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Just Bill
11-14-2016, 12:51
Well looking for a little help from you stick swinging ninnies :p

It seems I remain one of the few not enamored with trekking poles but find myself in the position of buying a pair so that I can sort out how to adapt a bridge hammock to a trekking pole.

Mainly I just wanted to get an idea of what folks like and are using; so looking to find a solution that works for most folks. Although I know what they look like and what folks generally like... I don't know much about them at all

So... I know they are popular and if you're going to use them you might as well use the hell out of them.
The big drawback to a bridge hammock is the weight of the poles but since many here already have that covered.... seems natural.

And if you don't know nothing about a bridge hammock- doesn't matter much either since I'd be looking to make the bridge work for you, not the other way round.

From the hammock side... SUL folks have done some Gossamer Gear pole adaptations but otherwise they fall back on the trusty (but heavy) mountainsmith monopoles at 10.5 ounces per pair plus the tips.
http://mountainsmith.com/products/trekking-poles/trekker-fx-monopod.html

These already have the right parts and pieces to make a conversion for a bridge hammock pretty easy and Warbonnet sell a tip kit of parts to adapt most camera monopod style poles.
https://www.warbonnetoutdoors.com/product/hiking-pole-tip-set/


And if you are curious... might as well give Brandon credit where credit is due: Here is the Ridgerunner which is one of two commercially available bridge hammocks at this time.
https://www.warbonnetoutdoors.com/product/ridgerunner-hammock/

The only minor thing unique here... I'll be using them (if I do) in the dunes and sandy areas so not sure how that would affect your choice if advice was offered or if folks have had poles fail (like the GG sometimes to) because of grit and sand in the mechanisms. Guessing the snow basket would be a nice choice in the sand as well.

Thanks in advance for any help or advice.

Feral Bill
11-14-2016, 13:40
Mountainsmith monopod.

rocketsocks
11-14-2016, 13:53
Cheapos and a Sasafrass sapling.

Furlough
11-14-2016, 14:13
Leki Cork Lite, with flip lock adjustors. Appreciated by my knees and quite helpful as the pole for my 6 Moon Design Lunar Solo Tarp Tent.

Furlough

Time Zone
11-14-2016, 14:19
I'm using Hikelite poles from LL Bean, made by Komperdell. Aluminum; twist lock; cork handles; no shock absorption. Have saved my bacon many times. No idea what would work well for a bridge hammock though, but if you have to thread your poles through a fabric sleeve, I suspect it would be easier with twist lock rather than flick lock poles, because the mechanism sticks out less. Most people like cam/flick lock better. Mine have been fine though, never collapsed on me.

Gambit McCrae
11-14-2016, 15:06
I've used Komperdell for years now, their customer service keeps me loyal because they always send me replacements when one breaks.

Lyle
11-14-2016, 15:07
Used quite a few from a walking stick picked up in the woods to ski poles, to REI conventional poles. For the past 15 years or so have been 100% sold on Pacer Poles. Unique, quality, comfortable, efficient!

Teacher & Snacktime
11-14-2016, 15:51
Homemade hiking stick from AT debris cleanup by DEM in Berkshires.

Odd Man Out
11-14-2016, 15:52
Other - Fizan Compacts

soumodeler
11-14-2016, 16:37
Leki Corklites are my favorites for the grip angle and cork grip.

Secondmouse
11-14-2016, 16:51
other - very light carbon poles found on Amazon and I have some heavier aluminum, REI Traverse w/ Powerlock.

the REI poles are heavier and more sturdy and I use where it's rockier.

the Carbon ones are light and seem to be strong but I destroyed the mud/leaf baskets and can't find replacements. the original listing on Amazon is gone...

Secondmouse
11-14-2016, 16:53
and btw, the Mountainsmith monopod is 10.5oz EACH, not pair...

Another Kevin
11-14-2016, 17:48
I'm using Hikelite poles from LL Bean, made by Komperdell. Aluminum; twist lock; cork handles; no shock absorption. Have saved my bacon many times. No idea what would work well for a bridge hammock though, but if you have to thread your poles through a fabric sleeve, I suspect it would be easier with twist lock rather than flick lock poles, because the mechanism sticks out less. Most people like cam/flick lock better. Mine have been fine though, never collapsed on me.

