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Arsenul
08-19-2017, 20:42
So this is a good community for the Appalachian trail, but it's known for one of the best backpacking communities. I come with a different interest in mind. I like to practice Bushcraft and the like, but it seems if I want to get better, I should settle with a 65L pack to get everywhere with. My main reason behind joining is I do a lot of winter camping trips. I hope to get a set up where I can take maybe two backpacks on the trips I take in order to stay kinda lightweight. (Little brain dead excuse the random confusion). The "gear list" would be put together after a while but it'd be my finished set up once I do have it all.

I have $300 I am willing to spend on a sleeping bag that needs to be a long version. I have a Big Agnes Q Core sleeping pad I'm content with. My cook kit as well is well thought out through experience and I like it based off that. So my question/help for you is simple. I need a $300 winter sleeping bag suggestion, a possible 65L Bag that's reliable and affordable. $300 for a sleeping bag is insane to me. Possible clothes that would help me in a winter situation. What I normally use is too bulky when packed. A possible DIY under quilt that'll help me keep my booty warm if I hang. And I'm sure other things I'm forgetting. I've got a tarp, hammock, and cook kit managed already as well as a saw, knife, and axe. Some things are worth the weight and needed. I also have some base layers I'll be bringing as well. The really bulky stuff is just my coat and my pajama bottoms. Never had a good bag so always needed them.


I realize not a lot of that made sense. Sorry.

Arsenul
08-19-2017, 20:44
Oh, let it be known, I was looking at this bag which meets my budget perfectly. Plus if it doesn't work like it suggest here, I can always use it as a normal sleeping bag. Right?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=47KWuiTm_yo

DownEaster
08-19-2017, 21:34
The picture refers to a sleep system. You've got a pad already, but are you looking for just a sleeping bag? I've got layers for my sleep system. My bag is a Marmot Cloudbreak 30, which is only a 32.4 bag. But I've got a silk mummy liner to go inside, and a Survive Outdoors Longer Escape Bivvy as an outer liner. With this combination I expect to be comfortable in the last few weeks of winter on the AT, adjusting the layers I use as appropriate.

OkeefenokeeJoe
08-19-2017, 22:02
I realize not a lot of that made sense. Sorry.
Not to be rude but, you're right ... it made zero sense to me. A hodge-podge of random sentences (often incomplete) with no central focus. Accordingly, I'm just going to sit back and see what others have to say.

I truly hope, however, that you find the perfect sleeping bag, or pack, or cook set, or whatever it is you're looking for. Lots of experience lurking here among forum members.

OkeefenokeeJoe

Slo-go'en
08-19-2017, 22:45
Search for "$300 down sleeping bags" and see what comes up. Define what you mean by winter. Do you want to sleep comfortably at -20F and 50 MPH winds or just stay alive for the night?

TNhiker
08-19-2017, 23:01
Two backpacks?

who is carrying the second one?

Arsenul
08-20-2017, 04:03
Two backpacks? who is carrying the second one?
One on the back, one on the front.

TTT
08-20-2017, 06:12
Bushcraft and hiking are two different disciplines; reminiscent of heavy surplus military gear and skill set, versus light disposable commercial products. Both are outcomes based and designed to take the user from point A to point B without dying :) However, taking the one discipline into the other is problematic as they serve two different objectives, with the latter requiring a 'less is more' approach. (An ax can weigh the equivalent of an ultra light backpackers entire skin weight). Your bushcraft skills begin at home deciphering what to select from your kitchen sink of goodies with bulk being your nemesis and functionality a prime consideration. Spending money on a few choice warm and light bits of durable gear will help you in the long run. Example: If you plan on sleeping near a fire then wool will be your friend and synthetic materials a risk factor. Increasing the size of your backpack or carrying two of them needs a rethink

Tipi Walter
08-20-2017, 09:17
Bushcraft and hiking are two different disciplines; reminiscent of heavy surplus military gear and skill set, versus light disposable commercial products. Both are outcomes based and designed to take the user from point A to point B without dying :) However, taking the one discipline into the other is problematic as they serve two different objectives, with the latter requiring a 'less is more' approach. (An ax can weigh the equivalent of an ultra light backpackers entire skin weight). Your bushcraft skills begin at home deciphering what to select from your kitchen sink of goodies with bulk being your nemesis and functionality a prime consideration. Spending money on a few choice warm and light bits of durable gear will help you in the long run. Example: If you plan on sleeping near a fire then wool will be your friend and synthetic materials a risk factor. Increasing the size of your backpack or carrying two of them needs a rethink

Good post and my thoughts exactly.

