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somers515
05-16-2017, 13:57
Do you offer $5? $10? Just say thank you? What's the standard protocol?
I'm starting my a 3 day/2 night hike in the Whites next week with a 3 mile road walk but if I stick out my thumb (while off the road way so it's legal) and get a ride I want to know what's customary. Any other advice appreciated.

Would like to see this as a poll but I'm not sure how to set that up.
Thanks in advance!

Old Hiker
05-16-2017, 14:04
After I got over my initial hesitation with hitching, I ALWAYS made sure I had a $5 bill in my pocket if I was going to hitch. I offered it at the end of the ride, regardless. Usually, my drop off point was somewhere along the drivers way.

If they were gracious enough to refuse (usually), I always dropped it into the seat or front console on my way out, preferable out of sight of the driver.

BuckeyeBill
05-16-2017, 14:21
I do the same thing as Old Hiker. I hate walking on asphalt and am always thankful for a ride.

Tipi Walter
05-16-2017, 14:30
In all my years of hitchhiking from 1980 to today I have never offered any amount of money at the end of a ride. In my opinion it sets up an awkward vibe as you fumble with your gear or your pockets trying to retrieve some cash while the driver just wants you to get out quickly and safely so he can be on his way. The driver does not want to be worried about where your hands are going and if you're pulling out something other than money, like a knife or pistol.

Whenever I get into a car or truck I sit quietly and do not fidget or get squirmy.

But one time I was hitching thru Winston Salem NC with my thumb out on some godawful thoroughfare when a woman pulled over and handed me $5 out of the window and then sped off. The cash was nice but I would've preferred a ride.

putts
05-16-2017, 14:32
I pick up hitch hikers when I can, always without expectations for compensation. When people offer cash I always say that I'm just paying forward the good will I've received over the years. A lot of people pick up hitch hikers because it feels good to help someone out, and really prefer not to make it about money. That said, I have "lost" a ten dollar bill in the cup holder before, and bought a pack of smokes for a driver who waited for me to do a quick resuply and drove me back to the trail. Which reminds me of the time I picked up a couple hikers to take to Monson - As soon as we got in my car they each lit up a ciggarette. ***?! All I'm saying is ask first, or maybe just wait until you get where you are going. Hitch with good manners.

Lone Wolf
05-16-2017, 14:33
i've never tipped when hitching

bigcranky
05-16-2017, 14:35
I always have a $5 bill in my pocket when hitching, and always offer it as "gas money" at the end. No one has ever taken it (and I have not ever taken money when I've been the driver), but I feel like it's polite to offer.

Slo-go'en
05-16-2017, 14:57
Typically they just want to hear your story and that is payment enough.

lonehiker
05-16-2017, 15:27
I always offer. They have always said no. Touching on a subject brought up earlier; I always try to have "correct" change on me when I might have to pay for a service. Makes life easier on everybody.

TNhiker
05-16-2017, 15:50
Typically they just want to hear your story and that is payment enough.




thats what ive noticed when i have hitched in the Great Smoky NP........

tell them a good story.....get them to smile.....and everything is cool.....

HooKooDooKu
05-16-2017, 15:58
I'd say tip them the standard 20%.

TNhiker
05-16-2017, 16:08
I'd say tip them the standard 20%.



so you give them a quarter mile?

peakbagger
05-16-2017, 16:18
When I pick folks up I generally refuse a tip if its on my way. If they have good story and decide I am going to give them ride way out of my way I may not refuse it.

Folks on occasion end up on the wrong side of Mt Washington in the whites and that is minimum of 50 miles out of my way one way to get them to the right side. They had better have a good story (and usually do);).

Patriot76
05-16-2017, 16:48
Depending on the distance I will offer a beverage or meal in the next town. Many have accepted a soda, ice tea, coffee, or adult beverage but none have accepted a meal. I usually ask them to drop me off at places where I can get these things and feel it is only fair to offer.

cbxx
05-16-2017, 17:12
I agree entirely with Tipi Walter, in everything he said, don't be fumbling through your pockets when someone, especially a woman, picks you up. The whole thing sets up a bad precedent.

HooKooDooKu
05-16-2017, 17:58
so you give them a quarter mile?
OK, so I initially laughed at that...

but wouldn't that be equivalent to barfing up a portion of your meal on the shoes of the waiter that has been serving you?
(i.e. you tip based on a percentage of what you are being charged... not a percentage of what was provided to you).

Dogwood
05-16-2017, 18:39
I usually offer $5-10 and have on occasion offered more for someone willing to take me out of their way as Old Hiker and Buckeye Bill. As Slo go en said usually they want to hear my story but sometimes people are lonely and want an ear to offer something of their own story. People have needs and desires beyond just our own. That has to be appreciated as well on a hitch...that you're willing to listen. I've many a time received rides by initially demonstrating a willingness to pay for gas or buy lunch, dinner etc. This builds trust for getting rides for others too...pay it forward. This has also led folks to further extend their generosity by offering a night in a vacant room(at least 10X), camping in their yard(many times), being invited for a home cooked sit down family dinner, work on a farm, etc. I've actually had several landscape design jobs I went back for after the hike as a result of breaking the ice through hitches. I believe when I show I'm willing to give and not only only get get get folks will extend themselves even more. Having a give and take not just about my(your) travels being so self centered has(can) truly enrich the lengthier hiking experiences.