REI Traverse poles, which are nearly the same Komperdell pole, but with flick locks rather than twist locks. Cork grips, no shock absorbers. I use baskets year round, Komperdell's largish mud baskets in summer and, of course, snow baskets in winter.

jimmyjam
11-14-2016, 19:04
Black Diamond cork ergo handles

bigcranky
11-14-2016, 19:14
I used REI/Komperdells for years, then my wife got me the big Leki Super Makalu -- I liked the cork grip but hated the shock absorber feature. Tried a couple of other Lekis but the twist locks were an issue. Finally last year got the carbon fiber Black Diamond poles with the flip locks. Great cork grips, the flip locks actually stay locked, and they are both much beefier and the same weight as the lightest "ultralight" Lekis I used to use.

I use them to support our tent as well as my knees.

coach lou
11-14-2016, 19:27
Black Diamond cork ergo handles

Me to me to!!!! They are red....i with they were green!:sun

coach lou
11-14-2016, 19:28
Me to me to!!!! They are red....i with they were green!:sun

Wish........wish they were green!:p

Kaptainkriz
11-14-2016, 19:37
I'm using these and like them.

Leki Cork Lite, with flip lock adjustors. Appreciated by my knees and quite helpful as the pole for my 6 Moon Design Lunar Solo Tarp Tent.

Furlough

Carl7
11-14-2016, 20:49
I used Fizan Compacts this summer. They are very light
. However, they did slip some in the very wet areas of the 100 Mile Wilderness this summer while moving fast. They were fine otherwise. I would gladly take a little slipping for the light weight.

kayak karl
11-14-2016, 21:19
no pacer poles ?

Feral Bill
11-14-2016, 21:26
and btw, the Mountainsmith monopod is 10.5oz EACH, not pair...
That's okay. I only use one. :)

Secondmouse
11-14-2016, 22:56
REI Traverse poles, which are nearly the same Komperdell pole, but with flick locks rather than twist locks. Cork grips, no shock absorbers. I use baskets year round, Komperdell's largish mud baskets in summer and, of course, snow baskets in winter.

Kevin, I believe these are made by Konperdell for REI. I have the same ones. only gripe is I can't change the tips...

Dogwood
11-15-2016, 02:31
Black Diamond Distance Carbon FLZ

Switched recently to Komberdell Carbon Vario 4

One of these items that spend more time in a gear closet than being used. Don't use trekking poles 80-90% of the time. Not pro or anti just know I don't absolutely need trekking poles as part of my backpacking ensemble. Besides I'd rather have my hands free so I can pick my nose and gnosh coconut chips when hiking.

cmoulder
11-15-2016, 10:29
Kevin, I believe these are made by Konperdell for REI. I have the same ones. only gripe is I can't change the tips...

Heat 'em up with a hair dryer. They'll come off.

Secondmouse
11-15-2016, 10:32
Heat 'em up with a hair dryer. They'll come off.

ok thanks, but then what? you can't buy replacements...

Secondmouse
11-15-2016, 10:36
That's okay. I only use one. :)

thanks but I was responding to Just Bill in his thread starter post he says they are 10.5oz/pair.

He's asking, I believe, to figure out how to make his bridge hammock and if I reckon correctly, he'll need two poles...

DuneElliot
11-15-2016, 10:44
Cascade Mountain Tech. While available at Costco and on Amazon for $45 I don't class them as a "cheapo" set. They have served me very well over a couple hundred miles and are nice quality.

Just Bill
11-15-2016, 10:57
thanks but I was responding to Just Bill in his thread starter post he says they are 10.5oz/pair.

He's asking, I believe, to figure out how to make his bridge hammock and if I reckon correctly, he'll need two poles...

Correct to you both... Typo in the first post on that being a pair...
Though for $30 I'll probably grab one of these just because the Hammock crowd loves em and perhaps they can be broken down and used as two poles from one.
A monopod/single staff can be quite handy with one hand free... but a bit of help when you need it.

I could potentially convert the existing poles into something like the Z-packs staff, this has long been a desire of mine as a companion to a mid shelter.
http://www.zpacks.com/accessories/staff.shtml


Guess that's still the hardest thing for me to wrap my head around with poles generally... weight.
On the other hand, much like shoes there is not much point in picking the lightest pair you can find when you are using them all day. Some of us can hike in minimalist shoes... some still prefer a full boot... such is the trekking pole debate it seems.

A set of 36" .625 bridge poles weighs 10oz on their own. So while on paper... doubling your weight (or more) in trekking poles is a hard thing for me to wrap my head around... it isn't any sillier than carrying 10oz of bridge pole when you already have 16-20 oz of trekking poles in your hands.