The OP probably or should know about Bushcraft USA and this forum link on "Backpacking"---

https://bushcraftusa.com/forum/forums/backpacking.144/

I don't understand the desire to use two backpacks fore and aft. Inefficient and uncomfortable. How about one big 100+ liter pack??

If you do alot of winter trips you should already have your sleeping bag dialed in. What's the need for a $300 sleeping bag then??

But if you're talking about driving a vehicle in close to your bushcrafting sites---and letting the vehicle get in all of your stuff close to a campsite, well, then you probably need some upgrades and can't carry all this stuff. Sounds like you want to do more backpacking and want to get further afield.

Backpackers generally don't Bushcraft---if you define bushcraft as building elaborate fire rings, camp furniture, packing axes and hatchets and saws and big knives, and cutting down saplings and trees to build hooches and witus and lean-tos and tipis etc. Most backpackers here on WB strongly advocate LNT principles---often the antithesis of bushcrafting---because most backpackers camp and hike on public lands---national forests, national parks and wilderness areas.

MuddyWaters
08-20-2017, 09:25
Where is it even legal to practice "bush craft" outside of private property?

bushcraft. Its a fancy synonm for "pretending to be a pioneer". What you claim to practice, isnt practice for anything. The day will never come when you need to call on it.

Tipi Walter
08-20-2017, 09:52
Where is it even legal to practice "bush craft" outside of private property?

bushcraft. Its a fancy synonm for "pretending to be a pioneer". What you claim to practice, isnt practice for anything. The day will never come when you need to call on it.

Several years ago I got into a heated discussion on a bushcraft forum about disfiguring public land to get their "bush" fix---as you say---wannabe davy crocketts and daniel boones etc. What spawned my mild outrage was stumbling on various Pioneer projects in the middle of the Citico and Slickrock wilderness areas. Some forum members said they'll cut as much stuff up on national forest land as they want.

Here's some pics of the stuff I have stumbled on---
40088
A simple hooch on Slickrock Creek---and of course left up.

40089
A major project on South Fork Creek in Citico wilderness. They cut over 40 (I counted) rhodo trunks down to achieve this wannabe daniel boone moment. Notice creek in background.

40090
Here's the butt kicker---I went back a couple months later and found their Wad---wonderful. Leave no trace? Nope, think again.

40091
On another trip I was backpacking up North Fork Creek and discovered an abandoned campsite with cut down living trees to make this camp furniture. I spent 30 minutes cutting it all apart and scattering it.

40092
But the worst thing of all? THEY LEFT THEIR CAMPFIRE BURNING!!!:mad:

Bronk
08-20-2017, 11:30
Bushcraft and hiking are two different disciplines; reminiscent of heavy surplus military gear and skill set, versus light disposable commercial products. Both are outcomes based and designed to take the user from point A to point B without dying :) However, taking the one discipline into the other is problematic as they serve two different objectives, with the latter requiring a 'less is more' approach. (An ax can weigh the equivalent of an ultra light backpackers entire skin weight). Your bushcraft skills begin at home deciphering what to select from your kitchen sink of goodies with bulk being your nemesis and functionality a prime consideration. Spending money on a few choice warm and light bits of durable gear will help you in the long run. Example: If you plan on sleeping near a fire then wool will be your friend and synthetic materials a risk factor. Increasing the size of your backpack or carrying two of them needs a rethinkI've always thought of bushcraft being lighter weight, as in not carrying a pack at all, but rather using what is in the environment to survive. If bushcraft means you're carrying more than an ultralight backpacker then you're probably doing it wrong or doing something else.

TTT
08-20-2017, 11:38
The heaviest thing a bushcrafter should be carrying is knowledge. :)

TNhiker
08-20-2017, 11:56
One on the back, one on the front.



Yeah...

ok.....other than short distances, you're not doing that....

TNhiker
08-20-2017, 12:04
The day will never come when you need to call on it.




yeah....

this reminds me of those "survival" bracelets made from para cord that are commonly sold around these parts of East Tennessee (especially tourist shops near the park)...

the people buying these and wearing them are people I would never see out on a trail let alone in the backcountry nor would they ever be in a situation to have a use for them....