Here's one more thing about hitching. Don't think of it as hitch-hiking. Think of it as meeting people. And, if it is a ride you seek getting it can be accomplished by chatting someone up in an honest manner rather than simply standing alongside a road with a thumb out which is illegal and enforced in some states while ASKING verbally for a ride through genuine conversation is not. In that conversation voluntarily offer gas money, buying lunch, etc.

evyck da fleet
05-16-2017, 18:44
If I'm planning on hitching, I'll try to clean up and put my poles away before sticking my thumb out. That gives me plenty of time to find $5 for a short hitch and put it in the pocket with my cell phone so I'm not fumbling around for it when I get out of the car because I know I'm checking I don't leave that behind.

Dogwood
05-16-2017, 18:55
In all my years of hitchhiking from 1980 to today I have never offered any amount of money at the end of a ride. In my opinion it sets up an awkward vibe as you fumble with your gear or your pockets trying to retrieve some cash while the driver just wants you to get out quickly and safely so he can be on his way. The driver does not want to be worried about where your hands are going and if you're pulling out something other than money, like a knife or pistol.

Whenever I get into a car or truck I sit quietly and do not fidget or get squirmy...


Yes, but that awkward vibe can be eliminated with some fore thought. First build repertoire. Don't pull out money until AFTER you size up the driver and possibly others in the car and they have sized you up. If you act like a mental ward or chain gang escapee, weirdo, drug addict, or homeless wayward drifter you can expect some awkwardness which is surprising you even made it into someone else's vehicle in the first place. AND, much of a driver's fears about reaching into your pack as they're driving can be eliminated IF you place you pack in the back seat with no one else there, or in the back of a PU, or in the trunk WAITING to pull out money only after your ride or if once at the gas station in a public place. It doesn't hurt to also say my wallet is in my pack, I need to get it. It really eases a drivers concerns when your pack is not stored in your lap or between your legs.

Tipi Walter
05-16-2017, 19:49
Don't pull out money until AFTER you size up the driver

If you act like a mental ward or chain gang escapee, weirdo, drug addict, or homeless wayward drifter you can expect some awkwardness which is surprising you even made it into someone else's vehicle in the first place.

To the first quote---Well, I never pull out money when I'm hitching so the problem is solved right off the bat.

To the second---You've got it opposite---The people that pick me up often act like they're from a mental ward or a chain gang or drug addicts and are some very weird . . . weirdos.

As mentioned, when I'm sitting in a stranger's car my behavior is very subdued, it has to be if I want the ride and want to get to Point B.

In my experience there are three categories of Rides---
** Those that just want to give you a ride no problem and nothing required.
** Those born-again Christians who want to get me saved. That's why they stopped.
** Cruising homosexuals who want to hook up. Remind me to tell the story of hitching north on I-77 back in 1992.

I've had a handgun "pulled" on me twice in my years of hitching. These fall into the first category---willing to give me a ride but just wanting to let me know they're carrying if things get weird. When the guns come out there's always that momentary twinge of What Now?

There's a fourth category of course, but something I've never experienced: Getting kidnapped or dismembered or shot. Just lucky I guess. I did have a "road dog" friend who traveled the country with his pack and we met up once and he had a cast on his broken wrist. Told me about a guy in a Jeep who took him up a dirt road and wouldn't let him out so he jumped and took off into the woods. Better a broken wrist than a possibly detached head.

Oh and one time an off-duty cop picked me up and he was friendly but I could see he had his pistol under a folded up newspaper next to him on the front seat. Just in case.

TNhiker
05-16-2017, 20:48
OK, so I initially laughed at that...

but wouldn't that be equivalent to barfing up a portion of your meal on the shoes of the waiter that has been serving you?
(i.e. you tip based on a percentage of what you are being charged... not a percentage of what was provided to you).





Well---this thread is about hitchhiking which is typically a free activity so when I saw the "20%" part I got a chuckle---as in, "what would tipping 20% of free be?" "Ah.....miles"

Dogwood
05-16-2017, 20:49
"The people that pick me up often act like they're from a mental ward or a chain gang or drug addicts and are some very weird . . . weirdos."

That's saying something more about how and from whom you seek rides.

I don't want rides from people drunk or intoxicated behind the wheel, or I feel threatened by. This is why I seek to and get more than 1/2 of all my rides through face to face conversation at key locations rather than always sticking a thumb out standing alongside a road attempting to get busy often in a rush motorists to stop. This allows for an easier breaking the ice time not only for the potential ride but for the ride seeker to size up rides. For example, on the Cherohala Skyway I seek rides at overlooks, CGs, at THs from other hikers leaving, that convenience store/small gas station near Robbinsville on the same side of the rode I'm seeking to get a ride in the direction of(towards Tellico Plaines), that convenience store/gas station just entering Tellico Plaines when heading pack towards Robbinsville, etc.

