PDA

View Full Version : Dehydrating recipes



Dogwood
11-10-2016, 17:37
Has anyone made any of these for backpacking trips?

coconut macaroons, watermelon jerky, dried persimmons, dried(candied) ginger, beet chips, or kale chips

I have access to substantial quantities of all these - coconut, watermelon, persimmons, fresh ginger, red beets, Lacinato kale, and fresh turmeric.

Share recipes and address shelf lives.

rocketsocks
11-10-2016, 18:57
I've done kale, just salt. My dog likes em, and they're a low caloric snack.

Wise Old Owl
11-10-2016, 21:43
Sorry Dogwood most of those items do not cost much its all about timing and heat when it comes to drying. So just like me you will need to set up a variable heating dry and timer... most likely less than 4 hours if the pieces are thin or small. One or two of the items you mentioned do not weigh anything and do not require drying. (Macaroons)

RockDoc
11-10-2016, 22:32
On our last trip (PCT, 90 miles) we made up our own soup mixes for dinner (disliked the ingredient lists on retail soup mixes).
Dried zucchini, tomatos, spinach, okra, and a few other veggies. Then just made beef bullion and added the veggies. It was great! No recipes really, just put them in the dehydrator. Fast and easy.
Sorry did not dry the things you mentioned, but they should be good too.

Dennis.OnthegO
11-11-2016, 09:40
A few months ago, I dried some watermelon "jerky" while they were in season. Two of the large round seedless melons ended up at around 24 oz. It takes forever. Well, maybe not forever, but we are talking close to 24 hours. The result, however, is sweet watermelon candy!

Just Bill
11-11-2016, 13:29
Man... I thought dried watermelon tasted like tomato when done.
Granted that was just store bought melon and maybe a nice fresh extra sweet one would be better. If I were to do it again... I'd make a leather out of it, not slice and dry it.

Coconut is cheaper dried than real for me in the Midwest. ;)

Kale- as said- kale chips in the oven are good.

But I also like just drying varied greens to make a "green superfood" style powder/addition for soups or meals. So I combine kale, spinach, parsley, spring greens, whatever into a big bag and then just crush it up a bit (like dried parsley flakes) to add to meals. This works well when you have a garden or other scraps and you keep that thing going and just dry stuff as it comes.

Though guessing a coconut oil, turmeric, and ginger sautéed lightly in a wok to combine then flash cooking the kale in that prior to drying would be good.

Guessing doing the same with some pasta, rice, or other grains then drying that would be good way to use it too.

Just Bill
11-11-2016, 13:33
Ya know... beet/watermelon/kale/coconut might make an interesting leather.

Blend up the whole mess and reduce it a bit on the stove to bring out the sugars and that might be yummy.

rocketsocks
11-11-2016, 14:47
Ya know... beet/watermelon/kale/coconut might make an interesting leather.

Blend up the whole mess and reduce it a bit on the stove to bring out the sugars and that might be yummy.red and green makes brown...hmm.

Venchka
11-11-2016, 17:44
Attempting a batch of butternut squash soup leather as I type.
Y'all are sick. Beets & melons are not in any food group that I can tolerate. [emoji3][emoji2][emoji1][emoji106][emoji41]
I'm going to try a batch of Logan Bread next.
Wayne


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Just Bill
11-11-2016, 18:33
red and green makes brown...hmm.


That's weird... I just realized no matter what color I put in my body it always makes brown.

rocketsocks
11-11-2016, 18:41
That's weird... I just realized no matter what color I put in my body it always makes brown.
Good point!

rocketsocks
11-11-2016, 18:43
Attempting a batch of butternut squash soup leather as I type.
Y'all are sick. Beets & melons are not in any food group that I can tolerate. [emoji3][emoji2][emoji1][emoji106][emoji41]
I'm going to try a batch of Logan Bread next.
Wayne


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Never heard of it, and had to look it up...that sounds really good.

Venchka
11-11-2016, 19:39
Logan Bread? Lots of recipes everywhere.
I'm going to give this one a try:
http://howtowilderness.com/food/logan-bread/
Wayne


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Dogwood
11-11-2016, 20:05
keep the ideas flowing. THX to all. I especially liked the dried squash soup leather, "green superfoods", and Logan bread suggestions. I hope Vegan Hiker and Tipi chime in.