That said... you break a trekking pole and you are SOL not only with your shelter but with your walking style.
That has always been a bit of a philosophical debate for me with dual use trekking pole/shelter systems overall.
...and there are quite a few forces in a bridge hammock that can stress a pole. (as well as high potential for user error) So this "trick" makes me nervous.

The mountainsmith or camera mount style poles are ideal as they already have factory integrated parts that allow the forces to transfer inline and in full bearing on the tubes.

Just Bill
11-15-2016, 11:00
no pacer poles ?

Still a bit niche... that and while a hair clunky... The master of all things bridge has already solved that problem for those that love their pacer poles.

I'm guessing it could be worked out for the BD ergo grip and similar poles too...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iZDwje-NcdY

cmoulder
11-15-2016, 11:18
ok thanks, but then what? you can't buy replacements...

Komperdell pole tips. (https://www.amazon.com/Komperdell-Vario-Flex-Tungsten-Carbide/dp/B0006OOA2O/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1479223013&sr=8-3&keywords=komperdell+pole+tips) $15

RockDoc
11-15-2016, 11:37
Flawed poll.

It's not a pole, it is a "staff", and it (single) should be made of wood. IMHO and with large historical basis.

cmoulder
11-15-2016, 11:46
A set of 36" .625 bridge poles weighs 10oz on their own. So while on paper... doubling your weight (or more) in trekking poles is a hard thing for me to wrap my head around... it isn't any sillier than carrying 10oz of bridge pole when you already have 16-20 oz of trekking poles in your hands.

I don't know how strong those poles need to be if used exclusively for the bridge hammock, but it might be possible to "roll your own" with a total weight of about 4 oz. It seems to me that the way the forces balance out that the spreader pole is under compression only, such that a massively strong pole is not needed. Carbon fiber tubes on eBay (http://stores.ebay.com/HaoZhong-Carbon-Fiber-Tube). I have MYOG trekking poles that weigh 8.6 oz per pair (2-section with flicklocks) and these tubes are plenty sturdy and are of very high quality.

In fact, I have some scrap left over and can PIF a set of 2-section 13mm poles for testing. Are both poles 36"?

Another Kevin
11-15-2016, 12:18
Kevin, I believe these are made by Konperdell for REI. I have the same ones. only gripe is I can't change the tips...
Yes. They aren't exactly the same Komperdell pole as the LL Bean ones. The chief difference is the locking devices. The REI ones are cam locked.

saltysack
11-15-2016, 12:21
BD alpine carbon cork and BD ergo carbon cork....


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Another Kevin
11-15-2016, 12:23
That said... you break a trekking pole and you are SOL not only with your shelter but with your walking style.

For the walking style, I can make do with a single pole although whichever knee it isn't supporting will start to complain in fairly short order. For my TarpTent, I could improvise with a sapling. I hear your worry about having a bridge hammock depending (literally) on trekking poles - but obviously don't have a good answer for you.

Secondmouse
11-15-2016, 12:28
Komperdell pole tips. (https://www.amazon.com/Komperdell-Vario-Flex-Tungsten-Carbide/dp/B0006OOA2O/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1479223013&sr=8-3&keywords=komperdell+pole+tips) $15

oh excellent! thank you...

cmoulder
11-15-2016, 12:31
oh excellent! thank you...

Oops, sorry I didn't see the (outrageous, really) $6 shipping, but still cheaper than a new set of poles!

Just Bill
11-15-2016, 13:00
I don't know how strong those poles need to be if used exclusively for the bridge hammock, but it might be possible to "roll your own" with a total weight of about 4 oz. It seems to me that the way the forces balance out that the spreader pole is under compression only, such that a massively strong pole is not needed. Carbon fiber tubes on eBay (http://stores.ebay.com/HaoZhong-Carbon-Fiber-Tube). I have MYOG trekking poles that weigh 8.6 oz per pair (2-section with flicklocks) and these tubes are plenty sturdy and are of very high quality.

In fact, I have some scrap left over and can PIF a set of 2-section 13mm poles for testing. Are both poles 36"?

Much appreciated! The carbon fiber poles would probably work- but I wouldn't trust a joint in them in anything much less than 5/8" commercially speaking. Not a CF expert at all but my understanding is anything less than full segments with factory ends and things get tricky... even transferring the compression force with a pole tip can be problematic and I'm not looking to huff epoxy to custom make pole sets anytime soon either ;)

But... the main point in me asking/having this discussion is not so much for me as for my customers...

