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View Full Version : Monadnock-Sunapee Greenway 6/18/17 - 6/23/17



iAmKrzys
08-06-2017, 21:32
Back in June I hiked Monadnock-Sunapee Greenway and recently I wrote up a trip report from that hike in a blog:


Day 0: Logistics & Getting There - http://hikingatsnailspace.blogspot.ca/2017/08/monadnock-sunapee-greenway-0-logistics.html
Day 1: Gilson Pond Campground -> Mt. Monadnock -> Spiltoir Shelter - http://hikingatsnailspace.blogspot.ca/2017/08/monadnock-sunapee-greenway-1-gilson.html
Day 2: Spiltoir Shelter -> Crider Forest Shelter - http://hikingatsnailspace.blogspot.ca/2017/08/monadnock-sunapee-greenway-2-spiltoir.html
Day 3: Crider Forest Shelter -> George Washington Shelter - http://hikingatsnailspace.blogspot.ca/2017/08/monadnock-sunapee-greenway-3-crider.html
Day 4: George Washington Shelter -> Steve Galpin Shelter at Moose Lookout - http://hikingatsnailspace.blogspot.ca/2017/08/monadnock-sunapee-greenway-4-george.html
Day 5: Steve Galpin Shelter at Moose Lookout -> Mt. Sunapee -> Tippicanoe Campground - http://hikingatsnailspace.blogspot.ca/2017/08/monadnock-sunapee-greenway-5-steve.html

Just a few words about logistics - I was hiking alone so I had to park my car near one end of the trail and get myself driven to the other end. While you can read full details in my blog, I parked my car for a reasonable fee at Tippicanoe Campground in Goshen and I got a ride from Flying Aces car service to Gilson Pond Campground in Monadnock State Park and that's where I started my hike.

MSG is likely to get you quite a bit of solitude on the trail. I really appreciate the efforts of all trail maintainers who keep MSG in great shape!

Shae
08-07-2017, 11:04
Nice job on the hike as well as the report and pictures! I live about 20 minutes from Sunapee and hike up to the lake and the ledges several times a year but I have yet to check the MSG off my list. Hopefully this September.

Slo-go'en
08-07-2017, 11:55
The MSG is a neat little trail. Rafe and I did it a couple of years ago, also in June. I think we did it in 4 days, 3 nights. Climbed Monadnock in the pouring rain. Of course it cleared up once over the top and down the other side. We only meet 4 people the whole time. A father/son coming off Monadnock in the rain, then 2 girls going SOBO about midway.

This would be a great fall hike when the colors peak. Need to think about doing this again in a month or two.

fastfoxengineering
08-14-2017, 00:48
I'm heading out to hike the Greenway the last week of September. Really excited. food dehydrator is running right now

Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk

Slo-go'en
08-14-2017, 10:51
The MSG is short enough that I'm considering doing a yo-yo so I don't need to find a way back to the car. Will be looking for a good weather window when the colors are about peak.

Deadeye
08-14-2017, 20:08
My son & I hiked it over Memorial Day weekend this spring - 3 nights, 4 days. Except for the top of Monadnock and Pitcher Mtn., we saw nobody. Great little hike, will post some details later - gotta run.

iAmKrzys
08-14-2017, 20:36
I hope you have great weather and really fun hike! I really enjoyed it and keep going back to my pictures and I keep thinking about everything I saw... Let me know if you have any questions - I will be glad to answer them.

One thing I did not mention in my trip report - I have walked along many miles of stone walls setting various property boundaries. These walls must have taken thousands of hours of hard human (manual) labor! Simply amazing! I don't think many people would be willing to build walls like these today...

Deadeye
08-14-2017, 22:40
... back from chores. My son & I hiked it last memorial day weekend (double check - it was the week before). We parked a car at Mt. Sunapee ski area - call the ski area first, they will (hopefully) give you permission to park, tell you where to park, and take your license and phone info so they can contact you if necessary, 603-763-2356. MY wife dropped us off at the Marlboro trailhead. We summited Monadnock on a weekday, so there were less than a dozen hikers on top, and we only encountered a few on the way up and back down. We spent the first night at Spiltoir Shelter surrounded by coyotes. At first they were howling up a storm, then they got quiet and we could hear them walking around the shelter. Wicked creepy! No water at Spiltoir. We cameled up at a spring about a mile south of the shelter, but in the summer or fall, you might need to load up at the more reliable stream on the Dublin trail, or stash some water.

We tented at Fox Brook on the second night. The hike was great, going through all sorts of terrain, and passing too many old stone walls and foundations to count. It was an 18.6 mile day, but pretty easy. Pitcher mountain and Hubbard Hill had great views, but lots of ticks, too. Plenty of water at Fox Brook, and a nice tent pad. Instead of coyotes, we spent the night with several moose, a little too close for comfort at times. We could hear one walking toward our tents, so I said loudly "Be careful Mr. Moose" and he snorted and took off through the woods, crashing down the hill... I don't think he expected the dome-shaped rock (my TarpTent Rainbow) in the trail to speak! When we got up in the morning, the hoof prints were less than 20 feet away.

