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Mother Natures Son
11-11-2016, 16:11
What is the steepest grade that you ever walked up? I've walked up a side trail on the Horseshoe. (Near Gov. Dick, by the old Radar tower site.) It had to be over 20%, near the top! OUCH!

Ashepabst
11-11-2016, 19:13
there's a AT section in the Smokies, on the East side of Brier Knob, that's 22%.

Suzzz
11-11-2016, 20:33
I have no idea what the grade was but going up Katahdin is the steepest I have ever attempted to climb. Not fun, yet such a feeling of accomplishment in the end.

Lone Wolf
11-11-2016, 20:48
i thought the last pitch to the top of everest was kinda tough

rocketsocks
11-11-2016, 21:38
i thought the last pitch to the top of everest was kinda tough
No way! Imabedamn is much tougher.

Another Kevin
11-11-2016, 23:02
Hmm, over how long a distance? Some of the fall line trails in the Catskills ascend 600 feet in a quarter-mile (maybe even 1200 feet in a half-mile), about a 50% grade for that short distance. The fall line trails in the Adirondacks, northern Vermont, the Whites and the Mahoosucs have similar grades over the quarter mile. That's pretty much a limit for a hiking trail, since much steeper than that and the route is likely to have at least one pitch that requires technical climbing. Some of the ones that I can think of that are that steep are indeed technical ice climbs in winter.

10-K
11-12-2016, 09:22
There are some places on the CDT in Montana where the trail is so steep it seems unreal that anyone could be expected to get up it. I'm not easily intimidated by inclines but there were a few times I wondered if I was going to be able to get up some sections.

MuddyWaters
11-12-2016, 09:28
You know its steep when you walk on your toes. Heels dont touch.

Slo-go'en
11-12-2016, 11:39
There are some places on the CDT in Montana where the trail is so steep it seems unreal that anyone could be expected to get up it. I'm not easily intimidated by inclines but there were a few times I wondered if I was going to be able to get up some sections.

It's coming down trails like that which scares me.

rafe
11-12-2016, 13:15
Plenty of short AT sections in the White Mountains and in Maine that must exceed 20%, maybe even 40% (like I say, short sections.)

A few that impressed me at the time -- Beaver Brook trail, the climb up South Kinsman, Wildcat, the descent off North Carter, South Arm. And of course Hunt Trail, up Katahdin.

Some of the real kickers are off the AT. (Like Knife Edge at Baxter State Park.)

MtDoraDave
11-12-2016, 13:24
The one that stands out to me was my very first day on the AT, I started at the NOC (nobo) and camped on top of Cheoah bald 8 miles later... well, the last half mile or so before getting to the top of Cheoah bald was crazy steep with a full pack!

The short bit on the way up to Albert Mountain fire tower was steeper - had to use hands AND feet to get up those rocks.

Tipi Walter
11-12-2016, 13:27
A 20% grade is just a normal trail around here.

http://www.42fordgpw.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/grade-1.jpg

I know of several trails in my area that are 45% or actually worse---handholds up vertically onto rocks and tree roots (the Upper Slickrock #42 Nutbuster trail comes to mind in NC).

Here are some bad ones---
**Panther Creek near the top (a trail veering off Tellico River in the Cherokee NF).
**Hangover Lead North Trail between Big Fat Gap and Yellowhammer Gap in NC.

StubbleJumper
11-12-2016, 14:41
A 20% grade is just a normal trail around here.


I know of several trails in my area that are 45% or actually worse---handholds up vertically onto rocks and tree roots (the Upper Slickrock #42 Nutbuster trail comes to mind in NC).

Here are some bad ones---
**Panther Creek near the top (a trail veering off Tellico River in the Cherokee NF).
**Hangover Lead North Trail between Big Fat Gap and Yellowhammer Gap in NC.



Walter,

You are bang-on. A trail which *doesn't* have at least a short section of 20% grade is probably a paved road in town.:rolleyes:

A better question for this thread would be, "Over the course of a mile or longer, what is the steepest grade you have ever hiked?"