I got sticker shock computing the cost per oz of packaged dried kale chips. They are awesome with EVOO and rosemary though dried in a conventional oven.

I also got sticker shock with higher quality coconut macaroons.

The dried TJ's broccoli was pretty tasty with its palm oil fat content? and the dried okra pods bought a Sprouts Snorkel brought to my attention.

rocketsocks
11-11-2016, 21:41
Logan Bread? Lots of recipes everywhere.
I'm going to give this one a try:
http://howtowilderness.com/food/logan-bread/
Wayne


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalkthanks, gonna have to try this one.

scrabbler
11-11-2016, 23:38
That should be a new quote in the next book, Biil! :-)

Venchka
11-12-2016, 11:52
Their is a brownie recipe on boxes of All Bran Buds. I took a batch with me on my 2 week trip through New Mexico and Colorado in September. The last brownie, at the end of the trip, tasted just as good as the first.
Wayne


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Venchka
11-12-2016, 12:18
Logan Bread? Lots of recipes everywhere.
I'm going to give this one a try:
http://howtowilderness.com/food/logan-bread/
Wayne


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


thanks, gonna have to try this one.
This is embarrassingand disconcerting. I found this recipe yesterday and now the link doesn't work. AND, I didn't print the recipe.
Safari and Chrome are telling me the the howtowilderness.com server doesn't exist.
Any clues? Help!
The recipe had cranberries and chocolate chips. Two ingredients ai didn't see in other recipes.
The internet can be a terrible place.
Wayne

Venchka
11-12-2016, 12:24
...and now it works. And printed.
Wayne

rocketsocks
11-12-2016, 12:31
This is embarrassingand disconcerting. I found this recipe yesterday and now the link doesn't work. AND, I didn't print the recipe.
Safari and Chrome are telling me the the howtowilderness.com server doesn't exist.
Any clues? Help!
The recipe had cranberries and chocolate chips. Two ingredients ai didn't see in other recipes.
The internet can be a terrible place.
Wayne
Well it's your lucky day...I book mares it!

http://howtowilderness.com/food/logan-bread/

Tipi Walter
11-12-2016, 12:39
keep the ideas flowing. THX to all. I especially liked the dried squash soup leather, "green superfoods", and Logan bread suggestions. I hope Vegan Hiker and Tipi chime in.


I dry all my backpacking foods at home and have done the butternut squash soup leather thing for years. Here's my current procedure---

**Cook up a big pot of organic brown rice.
** Once cooked put into blender.
** Add butternut squash soup into blender with rice such as---

https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/shopping?q=tbn:ANd9GcQKd5xdPuYQr-s-VHLN4DIvq9dsIu64NQmHIkBwCdE74R6LtJwzaUtqApUuVacUAM OPn8nghsn1&usqp=CAE

** Blend thoroughly using added water to allow blender to work well.
** Pour mix onto silicone dryer sheets and home dry and later ziplock.

By blending up the cooked rice you can rehydrate in the field quickly with no cooking and only bringing water to a boil to add to the mix and putting in pot cozy for 30 minutes.

You can do this blended brown rice trick with soups, tomato soups, vegetarian chilis like Amy's canned stuff, broccoli soups, etc.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Backpack-2014-Trips-152/24-Days-in-the-Cold/i-6SGC3K6/0/XL/TRIP%20152%20005-XL.jpg
Here is some dried sweet potato soup ready for the ziplock. Break it up and place it in your cook pot with water and bring to a boil and place in pot cozy for 30 minutes. Voila, you got soup.

rocketsocks
11-12-2016, 12:56
I dry all my backpacking foods at home and have done the butternut squash soup leather thing for years. Here's my current procedure---

**Cook up a big pot of organic brown rice.
** Once cooked put into blender.
** Add butternut squash soup into blender with rice such as---

https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/shopping?q=tbn:ANd9GcQKd5xdPuYQr-s-VHLN4DIvq9dsIu64NQmHIkBwCdE74R6LtJwzaUtqApUuVacUAM OPn8nghsn1&usqp=CAE

** Blend thoroughly using added water to allow blender to work well.
** Pour mix onto silicone dryer sheets and home dry and later ziplock.

By blending up the cooked rice you can rehydrate in the field quickly with no cooking and only bringing water to a boil to add to the mix and putting in pot cozy for 30 minutes.