You have to admit hitch hiking is a bit of a weirdo thing to do in today's culture as we seek rides so were weirdos also. That's why many people are fearful to stop. When we seek rides in person striking up a genuine conversation we, or at least most of us, can present ourselves as travelers, just hikers lokking to get into town for a resupp and back to our hikes. This makes us familiar to potential rides. And we can get some fimailarity with potential rides

middle to middle
05-16-2017, 20:54
In college days I hitched everywhere, coast to coast several times. Nobody expects you to pay anything ! Try to be a good conversationalist if that is received well at night drivers want to be kept awake and alert by conversation. The rare goofy ones or drinkers just say thanks this is ware I am going and get out.

Dogwood
05-16-2017, 20:59
"Those born-again Christians who want to get me saved. That's why they stopped."

Hey, I let them have their say if that gets me to where I need to go. And, if it is too over the top a little politeness saying I'll consider it is usually all it takes to quiet them down. Or, there are ways to steer conversations onto non religious or philosophical topics. Besides, we can learn something from everyone. I certainly have from atheists, agnostics, Naturalists, Wiccans, Mormons, Jehovah's Witnesses, Muslims, Christians, Jewish folks, and a whole lot more. I like hearing about different beliefs, cultures, philosophies, and points of view different than my own when presented respectfully which I'd say most of these people are. I think that's a big reason why I travel and LD hike so much. I become more tolerant. Might want to try that?

Dogwood
05-16-2017, 21:07
"Cruising homosexuals who want to hook up."

Been there. But that's OK. I'm in a vehicle going to where I need. Keep the ultimate goal in sight! The LGBT crowd usually gets a hint that you're straight, if you are, and once that's clear and you stand your ground(they might test you) LGBT folks have been some of the most funniest people I've met. Besides, now you know how women feel when heterosexual males hit on them so obviously which incidentally has made me more aware of being more respectful of women.

BuckeyeBill
05-16-2017, 21:31
You tip based on a percentage of what you are being charged... not a percentage of what was provided to you.

I actually do both. Depending on the restaurant, I start at 10%-15% and if service/advice is good I increase the amount up to 20%. Outstanding service gets 25%. Waiters/waitresses remember you and give great service. I sometimes asked if a waiter/waitress is working and asked to be seated at one of their tables. Sorry I floated of topic, I will do the dishes.:)

devoidapop
05-16-2017, 21:45
"Cruising homosexuals who want to hook up."


With Grindr and all the other hook up apps available, I think cruising for hitch hikers is far less common. Another great American pastime lost to technology.

Tipi Walter
05-16-2017, 23:34
For example, on the Cherohala Skyway I seek rides at overlooks, CGs, at THs from other hikers leaving, that convenience store/small gas station near Robbinsville on the same side of the rode I'm seeking to get a ride in the direction of(towards Tellico Plaines), that convenience store/gas station just entering Tellico Plaines when heading pack towards Robbinsville, etc.

You have to admit hitch hiking is a bit of a weirdo thing to do in today's culture as we seek rides so were weirdos also. That's why many people are fearful to stop. When we seek rides in person striking up a genuine conversation we, or at least most of us, can present ourselves as travelers, just hikers lokking to get into town for a resupp and back to our hikes. This makes us familiar to potential rides. And we can get some fimailarity with potential rides


Since I lived in Tellico Plains for 15 years I probably hitchhiked the Cherohala "Screamway" at least a dozen times in all weather including blizzards. There is really no comparison with hitching the Skyway to hitching on Interstate ramps or hitching major highways in and around urban areas. Hitching the Skyway means you're either going to Robbinsville or Tellico---so rides are a no-brainer. I consider hitchhiking the Skyway to be a vacation from real hitchhiking.

Speaking of hitching roads like the Skyway, I once got kicked off the Blue Ridge Parkway back in 1988 by a forest Ranger in a . . . . green Jeep. Bummer and who knew? He made me walk to the nearest intersecting State Road where I quickly thumbed a ride up into Independence, Virginia. And eventually thumbed into Waynesboro to start an AT hike in the Shenandoahs.

cliffordbarnabus
05-16-2017, 23:44
taxi, uber, lyft, shuttle - whatever the hell....yes, pay. and tip. and give pieces of paper with dead men (and soon, women) on them.

if you thumb, be free. FREE! driver's choice.

Tipi Walter
05-16-2017, 23:48
taxi, uber, lyft, shuttle - whatever the hell....yes, pay. and tip. and give pieces of paper with dead men (and soon, women) on them.

if you thumb, be free. FREE! driver's choice.

Exactly. In my hitching years I maybe had $40 bucks to my name. (But I had some dang fine gear on my back). I would've been broke the first week had I paid for each hitch. Never even considered it, in fact.

Starchild
05-17-2017, 00:04
Never have considered it, nor have I ever received it when picking up. I honestly would not know what to do if I was offered a tip, can't I just be a nice person without expecting payment for it?

cliffordbarnabus
05-17-2017, 00:19
Never have considered it, nor have I ever received it when picking up. I honestly would not know what to do if I was offered a tip, can't I just be a nice person without expecting payment for it?

hell yeah man! i hate how money dominates this world. be kind. perhaps receive kindness. perhaps not. it doesn't matter. the world spins. we spin. we live. we die. we don't need cheap plastic crap from wal-mart. we need experiences and memories. done.

evyck da fleet
05-17-2017, 07:08
Never have considered it, nor have I ever received it when picking up. I honestly would not know what to do if I was offered a tip, can't I just be a nice person without expecting payment for it?
Sure. Can't I just be nice and offer something in addition to a thank you? I'm not sure anyone has ever taken my offer since they are doing it to be kind. Thankfully no one who has picked me up has been drunk, made advances or pulled a gun on me.