For short distances of 0.25 or 0.5 miles, I'd say the Adirondacks have some of the steepest sections that I've hiked (eg, climbing the slide up to Gothics Mountain). Or the last 0.25 miles climbing up Camel's Hump in Vermont is pretty steep too. But over a full mile or more? A 30% grade over a mile is pretty ridiculous. I've hiked some stretches in the Pyrenees that would be roughly that, but I don't recall too many.

renais
11-12-2016, 15:45
I believe this data is from Guthook on another Whiteblaze thread:
Steepest 0.5 mile stretches:
Section 1 from 1865.5 to 1866.0 with 1017 change --Pinkham Notch to Wildcat E (2000' in 1.5m)
Section 2 from 1794.3 to 1794.8 with 934 change -- Asquam Ridge Trail toKinsman Notch (2180' in 1.7m)
Section 3 from 1824.2 to 1824.7 with 896 change -- Galehead to South Twin(1130' in 0.8m)
Section 4 from 1821.2 to 1821.7 with 875 change -- Northbound from Mt Garfield(970' in 0.6m)
Section 5 from 2182.1 to 2182.6 with 860 change -- O Joy Brook to The Gateway(2120' in 1.4m)
Section 6 from 1908.2 to 1908.7 with 850 change -- Mahoosuc Arm (1600' in 1.4m)
Section 7 from 1869.9 to 1870.4 with 846 change -- Carter Notch to Carter Dome(1530' in 1.1m)
Section 8 from 1934.5 to 1935.0 with 812 change -- South Arm Rd to Old Blue(2180' in 2.6m)
Section 9 from 1790.4 to 1790.9 with 801 change -- South Peak Moosilauke(total, 2920' in 3.0m)
Section 10 from 1932.2 to 1932.7 with 799 change -- Sawyer Notch to Moody Mtn(1300' in 1.3m)

Steepest 1 mile stretches:
1 - 1794.1 to 1795.1, 1760': Asquam Ridge Trail to Kinsman Notch (2180' in 1.7m)
2 - 2181.6 to 2182.6, 1640': O Joy Brook to The Gateway (2120' in 1.4m)
3 - 1858.6 to 1859.6, 1640': Mt Madison to Osgood Tentsite (2850' in 2.3m)
4 - 1865.6 to 1866.6, 1500': Pinkham Notch to Wildcat E (2000' in 1.5m)
5 - 1869.9 to 1870.9, 1430': Carter Notch to Carter Dome (1530' in 1.1m)**
6 - 1813.4 to 1814.4, 1420': Liberty Brook to Franconia Ridge Trail (2180' in 1.8m)
7 - 1880.1 to 1881.1, 1360': Just north of Mt Moriah to First Crossing of Rattle River (1600' in 1.3m)
8 - 1930.8 to 1931.8, 1340': Hall Mtn Lean-to to Sawyer Notch (1530' in 1.3m)
9 - 1823.8 to 1824.8, 1330': Galehead Hut to South Twin Mtn (1130' in 0.8m)
10 - 1907.8 to 1908.8, 1330': Mahoosuc Notch to Mahoosuc Arm (1600' in 1.4m)

Puddlefish
11-12-2016, 17:51
The more important question for me, is at what grade do I start noticing it. I can hike all day on a 20% grade, but somewhere around 30% I lose the rhythm. It obviously depends on what kind of shape I'm in, and even my frame of mind at the moment.

The steepest climbs I've been on aren't always the ones I've struggled on. I had a blast climbing up Mt Albert, but struggled coming up from Fontana dam.

AfterParty
11-12-2016, 19:48
I went straight up some mountain around Colorado springs one day it was very steep. Standing up you could reach out and touch the ground a lot. I wouldn't recommend it though trail would have been faster some places were almost technical climbing.

jgillam
11-12-2016, 19:54
It's been over a decade now but, I remember coming up the Bright Angel Trail in the Grand Canyon there was a section called the "devils corkscrew".......that was steep.

HeartFire
11-12-2016, 20:01
Hope Pass is up to a 21% grade - at an altitude of 12,000+feet! not only is it steep, but there's no oxygen. I've done it twice.

capehiker
11-12-2016, 22:28
The out of Port Clinton is pretty steep.