You can do this blended brown rice trick with soups, tomato soups, vegetarian chilis like Amy's canned stuff, broccoli soups, etc.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Backpack-2014-Trips-152/24-Days-in-the-Cold/i-6SGC3K6/0/XL/TRIP%20152%20005-XL.jpg
Here is some dried sweet potato soup ready for the ziplock. Break it up and place it in your cook pot with water and bring to a boil and place in pot cozy for 30 minutes. Voila, you got soup.Walter am I understanding this right right that the rice/soup leather then rehydrates back into a soup...Brilliant!

Tipi Walter
11-12-2016, 13:21
Walter am I understanding this right right that the rice/soup leather then rehydrates back into a soup...Brilliant!

Exactly. Liquid soups are a no-brainer and rehydrate perfectly. The only purpose of running some things thru a blender is to liquefy the ingredients allowing for much better rehydrating in the field. My current fave is to take Amy's veggie chili in a can and mix with brown rice in the blender and pour onto drying sheets.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Backpack-2016-Trips-171/17-Days-in-the-Snow/i-5sC5hLB/0/XL/TRIP%20172%20004-XL.jpg
Or you can just dry the chili up by itself. Cooked brown rice dries up to hard kernels but blending allows for much easier rehydrating on a trip. I put a can of chili in the blender with brown rice and as mentioned blend the whole wad and then dry.


https://photos.smugmug.com/Backpack-2016-Trips-171/17-Days-in-the-Snow/i-WVHxhpq/0/XL/TRIP%20172%20008-XL.jpg
You can also bake butternut squash with olive oil in the oven and mash onto drying trays and put in ziplocks to later add to soups. Works great.

Venchka
11-12-2016, 13:23
Follow up questions:
Dehydrating time and temperature?
Proportions of rice to packaged soup?
Would there be any advantage to running the dried leather through the blender to enhance rehydration?
Thanks for all of your help!
Wayne


I dry all my backpacking foods at home and have done the butternut squash soup leather thing for years. Here's my current procedure---

**Cook up a big pot of organic brown rice.
** Once cooked put into blender.
** Add butternut squash soup into blender with rice such as---

https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/shopping?q=tbn:ANd9GcQKd5xdPuYQr-s-VHLN4DIvq9dsIu64NQmHIkBwCdE74R6LtJwzaUtqApUuVacUAM OPn8nghsn1&usqp=CAE

** Blend thoroughly using added water to allow blender to work well.
** Pour mix onto silicone dryer sheets and home dry and later ziplock.

By blending up the cooked rice you can rehydrate in the field quickly with no cooking and only bringing water to a boil to add to the mix and putting in pot cozy for 30 minutes.

You can do this blended brown rice trick with soups, tomato soups, vegetarian chilis like Amy's canned stuff, broccoli soups, etc.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Backpack-2014-Trips-152/24-Days-in-the-Cold/i-6SGC3K6/0/XL/TRIP%20152%20005-XL.jpg
Here is some dried sweet potato soup ready for the ziplock. Break it up and place it in your cook pot with water and bring to a boil and place in pot cozy for 30 minutes. Voila, you got soup.

Tipi Walter
11-12-2016, 13:35
Follow up questions:
Dehydrating time and temperature?
Proportions of rice to packaged soup?
Would there be any advantage to running the dried leather through the blender to enhance rehydration?
Thanks for all of your help!
Wayne

For healthier food I believe the secret in dehydrating is to keep the temps between 105 and 115F. Of course, this lengthens drying time but protects the food enzymes . . . possibly. (Esp true for fresh stuff like tomatoes and mushrooms and veggies). Time is based on when it's dry. (The eyeball and finger check).

Proportions of rice is based on the container size of your blender. I like to get a lot of rice into the blender, maybe half full, and then add the soup and then the water. When everything is right the mix should come all the way up to the top lid of the blender as you keep adding water to allow the blades to work. If it's too thick you can pour off some and keep adding water until it blends easily and thoroughly. It dries faster if the mix is wetter and not too thick.

No advantage to chopping up the dried leather---just fold and ziploc as is and break up into pot and boil on your trip.