Bansko
05-17-2017, 07:52
I have never conserved tipping to be expected while hitchhiking. That said, I've been picked up by some nice people who obviously didn't have much money. In those cases I usually insist that they accept a little "gas money". It's always been accepted and appreciated.

coach lou
05-17-2017, 08:27
I have never conserved tipping to be expected while hitchhiking. That said, I've been picked up by some nice people who obviously didn't have much money. In those cases I usually insist that they accept a little "gas money". It's always been accepted and appreciated.

Bansko and I are on the same page on this. We are on vaca, and in countryside that is not always affluent.

Francis Sawyer
05-17-2017, 10:46
The OP stated that his Road walk was 3 miles. Why not just walk and not have to worry about hitching or tipping. You're going hiking (walking) (volksmarching) but a walk along a road dosn't count? As far as tippping goes offer a couple bucks unless it's a long ride or it's out of the guys way.

Tipi Walter
05-17-2017, 11:17
The OP stated that his Road walk was 3 miles. Why not just walk and not have to worry about hitching or tipping. You're going hiking (walking) (volksmarching) but a walk along a road dosn't count? As far as tippping goes offer a couple bucks unless it's a long ride or it's out of the guys way.

You bring up an obscure facet of hitchhiking: Do I stand in one spot and thumb or do I hike on the right shoulder and thumb? Both work. Third option? If it's a short distance like 3 miles I'll hike on the left shoulder facing traffic and not bother hitching. Sometimes I'll even get a ride by not hitching just from friendly guys who stop and offer.

Standing in one spot is sometimes required like on Interstate ramps because you can't really hike on the actual Interstate. And sometimes you're hitching a paved rural road and find a perfect place for someone to pull over with plenty of room so you stay put there and not hike. But if a couple hours go by at one spot with no ride I'll saddle up and start walking.

One time I was hitching from Lake Junaluska (NC) north on Hiway 209 up to Hot Springs and dangit never did get a ride the first day so I hiked almost the entire 36 mile distance and set up the tent midway at a scenic spot called Beck's overlook. The next day I hiked thru places like Luck NC and Trust NC and then a guy in a bread truck took me into Hot Springs.

Starchild
05-17-2017, 11:27
The OP stated that his Road walk was 3 miles. Why not just walk and not have to worry about hitching or tipping. You're going hiking (walking) (volksmarching) but a walk along a road dosn't count? As far as tippping goes offer a couple bucks unless it's a long ride or it's out of the guys way.
Roadwalking really sucks. Really that is 90% of the answer. The other 10% is it doesn't count unless it is part of the white blazed path, in which case walking it would be the way to go unless you are Bill Bryson.

Puddlefish
05-17-2017, 13:27
I never hitched before the AT. From my limited experience.

- One church lady, who gave us a ride into town, and let us know that she was doing it for Jesus. I wasn't sure if she was expecting a tip, as in one good turn deserves another, or what. Left the car kind of awkwardly.
- A young guy in a pick up, let three of us hop in the back. Offered him a $5, think he was a bit insulted.
- A really creepy guy who was laughing nervously the whole drive. Suspect he was on meth or something. I didn't want him to think I had money and I dashed away quickly.
- A young couple on a camping vacation in the Smokies. They offered me fresh fruit, and were really friendly. I gave them $40 to buy themselves dinner in town.

There's no right answer. I just thank everyone, and have a bit of cash handy before I ever stuck out my thumb. Then I play it by ear.

BuckeyeBill
05-17-2017, 13:47
When I get a ride, whether thumbing or just offered a ride, I usually have $5-$10 in a shirt pocket. When getting dropped off I offer the the $5 for very short trips and the $10 for longer trips. I also consider going out of the way trips as well. If they refuse it, I drop it on the seat and tell them to donate it to their favorite charity. I won't force the issue, but when you say charity, they usually say OK and drive off.

Tipi Walter
05-17-2017, 13:50
I never hitched before the AT. From my limited experience.

- One church lady, who gave us a ride into town, and let us know that she was doing it for Jesus. I wasn't sure if she was expecting a tip, as in one good turn deserves another, or what. Left the car kind of awkwardly.
- A young guy in a pick up, let three of us hop in the back. Offered him a $5, think he was a bit insulted.
- A really creepy guy who was laughing nervously the whole drive. Suspect he was on meth or something. I didn't want him to think I had money and I dashed away quickly.
- A young couple on a camping vacation in the Smokies. They offered me fresh fruit, and were really friendly. I gave them $40 to buy themselves dinner in town.

There's no right answer. I just thank everyone, and have a bit of cash handy before I ever stuck out my thumb. Then I play it by ear.

