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SubSquid
01-02-2017, 16:17
I am looking for a light, one person, double walled tent that can fit a 6'3" person with a little extra room since I am normally a restless sleeper. I am not looking for a tarp tent or a hammock. I do hammock camp but I am looking for a tent. I have the REI Half Dome 2+ which is very spacious and heavy for backpacking. The camping I do is mostly in warmer climates, lowest is around 30 degrees Fahrenheit camping in the southeast.
Most of my reading here everyone points toward tarps and I am not convinced on them yet, a friend of mine uses one but still doesn't appeal to me.
Thank you for your suggestions and advice in advance.

SubSquid
01-02-2017, 16:27
I did forget to add freestanding to what I am looking for in a tent

Maineiac64
01-02-2017, 16:32
There was just a post about REI quarter dome 1 and 2, which are on sale right now. I like QD2 for solo for extra room.

G-FOURce
01-02-2017, 16:53
SMD's Skyscape Trekker?

Maybe one of the Big Agnes UL2 tents?

SubSquid
01-02-2017, 17:02
On my list so far is the quarter dome, BA fly creek, and the BA cooper spur. I have also looked at the nemo hornet. Are there any others that I should look at and consider? I am a big proponent of quality, I like to buy something that lasts which is something I should also add to my list.

G-FOURce
01-02-2017, 17:10
My Trail Company makes a UL1 and UL2. They're the old Go Lite tents and they're quite nice. In fact, Big Agnes nabbed them for a brief period and rebranded them as their own Triangle Mountain tents (I know bc I have one). They might be a touch heavier than the Big Agnes Fly Creek series tents but the quality is there and the price is more attractive. However, if you're okay buying used then you can grab a used Big Agnes in good condition for the same or less.

C-shell
01-02-2017, 17:46
My husband and I used a BA copper spur(3) for our thru hike. I loved it so much that I bought the BA copper spur 1 to use when I go alone. I like to keep my pack inside my tent. I am 5'3" and it is a tight fit for me. You might want to consider the 2man. We went to REI and climbed inside the tents they had set up to make our decision.

SubSquid
01-02-2017, 18:00
My husband and I used a BA copper spur(3) for our thru hike. I loved it so much that I bought the BA copper spur 1 to use when I go alone. I like to keep my pack inside my tent. I am 5'3" and it is a tight fit for me. You might want to consider the 2man. We went to REI and climbed inside the tents they had set up to make our decision.

thank you for that, good to know practical size. I don't mind my pack out side, I tend to wrap it on a tree or put it in my vestibule, but like I mentioned I am a restless sleeper at times.

Time Zone
01-02-2017, 18:34
I am looking for a light, one person, double walled tent that can fit a 6'3" person with a little extra room since I am normally a restless sleeper. I am not looking for a tarp tent or a hammock. I do hammock camp but I am looking for a tent. I have the REI Half Dome 2+ which is very spacious and heavy for backpacking. The camping I do is mostly in warmer climates, lowest is around 30 degrees Fahrenheit camping in the southeast.
Most of my reading here everyone points toward tarps and I am not convinced on them yet, a friend of mine uses one but still doesn't appeal to me.
Thank you for your suggestions and advice in advance.

Seems to me you've got a very good tent for what you're seeking, except for the weight. In particular, at your height, the half dome 2+ has a very generous floor length of 96". One doesn't usually see more than 90" except in a tarp-tent style shelter (which, frankly, I would not rule out if you already use hiking poles ... for, what's the difference what kind of poles you set up a tent with? Unless you plan to leave the tent up and hike during the day (one can always buy a separate poles, or use cord).

I think you probably should look for a tent that has about 30 sq ft. A true 1P tent tends to have about 20 sf, but that leaves little margin for the tall and restless. At 30 sf, you have more wiggle room, and it's not really a 2P tent. More like 1.5P, i.e., 1P + gear, or 1 big person + rolling around. The REI QD2 is 28.7 sf, almost 2 lbs lighter ... it's off their website now, so perhaps they've sold out of the old model. New one coming soon.

Another you could consider is the LL Bean Microlight UL 2. It has 90" floor, 30.5 sf, and about 6 oz lighter yet than the QD2. I have the previous model (in heavier fabric - this new "UL" one is 30% lighter than mine). I find 30 sf to be the sweet spot for me. I'm 6'1". As for quality, one does take risks with super UL fabrics, but LL Bean will back it indefinitely. I do not call them on their satisfaction guarantee for wear and tear, but I have had them back things that fell apart before wearing out, and my experience is you can count on them.