The bridge in question is a 36" pole bridge I call "Just a Bridge".
It is on par with Grizz's lightest bridges and may even rival them depending on the exact design/fabric choosen. It's a very comfy mass appeal kind of thing in my opinion.
It's not crazy extreme light gear... but at 8-12 ounces for the body of the hammock it is light. The pole set in .625 AL is about 10 oz.
The other thing with a bridge... they are very comfy with a pad too; so the system fits an AT style trip where you may want a pad along.

For somebody like me... I'd probably just carry the poles and accept the minor weight penalty for the comfort level.
I can also "make up" that weight in other places (pad vs UQ) (headnet vs bugnet) (UL tarp) so the "switch" isn't much of a penalty, especially for a casual trip.

But many people like and enjoy their hiking poles so I'm trying to find a way to make the bridge work for the widest range of poles that people already like and use.
So the goal isn't to force you to give up something you already like and use for my piece of gear, but to figure out how my piece of gear can integrate with what you already like and use.

That said... you are kind of "all-in" which is what I don't like. It's one thing for a user to adapt their pole on their own and take the risks knowingly to save some weight. (and understand what's involved to do it)
But the tradeoff is that if your pole breaks (as they often do) then your shelter breaks too. You can get a stick or duct tape a section on your pole and use it just fine to prop up a tarp or a shelter if that happens... but you can't jury rig a bridge hammock without some decent skills or introducing another failure (tearing fabric, abrading suspensions, etc). Finding a stick to prop up a shelter is a 20 minute task of little trouble to get you by until you can get off trail is doable for most people. Masterfully crafting a structural pole with appropriate tips that fit the bridge safely would probably take me an hour as a carpenter... and likely exceed the average user's skillset.

There is a large margin of potential user error too with using jury rigged poles.

Even worse- if you tweak your pole a bit... it will probably be possible to hike with a bent pole but it could be very dangerous indeed to put a slightly bent pole under compression in a bridge hammock when the pole set is right over your head/face or knees. That's the scary thing in my opinion. You can probably hike on a slightly damaged pole for a long time, maybe never even know it, but with out a large safety margin in the pole diameter/strength then any out of axis loading of a pole in a bridge is risky.

The poles can be used for porch mode with a tarp, or even for end poles if you take the tarp to the ground... those are lower risk applications than a bridge. So it's not that your poles are "useless" in camp...

I don't think I will offer anything directly... more want to have the ability to answer the question with some knowledge when it arises. The tricky bit is all the different handles... if you don't have a camera mount then you need some kind of creative webbing or basket to capture them in... There may be a way to make a slightly adjustable or universal (fits most) adapter if I can identify some major brands folks use and if so then I could potentially offer that item.



And if we are talking SUL/XUL stuff...

I have a microbridge that uses 26" poles and weighs about 10-12 ounces all in (tree-to tree including poles) depending on fabric choices.
So that customer base (runners, FKT, SUL) that would be looking for that product tend not to use trekking poles or use the GG poles which can be adapted easily enough (at your own risk).
But anyone using the GG poles understands they may break anytime regardless and accepts that fact IMO.

cmoulder
11-15-2016, 13:40
I think you' be surprised how strong these things can be. Just yesterday I was hiking down some hills in the Berkshires and slipped a few times on the leaves, catching my full weight + pack on one of those 4.3 oz poles with nary a worry.

My poles are a bit heavier than the GG poles because I agree that those are a bit too light, and I also wanted flicklock adjusters. (And to fill out the description I also used GG kork-a-lon grips and BD distance pole tips.)

The tip capture pockets could be made from the same material they use for ice axe pick covers, or that plastic they use for snowshoe decks.

Well my offer stands and they're just for testing, so wear some safety goggles and plop down for a nap. :D

Just Bill
11-15-2016, 13:40
369593696036961

Essentially; The commercial bridges available now put the poles outside the body fabric of the hammock.
My designs use a recessed spreader bar, which means that the poles are inside the body of the fabric and over your head or shins in use.

If a pole failed on a Warbonnet or Jack's R Better bridge then it's unlikely you would be injured. It also makes it easier to say lash a stick onto the ends to substitute your poles as other than interfering with your tarp... they are otherwise out of the way.
https://www.warbonnetoutdoors.com/product/ridgerunner-hammock/
http://www.jacksrbetter.com/shop/bear-mountain-bridge-hammock/

With mine, it would be quite unpleasant if a pole broke or, even worse, you jury rigged a stick and it shattered.