Excellent post. I remember one time I was hitching across North Carolina from Boone to Chapel Hill and after my town visit (played music on Franklin Street for cash) I was back on hiway 52 at night so I had to camp in the trees by the road and the next day stood on 52 to head back west.

Three guys in a pickup truck pulled over, all in the cab, and the middle guy pulled out a pistol and waved it around and told me to hop in the bed of the truck. I got spooked by the guys and hemmed and hawed and said, basically, "Uh, gosh but you know, I'm actually on the WRONG side of the road and I should be going the other direction! Not West but East!!!" They thought I was a complete retardant and probably thought I was huffing glue etc.

But dangit I did not get into that truck.

Dogwood
05-17-2017, 14:45
I have never conserved tipping to be expected while hitchhiking. That said, I've been picked up by some nice people who obviously didn't have much money. In those cases I usually insist that they accept a little "gas money". It's always been accepted and appreciated.


Bansko and I are on the same page on this. We are on vaca, and in countryside that is not always affluent.

Even if the money isn't taken it demonstrates appreciation of another's resources - gas, vehicles, and insurance - which all cost MONEY. Showing appreciation is appreciated! It invokes and promotes an environment of congenial gratitude...something that is sorely needed in many cultures, including the U.S.! It demonstrates the ability to consider beyond one's own immediate give me give me desires and needs.

Responding to another poster who said he only had $40, I've been there. Communicating that I was currently cash strapped but still needing a ride didn't stop me from offering to mow a lady's grass in TN on an AT hike, or milking goats on a farm in Etna CA on a PCT hike, or helping to unload hay bales in Montana on a cattle ranch on a CDT hike in exchange for a ride. It's NOT just about the money. It's about showing appreciation and kindness; it's about showing consideration for others;it's about building a repertoire, a relationship even if only a temporary one.

Coming from this place I attended a church service with the widow in TN. She said she was so glad to have someone to talk because she felt so lonely with her husband having died 8 yrs previous and her adult children all living far away. As she told me this she emotionally broke down started crying and laid her head on my shoulder as I embraced her in loving kindness. She drove me 50 miles to attend Trail Days in Damascus. Afterward she invited me back anytime I was ever in the area.


In Etna I worked on the farm for two days eating huge meals with the entire family. At the end of the two short days he gave me $100. I was then driven back up to the pass/PCT TH. Later, we consulted through emails about his landscaping where I set him up with a regional wholesale Plant Nursery to buy his 18 trees that he later bought to line the farm's driveway. I was invited back if ever again in the area.

In Montana the rancher's son showed me how to rope a calf and take it down. We all got along despite me being a "Yankee" from the east and being a vegetarian although I did not decline a considerate nicely made fried chicken dinner his wife made specifically on my behalf.

JPritch
05-17-2017, 14:58
I'm actually a good tipper, but it never really crossed my mind to tip for a hitch. I guess it's the vibe I get, which is more of these people doing a good deed and enjoying a good conversation and sharing the history of their hometown as their reward.

orthofingers
05-17-2017, 16:09
I think that when you're hitching, you're basically begging for a ride. If I did something helpful for a beggar, I wouldn't expect anything in return.

A bit bit off topic but I've found that your chances of getting picked up are better if you turn around and face the oncoming cars as you walk backwards. I think psychologically, it's easier to drive on by someone if you're looking at the back of their head with their thumb sticking out vs. them looking you in the eye especially, if they look like they're miserable. Also, I'm more inclined to stop and pick up a hitchhiker if they are walking vs. just standing there. I think it shows that they are trying to get somewhere and not hanging out and maybe up to no good. YMMV.

PatmanTN
05-17-2017, 17:04
Fun thread. I once got a ride in the GSMNP on 441 from two older gentleman to get from Thomas Divide to Kanati Fork and when I pointed out the trail-head the driver inexplicably stopped in the middle of the road to let me out. I urged him to go on to a safer place but he didn't and in the awkward rush of the moment I went ahead and got out. As luck would have it, a law enforcement ranger was right behind us and turned on the blue lights. Those nice guys that gave the ride got a ticket. I hung out for a moment to try and offer to pay the fine but the ranger was really mad and told me to go so I went. I felt pretty bad that they suffered for helping me. bad ending to good deed

rocketsocks
05-17-2017, 17:10
I don't recall ever actually tipping, I have offered to buy a beer or a cup of coffee...all declined though, just a "thanks so much"

capehiker
05-17-2017, 18:37
The whole point of hitchhiking is to get from point A to point B for free. If I wanted to pay, I'd hire a shuttle driver.

Lone Wolf
05-17-2017, 19:58
The whole point of hitchhiking is to get from point A to point B for free. If I wanted to pay, I'd hire a shuttle driver.

exactly. close thread :rolleyes:

MuddyWaters
05-17-2017, 20:58
Most offer a few $ for gas in my experience
Most decline (I presume). I do.

I see it as a polite gesture which shows you really do appreciate the help. Not expected, a simple thanks will do, even if drive 30 miles out of way

I dont appreciate it when offer ride to one person, and next thing you know 6 are climbing in back of truck, without asking. Word spreads fast at hostels

Slo-go'en
05-17-2017, 21:50
The whole point of hitchhiking is to get from point A to point B for free. If I wanted to pay, I'd hire a shuttle driver.