I looked up a number of other tents for you at the REI website, but many are less than 90" in floor length. Once you account for sloping walls and the stake-to-stake measurement convention (it's not 90" inside the tent), I think you, at 75" tall, need at least 88" in nominal floor length, and given your restlessness, I'd set the minimum at 90".

Good luck!

G-FOURce
01-02-2017, 19:26
CSpan is right on. Keep in mind that a lot of tent manufacturers measure tent length from stake to stake, not the actual interior floor length. You may want to lay your sleeping bag out and measure its exterior from end to end. That'll help you separate the wheat from the chaff when trying to find a solution.

G-FOURce
01-02-2017, 19:38
CSpan is right on. Keep in mind that a lot of tent manufacturers measure tent length from stake to stake, not the actual interior floor length. You may want to lay your sleeping bag out and measure its exterior from end to end. That'll help you separate the wheat from the chaff when trying to find a solution.

Case in point, I just measured my Big Agnes Triangle Mountain and the floor measures 81"L x 41"W (@ foot) x 52"W (@head) where the manufacturer listed the measurements as 86" x 44" x 56". I have a Fly Creek HV UL1, also, if you'd like to know the actual floor measurements for that one, too.

ScareBear
01-02-2017, 20:29
Keeping the 90" floor length as the primary requirement along with freestanding, then weight, then money, what I came up with is:

Brooks-Range Mountaineering, a little heavy for one person at 3 pounds, but freestanding, 90 inch floor length, 42" height and 45sq ft of space. Huge, really. http://www.backcountry.com/brooks-range-foray-2p-tent-2-person-3-season?skid=BKR000K-HEM-ONESIZ&ti=UExQIENhdDozLVNlYXNvbiBUZW50czozOjM1OmJjc0NhdDc xMTAwMDQx

Sierra Designs Flashlight 2FL, under 3 pounds with 90 inch floor and 46 inches of height. I'd def. be wary of the wind when I pitched it! http://www.backcountry.com/sierra-designs-flashlight-2-ul-tent-2-person-3-season?skid=SDS003Q-SIDEYEDETN-ONESIZ&ti=UExQIENhdDozLVNlYXNvbiBUZW50czo1OjY6YmNzQ2F0NzE xMDAwNDE=

A non-freestanding that comes in under 2 pounds, uses your hiking poles, has 88 inches of floor(every inch usable)and 45 inches height is the BA SuperScoutUL2 http://www.backcountry.com/big-agnes-super-scout-ul-2-person-3-season-tent?skid=BAG008H-X001-Y001&ti=UExQIENhdDozLVNlYXNvbiBUZW50czozOjI0OmJjc0NhdDc xMTAwMDQx

It takes some research to ferret out the floors that won't work for you. Hope this helps a little.
If you didn't mind 3.5 pounds and HUGE space for one, try the BA FlyCreekUL3, a free-standing 2.5 person tent with 90 inches of floor space. Its on sale now too!!!

Good luck!

G-FOURce
01-02-2017, 20:56
For a little under 3lbs, the Eureka Spitfire would work. I dont think anyone would confuse Eureka's build quality or material choices with those of Big Agnes (or a similar company), but Campsaver has a 20% off sale which would make it about $115 shipped which may make it more appealing...

http://www.campsaver.com/spitfire-1-tent-1-person-3-season

If that might work then there is one for sale here. The price listed is way too high, IMHO, but it is OBO.

http://whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php/122515-FS-Eureka-Spitfire-1-solo-tent-100-OBO

cmoulder
01-02-2017, 20:59
Double wall and freestanding requirements rule out some seriously nice and lightweight options, such as the Zpacks Altaplex (http://www.zpacks.com/shelter/altaplex.shtml), which weighs 17.9 oz...