StubbleJumper
11-13-2016, 01:08
Hope Pass is up to a 21% grade - at an altitude of 12,000+feet! not only is it steep, but there's no oxygen. I've done it twice.


Hope Pass is a very stiff but beautiful climb. I was huffing and puffing for the final 1,000 feet of gain. I've only done it once, heading up from Twin, but when I got to the top, I realized that going down the west side seemed even steeper than the east side that I had just climbed!

Leo L.
11-13-2016, 05:28
The GPS track of my biggest trip this summer indicates a max. grade of 78%. Its pretty common here in the Alps that many summits and some traverses include some scramble, usually with fixed ropes, some pegs and other ironwork.
The number 78% doesn't tell the full truth, though. There was one point when the path led through a short tunnel just to open up in the middle of a sheer vertical face, giving way to a vertical drop of ~50 meters that is to be done by a system of ladders and other ironwork down to the glacier. In the last few years the glacier has retreated so much further that the stirrups were not enough and one has to grab this climbing rope on the right and slide down the remaining few meters. Though being a rock climber myself, I was a bit scared, due to the heavy pack and no belay set.

Engine
11-13-2016, 07:18
The GPS track of my biggest trip this summer indicates a max. grade of 78%. Its pretty common here in the Alps that many summits and some traverses include some scramble, usually with fixed ropes, some pegs and other ironwork.
The number 78% doesn't tell the full truth, though. There was one point when the path led through a short tunnel just to open up in the middle of a sheer vertical face, giving way to a vertical drop of ~50 meters that is to be done by a system of ladders and other ironwork down to the glacier. In the last few years the glacier has retreated so much further that the stirrups were not enough and one has to grab this climbing rope on the right and slide down the remaining few meters. Though being a rock climber myself, I was a bit scared, due to the heavy pack and no belay set.

I really enjoy working pitches on steep rock, but NOT when I'm backpacking...that would be less than enjoyable. :-)

StubbleJumper
11-13-2016, 08:57
The GPS track of my biggest trip this summer indicates a max. grade of 78%. Its pretty common here in the Alps that many summits and some traverses include some scramble, usually with fixed ropes, some pegs and other ironwork.
The number 78% doesn't tell the full truth, though. There was one point when the path led through a short tunnel just to open up in the middle of a sheer vertical face, giving way to a vertical drop of ~50 meters that is to be done by a system of ladders and other ironwork down to the glacier. In the last few years the glacier has retreated so much further that the stirrups were not enough and one has to grab this climbing rope on the right and slide down the remaining few meters. Though being a rock climber myself, I was a bit scared, due to the heavy pack and no belay set.


At a certain point, it's no longer hiking but rather rock climbing. If you need special gear, such as ropes for an escalade or a harness for a via ferrata, I'd say you're no longer hiking. But, I guess the same argument could be made that a hike which requires crampons or a piolet might be better described as mountaineering rather than hiking.

Leo L.
11-13-2016, 09:57
Our small country doesn't offer much of a wilderness, every possible level space is inhabited or cultivated. Mountains are about the only place that come somewhat close to what you would call a wilderness, although many of them are managed for skiing and other tourism business. Well, we have a lot of mountains, and we have a lot of tourism business.

During the whole 9 days trip I was crossing numerous mountaintops, three or four of them I knew would include some scrambling, which usually means some short via ferrate type of path. I was familiar and comfortable with this. Except this one skyscraping stairway in the pic, which I hadn't been prepared for mentally. It took me some minutes to accept the fact that I definitely had to climb down.

Aside this little steep part, the whole trip was as close to hiking in your way of thinking as possible: Being out for as many consecutive days as possible, carrying everything in I need and carrying everything I didn't need out again.

egilbe
11-13-2016, 10:47
At a certain point, it's no longer hiking but rather rock climbing. If you need special gear, such as ropes for an escalade or a harness for a via ferrata, I'd say you're no longer hiking. But, I guess the same argument could be made that a hike which requires crampons or a piolet might be better described as mountaineering rather than hiking.