The third day we made it into Washington Center for an early lunch at the general store (turn left on Rte 31, only a few hundred feet off the trail). They have a small selection of groceries, and a nice little grill where you can get burgers, sandwiches, breakfast, etc. CASH ONLY, but there's an ATM... if you brought your card. After lunch, the expected rain started... with a few snowflakes mixed in. When we left the house, the weatherman was talking about a "deepening low", and man, it got deep! To shorten our last day, which would be in the rain, we stayed at Steve Galpin shelter, another 18 mile day. Wicked storm, and a metal roofed shelter - we didn't sleep much! The wind screamed all night, and we could hear trees falling and lightning crackling nearby and deafening thunder. One of the few nights when I wondered "what the #$%^ am I doing out here!?!?!"

Made our way out on day four along Sunapee Ridge. I'll bet there's lots of great views, but we were in the clouds and rain for most of the rest of the trip.

It's a great little trail! An interesting mix of open summits, rocky ridges, old farmland, road walking (maybe a bit more than you'd like), fields and woods. Plenty of big and small views. Keep in mind, a lot of it is on private land, so the only camping is at designated sites, and there are no fires. I'm willing to bet that General Washington Shelter won't last - folks clearly are ignoring the rules there. Water is plentiful, at least in the spring, but not always in convenient places. Spiltoir shelter has no nearby water, the rest had water within a half mile or less. Only Fox Brook had water on site. I think I'll do it again, next time in the fall.

rafe
08-15-2017, 06:54
The only shelter I'd avoid is the one just outside Washington. Much too close to town, and it was a dump. The other shelters were new and clean.

iAmKrzys
08-15-2017, 21:19
... back from chores. My son & I hiked it last memorial day weekend (double check - it was the week before). We parked a car at Mt. Sunapee ski area - call the ski area first, they will (hopefully) give you permission to park, tell you where to park, and take your license and phone info so they can contact you if necessary, 603-763-2356. MY wife dropped us off at the Marlboro trailhead. We summited Monadnock on a weekday, so there were less than a dozen hikers on top, and we only encountered a few on the way up and back down. We spent the first night at Spiltoir Shelter surrounded by coyotes. At first they were howling up a storm, then they got quiet and we could hear them walking around the shelter. Wicked creepy! No water at Spiltoir. We cameled up at a spring about a mile south of the shelter, but in the summer or fall, you might need to load up at the more reliable stream on the Dublin trail, or stash some water.

We tented at Fox Brook on the second night. The hike was great, going through all sorts of terrain, and passing too many old stone walls and foundations to count. It was an 18.6 mile day, but pretty easy. Pitcher mountain and Hubbard Hill had great views, but lots of ticks, too. Plenty of water at Fox Brook, and a nice tent pad. Instead of coyotes, we spent the night with several moose, a little too close for comfort at times. We could hear one walking toward our tents, so I said loudly "Be careful Mr. Moose" and he snorted and took off through the woods, crashing down the hill... I don't think he expected the dome-shaped rock (my TarpTent Rainbow) in the trail to speak! When we got up in the morning, the hoof prints were less than 20 feet away.

The third day we made it into Washington Center for an early lunch at the general store (turn left on Rte 31, only a few hundred feet off the trail). They have a small selection of groceries, and a nice little grill where you can get burgers, sandwiches, breakfast, etc. CASH ONLY, but there's an ATM... if you brought your card. After lunch, the expected rain started... with a few snowflakes mixed in. When we left the house, the weatherman was talking about a "deepening low", and man, it got deep! To shorten our last day, which would be in the rain, we stayed at Steve Galpin shelter, another 18 mile day. Wicked storm, and a metal roofed shelter - we didn't sleep much! The wind screamed all night, and we could hear trees falling and lightning crackling nearby and deafening thunder. One of the few nights when I wondered "what the #$%^ am I doing out here!?!?!"

Made our way out on day four along Sunapee Ridge. I'll bet there's lots of great views, but we were in the clouds and rain for most of the rest of the trip.

It's a great little trail! An interesting mix of open summits, rocky ridges, old farmland, road walking (maybe a bit more than you'd like), fields and woods. Plenty of big and small views. Keep in mind, a lot of it is on private land, so the only camping is at designated sites, and there are no fires. I'm willing to bet that General Washington Shelter won't last - folks clearly are ignoring the rules there. Water is plentiful, at least in the spring, but not always in convenient places. Spiltoir shelter has no nearby water, the rest had water within a half mile or less. Only Fox Brook had water on site. I think I'll do it again, next time in the fall.
It sounds like you had few rough nights on the trail! I'm not a great sleeper while backpacking but luckily my shelter stays were much less eventful.

One comment on water at Spiltoir Shelter - I also came in NOBO, and had to make do with whatever I brought with me, however, there is water at Eliza Adams Gorge which is about 0.2 miles north of the shelter, so it is possible to get water not too far from the shelter, however it requires backtracking.

Deadeye
08-24-2017, 14:01
It sounds like you had few rough nights on the trail! I'm not a great sleeper while backpacking but luckily my shelter stays were much less eventful.

I wouldn't call them "rough" - they were a blast! Except maybe the parts about getting burned to a crisp by lightning... or stomped by a moose...

iAmKrzys
08-24-2017, 18:42
I wouldn't call them "rough" - they were a blast! Except maybe the parts about getting burned to a crisp by lightning... or stomped by a moose...

Did you pitch your tent on the platform or on the ground? Hopefully moose would not climb the tenting platform if no food was involved. :)

Deadeye
08-24-2017, 20:32
we pitched on the ground, agreed the moose was not likely to get up on the platform. Maybe if we had some moose music...