Time Zone
01-02-2017, 21:01
Brooks-Range Mountaineering, a little heavy for one person at 3 pounds, but freestanding, 90 inch floor length, 42" height and 45sq ft of space. Huge, really. http://www.backcountry.com/brooks-range-foray-2p-tent-2-person-3-season?skid=BKR000K-HEM-ONESIZ&ti=UExQIENhdDozLVNlYXNvbiBUZW50czozOjM1OmJjc0NhdDc xMTAwMDQx


That's an interesting one, but I don't understand how the description says "45sq ft of liveable comfort inside" but the specs say "Floor Space 30 sq ft". That's quite a difference. [Vestibule is listed as 6, so that doesn't make up for it, not that it should count anyway].

Also the description says "this tent somehow manages a 42in height" but the specs say "Interior Height 39 in". I suppose the former might be the exterior height, but they really ought not promote that in the description, if it's 39" inside.

G-FOURce
01-02-2017, 22:20
Double wall and freestanding requirements rule out some seriously nice and lightweight options, such as the Zpacks Altaplex (http://www.zpacks.com/shelter/altaplex.shtml), which weighs 17.9 oz...

Agreed. The SMD Skyscape X is a hybrid cuben shelter with 80% of the fly configuration being double-walled, it weighs 17oz, and it uses only five stakes.

Venchka
01-02-2017, 22:47
TarpTent.com
Don't be fooled by the company name. These are real tents. Either full mesh or partial solid bodies. 1 & 2 person floor plans. Adjustable floors for either interior or vestibule space. They all set up fly first so no rain inside. The Rainbow, Moment and Scarp models can be set up freestanding with trekking poles or optional crossing poles. Durable and made in the USA. Worth a serious look.
Last year I made a tent purchase. I had BA & MSR tents in front of me. I chose the MSR Hubba Hubba over the BA tents for durability, stronger poles, better doors, more shoulder room and the ability to set up the fly only without buying the footprint I didn't want or need.
I used the Hubba Hubba in Colorado above 10,500' and thoroughly like it.
Wayne


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ScareBear
01-02-2017, 23:22
That's an interesting one, but I don't understand how the description says "45sq ft of liveable comfort inside" but the specs say "Floor Space 30 sq ft". That's quite a difference. [Vestibule is listed as 6, so that doesn't make up for it, not that it should count anyway].

Also the description says "this tent somehow manages a 42in height" but the specs say "Interior Height 39 in". I suppose the former might be the exterior height, but they really ought not promote that in the description, if it's 39" inside.

Scratch the Brooks! I looked at the manufacturer's website and talk about misleading dimensions...it will barely fit a 78"pad and then it slopes in at 45 degrees until the max floor length is 90 inches! Although, I suppose if it is only one person and you centered the pad...too much weight/money for what it is...sorry for my bad in not researching it further...
http://www.brooks-range.com/Foray-Tent-p/4206.htm

SubSquid
01-03-2017, 00:32
Double wall and freestanding requirements rule out some seriously nice and lightweight options, such as the Zpacks Altaplex (http://www.zpacks.com/shelter/altaplex.shtml), which weighs 17.9 oz...

One of the things I hate most is water of any kind in my sleeping area, and that's why I am looking for the double wall, and the price tag on that scares me a bit.

SubSquid
01-03-2017, 00:56
I really appreciate all the information so far, I will be looking at a lot of this, I didn't know about the LL Bean microlight which looks nice, and the eureka which I will now compair them to the previously mentioned REI QD, BA Flycreek and Cooper Spur, and nemo hornet.
Also how durable is the Cuban fiber? The only time I have had contact with it was on one of my section hikes and a gentleman had a hole in one of his new bags and was only 2 days in to his hike with it, luckily he had the repair kit handy but that is really the only interaction I have with it, and all the reading and videos of course.
Again thank you

G-FOURce
01-03-2017, 01:07
I really appreciate all the information so far, I will be looking at a lot of this, I didn't know about the LL Bean microlight which looks nice, and the eureka which I will now compair them to the previously mentioned REI QD, BA Flycreek and Cooper Spur, and nemo hornet.
Also how durable is the Cuban fiber? The only time I have had contact with it was on one of my section hikes and a gentleman had a hole in one of his new bags and was only 2 days in to his hike with it, luckily he had the repair kit handy but that is really the only interaction I have with it, and all the reading and videos of course.
Again thank you

I just repaired a hole in my Hexamid tarp this evening. I love the feel and the weight of the stuff but I am not in awe of it like so many others. With proper care and treatment I'm sure its wonderful, but for my preferences I like other materials better. I guess I just prefer something more durable, especially for the price.