My experience has been in the Whites where Winter hiking requires crampons and some areas an ice axe to self-arrest. These are areas that in the Summer are loaded with tourists. Still mountaineering? Does the weather and time of year determine if its a hike rather than Alpine mountaineering?

colorado_rob
11-13-2016, 10:59
We do lots of snow couloir (fancy name for gully) climbs/hiking in the spring in Colorado that exceed 45 degrees, which is over 100% grade with no ropes/etc, but of course we have crampons on our feet. Is this hiking? It's as easy as hiking many times, given perfect snow conditions, meaning soft enough to make bucket-footsteps, but stiff enough to not slide. We generally rope up and set protection above 50 degrees or so if that steepness is continuous. Plenty of mountain "climbs" (really just hikes) have continuous slopes above 30 degrees (58%) for well more than a mile.

But ignoring mountain climbing, per se, I'd say the steepest slopes I've ever hiked are along the Long trail in VT, and the Whites in NH. The steepest single mile I can recall is going southbound along the AT approaching the base of Mt. Madison. I betcha that grade is over 50% for a mile (meaning 2600 vertical in a mile horizontal), but us humans tend to exaggerate slope steepness in our brains....

hobby
11-13-2016, 11:07
Aasgard Pass in the Cascades 2000 ft climb in 3/4 mile top is @7800'
I won't do it again!

Another Kevin
11-13-2016, 14:49
My experience has been in the Whites where Winter hiking requires crampons and some areas an ice axe to self-arrest. These are areas that in the Summer are loaded with tourists. Still mountaineering? Does the weather and time of year determine if its a hike rather than Alpine mountaineering?

Yes. In a typical year, the Northeast 4000 footers are hikable May-October, and require winter mountaineering skills for the other half of the year. (You can also be surprised by winter conditions at other times, which is one reason that those peaks are all deadly.) I tend to think that if you require a belay, or piolet and crampons, that the activity has gone beyond 'hiking'. Many insurance companies agree with me, so you should check your policy for an 'extreme sports' exclusion if you go out in such conditions and have dependents.

Dogwood
11-13-2016, 15:04
The steepest walk up without it being a 3 pt climb or being roped in was about 80 degree slopes up snow whites wearing crampons or up pour offs of 70 degrees in places like Utah and Arizona.

StubbleJumper
11-13-2016, 16:21
Yes. In a typical year, the Northeast 4000 footers are hikable May-October, and require winter mountaineering skills for the other half of the year. (You can also be surprised by winter conditions at other times, which is one reason that those peaks are all deadly.) I tend to think that if you require a belay, or piolet and crampons, that the activity has gone beyond 'hiking'. Many insurance companies agree with me, so you should check your policy for an 'extreme sports' exclusion if you go out in such conditions and have dependents.


Good point about the insurance companies. In the past, when I've shopped for emergency medical insurance for foreign hiking trips, it's been a chore to find a policy that doesn't have an exclusion for rock climbing and mountaineering. I don't do rock climbing and I don't really consider myself a mountaineer, but even a little peak bagging which requires the crossing of a glacier using crampons and a piolet would be at odds with many of the travel insurance policies that I've seen as their definition of mountaineering is often simply hiking that requires special equipment. Worse yet, I actually saw one insurance policy which permitted hiking only under a certain altitude (if I recall correctly, it was about 3,000 meters, which is a joke for our friends in Colorado!).

Dogwood
11-13-2016, 16:56
i thought the last pitch to the top of everest was kinda tough

:D:banana;).....

Dogwood
11-13-2016, 16:56
up snow chutes not snow whites

lol

Another Kevin
11-13-2016, 22:04
I don't do rock climbing and I don't really consider myself a mountaineer, but even a little peak bagging which requires the crossing of a glacier using crampons and a piolet would be at odds with many of the travel insurance policies that I've seen as their definition of mountaineering is often simply hiking that requires special equipment.

Traversing a glacier with crampons and ice axe - on the way to bag a peak. Isn't that kind of the definition of mountaineering?

