PDA

View Full Version : My gear...open to suggestions...



YankeeDude
06-12-2017, 15:46
Quick background since I'm new here: I've played, built forts and hiked in woods since I was a kid. Can't get enough of them. Typically, my hikes were rather unprepared for the most part. As I got older I did some longer, slightly more prepared hikes but was still limited in what I brought primarily due to what I could (or couldn't) afford.

Due to relocations and what not, I got away from hiking for a bit - at least as much as I would have liked to have gone. I'm trying to get into it more and have the goal of doing more weekend type hikes with maybe one or two overnight stays.

The following is a pretty complete list of what I've recently acquired. Most, but not all of the items are shown in the pictures. Everything fits comfortably in the backpack. I'm open to any advice or critique from those that have it to offer. These items were put together for a hike up Mount Thielsen earlier this year, thus the snow gear.


Teton Talus 2700 backpack (w/poncho/backpack cover)

ALPS Lynx 1-man tent

Platypus Big Zip 3l hydration bladder

Petzl Aktic headlamp

SOGfari kukri

Morakniv Kansbol

Fiskars X11 hatchet

Gerber Dime

Luminox Recon Point Man watch

Sawyer mini filter

La Sportiva Eco 2.0 shoes

Spare cell phone battery

Spare headlight batteries

Paracord

Kevlar string

Gorilla tape

Emergency blankets

Waterproof matches

Cotton balls rubbed w/petroleum jelly

Aquatabs water purification tablets

REI first aid kit

Snow bibs

Wool knit hat

Microfleece balaclava

Darn Tough wool socks

Marmot Precip jacket

Marmot Precip pants

Neoprene gloves


395923959339594

HooKooDooKu
06-12-2017, 16:21
I would say that you've got far too many "cutting" tools.

A pocket knife (or small multi-tool) and some sort of light weight saw (http://www.gerbergear.com/Cutting-Tools/Saws/Exchange-a-blade-Saw_46036) is all you need, and even the saw would be considered by most to be a luxury to make cutting fire wood easier.

soumodeler
06-12-2017, 16:29
Agreed. Ditch everything except the smallest, lightest knife. You don't need anything more than a small blade on the AT.

mister krabs
06-12-2017, 16:35
Agreed on the cutting tools, all I cut are rope and meat. Wood gets broken for the fire. You've got a pretty standard "non-lightweight" kit. I'd say just throw it in your bag and go hiking, you'll figure out what you need and what you can leave behind. I didn't see a sleeping bag or pad, half of your "big four." Opportunities for lightening up, cheap -- bring less stuff, no multiples of things like cutting tools, water purification, poncho/precip, embrace multi-use items. Hydration packs are heavy, I like 32oz poweraide bottles for carrying water -- light, cheap, and they come with poweraide inside!

soumodeler
06-12-2017, 16:36
I have carried nothing but this: https://www.leatherman.com/style-23.html#q=style&lang=default&start=1 for the past several years and hundreds of miles on the AT and have never needed anything more.

The Kisco Kid
06-12-2017, 16:52
Holy daggers, Batman! That's a lot of knives. (in honor of Adam West). Yeah, ditch the arsenal of the five cutting instruments and just take the knife on the bottom right. I would also recommend getting rid of the snowbibs and bringing a pair of baselayer bottoms like the patagonia capilene lightweight bottoms or the midweight instead. The bibs are overkill for three-season.

As other posters noted, no mentioned of sleeping bag or pad. I recommend folks getting into ultralight gear start with the big four: pack/tent/sleeping bag/sleeping pad. That's where you'll save the most weight.

Nice list. Pretty well dialed-in.

kestral
06-12-2017, 17:13
If I saw you coming toward me dressed in black, black face cover and all those knives strapped on you I would be very nervous and would probably be holding my pepper spray and telling you about the bid group of guys I'm hiking with who are right behind me!

People worry me much more than critters. And you really don't need all that arsenal.

YankeeDude
06-12-2017, 17:15
I would say that you've got far too many "cutting" tools.

A pocket knife (or small multi-tool) and some sort of light weight saw (http://www.gerbergear.com/Cutting-Tools/Saws/Exchange-a-blade-Saw_46036) is all you need, and even the saw would be considered by most to be a luxury to make cutting fire wood easier.

lol...yeah, I kind of figured I went heavy on the cutting tools. I took everything there on the Thielsen hike. I took it all mainly: 1.) to see how I did with the load and 2.) thinking being over-prepared isn't a bad thing in case we wound up stuck on the mountain for some reason.

The overall weight of the pack wasn't bad. I'm 6'-1", 230 pounds (need to drop about 20) and it didn't really negatively affect me. But I get it - being lighter is better. Thanks for the link to the saw.


Agreed. Ditch everything except the smallest, lightest knife. You don't need anything more than a small blade on the AT.

The SOG is a thin bladed kukri. I don't love it. The serrated edge seems decent but haven't tested it. I think I could get away with the Mora and a saw similar to mentioned above.


Agreed on the cutting tools, all I cut are rope and meat. Wood gets broken for the fire. You've got a pretty standard "non-lightweight" kit. I'd say just throw it in your bag and go hiking, you'll figure out what you need and what you can leave behind. I didn't see a sleeping bag or pad, half of your "big four." Opportunities for lightening up, cheap -- bring less stuff, no multiples of things like cutting tools, water purification, poncho/precip, embrace multi-use items. Hydration packs are heavy, I like 32oz poweraide bottles for carrying water -- light, cheap, and they come with poweraide inside!