In the context of a short hitch, that maybe the only way to get from point A to point B.


Also, I'm more inclined to stop and pick up a hitchhiker if they are walking vs. just standing there. I think it shows that they are trying to get somewhere and not hanging out and maybe up to no good. YMMV.


I have mixed feeling about the walk/stay put dilemma. If your walking, you have to make darn sure they know your looking for a ride and not just walking. Then you have to hope your in a spot where they can safely pull over at the time.

Being at a spot where a ride can safely pull over is important, so once you find such a spot, you should stay there. That spot is usually at or near where the trail crosses the road at the top of a gap. Many of the little roads which cross the AT are very narrow and twisty and are not safe to walk on. Meeting a motorcycle or sports car coming around a blind curve at top speed would not end well.

PennyPincher
05-18-2017, 06:57
I want a good trail story in return for a pick up. LOL no really. I don't want cash. I have even gone out of my way for a thru I met when I was out hiking. I drove back to a trailhead 3 days later - about 2 hours each way- to pick him up and drop him in Boston so he could visit a friend. We had a good convo and I had the enjoyment of helping a fellow traveler.


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coach lou
05-18-2017, 08:39
I want a good trail story in return for a pick up. LOL no really. I don't want cash. I have even gone out of my way for a thru I met when I was out hiking. I drove back to a trailhead 3 days later - about 2 hours each way- to pick him up and drop him in Boston so he could visit a friend. We had a good convo and I had the enjoyment of helping a fellow traveler.


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Always pick up hikers! On my way back from Roan, I detoured thru the Shenandoah. Just past Loft Mtn. This cutie had her thumb out, so I picked them both up. They bought lunch at Big Meadow, and they resumed their walk. It was a pleasant break from the long drive.39361

bamboo bob
05-18-2017, 08:41
In 50 years I have never tipped hitched ride. Never even heard of it until today.

Dogwood
05-18-2017, 09:02
The whole point of hitchhiking is to get from point A to point B for free. If I wanted to pay, I'd hire a shuttle driver.

Shuttles aren't always feasible or available(hitch hiking goes beyond the AT environment!) ie; no phone service to call for a shuttle, shuttlers aren't always available immediately, knowing when one might arrive at a shuttle location prearranging for a shuttle doesn't always work out according to one's own anticipated plans or plans of a shuttler, shuttles aren't available where you are or are extremely expensive which makes them an expensive taxi like service

Dogwood
05-18-2017, 09:10
In the context of a short hitch, that maybe the only way to get from point A to point B.


I have mixed feeling about the walk/stay put dilemma. If your walking, you have to make darn sure they know your looking for a ride and not just walking. Then you have to hope your in a spot where they can safely pull over at the time.

Being at a spot where a ride can safely pull over is important, so once you find such a spot, you should stay there. That spot is usually at or near where the trail crosses the road at the top of a gap. ManYup +1 y of the little roads which cross the AT are very narrow and twisty and are not safe to walk on. Meeting a motorcycle or sports car coming around a blind curve at top speed would not end well.

Yup! +1 I've made the mistake of leaving a safe place for driver's to pull over while hitching to the Long trail's northern terminus resulting in a 6 mile road walk. Several drivers as they passed put up their hands as if to say I would give you a ride but it's unsafe to pull over.

On a recent Oregon Coast Trail attempting to hitch a portion of HWY 101 , the busy West Coast Hwy, I grew impatient walking away from a key hitchhiking location breaking my own rule of not always attempting to hitch by sticking a thumb out but also asking people through conversation which resulted in a 14 mile road walk.

Tipi Walter
05-18-2017, 10:11
I have mixed feeling about the walk/stay put dilemma. If your walking, you have to make darn sure they know your looking for a ride and not just walking. Then you have to hope your in a spot where they can safely pull over at the time.

Being at a spot where a ride can safely pull over is important, so once you find such a spot, you should stay there. That spot is usually at or near where the trail crosses the road at the top of a gap. Many of the little roads which cross the AT are very narrow and twisty and are not safe to walk on. Meeting a motorcycle or sports car coming around a blind curve at top speed would not end well.

I am actually physically capable of doing both---walk and hitch. When I hear a car I turn around and stick out my thumb. Many rural routes have sparse traffic so you can easily both walk and hitch unless you're deaf and can't hear traffic. Other routes are cram-packed with traffic and hitching is then a constant thumb-out endeavor with no walking needed; unless you give up hope and just start hoofing it.

Walking is important near dusk when you can't get a ride and need to find a decent treeline for camping. In the morning the fun starts up again. Walking is also important if your Point B is 10 or less miles away. Start walking and hitching and if no rides come in a day you'll be there.

There's also one more facet of this---On long backpacking trips like 21 days I may not WANT to catch a ride and interact with "civilians" in any form. I want to keep to my solo trip and not talk to anyone. So when I'm road walking (to connect various trails) I'll get on the left shoulder and hike facing traffic. I sincerely don't want a ride. I'm in no mood to be social, especially with rolling couch potatoes.