The recessed bar design has many advantages though IMO and you can truly belly sleep in mine too. They also allow you to make a much shallower bridge so you don't feel like you're in a coffin.
The bear mountain bridge is a stout 39 oz, the Warbonnet pretty decent at 31 ounces, and mine is 19 oz (21 with SUL suspension).
To be fair, I don't have netting on my base model as you can get by with a headnet if you want to save weight.

So if your trekking poles could work you'd be well under a pound for a "luxury" hammock.
But I'm trying to avoid too much of the PIA factor involved with using a hammock as well as eliminating most, if not all of the weight penalty if you make the switch.

Sorry for the drift... not trying to turn this into a promo, just to explain why I'm asking and what I'm trying to do overall.
When I started looking at hammocks I tried to figure out how a backpacker could adapt a hammock to their kit. It seems to me that most hammock choices center around adapting your kit to your hammock.
A bridge works with a pad or without, but standard bridges are heavy and very deep. They also need specialized tarps and more space to pitch. You can rig a regular UQ... but an UQ designed for a bridge is much better but adds another specialized piece of gear you have to buy to the system.

I think I solved many of those issues and since so many folks like trekking poles (even if I don't) then a possibility of getting dual use there is a big appeal I would think... though it may be pushing too far or asking too much from the trekking poles which could be used to augment a tarp pitch just as well.

bosborne
11-15-2016, 18:58
Pacer Poles.

Miles 2 Go
11-15-2016, 20:22
My first set were Walmart brand with flip locks. Next set were Black Diamond Z, but now use Easton AL-2.

Dogwood
11-16-2016, 02:56
Correct to you both... Typo in the first post on that being a pair...
Though for $30 I'll probably grab one of these just because the Hammock crowd loves em and perhaps they can be broken down and used as two poles from one.
A monopod/single staff can be quite handy with one hand free... but a bit of help when you need it.

I could potentially convert the existing poles into something like the Z-packs staff, this has long been a desire of mine as a companion to a mid shelter.
http://www.zpacks.com/accessories/staff.shtml


Guess that's still the hardest thing for me to wrap my head around with poles generally... weight.
On the other hand, much like shoes there is not much point in picking the lightest pair you can find when you are using them all day. Some of us can hike in minimalist shoes... some still prefer a full boot... such is the trekking pole debate it seems.

A set of 36" .625 bridge poles weighs 10oz on their own. So while on paper... doubling your weight (or more) in trekking poles is a hard thing for me to wrap my head around... it isn't any sillier than carrying 10oz of bridge pole when you already have 16-20 oz of trekking poles in your hands.

That said... you break a trekking pole and you are SOL not only with your shelter but with your walking style.
That has always been a bit of a philosophical debate for me with dual use trekking pole/shelter systems overall.
...and there are quite a few forces in a bridge hammock that can stress a pole. (as well as high potential for user error) So this "trick" makes me nervous.

The mountainsmith or camera mount style poles are ideal as they already have factory integrated parts that allow the forces to transfer inline and in full bearing on the tubes.

Depending on the wall thickness, compression force, and side force desired I'm almost certain you can beat the 10 oz wt of the .625 OD 6 ft length of carbon fiber poles even with a paired set of 36" each using a collapsible design, which I'm guessing you'd want, with 18" bungeed/shock corded and ferruled segments. I'm wondering if you even need .825 OD material for your application. An intelligent gear wonkish hands on DIYer like you I'd definitely suggest you save some do re mi and make them yourselves. It's an easy project making your own collapsable personally customized set.

https://www.rockwestcomposites.com/round-tubing/round-carbon-fiber-tubing?gclid=CP6Qqt3WrNACFdgWgQod9DcAqg

Might find components here for your diameter tubing: http://tentpoletechnologies.com/?page_id=865

I'd contact both describing your project and ask for suggestions.

rafe
11-16-2016, 08:49
My first pair were Lekis, twist-locks. Lasted 13 years, eventually bent them beyond fixing. Picked up a pair of BDs in 2015. I've already kind of mangled the BDs. Totally my fault. I backed over them while heading home after a hike. D'oh. :(

Christoph
11-16-2016, 17:24
Been using the WallyWorld cheapo's and have had great luck. While they're not the best, they are available everywhere and lasted a long time. The handles seem kind of heavy, They're rubber coated plastic, so the cork would definitely be more comfortable, but overall I'd give them a 9 out of 10. They're cheap enough to try a set without being out a lot of cash.

hikernutcasey
11-16-2016, 17:34
REI Traverse = best value

Just Bill
11-17-2016, 15:01
Thanks for the votes and the responses everyone.

rocketsocks
11-17-2016, 15:20
Thanks for the votes and the responses everyone.
Can we drift now?:D
I seem to remember reading somewhere that carbon fiber doesn't like compression, which I've never really fully understood with regard to say a bending cylinder or rod, the top is under a pulling force while the bottom is under compression...

rocketsocks
11-17-2016, 15:20
Or is it??????