I need to add a sleeping bag. I have the black Marine's sleeping bag. I forget what temps it's rated for - I think for below 30 degrees...I'd need to look. I'm sure there are better, lighter options out there - just need to see what they are.

I also need a pad...need to research that as well.

Thanks krabs


I have carried nothing but this: https://www.leatherman.com/style-23.html#q=style&lang=default&start=1 for the past several years and hundreds of miles on the AT and have never needed anything more.

Good to know. I've clearly overestimated my needs lol...


Holy daggers, Batman! That's a lot of knives. (in honor of Adam West). Yeah, ditch the arsenal of the five cutting instruments and just take the knife on the bottom right. I would also recommend getting rid of the snowbibs and bringing a pair of baselayer bottoms like the patagonia capilene lightweight bottoms or the midweight instead. The bibs are overkill for three-season.

As other posters noted, no mentioned of sleeping bag or pad. I recommend folks getting into ultralight gear start with the big four: pack/tent/sleeping bag/sleeping pad. That's where you'll save the most weight.

Nice list. Pretty well dialed-in.

Thanks, Kisco Kid. I'll definitely pare down the edged instruments. :)

Agreed on the snow bibs. Thielsen was cold and I had no need for them. I wore thermal underwear, Duluth flex work pants (comfy) and the Precip pants and I was plenty warm. Thanks for the recommendations. I'll check them out.

I'll stick with the tent and pack that I got but definitely need to look into the sleeping bag and pad arena. Any recommendations are welcome and I'll do some reading here on the forum in the meantime.

YankeeDude
06-12-2017, 17:25
If I saw you coming toward me dressed in black, black face cover and all those knives strapped on you I would be very nervous and would probably be holding my pepper spray and telling you about the bid group of guys I'm hiking with who are right behind me!

People worry me much more than critters. And you really don't need all that arsenal.

Understood Kestral. Most of it is pretty unobtrusive when in the pack but I totally understand your point. But that aside, it's still obviously more than I need to bring.

I keep the Mora in the sheath on my front left pack strap for 'just in case'. The kukri and hatchet ride in the outside pockets of the pack and aren't too noticeable. Looks like I'll be ditching both though based on recommendations just received. If it reduces my scariness in the process, that's an added bonus. :)3960339604

mister krabs
06-12-2017, 18:27
Your kit would make Johnny Cash proud. You are the man in black! As far as lightening up goes, go with what you're comfortable with, but try a summer trip with a lot less stuff and you might get hooked!

Sleeping pads are a highly personal choice, you seem to gravitate toward budget, but solid gear. If you're a young back sleeper, you'll be fine with just about anything -- check out the z-rest. I'm old and a side sleeper, I love my Alps featherlight pad. Both are the budget but solid choices of their types.

The sleeping bag is where you have the possibility of saving the most weight (not so important to you) but also the most volume (to fit your 45L pack.) I trust down over synthetic, but there are good synthetic bags too, just watch the packed size and weight. For budget but solid, try the kelty cosmic or if you're brave, one of the cheap chinese ones on gearbest or amazon.

YankeeDude
06-12-2017, 18:45
The black wasn't intentional lol...nor was the large amount of orange that my gear contains.

I'm 43 and a side sleeper, so if that pad works for you, I'll look into it - thanks for the suggestions on pad and bag!

YankeeDude
07-03-2017, 00:01
Sleeping pad and bag are on the way...ordered a Klymit Ozone Recon pad and Klymit KSB 20 bag.

39765

39764

Need to do some research on clothing and footwear. Currently have Sportiva Eco 2.0's:

39766

Thinking of getting the 3.0's...the boot versions of the 2.0:

39767

Huntmog
07-04-2017, 12:17
I'm not sure about that bag/ pad pairing....

Based on the pics above and the bag you ordered I'm assuming winter trips. I had the klymit static pad and froze... in the summer.

Stalk eBay and you can get top of the line pads new in box for 80. Even lower if you get regular width.

If they're for different weather then not a biggie.

martinb
07-04-2017, 13:02
Couldn't find a "r" value on that pad. If you plan to camp in cool/cold weather then think about getting a better pad, one with a R-value rating of at least 3. The higher the better.

YankeeDude
07-05-2017, 18:42
I'm not sure about that bag/ pad pairing....

Based on the pics above and the bag you ordered I'm assuming winter trips. I had the klymit static pad and froze... in the summer.

Stalk eBay and you can get top of the line pads new in box for 80. Even lower if you get regular width.

Yes, they will be for winter(ish) trips. Going to RMNP area mid-October.

I bought both of these as refurbs from Klymit off eBay. Got the pad for $37 ($80 retail) and the bag for $75 ($150 retail). I'm a hot sleeper, I've slept in cold temps before with far worse bags, so not too worried about staying warm. The bag has pretty stellar reviews.

If they're for different weather then not a biggie.


Couldn't find a "r" value on that pad. If you plan to camp in cool/cold weather then think about getting a better pad, one with a R-value rating of at least 3. The higher the better.

If it performs as they say, I'll be fine. Klymit's site states: "Klymit Inertia pads do not have an r value because they use the warmth from your sleeping bag. If you have a sleeping bag that is rated to 35 degrees, then you can use any of our Inertia camping pads at that temperature."

martinb
07-05-2017, 19:54
That's not how it works. The, lets say R-5 rated, provides enough insulation between your bag and the ground to allow the bag (properly made) to perform to its rated temperature. Just looking at that pad I can say you are going to freeze in winter temps.