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RollTide
01-17-2017, 20:18
Hi, I have been a hammock camper, but I'm looking to go to ground this year. When I got hardcore into hammocking I threw down a boat load on a set of 20 & 40 degree topquilts and underquilts. Now I know most suggest a 20 degree quilt is adequate for a Feb/March start, and that 40 degrees should be good to see you through to Katadin. (Except maybe a swap out in the Whites)

I have 20 Denier fabric on all of the quilts. While it's more durable and can withstand more abuse, it is not as light and breathable as 10 Denier fabrics. Would that said, what would be your opinions on aquiring a 50 degree 10 Denier quilt? It would be lighter, more breathable and easier to vent than the 40 degree during the summer.

If one already have a 40 degree is it worth investing in a 50 degree, or would it be better to just get a 15 degree liner and use that instead?

Thoughts, opinions, ideas?

AfterParty
01-17-2017, 20:24
I'd say its not gonna be much better.

RollTide
01-17-2017, 20:36
Yeah you're probably right, I just did some calculations that if I instead used a 950 down 10 denier 50 degree quilt over the one I have it'd be about the weight savings of an iPhone 6.... Not much.. Plus if it got down into the low 40s or high 30s in a freak spell and that would suck. I'm not going to hit, I'll stand pat.

orthofingers
01-17-2017, 23:55
Out of curiosity, why are you going to ground this season? Weight savings? Temperature/comfort?

RollTide
01-18-2017, 00:02
Out of curiosity, why are you going to ground this season? Weight savings? Temperature/comfort?

Yep. I decided to sacrifice the Warbonnet Blackbird XLC, cuben tarp and underquilt for a thermarest pad, and Solplex tent. 3-4 pounds in savings. I am trying to go ultralight, plus now I can sleep at the shelters if I want to save even more time on setup/takedown & decrease pack space. It's a win win for me I think. Looking hard at Zpacks' pillow dry bag, might be a good investment.... I'll get it all suched out by month's end. :confused:

RollTide
01-18-2017, 00:10
Plus a freak microblast on walnut mountain during a blizzard destroyed the stitching on the tieout for the cuben tarp, and cut my underquilt, then I had to sleep on frozed ground on the floor of the shelter. It was full and I nearly had hyperthermia had no pad only the broken tarp underneath me and it was one of the worst experiences of my life. Gave me PTSD for hanging for a while. The lesson, never hang from the top of a mountain, get your water topped off and go to the gap at the lower elevation and setup.

jj dont play
01-18-2017, 01:46
Mid/late April start, early/mid Aug finish and 25 degree quilt (jacks r better sniveler advertised as 25 ish) worked entire time for me. It was a little warm some night but not overly so and only had a handful of cold nights in which it performed perfectly.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

orthofingers
01-18-2017, 12:05
[QUOTE=RollTide;2120145]. 3-4 pounds in savings.

Yep, if you can be as comfortable on the ground as hanging, it's hard to argue with that much of a weight savings. For me, because of the comfort factor, once I started hanging, I can't imagine going to ground.

Hikingjim
01-18-2017, 12:23
I would just use the 40. You mentioned a feb/march start... you're not going to even want to carry a 50 on most of that, because you'll probably be in vt/nh/maine for the hottest months, and 50 is not enough there anyway

Only time I'd possibly carry a 50 quilt is south of vermont in summer, and a vented 40 would do fine for me

Flounder940
01-18-2017, 12:28
I'd be hesitant to use a 20 degree quilt with a Feb/March start date. I saw several nights of single digit and below 0 temps on the Southern portion of the AT in February, March and even April. One could make the argument that putting on all your clothing and puffy and you would have an uncomfortable night but survive is entirely true, but given your previous experience, I would opt for a 0 degree quilt. Not to be lost in this discussion is your sleeping pad. I would suggest a NeoAir XTherm or similar pad that has an R value over 5.

Hikingjim
01-18-2017, 12:38
Yeah, there's no way I'd be starting feb/early march with a 20f quilt, unless I had a good bottom base layer, a good down jacket (not 3 oz down) and good head/neck coverage.
You may want to consider both quilts for the start or a summer sleeping bag + 20f quilt on top
Definitely r-value close to 5 and above for your mat(s). If you have an r-3 or so sleeping pad, you can double up with CCF foam (bulky, but not that heavy)

RollTide
01-18-2017, 16:51
Yeah, there's no way I'd be starting feb/early march with a 20f quilt, unless I had a good bottom base layer, a good down jacket (not 3 oz down) and good head/neck coverage.
You may want to consider both quilts for the start or a summer sleeping bag + 20f quilt on top
Definitely r-value close to 5 and above for your mat(s). If you have an r-3 or so sleeping pad, you can double up with CCF foam (bulky, but not that heavy)

Thank you so much dude!!! I had an epiphany last night when I was sleeping on my thermarest prolite plus pad, and thought if that was the right one to go with. Come to find out it has an R value of 3.4 but it's friggin 28 oz :eek:

I thought it was pretty light and the way to go cause some outfitter down in Florida said it was great a couple years back. Now I know what the best thing to do is, if you can budget it....

For the cold temps with the 20 degree quilt, the Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XTherm packs quite the punch with a 5.7 R value and a weight savings of 7 oz over the prolite plus, tipping the scales at 20 oz for a Large.

Then when it's time to swap out for a 40 degree quilt, swap out that pad with the Therm-a-Rest NeoAir Xlite... That pad has a cooler 3.2 R value combined with a 4 oz shaving off the XTherm to come in at only 1 lb for a large pad.

I'll just go alcohol-free and eat P&Js for the next month to afford both pads. It the best of both worlds, I talked to some outfitters on the trail and they think it's a brilliant plan.:banana

RollTide
01-18-2017, 16:52
I'd be hesitant to use a 20 degree quilt with a Feb/March start date. I saw several nights of single digit and below 0 temps on the Southern portion of the AT in February, March and even April. One could make the argument that putting on all your clothing and puffy and you would have an uncomfortable night but survive is entirely true, but given your previous experience, I would opt for a 0 degree quilt. Not to be lost in this discussion is your sleeping pad. I would suggest a NeoAir XTherm or similar pad that has an R value over 5.

I had some of those nights last year in my hammock, and the best cure is Jack Daniels.