Then again, I'm even less a mountaineer than you are. I simply live Up North and don't like giving up local hiking for half the year, which means that I need at least basic skills with traction gear. Fortunately, none of my insurance policies appear to have any nonsense about mountaineering.

AfterParty
11-13-2016, 22:24
Pikes peak incline 2000 ft in less then a mile. Its pretty steep.

StubbleJumper
11-13-2016, 22:54
Pikes peak incline 2000 ft in less then a mile. Its pretty steep.

When I read your post, I actually didn't believe you. So I Googled it, and it *is* a gain of about 2,000 over about a mile!


http://www.fourteeners.org/ranges/front/pikes/091005/pikes_elev.htm



That's getting close to 40%, sustained over a mile. Insane!

StubbleJumper
11-13-2016, 23:02
Traversing a glacier with crampons and ice axe - on the way to bag a peak. Isn't that kind of the definition of mountaineering?




Yeah, you're right, that probably does qualify as mountaineering. I tend to differentiate in my own mind based on whether it's a very dangerous glacier with a difficult slope and numerous crevasses (in which case, count me out!), or a more sedate glacier without any known crevasses and only a mild slope. In the latter case, it's still a good idea to carry equipment even if it's not 100% necessary (I've seen people bare-boot it with only hiking poles for self-arrest if they commence a glissade...I'm too cautious for that!).

AfterParty
11-14-2016, 00:18
When I read your post, I actually didn't believe you. So I Googled it, and it *is* a gain of about 2,000 over about a mile!


http://www.fourteeners.org/ranges/front/pikes/091005/pikes_elev.htm



That's getting close to 40%, sustained over a mile. Insane!

I did it once full and tried a second time but I was to hung over and bailed about half ways. It is pretty cool..

Dogwood
11-14-2016, 01:19
Mountaineering sometimes is nothing more than hiking or scrambling or non technical traversing. Uhh, hiking up to the summit of MOUNT Whitney even on trail is in a sense non technical mountaineering - climbing a mountain. Mountaineering can be defined as hill walking or mountain walking. Mountaineering doesn't always require being roped in, crossing glaciers and crevasses, carrying O2, needing an ice axe, snow, or be narrowly defined by expedition summiting of Mt Everest.

YoungBloodOnTrail
11-14-2016, 08:00
I remember the wildcats being pretty damn steep

Engine
11-14-2016, 08:21
Last month I climbed 792' in 1 mile...thanks to the treadmill at my Florida gym. ;)

In all seriousness, the worst sustained climb I remember was on the Noland Creek trail, going up from campsite #61 to the Noland Divide trail. It averages a bit over 30%, climbing over 800' in 1/2 mile, with some sections steep enough to use hands on the trail. My kids almost mutinied on that one.

fiddlehead
11-14-2016, 08:33
I've hiked a lot of steep stuff in Borneo (Kinabalu), and Nepal (turning east from TatoPani and there's a 6,000 ascent)
But the steepest trail I've seen was in the Pyrenees.
Lucky for me, it was downhill on our eastbound thru-hike of the HRP.
From my blog that i wrote just after finishing (while these things were fresh in my mind): Two days later, we had the steepest descent I’ve ever done; it was a 1600 meter (5,000 ft) descent in one and a half kilometers (one mile) of trail!!

StubbleJumper
11-14-2016, 20:34
I've hiked a lot of steep stuff in Borneo (Kinabalu), and Nepal (turning east from TatoPani and there's a 6,000 ascent)
But the steepest trail I've seen was in the Pyrenees.
Lucky for me, it was downhill on our eastbound thru-hike of the HRP.
From my blog that i wrote just after finishing (while these things were fresh in my mind): Two days later, we had the steepest descent Iíve ever done; it was a 1600 meter (5,000 ft) descent in one and a half kilometers (one mile) of trail!!


Which section on the HRP was that? I recall some really nasty climbs and descents on the HRP, but I can't think of one off-hand that would be 45 degrees over a mile. In particular, the descent into Oullettes de Gaubes was stupid steep, but not too long. Or the descent off of Col de Mulleres was ridiculous for the first 500 metres, but it was only stupid for the next kilometer. The descent towards Parzan was no party either...

