. When there is enough money to put the mortgage on auto-pay for 6 months and enough money to do the thru hike... we'll see how it works out. By then, I may be complacent doing section hikes 2 or 3 times a year and weekenders locally. I may no longer want to hike at all, in which case I can put that money into the retirement account or my next hobby? I cannot see the future and can not know the way things will work out - however, if I don't plan for the future I desire, how is it ever going to happen? Lotto? Right.

I buy equipment as I need it, so when the time comes to do a thru, my equipment purchasing costs will be reasonable. I realize there are plenty of people who are more impulsive or even surprised by their opportunity to do a thru... it's all good, it will work out the way it works out. For me, I have (hopefully) learned my lesson charging my hobbies and desires.

Hikingjim
10-29-2016, 09:22
This. Right. Here.

I want to do a thru hike. I have a mortgage and a business partnership. Convincing the partner to let me take off for 5 months hasn't happened yet. He thinks I should wait until I retire. My knees may not be able to wait that long. What has happened is that I started putting $35 a week into a savings account for my thru hike. When there is enough money to put the mortgage on auto-pay for 6 months and enough money to do the thru hike... we'll see how it works out. By then, I may be complacent doing section hikes 2 or 3 times a year and weekenders locally. I may no longer want to hike at all, in which case I can put that money into the retirement account or my next hobby? I cannot see the future and can not know the way things will work out - however, if I don't plan for the future I desire, how is it ever going to happen? Lotto? Right.

I buy equipment as I need it, so when the time comes to do a thru, my equipment purchasing costs will be reasonable. I realize there are plenty of people who are more impulsive or even surprised by their opportunity to do a thru... it's all good, it will work out the way it works out. For me, I have (hopefully) learned my lesson charging my hobbies and desires.

The opportunity cost of me doing a thru at this point also makes no sense. I feel privileged to be able to get in the woods a couple months a year (every year), hiking or canoeing
I walk on and enjoy

rafe
10-29-2016, 10:32
Expensive, compared to what? (Skiing? Bicycling? Golf?) Obviously there are ways of keeping costs down -- it's always a tradeoff between time and patience (eBay, craigslist, yard sales, thrift stores, closeouts) vs. what you want, when you want it, at retail. (And hefty credit card interest rates.) On the plus side, good gear lasts a long time, if not forever. All of my serious hiking gear from ten years ago is still 100% serviceable.

A serious thru hike attempt calls for decent gear, that's true. Get it, use it, and have a blast.

George
10-29-2016, 14:58
I would imagine that I have spent more than 15K - what I have used in the last 5 years would be around 3K ( when purchased )

I scoped out a gear set from the newest materials and it looked like another 2K for very slight improvement

Maizeandblue9
10-29-2016, 15:22
Compared to how much I spend on golf this hobby isn't too bad. It helps being single though and not having to hide receipts too

rocketsocks
10-29-2016, 16:46
Wow
Trader Joe's discontinued "dried wasabi peas" at least in my store, it's sad day.

theinfamousj
10-29-2016, 20:18
Wow
Trader Joe's discontinued "dried wasabi peas" at least in my store, it's sad day.
Time for you to find an Asian market. I think you will enjoy the cheaper prices, too.

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

josh_ATL
10-30-2016, 22:01
$1100 sounds very reasonable. I guarantee I've got well over twice that into my gear. But like everyone else has pointed out: It's a one and done kind of purchase. I don't have to buy anything else to replace any of the gear I have...I just want to!

PennyPincher
10-30-2016, 23:43
my husband's last bicycle was more than all your gear cost. and that doesn't include shoes, repairs, maintenance, riding clothes, etc. And NONE of it can be used for anything but riding a bicycle (not really). Okay, maybe the sunglasses except he affixed a mirror to them (and he needs like 3 pairs for different lighting conditions).

garlic08
10-31-2016, 08:10
my husband's last bicycle was more than all your gear cost. and that doesn't include shoes, repairs, maintenance, riding clothes, etc. And NONE of it can be used for anything but riding a bicycle (not really). Okay, maybe the sunglasses except he affixed a mirror to them (and he needs like 3 pairs for different lighting conditions).