Venchka
11-12-2016, 13:49
Thanks Walter! Experimentation begins.
Wayne

Dogwood
11-12-2016, 18:01
Thx Tipi. I'm on the same page with everything you said. Great ideas . I really like the grated squash dried and broken into chips and the rice mixed in the blender with the other soup ingredients for the reasons you said.

Secondmouse
11-12-2016, 18:57
I've done kale, just salt. My dog likes em, and they're a low caloric snack.

lol, my dog like em. LOL...

rocketsocks
11-12-2016, 19:41
lol, my dog like em. LOL...kinda funny watching em crunch. :D

saltysack
11-12-2016, 22:02
That's weird... I just realized no matter what color I put in my body it always makes brown.

Except yellow......corn[emoji51][emoji51][emoji51]


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

theinfamousj
11-16-2016, 15:57
What does the brown rice do to make the soup rehydrate? And would a potato or white rice do the same?

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

Tipi Walter
11-16-2016, 16:18
What does the brown rice do to make the soup rehydrate? And would a potato or white rice do the same?

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

Brown rice itself does nothing to "make soup rehydrate"---it's just a tasty ingredient which is generally difficult to prepare on a backpacking trip. Most store-bought dehydrated brown rice is trash and inedible in my opinion. And of course cooking up raw brown rice in the field takes too long. Dehydrating brown rice turns it into hard kernels which don't reconstitute well in the field. SO I blend it up with other foods to produce a sort of rice gruel which mixes well with soups and beans and chilis etc.

Plus, brown rice mixed with beans offers interesting protein potentials. I prepare my home-cooked brown rice with plenty of olive oil and salt---and once cooked blend it in with other foods ETC.

Regarding potatoes, here's a batch of oven baked sweet potatoes on a drying tray. Once dried it mixes well with soups etc and doesn't really need to be blended up.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Backpack-2016-Trips-171/17-Days-with-the-Cranberries/i-7zjNVHG/0/XL/TRIP%20173%20008-XL.jpg

For those whole eat dairy you can make a great cream of wheat type meal blending up cooked brown rice with whole milk (and some honey if needed) and place on trays to dry---

https://photos.smugmug.com/Backpack-2014-Trips-152/21-Days-in-the-Snow/i-2xJnVG9/0/XL/TRIP%20153%20051-XL.jpg
Some brown rice/milk mix ready to dry.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Backpacking2013-1/Green-Cove-Cabin/i-Lj6Nhg9/0/XL/TRIP%20147%20050-XL.jpg
Here is the result in the field (this batch was brown rice with milk and honey and peanut butter all blended together to form a hot morning cereal.

Greenmountainguy
11-30-2016, 20:35
The best place I have found for dehydrating recipes is:
http://www.backpackingchef.com/dehydrating-food.html

Venchka
11-30-2016, 22:07
The best place I have found for dehydrating recipes is:
http://www.backpackingchef.com/dehydrating-food.html

That might be true but a person could starve to death wading though all of those links.
Wayne


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

jjozgrunt
11-30-2016, 23:19
Here's some info that I put together for some people I walk with who were just getting into doing their own meals.

Dehydrating
1. Mince must be lean and preferably cooked first and the oil drained off. Oil can make the meal go rancid. Take oil in sachets or small bottle and add when meal is re-hydrating. 1 gram olive oil = 9 calories. I usually add 10 – 15 grams per meal.
2. Vegetables cut small or shredded with a grater. The smaller the pieces the better the rehydration.
3. One tray should have your control meal to get the weight/qty of the meal right. Serve up 1 normal size meal, I add 30% to account for extra hunger, and place on a tray by itself. If you are doing meals for 2 double it. When dried, weight this meal and then make all the rest the same weight.
4. Use Freeze dried rice. Add the rice to the dried meal, don’t cook it.
5. I use risoni pasta, seed sized pasta, for those meals requiring pasta. It dries and rehydrates very quickly. I cook them and add them to the meal to get the weight right, before drying.
6. Use dried spices and spice mixes as bottle mixes, especially curries, contain a lot of oil.
7. If you want to use cream, use powdered coconut cream.
8. Don’t have overly spicy meals.
9. Add salt and pepper to taste in the meal.
Pasta
1. Cook the mince, drain the oil and set aside.
2. Grate onions, zucchini and carrot and add to a non-stick pan. Cook until onion translucent.
3. Add mince with tomato paste, can/s tomatoes, spices, salt, pepper and cup of beef stock. Cook and simmer to reduce liquid.
4. Add can/s of brown lentils a couple of minutes before serving.
5. Cook risoni pasta.
6. Add pasta and sauce together, mix, and divide into portions for drying.
7. To rehydrate, just cover the contents of the bag with boiled water and set aside for 6-10 minutes. You can also add it to boiling water in a pot and simmer.
All in the pot (AIP)
1.Use the same veggies as with pasta and you can also add diced capsicum, beans etc.
2.Cook the mince, drain the oil and set aside.
3.Grate onions, zucchini, carrot and any other veggies and add to a non-stick pan. Cook until onion translucent. Don’t add beans here, add them with lentils or at the end.
4.Add mince, can/s tomatoes, spices, salt, pepper and cup of beef/chicken stock. Cook and simmer to reduce liquid.
5.Add lentils, beans at the last and simmer.