Time Zone
01-03-2017, 01:48
and the eureka which I will now compair them to the previously mentioned

I found this somewhat older review of the Eureka Spitfire:

http://sectionhiker.com/eureka-spitfire-tent-ultralight-goes-mainstream/

In there, reviewer Philip Werner states that the interior of the so-called 9-foot tent is dramatically shorter than 9 feet:
"The inner tent with all of the bug netting barely fit me and I'm 5'10.5". I guess eureka uses the 9' measurement to include the fly."
I've seen other reviewers say it'll fit a 6 footer, but not more. Best to look into that before you commit.

Please note that if you were considering the LLB Microlight UL 1, that has an interior height that is too low (31") for you to sit up in. That's one reason I picked the taller Microlight 2.

MtDoraDave
01-03-2017, 08:26
TarpTent.com
Don't be fooled by the company name. These are real tents. Either full mesh or partial solid bodies. 1 & 2 person floor plans. Adjustable floors for either interior or vestibule space. They all set up fly first so no rain inside. The Rainbow, Moment and Scarp models can be set up freestanding with trekking poles or optional crossing poles. Durable and made in the USA. Worth a serious look.
Last year I made a tent purchase. I had BA & MSR tents in front of me. I chose the MSR Hubba Hubba over the BA tents for durability, stronger poles, better doors, more shoulder room and the ability to set up the fly only without buying the footprint I didn't want or need.
I used the Hubba Hubba in Colorado above 10,500' and thoroughly like it.
Wayne


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


Check.this.one.out.:
https://www.tarptent.com/momentdw.html

it's double walled (that's what DW stands for) has two large vestibules and two doors... and it weighs 2lbs, 2oz.

The Rainbow is larger and wider, but isn't double walled.

jeffmeh
01-03-2017, 09:19
Check.this.one.out.:
https://www.tarptent.com/momentdw.html

it's double walled (that's what DW stands for) has two large vestibules and two doors... and it weighs 2lbs, 2oz.

The Rainbow is larger and wider, but isn't double walled.

The Notch and the Stratospire are also double walled.

Ktaadn
01-03-2017, 10:22
I'm about 6-2.5 and also a restless sleeper. I use a BA Seedhouse SL1 and have always felt like I have plenty of room. The tent, fly, poles, and 6 stakes weigh 35.5 oz on my home scale. I think I have 3 BA tents and I haven't had an issue with any of them.

MtDoraDave
01-03-2017, 16:31
The Notch and the Stratospire are also double walled.

Yes.
but he said he wanted freestanding... I took a little liberty suggesting ones that don't use trekking poles, although they aren't truly "freestanding.

Venchka
01-03-2017, 16:44
Yes.
but he said he wanted freestanding... I took a little liberty suggesting ones that don't use trekking poles, although they aren't truly "freestanding.

Perhaps the OP should reevaluate the freestanding requirement. I've owned 4 tents so far. 2 of each: freestanding and not freestanding. All 4 tents performed well. For the life of me I don't see any big advantages in a freestanding tent.
One thing is "for sure and for certain":
No tent is freestaying. They all require secure anchors as I learned the hard way.
Wayne


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

poolskaterx
01-03-2017, 18:30
I really appreciate all the information so far, I will be looking at a lot of this, I didn't know about the LL Bean microlight which looks nice, and the eureka which I will now compair them to the previously mentioned REI QD, BA Flycreek and Cooper Spur, and nemo hornet.
Also how durable is the Cuban fiber? The only time I have had contact with it was on one of my section hikes and a gentleman had a hole in one of his new bags and was only 2 days in to his hike with it, luckily he had the repair kit handy but that is really the only interaction I have with it, and all the reading and videos of course.
Again thank you


Cuben is pretty tough if treated based on the attributes of cuben; i love my cuben tent but don't think a cuben groundsheet is my favorite and my tent is def not free standing but I got over that really quick. Cuben is amazingly easy to patch if needed and so, so light, does not stretch when wet... and so, so exspensive. Not sure there are a lot of free standing double wall cuben tents out there?