I already brought up the point of finding a spot to stand with a safe pull-off for cars.


In 50 years I have never tipped hitched ride. Never even heard of it until today.

Exactly. Never heard of it until this thread.

coach lou
05-18-2017, 12:32
......well I have had the experience on 3 separate occasions that I was hitching off the trail and got a ride from 3 different folks that were obviously destitute, I can see that their tank was near E. I'm no rich Connecticut Yankee by no means, but I was better off that they were, so I gave them gas money

TrappedInsideACube
05-18-2017, 13:03
After I got over my initial hesitation with hitching, I ALWAYS made sure I had a $5 bill in my pocket if I was going to hitch. I offered it at the end of the ride, regardless. Usually, my drop off point was somewhere along the drivers way.

If they were gracious enough to refuse (usually), I always dropped it into the seat or front console on my way out, preferable out of sight of the driver.

Yeah, but then if they don't notice it they might end up getting a window busted out by someone who does notice it.

BuckeyeBill
05-18-2017, 13:39
After rereading this thread I think we are using the wrong terminology. A tip is something given to someone for extra service or something similar when you are also paying for part of that service. What we are talking about here is offering a token of appreciation given to some one that is not charging for the service provided. Offering a small amount of cash for not only picking you up, but to help offset the price of gas used, especially at current prices. If the person refuses, at least you made the effort. I hand it to them and tell them to give to a charity of their choice. $5-$10 may not sound like much, but if everyone that walked on any part of the AT sent it to the ATC, it would certainly help them with their overall mission as overseer of the AT.

theinfamousj
05-18-2017, 14:55
The word you are looking for is donation or gratuity.

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BuckeyeBill
05-18-2017, 16:40
That makes sense. Thank you.

rocketsocks
05-18-2017, 17:59
......well I have had the experience on 3 separate occasions that I was hitching off the trail and got a ride from 3 different folks that were obviously destitute, I can see that their tank was near E. I'm no rich Connecticut Yankee by no means, but I was better off that they were, so I gave them gas moneyim sorry but I can't help but think that they might be thinkin' the same thing...this poor bastards walkin' with Everything he owns on his back, he dosen't even have a car. :D

coach lou
05-18-2017, 21:19
im sorry but I can't help but think that they might be thinkin' the same thing...this poor bastards walkin' with Everything he owns on his back, he dosen't even have a car. :D

I would hope to have a slice to give that person!

shelb
05-18-2017, 23:00
I hadn't ever thought about this...

Bansko
05-19-2017, 07:26
Just curious, but how many of you have been stubbornly walking into or out of some town after giving up hitching, your back facing oncoming traffic, and STILL been picked up by some good samaritan?

Tipi Walter
05-19-2017, 10:30
You bring up an obscure facet of hitchhiking: Do I stand in one spot and thumb or do I hike on the right shoulder and thumb? Both work. Third option? If it's a short distance like 3 miles I'll hike on the left shoulder facing traffic and not bother hitching. Sometimes I'll even get a ride by not hitching just from friendly guys who stop and offer.



Just curious, but how many of you have been stubbornly walking into or out of some town after giving up hitching, your back facing oncoming traffic, and STILL been picked up by some good samaritan?

You must've not read my Post #37 as quoted above.

Bronk
05-19-2017, 12:08
If someone invited you over for dinner would you offer them money when the meal was over? Probably not...that would be kind of awkward and insulting. :-)

Turk6177
05-19-2017, 12:28
If I am at a hotel/hostel and they give me a ride, I pay them at the end of the ride or I even offer them X amount of dollars before the ride. If I just catch a ride from the trail, I figure if someone is stopping, they aren't doing it for money. I offer them at the end of the ride, but have never had someone take the money. If you have ever done any kind of trail magic, you know you get just as much, if not more out of giving than receiving.

Bansko
05-22-2017, 08:19
You must've not read my Post #37 as quoted above.
My bad. I should have read through all posts before posting.

MuddyWaters
05-22-2017, 10:26
If someone invited you over for dinner would you offer them money when the meal was over? Probably not...that would be kind of awkward and insulting. :-)
What about if you told him first that you were hungry and you needed to eat?

Hitchhikers solicit rides..

MuddyWaters
05-22-2017, 10:27
Double post

Bronk
05-22-2017, 12:09
What about if you told him first that you were hungry and you needed to eat?

Hitchhikers solicit rides..Not always on the AT. I only remember sticking out my thumb one time in 850 miles. Most of the time all I had to do was arrive at the trailhead and before I could make it across the road someone had stopped and offered me a ride. If it was clear that they were in business (hostel, professional shuttle, or other service provider) I asked them how much they wanted before I got in the car.

Dogwood
05-22-2017, 12:40
If someone invited you over for dinner would you offer them money when the meal was over? Probably not...that would be kind of awkward and insulting. :-)

You r conviently omitting the solicitation of goods and services that most often lead up to being offered a ride.

theinfamousj
05-22-2017, 14:21
If someone invited you over for dinner would you offer them money when the meal was over? Probably not...that would be kind of awkward and insulting. :-)
"Thank you so much for such a delicious meal. I wish I could have helped contribute. Would you accept this as a thanks for the delicious food and the great company, and use it to help offset the costs for the next person you feed, even if you don't think it necessary?"