-Rush-
11-14-2016, 21:40
there's a AT section in the Smokies, on the East side of Brier Knob, that's 22%.

I think you're referencing coming out of Starkey Gap SOBO. And yes, that's a tougher section than anything you'll encounter on the PCT.

-Rush-
11-14-2016, 21:42
It's been over a decade now but, I remember coming up the Bright Angel Trail in the Grand Canyon there was a section called the "devils corkscrew".......that was steep.

Coming up Bright Angel is tough.. but at least there's a lot of switchbacks like in the Devil's Corkscrew.

Dogwood
11-15-2016, 02:41
I've hiked a lot of steep stuff in Borneo (Kinabalu), and Nepal (turning east from TatoPani and there's a 6,000 ascent)
But the steepest trail I've seen was in the Pyrenees.
Lucky for me, it was downhill on our eastbound thru-hike of the HRP.
From my blog that i wrote just after finishing (while these things were fresh in my mind): Two days later, we had the steepest descent I’ve ever done; it was a 1600 meter (5,000 ft) descent in one and a half kilometers (one mile) of trail!!

5000 ft elevation decent in a mile(5280 ft) is a 94* grade. That's almost vertical. That's life threatening steep on a descent. That sounds more like a climb. Were you able to descend totally erect on your two ft with only your feet(two pts of contact?)

Dogwood
11-15-2016, 02:43
I've hiked a lot of steep stuff in Borneo (Kinabalu), and Nepal (turning east from TatoPani and there's a 6,000 ascent)
But the steepest trail I've seen was in the Pyrenees.
Lucky for me, it was downhill on our eastbound thru-hike of the HRP.
From my blog that i wrote just after finishing (while these things were fresh in my mind): Two days later, we had the steepest descent I’ve ever done; it was a 1600 meter (5,000 ft) descent in one and a half kilometers (one mile) of trail!!


So it was switchbacked?

Leo L.
11-15-2016, 03:21
5000 ft elevation decent in a mile(5280 ft) is a 94* grade. That's almost vertical. That's life threatening steep on a descent. That sounds more like a climb. Were you able to descend totally erect on your two ft with only your feet(two pts of contact?)
Thats about 100% grade which translates into 45 degrees (while 90 degrees would be vertical).
Still quite steep, but do-able by foot depending on the ground.

Dogwood
11-15-2016, 04:16
Thats about 100% grade which translates into 45 degrees (while 90 degrees would be vertical).
Still quite steep, but do-able by foot depending on the ground.

Too late for me. Glad someone is paying closer attention. Thx for the correction.

Time Zone
11-15-2016, 10:21
how about some love for the Grouse Grind, in Vancouver BC? 31% average grade (58% max). Downhill travel prohibited (you must take an aerial tram down). Wonderfully wooded, too, not exposed rock.

Leo L.
11-15-2016, 11:20
Grouse Grind looks very "nice"!

@Dogwood:
Sorry for sounding picky. Its just difficult for me in non-native language, sometimes.

fiddlehead
11-18-2016, 17:28
So it was switchbacked?

It was the tiny-est and so many switchbacked trail.
It was almost like going down a set of circular stairs (on the inside)
I don't remember exactly where it was.
That's why I took the quote right off of my blog which i wrote not long afterwards.
As it was 17 years ago.

Maybe I'll have some time to study closely some top maps and figure it out as to where exactly.
Sometimes we were on the HRP, sometimes the GR11 and sometimes the GR10 as it rained a lot, but our goal was always the HRP.
(with the Odessa canyon alternate in Spain)

Dogwood
11-18-2016, 17:55
That's massively steep Fiddlehead. THX for the details. Was it a crowded descent or was the descent somehow spread out among people? I would guess someone above could cause havoc to the people directly below.

Dogwood
11-18-2016, 18:01
Grouse Grind looks very "nice"!

@Dogwood:
Sorry for sounding picky. Its just difficult for me in non-native language, sometimes.