My two hiking buddies have the REI tent and the BA tent that you mentioned; BA tent sure looks more roomy but the fly "looks" to made of butterfly wings and front entry "Yuck"

SubSquid
01-04-2017, 21:12
Again thank y'all for the input, I have started looking at the tarp tents, the double rainbow and moment DW. I now have some questions if ya don't mind. How is the splashing when it rains because it looks like it would splash into the tent, or wind blowing it in. Second, I couldn't find to much on the extra liner for the condensation, how it hooks in and if it is a good thing to get.

Franco
01-04-2017, 22:12
The Moment DW can be purchased with a "solid" inner made with water resistant white fabric.
more than good enough for possible splashes.
The DR liner is listed under "extras" ($30) clips on via mitten hooks . Takes me about 1 minute to do some will take a bit longer. It covers the roof area so that you don't touch the fabric and if heavy rain dislodges condensation from the underside of the fly the liner will catch it. (works the same with the solo version (Rainbow))
[email protected]

MtDoraDave
01-04-2017, 22:19
If you go with the Stratospire 1 (if you use trekking poles) the vestibules are so enormous, I can't imagine blowing rain ever getting inside... my hiking partner has a notch, and swears no rain has ever gotten inside...

Venchka
01-05-2017, 01:07
Another Kevin uses a Notch year round in upstate New York. Hopefully he will drop in and give us his opinion of the Notch which is similar to the Moment.
Wayne


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rafe
01-05-2017, 01:34
Pretty happy with my Tarptent Rainbow. It has a "freestanding" mode but I don't use it that way. Setup couldn't be simpler. Plenty of floor space and headroom.

SubSquid
01-06-2017, 00:12
So one reason I was looking for freestanding is setting up in sand I have found to not be easy in non freestanding tents. I was only one but I was unable to keep it staked in and taught. Then the thought of hard ground. I may just not understand how to to it properly, but that's why I ask the questions

Franco
01-06-2017, 05:30
For staking on sand you either get sand and snow stakes or use some form of deadman anchor (look it up)
On hard ground you can use rocks/wood or sand /dirt bags or tie out to shrubs or trees.
(typical : jam the stake under/in between rocks )
For these situations helps to have extra cordage.

Engine
01-06-2017, 06:05
Perhaps the OP should reevaluate the freestanding requirement. I've owned 4 tents so far. 2 of each: freestanding and not freestanding. All 4 tents performed well. For the life of me I don't see any big advantages in a freestanding tent.
One thing is "for sure and for certain":
No tent is freestaying. They all require secure anchors as I learned the hard way.
Wayne


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I've always felt the same way. Except for pitching the tent on a platform or some surface just too hard to get stakes in the ground, there's no advantage I can identify. Neither of those situations occur often enough for me to consider them when choosing a tent.

Time Zone
01-06-2017, 12:33
I've always felt the same way. Except for pitching the tent on a platform or some surface just too hard to get stakes in the ground, there's no advantage I can identify. Neither of those situations occur often enough for me to consider them when choosing a tent.

Well, if there's an un-moveable rock or root that you missed in site selection (say because you did so in dim light), or there was some other issue with where you pitched, one minor benefit of a freestanding tent is that you can pick it up and move it pretty easily. Another is, if you rely on hiking poles to be used as tent poles, and you accidentally break one, well, it'll be harder (though not likely impossible) to set up your non-freestanding tent. A third is, if you rely on hiking poles to be used as tent poles, and you want to go hiking after setting up your tent, well, you either do without your poles or you have to do without the tent being set up. And as you said, for tent platforms, really hard or really soft ground, etc.

All that said, finding ways to economize on packing via choosing dual-use items is a hallmark of UL hiking, and thus one should certainly consider the advantages of weight saving via not having to carry both tent poles and hiking poles, versus the loss of the above conveniences. It's a classic tradeoff.

idc1970
01-06-2017, 21:01
I've got the Tarptent Notch and Moment DW.

The Notch has the half solid inner, meaning the bottom half is solid and the top half is mesh. I use this tent in cold windy climates and it helps to keep the wind out and me warmer compared to having full mesh walled inner.

The Moment DW has the mesh inner, it's tops when it's a warm night and still pretty good when it's cooler as you can lift and lower the outer to adjust the ventilation.

In either tent, I've never had an issue with the splash effect. But then I've always been fussy about where I set up and always try to aim for grass. I've camped on dirt before, but fortunately it's never rained.