AfterParty
11-17-2016, 18:39
Some rei twist locks from the goodwill. I have no issues with them I have put some effort into making them fail with no luck.

MtDoraDave
11-26-2016, 13:39
The wally world twist locks are being retired. I now have perhaps 500 total miles with trekking poles, and have lost 2 of the steel tips ... I'm not going to keep replacing them with more of the same inferior products when there are wonderfully rated carbon poles (cascade mountain) online for only $45/pair. Those will be my next step.

The wally world tipless poles will be relegated to the pile of equipment for friends/ newbies to use. In Florida, in the sand, steel tips aren't necessary.

psyculman
09-23-2017, 06:52
Thrift store/yard sale ski poles, and as long as possible. The old aluminum ones. For steep winter ice with down slope, they are so much more solid.

DrL
09-23-2017, 08:45
Old poll, new poles!

Helinox Featherlite Passports.

I was totally unaware of Helinox and their poles, but they turned out to be a great set of poles. I bought the collapsible, twist-lock version which weighs just 10 oz for the pair. They collapse down to 21 inches and work great with my TT Protrail. They are very comfy in the hand and provide great support without feeling too bendy.

TTT
09-23-2017, 09:09
Black Diamond with cork grips. Need something to hold my tent up and didn't order tent poles, so...
Never used trekking poles before. If they become superfluous I'll dump them and go in search of tent poles

poolskaterx
09-25-2017, 19:32
My gram counting addiction has led me to now use the GGLT4's and I just LOVE the weight reduction; I do miss the shape of my old Leki CorkLite handles. Leki has GREAT customer service!!!

DownEaster
09-25-2017, 19:41
Yukon Charlie's Trek Lite Series Trekking Poles: 8.5 oz. each pole, cork grips, mix of twist lock (lower) and flick lock (upper) adjustments.

cmoulder
09-26-2017, 08:25
My gram counting addiction has led me to now use the GGLT4's and I just LOVE the weight reduction; I do miss the shape of my old Leki CorkLite handles. Leki has GREAT customer service!!!

Once you use really light poles it's hard to go back. :)

I really like the GG grips and use them on my myog poles.
40386

jgillam
09-26-2017, 19:33
I recently pick up a set of GG LT5's. The grips are very nice and they hardly weigh a thing. I've always wondered how people could hike without straps but, these are so light that I could see how it could be done.

I am hoping that the external locking mechanism is more reliable than the LT 4's.

JoeVogel
11-08-2017, 12:17
I have found these Cascade Mountain Tech 100% Carbon Fiber Trekking Poles (http://amzn.to/2gQ2oMi) very sturdy and light for the price. I am not one for trekking poles either but they are required for my tent setup so I might as well use them.

camper10469
11-08-2017, 16:08
ah, hiking sticks grow on trees!

Scrum
11-08-2017, 17:50
I picked up a pair of the Montem Ultra Strong polls this spring. https://montemlife.com/product/ultra-strong-trekking-poles/ It took a while to get the tension dialed in (tighten when clip is open), but no slippage now. I really like the cork hand grip. Very strong and light (19.2 oz) for the money ($50). The only think I don't like is that the screws rust. When I wrote the company about it, they said I need to take the polls apart and dry them -- does that happen with other brands?

Cookerhiker
12-02-2017, 16:27
Black Diamond but not cork.

Redbird2
12-03-2017, 10:06
Black Diamond*Trail Ergo Cork Trekking Poles. 18 ozs for the pair. To each their own but poles are some of my most important pieces of equipment. Really saves my knees and have given me stability when crossing streams and uneven terrain.

zig-zag man
12-05-2017, 09:20
I like my PacerPoles.

Deacon
12-05-2017, 09:26
Black Diamond*Trail Ergo Cork Trekking Poles. 18 ozs for the pair. To each their own but poles are some of my most important pieces of equipment. Really saves my knees and have given me stability when crossing streams and uneven terrain.

+1. But then again they are the only poles Iíve ever used so I canít really be objective.


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