I add a packet of commercial dried spice mix, such as a hot pot.
I add, in a separate packet, deb potato or similar to have with it.


Curry
1. Made with mince, chicken, lamb, or beef. You can also make with just veggies but you need beans and/or lentils for protein.
2. Cook the mince, drain the oil and set aside.
3. Grate or finely dice veggies such as onions, zucchini, carrot, capsicum etc add to a non-stick pan. Cook until onion translucent.
4. Add mince, can/s tomatoes, Curry spices, salt, pepper, cup/s of beef/chicken stock and powdered coconut cream. Cook and simmer to reduce liquid.
5. You can add lentils, beans at the last and simmer.
Dehydrate this first and then add freeze dried rice.
Don’t use bottled/wet packet spice mixes as they have too much oil and the meal can go rancid.

Noodle magic

This good for adding to noodles to give it some flavour and taste.

1. Cook up some veggies, your choice, in a non stick pan. little to no oil.
2. Add spices ect
3. Dehydrate and then if you wish add some freeze dried meat, and package. You don't need a lot, I usually do about 50 grams packages.
4. Add to noodles, boiling water and a you have a better tasting meal.

You can get freeze dried meat from the USA, I get mine from Packit Gourmet and add it to your dehydrated meal before packaging (they have chicken, beef cubes, sausage). If you're using commercial packets of rice or pasta then just add the meat when rehydrating for protein.

D.D.Bear
11-30-2016, 23:41
https://photos.smugmug.com/Backpacking2013-1/Green-Cove-Cabin/i-Lj6Nhg9/0/XL/TRIP%20147%20050-XL.jpg
Here is the result in the field (this batch was brown rice with milk and honey and peanut butter all blended together to form a hot morning cereal.


I have GOT to try this. Thanks, Tipi!

rocketsocks
12-01-2016, 01:16
Brown rice itself does nothing to "make soup rehydrate"---it's just a tasty ingredient which is generally difficult to prepare on a backpacking trip. Most store-bought dehydrated brown rice is trash and inedible in my opinion. And of course cooking up raw brown rice in the field takes too long. Dehydrating brown rice turns it into hard kernels which don't reconstitute well in the field. SO I blend it up with other foods to produce a sort of rice gruel which mixes well with soups and beans and chilis etc.

Plus, brown rice mixed with beans offers interesting protein potentials. I prepare my home-cooked brown rice with plenty of olive oil and salt---and once cooked blend it in with other foods ETC.

Regarding potatoes, here's a batch of oven baked sweet potatoes on a drying tray. Once dried it mixes well with soups etc and doesn't really need to be blended up.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Backpack-2016-Trips-171/17-Days-with-the-Cranberries/i-7zjNVHG/0/XL/TRIP%20173%20008-XL.jpg

For those whole eat dairy you can make a great cream of wheat type meal blending up cooked brown rice with whole milk (and some honey if needed) and place on trays to dry---

https://photos.smugmug.com/Backpack-2014-Trips-152/21-Days-in-the-Snow/i-2xJnVG9/0/XL/TRIP%20153%20051-XL.jpg
Some brown rice/milk mix ready to dry.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Backpacking2013-1/Green-Cove-Cabin/i-Lj6Nhg9/0/XL/TRIP%20147%20050-XL.jpg
Here is the result in the field (this batch was brown rice with milk and honey and peanut butter all blended together to form a hot morning cereal.thats some outta box dehydrating there, nice!