I got the extra pole for the Moment DW and set it up as a free standing tent in my back yard, but I've never had to use it in the bush when out walking. If a site is unsuitable, I've kept walking to find a better site. Saves weight carrying extra poles too.

It all depends on where you are walking and the terrain when it comes to having a free standing tent. Do a bit of research before hand if you can.

Before I bought the Tarptents (I bought the Moment DW for my sister in law before she decided she hated bushwalking), I researched tents for a couple of months. I made my decision based on Tarptent's reputation and the total weight, and I'm happy with my choice. FYI, I'm 6' and a restless sleeper and find I have plenty of room.

Good luck with your decision, it's a fun process!!!

ggreaves
01-10-2017, 10:48
Check out the re-designed REI quarter dome 1 and 2. They're freestanding, bigger than the tents they replace and weigh quite a bit less than the half dome 2+. I'm not sure of the release date though. Here's a review from GearJunkie...

https://gearjunkie.com/review-rei-quarter-dome-tent-2017

Lnj
01-10-2017, 17:08
I have the TT Moment DW and I love it. I have slept in the rain with no problem. I have the Double Moment, even though I sleep in it alone. My husband hammocks, but if it gets really cold, he climbs in with me. There is room for two VERY LARGE people in there, but with just me, It's perfect. I don't touch a wall anywhere and there's room for my gear too. Great tent. Never had a condensation problem either. I haven't been out in it a thousand nights, but it has been well field tested on Grandfather Mountain in NC, and on the PMT in south GA. and also on the Approach trail of the AT. I set up and slept in rain and cold and endured some killer winds.

daddytwosticks
01-10-2017, 17:16
Check out the MSR Hubba. I have the latest version and am very happy with it. I've tried tarps, tarp tents and other double wall tents and really like my Hubba. I'm six foot even and am a restless sleeper. It serves me well. :)

Tinker
01-10-2017, 17:29
"Ultralight" and "freestanding" are almost mutually exclusive, unless exotic (and expensive) materials are used. even most freestanding winter mountaineering tents require that you stake out the vestibule. I think that two full-length poles, in an "x" configuration is the lightest option that could be truly freestanding. Even the mountaineering tents mentioned above, need to be staked out when the wind gets wicked and the snow starts to pile up. I have a Hilleberg Akto that I use for winter heavy-weather hiking. It's not freestanding, but a handful of not-so-light stakes are lighter (and offer more strength and stability in wind) than an extra pole. "Freestanding" is kinda like "waterproof-breathable".... Pick one or the other, depending on your needs. Look beyond the apparent benefits and imagine your gear in real-world conditions. It can change your perception on the "buzz words" used to sell products. Btw: you might want to look at the Hilleberg Unna.

Shutterbug
01-10-2017, 19:21
I am looking for a light, one person, double walled tent that can fit a 6'3" person with a little extra room since I am normally a restless sleeper. I am not looking for a tarp tent or a hammock. I do hammock camp but I am looking for a tent. I have the REI Half Dome 2+ which is very spacious and heavy for backpacking. The camping I do is mostly in warmer climates, lowest is around 30 degrees Fahrenheit camping in the southeast.
Most of my reading here everyone points toward tarps and I am not convinced on them yet, a friend of mine uses one but still doesn't appeal to me.
Thank you for your suggestions and advice in advance.

When I did the same research a year ago, I settled on the REI Quarterdome. I have been pleased with it, but I am not as tall as you are.

scrabbler
01-12-2017, 23:14
Settle on using a 2 man tent and sleep diagonally.

Franco
01-13-2017, 01:28
On some floor plans sleeping diagonally makes very little difference.
A quick check can be done using a mock up of the mat one intends to use and the tent floor dimensions.
Mind you, not that it does tell you if it will work on 3D but it will tell you if it does not.

Another Kevin
01-13-2017, 10:18
Another Kevin uses a Notch year round in upstate New York. Hopefully he will drop in and give us his opinion of the Notch which is similar to the Moment

Haven't had the time to check in here regularly, so I only just saw this.

I do indeed use a Notch - with the half-solid inner tent. Having the half-solid inner really cuts down on the wind.

I'm not quite as big as the original poster, but I'm largish (6'1") and find it comfortable. Adequate floor space, and the headroom is much more than I need to sit up. I like the double vestibules, because that means that wet gear doesn't have to come inside with me. And I'm old enough to have a real appreciation for the side entry. Not having to crawl through a tunnel around a tent pole is a major plus.