If I have means, I absolutely offer to contribute. I have had people refuse, but ever since I added the "pay it forward" part, people now accept. Gratitude and generosity are important to show and encourage.

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theinfamousj
05-22-2017, 14:22
Also, if you are invited to a dinner party, you are supposed to bring wine, dessert, or whatever else the host(ess) requests. They won't demand. You are supposed to ask, "What can I bring?" after accepting the dinner party invitation.

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Dogwood
05-22-2017, 17:06
Also, if you are invited to a dinner party, you are supposed to bring wine, dessert, or whatever else the host(ess) requests. They won't demand. You are supposed to ask, "What can I bring?" after accepting the dinner party invitation.

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You show consideration for others InfamousJ. I can't imagine being a freeloader taking everyone else's resources and gratitude for granted with out showing appreciation and consideration. Amazed out how self absorbed, self centered, cranky, and inconsiderate of others we alpha humans can be.

Tipi Walter
05-22-2017, 17:27
Also, if you are invited to a dinner party, you are supposed to bring wine, dessert, or whatever else the host(ess) requests. They won't demand. You are supposed to ask, "What can I bring?" after accepting the dinner party invitation.

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

Hitchhiking is not a dinner party. For anyone who has hitched, the exchange of money is never part of the equation, unless you want to complicate things. As many hitchhikers have mentioned in this thread, the exchange of money never occurred to us.


You show consideration for others InfamousJ. I can't imagine being a freeloader taking everyone else's resources and gratitude for granted with out showing appreciation and consideration. Amazed out how self absorbed, self centered, cranky, and inconsiderate of others we alpha humans can be.

To echo Lone Wolf---It's just HITCHING. Gratitude for a ride comes in many unspoken forms and gratitude has nothing to do with money---either giving or receiving. When I get out of a car after a decent ride I project a good vibe towards that person---it's inevitable. Such harmony and decency is what makes hitchhiking work---not the exchange of money.

theinfamousj
05-22-2017, 17:41
You are right that gratitude comes in different forms. But even if hitchhiking, it is still important to *express* out loud, explicitly, not just *project* internally and quietly.

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rocketsocks
05-22-2017, 20:13
You are right that gratitude comes in different forms. But even if hitchhiking, it is still important to *express* out loud, explicitly, not just *project* internally and quietly.

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk"inaction is the ruination of man" ~not sure who said it, but I always liked it.

Lone Wolf
05-22-2017, 20:16
folks pick up hitchers cuz they wanna help. don't offend them by tryin' to pay

Dogwood
05-22-2017, 23:38
Appreciation is what gets this person rides even if that appreciation is sometimes shown with money. I said this previously.

Dogwood
05-22-2017, 23:41
If you dont recognize rides can be obtained or facilitated by sweetening the pot with money then you're missing out on rides.

JFKinYK
05-23-2017, 16:22
I'm in the don't pay category. I like to think there are still a few things in this world free of that system. My payback is on a broader level, back into the network of all us hitchers, as I stop and pick up people whenever I can.

Tipi Walter
05-23-2017, 16:44
I'm in the don't pay category. I like to think there are still a few things in this world free of that system. My payback is on a broader level, back into the network of all us hitchers, as I stop and pick up people whenever I can.

So true. As Dylan wrote, "The loser now will be later to win."

Or---The Hitcher now will be later to Drive.

And so yes I've picked up many hitchhikers. One time on my motorcycle I had an extra helmet and picked up a guy---what could he do to mess with me??

rocketsocks
05-23-2017, 17:00
So true. As Dylan wrote, "The loser now will be later to win."

Or---The Hitcher now will be later to Drive.

And so yes I've picked up many hitchhikers. One time on my motorcycle I had an extra helmet and picked up a guy---what could he do to mess with me??I can't, I just can't, I mean I shouldn't...:D it would be grounds!

rocketsocks
05-23-2017, 17:02
I be affriad he'd tickle me and I'd have to lay it down.

Bronk
05-27-2017, 12:35
I would be very offended if I invited someone to dinner and when it was over they pulled out their wallet. No matter what they said or how they said it. I'd mostly feel like you were a rich a-hole flaunting your money and that you were looking down on me. And I'd also think that you had no manners. When you stop for a hitchhiker there should be no expectation of payment. If you are offering a shuttle service, tell them that when you stop to offer them a ride. Otherwise, its hitchhiking. You should no more expect money than you would offer a stranger a tip when they hold the door open for you. I've given a lot of hitchhikers rides over the years and nobody has ever offered me any money...and I wouldn't accept it if it were offered. I find this whole discussion very bizarre.

Tipi Walter
05-27-2017, 13:52
I would be very offended if I invited someone to dinner and when it was over they pulled out their wallet. I find this whole discussion very bizarre.

I'm assuming the OP, Somers515, has never hitched and probably figures that there's normally money exchanged at some point.

The beauty of hitchhiking is I can slap on a backpack and start on the side of a road in NC and end up in the Sierras in California eventually to start a backpacking trip---without spending a dime for transportation.