This got me laughing and nodding at the same time. I cycle a lot around Denver. Yesterday I rode a while with a guy whose pedals and shoes cost more than my entire bike ($300, twenty years ago). We joked about that for a while, but I wonder what his spouse thought about the disappearing paychecks.

There are definitely gear heads in every sport, as well as us dirtbaggers. I'm glad they're out there, fueling development and the economy!

ScareBear
10-31-2016, 08:35
Wow where did you go REI? otherwise this owl is stumped

http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg275/MarkSwarbrick/__OWLq.gif

Well, let' assume you start with nothing. Tent? $200. Pack? $200. Down sleeping bag? $200. Boots? $200 Rain Jacket and Pants? $200. That's a grand, right there. Seems about right, to me...YMMV...

theinfamousj
10-31-2016, 08:50
Rain jacket alone is nearly $200. (says the girl who just replaced her absconded-with Precip, last Friday)

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

rocketsocks
10-31-2016, 09:24
Time for you to find an Asian market. I think you will enjoy the cheaper prices, too.

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalki actually have a pretty old one near by...good idea! Thanks

Dogwood
10-31-2016, 12:49
What I recognize as much much more unproductive, even enslaving, exceedingly wasteful, selfish, and costly is complacently with little thought of the consequences letting oneself adopt destructive cultural and national norms.

What has to be respected and considered is different paths for different people. And, people can change. I did to realign with a sobering highly more passionate more self determined lifestyle. Not every career path needs that perfect resume(most are padded anyway), defines opportunity or productivity in terms of money or having more stuff, or being a rampant shopper or consumer or waster of resources. More is not always better! Downsizing, recognizing that I could forgo expensive automobile/truck or large house(often with empty rooms) choices, cancelling my cable subscription and killing my TVs, getting 50+ % of my food by growing it myself, changing my diet to eating less meat, etc has enabled me to take more time off from paid career work to focus on a life of experiences, traveling, and contributing through volunteering.

If folks are willing to take long hard looks at what is truly expensive they would be astonished - the behavior and things we allow by choice that undermine our time, happiness, and freedom to live more directed lives.

https://www.ted.com/talks/graham_hill_less_stuff_more_happiness

ScareBear
10-31-2016, 15:01
What I recognize as much much more unproductive, even enslaving, exceedingly wasteful, selfish, and costly is complacently with little thought of the consequences letting oneself adopt destructive cultural and national norms.

What has to be respected and considered is different paths for different people. And, people can change. I did to realign with a sobering highly more passionate more self determined lifestyle. Not every career path needs that perfect resume(most are padded anyway), defines opportunity or productivity in terms of money or having more stuff, or being a rampant shopper or consumer or waster of resources. More is not always better! Downsizing, recognizing that I could forgo expensive automobile/truck or large house(often with empty rooms) choices, cancelling my cable subscription and killing my TVs, getting 50+ % of my food by growing it myself, changing my diet to eating less meat, etc has enabled me to take more time off from paid career work to focus on a life of experiences, traveling, and contributing through volunteering.

If folks are willing to take long hard looks at what is truly expensive they would be astonished - the behavior and things we allow by choice that undermine our time, happiness, and freedom to live more directed lives.

https://www.ted.com/talks/graham_hill_less_stuff_more_happiness


OK...you found enlightenment. Good for you. Now, *** does this have to do with the thread from the O/P????????

Dogwood
10-31-2016, 18:40
OK...you found enlightenment. Good for you. Now, *** does this have to do with the thread from the O/P????????

Bitching about costliness of backpacking gear is relatively inconsequential to other common things or habits or lifestyle choices we take for granted that are actually quite significant to our finances.

kayak karl
10-31-2016, 19:59
I don't think the OP was bitching, I think they were bragging ;)

Venchka
10-31-2016, 20:54
my husband's last bicycle was more than all your gear cost. and that doesn't include shoes, repairs, maintenance, riding clothes, etc. And NONE of it can be used for anything but riding a bicycle (not really). Okay, maybe the sunglasses except he affixed a mirror to them (and he needs like 3 pairs for different lighting conditions).