I tend to be one of those people who think that a three-season tent is adequate for short winter trips (I wouldn't want to be stuck in one for an extended spell of weather, but I seldom do a trip longer than a 3-4 day weekend in any case.) The Notch certainly stands up to a light snow load. In a heavier storm, I'd want to get up a time or two in the night to knock the snow off. The other old farts here will give me a knowing wink when I say that for a guy on the wrong side of sixty, getting up a time or two in the night is pretty routine.

If I got out more often on snowshoes, I might want a tent that doesn't tie up my poles. Otherwise, the fact that I can't use my poles with it set up is fine. I can go about my business in camp without them, and I'm always nervous about walking away from a camp. Too much chance that the local wildlife will tear it apart looking for food that isn't there.

I haven't tried it in really deep cold. Negative single digits F is as low as I've gone with it. (I'm really not geared up for colder conditions, in other respects as well.) That's enough for what I get down here in the valley, and enough for shorter jaunts into the peaks, timed to the weather.

Like all silnylon structures, it stretches and sags. It happens to look particularly unkempt when it does. I'm not overly house-proud.

SubSquid
01-13-2017, 15:50
I have to say I have been very impressed with all the tarp tents, I was originally completely against them but now I am really considering one. Only thing is I have to find somewhere or someone who has one so I can check it out before I buy, considering the price. But my original research and looking at them I thought it was go to Walmart and get an actual tarp. Mostly since that's how a friend of mine does it. So now it's between a tarp tent and the BA Cooper Spur.
Thank you for the help so far.

saltysack
01-15-2017, 22:53
If you decide to look st non free standing definitely check out LHG Solong 6....it's been a great 1-2 person shelter under 2lbs


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Venchka
01-15-2017, 23:09
There are tarps. There are tents. There is a company named TarpTent that makes tents. Good luck.
Wayne


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FootPathOne
01-15-2017, 23:34
-squTd0TCXI

How about this one?: 10x10 Tarp Pyramid Design for High Winds - Full Length Video.


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FootPathOne
01-15-2017, 23:38
https://youtu.be/-squTd0TCXI

FootPathOne
01-15-2017, 23:42
How about this one?: 10x10 Tarp Pyramid Design for High Winds - Full Length Video.

https://youtu.be/-squTd0TCXI


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Luna Anderson
10-13-2017, 05:29
I would suggest the Coleman Pop Up Tent if you want a 1 person tent and also a lightweight tent for your backpacking trip. I bought it last year and it worked really well when I go camping or hiking with my friends.
One thing that I like the most is the set-up process. It takes 1 minutes to make all things done and you dont need to carry any heavy stakes on your back. You just have to use some sticks to tighten it on the ground. Although it's not really good for winter or camping in the rain, it's still a good and affordable choice.
You can see my review here along with some essential features when choosing a good tent
http://hikertrack.com/best-pop-up-tent/
Hope you could make the best decision. Safe backpacking!

jjozgrunt
10-13-2017, 09:31
I would suggest the Coleman Pop Up Tent if you want a 1 person tent and also a lightweight tent for your backpacking trip.

Your idea of light weight and mine are vastly different. The only dealer that I found that had a weight listed, was "approx" 3.4 kg/7.5 lbs. That's more than my big 4 (pack, quilt, pad and 2 person tent 2.6kg/5.7lb).

jjozgrunt
10-13-2017, 09:50
I think most experienced bushwalkers/hikers know there is a correlation between weight, materials and price. Unless you manage to snag a exceptional sale item, usually the more advanced materials used, the lighter the item, and of course the price is big $$$$$. The reverse is also true, older or poorer types of material, heavier the item and they are cheap.

So it becomes a trade off. If money is no option great, but for most people it's more the middle of the road with weight, dollars and materials. Good materials that are going to do the job for a reasonable amount of time, reasonably light weight and good value. Then of course you trade up as $$$$ become available.

Plenty of good options have been mentioned in this thread.

SwathHiker
10-16-2017, 19:04
tarptents has good options for you often used by thru hikers. I like the bowfin for freestanding doublewall. the notch is lighter and uses tracking poles. the rainbow is a versatile single wall. they aren't tarps. they are awesome tents at great prices and weigh between 25 and 37 ounces.


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