I can imagine as I struggle in my non native Spanish communicating effectively landscape directives to Spanish only associates and vice versa. It seems though when time to get paid everyone suddenly knows some significant pay day related English. :) I absolutely love associating with Spanish associates though in my career. Such a different perspective than with some of my U.S. career related counterparts.

fiddlehead
11-18-2016, 18:45
That's massively steep Fiddlehead. THX for the details. Was it a crowded descent or was the descent somehow spread out among people? I would guess someone above could cause havoc to the people directly below.

Crowded?
In 1999, 3 of us from the states thru-hiked the trail.
A French couple also did the whole trail.
That was it!

We'd see a few weekenders from time to time and lots of sheep and shepherders.
But not many hikers.
Was Great!

I'm heading to the Balkans to hike that Via Dinarica trail this coming July.
I heard there was only 5 or 6 thru-hikers doing the whole thing this past year.
My kind of trail.

fiddlehead
11-18-2016, 18:50
By the way, we did do a slideshow of our Pyrenees hike.
Although it was taken from slides so, quality is old-school.
But here it is if anyone is interested: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Ltyc0eWqoo

Dogwood
11-18-2016, 20:59
Yippee pictures old school yellow haze style. Love the opening Canned Heat vibe. Are you the wannabe Michael Bolton or the grinning like a tax cheat one? :p

Sparkeh
11-18-2016, 21:11
Huntington Ravine Trail, Mount Washington New Hampshire. Steeper than anything I have hiked on the AT in New England.

Dogwood
11-18-2016, 21:43
Good one Cspan.

For the adventurous soul:

Reminds of the Haiku Stairs - Stairway to Heaven hike near Honolulu. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZtNNUyXc94 Done. NOW CLOSED!

Walking rather than driving all the way to China's Heaven's Gate Mt - Tianmen Shan in Tianmen Mountains Hunan providence is steep too. https://roadtrippers.com/stories/tianmen-shan It's on the bucket list.

One can also hike up to the summit of 13, 800 ft Mauna Kea ALL THE WAY from sea level. NO TRAIL CONSTRUCTION STEPS at all. Rarely, it's attempted though. Most drive to the summit. Never saw anyone on two entire walk ups from sea level. Done. :p

One can also start at sea level almost entirely on trail and crossing lava fields ascend to the summit of 13, 700 ft Mauna Loa, steep at times, depending on route(there are several!) or from sea level to 10k ft Mt Haleakala via Kaupo Gap. Both sustained uphill backpacking trips(not mountaineering or climbing trips or with trail constructed steps). Done :p

Dogwood
11-18-2016, 22:00
Fiddlehead, such a more interesting riskier trip than the tame comfortable walk that is the Camino de Santiago. Your route beats the most taken Camino de Santiago route by a long shot.

fiddlehead
11-18-2016, 23:22
Yippee pictures old school yellow haze style. Love the opening Canned Heat vibe. Are you the wannabe Michael Bolton or the grinning like a tax cheat one? :p

Ha ha.
THere are 3 of us.
I'm the one with guitar.
Glad you enjoyed it.
No comparison at all to the Camino except same part of the world.
Read Francis Tapon's take on the two trails.
http://francistapon.com/Travels/Spain-Trails/10-Reasons-Why-El-Camino-Santiago-Sucks

Dogwood
11-18-2016, 23:54
Yeah, I've read and researched Tapon's hike in Spain. I'm quite familiar with his conclusions about Camino de Santiago and find them appropriate to consider for those wanting a somewhat different experience in the region. FWIW, his conclusions followed up by other accounts kept me from committing to the somewhat commercialized convenient eco tour like pilgrimage of the most oft taken route and length of the Camino de Santiago. Tapon's route and experiences are or your Pyrenees route are more in line with my desires.

Greatly enjoyed your sideshow and appreciated your parties willingness to go outside the box. ^^ thumbs up.

Dogwood
11-18-2016, 23:58
I'm the one with guitar.

Why is that not a surprise FIDDLEHEAD. :D

Ever think about that trip already being 17 yrs ago?