Bikes are expensive. $100 for a pair of mid priced gravel tires on the Americano. I try not to think about what the bike cost. They are fun.
Wayne


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Greenlight
10-31-2016, 21:09
You start out with an old pair of boots and blistered heels. Then you graduate to better footwear and learn to take care of your feet since they're your MMOT (major mode of transportation) and you only get one pair. Then you pull a couple of overnighters and find you can cover 20 or 30 miles in a weekend and you're hooked. You scheme like a pawnbroker to get good gear by hook or crook, and before you know it, skinnbones, you're right, you're innit to winnit and over a $Grand thrown to the wind. But you know and I know that your trek is going to be epic. And you had better post your updates to trailjournals.com so I can follow you.


Just purchased my MSR pocket rocket stove today. After $1,100.00 spent, I only lack buying a pair of trekking pants and a few minor items. This is a very expensive hobby, yet I know the Appalachian Trail will live up to the hype. Hurry up April, I want a real honest challenge. Starting from ground zero, I'm sure I'm within the normal range for gear. But wow, over a grand just to go walking for half a year.

AfterParty
10-31-2016, 21:17
My hammock setup hasn't been cheap And I don't mind having what I will have. I remember spending 2k on bikes in the 80-90s I can guess what a quality bike costs nowadays. Every hobby costs I play disc golf and I will buy up discs like you wouldn't believe so will all my friends. I enjoy this and that and try not to think about money. If I am passoniate about something, reef tanks is another one, that thing will become my money pit and I'll be happy temporarailly then I move on, backpacking though is like an extended fishing trip and has me more intrigued then any other recent distraction. So it goes. It is what I was born to do pretty sure anyways.

egilbe
10-31-2016, 21:38
I just dropped over a grand on a couple of Winter sleeping bags. Now i need a bigger pack. Or a bigger Unaweep packbag.

OldGringo
10-31-2016, 21:48
Well... I have a motorcycle jacket that almost cost a grand add the $600 water proof armored pants, $800 helmet, $500 gloves, not to mention the scooter and luggage ... hiking backpacking and my hammock addiction is cheep.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Greenlight
10-31-2016, 21:53
I was lucky enough to happen upon a clearance sale at the flagship Cabela's in WV during a trip home to Indiana from DC (at the time). It was a customer return that still had leaves stuck in the stuff sack but didn't smell like rotten shrimp and ball sweat, a zero degree North Face down bag for $99 that otherwise would have put me out $450. I know where you're coming from.



I just dropped over a grand on a couple of Winter sleeping bags. Now i need a bigger pack. Or a bigger Unaweep packbag.

skinnbones
10-31-2016, 23:33
You start out with an old pair of boots and blistered heels. Then you graduate to better footwear and learn to take care of your feet since they're your MMOT (major mode of transportation) and you only get one pair. Then you pull a couple of overnighters and find you can cover 20 or 30 miles in a weekend and you're hooked. You scheme like a pawnbroker to get good gear by hook or crook, and before you know it, skinnbones, you're right, you're innit to winnit and over a $Grand thrown to the wind. But you know and I know that your trek is going to be epic. And you had better post your updates to trailjournals.com so I can follow you. Thank you Greenlight.

PennyPincher
11-01-2016, 10:17
After reading the rest of the comments I have to say, there are a lot worse ways to spend your money, especially if hiking is going to be a lifelong endeavor. Some people buy coffee out every day, we hardly ever do and when we do it's usually just a normal coffee. None of that latte, mocha, soy milk, etc. So for me a $2 coffee once in a while is no big deal while others are spending $3.50 or more per day on coffee out. $3.50/day for 6 months is $637! on crappy coffee usually! And don't even get me started on the cost of "fast food" or restaurant meals or even those "convenience foods" most people eat. Your $1,100 on hiking gear or my husband's $1400 bike (which in reality isn't even on the high end for bikes) seems very much like a deal to me.