Kinda like "bear bells"....


however, there was a rescue of some guy who slid off alum cave trail in the steeper sections where the paracord was used.....

Cheyou
08-20-2017, 15:41
One on the back, one on the front.


https://www.aarnpacks.com/

some use 2 packs all the time . Zpacks has a front pack .

Thom

Cheyou
08-20-2017, 15:46
http://www.zpacks.com/accessories/backpack_lid.shtml

i do not own or indorse the use of this pack.

Tipi Walter
08-20-2017, 15:53
https://www.aarnpacks.com/

some use 2 packs all the time . Zpacks has a front pack .

Thom

My backpacking buddy Medicine Man uses the Aarn system---

https://photos.smugmug.com/Backpacking2010/16-Days-with-Wisenber-and/i-NtzVF5P/0/47649cf9/L/TRIP%20112%20082-L.jpg

Venchka
08-20-2017, 15:58
WhiteBlaze is so inbred. Expand your database.
https://www.aarnpacks.com/featherlite-freedom
Not exactly two backpacks in the traditional sense. Better weight distribution than everything behind your back.
Wayne


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Venchka
08-20-2017, 15:59
Late again.
Wayne


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Smooth & Wasabi
08-20-2017, 22:31
I recently got a long Marmot Radon from sierra trading post for under 300 bucks. 0 degree bag, 850 fill down, and just a few ounces over 3 pounds. I haven't had a chance to put it through its paces as I got it this spring but it was the best value to quality I could find on a new winter bag.

Arsenul
08-20-2017, 23:52
I recently got a long Marmot Radon from sierra trading post for under 300 bucks. 0 degree bag, 850 fill down, and just a few ounces over 3 pounds. I haven't had a chance to put it through its paces as I got it this spring but it was the best value to quality I could find on a new winter bag.
Thank you for being the only one to actually reply to the post the way it was meant to. I'll look into it.

egilbe
08-21-2017, 06:07
Thank you for being the only one to actually reply to the post the way it was meant to. I'll look into it.
I dont think anyone could really understand the question, if there was one.

saltysack
08-21-2017, 07:14
U can find a good used 0* quilt, just missed one here that was for sale...did you specify where winter is? How cold?


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saltysack
08-21-2017, 07:28
HG Burrow 0* NWT Down Quilt

https://r.tapatalk.com/shareLink?share_fid=24664&share_tid=126062&share_pid=2164079&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Ewhiteblaze%2Enet%2Fforum%2 Fshowpost%2Ephp%3Fp%3D2164079&share_type=t




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gracebowen
08-21-2017, 10:29
So my question/help for you is simple. I need a $300 winter sleeping bag suggestion, a possible 65L Bag that's reliable and affordable. $300 for a sleeping bag is insane to me. Possible clothes that would help me in a winter situation. What I normally use is too bulky when packed. A possible DIY under quilt that'll help me keep my booty warm if I hang. And I'm sure other things I'm forgetting. I've got a tarp, hammock, and cook kit managed already as well as a saw, knife, and axe. Some things are worth the weight and needed. I also have some base layers I'll be bringing as well. The really bulky stuff is just my coat and my pajama bottoms. Never had a good bag so always needed them.


I realize not a lot of that made sense. Sorry.[/QUOTE]


Thats his question

Tipi Walter
08-21-2017, 11:05
Thank you for being the only one to actually reply to the post the way it was meant to. I'll look into it.

Never answered my question---If you say you're doing alot of winter camping trips---What bag are you using for these trips???

Southeast
08-21-2017, 14:01
[QUOTE=Arsenul;2165878]

I have $300 I am willing to spend on a sleeping bag that needs to be a long version. I have a Big Agnes Q Core sleeping pad I'm content with. My cook kit as well is well thought out through experience and I like it based off that. So my question/help for you is simple. I need a $300 winter sleeping bag suggestion, a possible 65L Bag that's reliable and affordable. $300 for a sleeping bag is insane to me. /QUOTE]

If you are winter camping with a hammock, I'd recommend an Underquilt such as an Incubator by Hammockgear. It will compress and keep you warm.

Another option is to use a DIY Peapod. If you are familiar with Shug on YouTube, this is what he uses in Minnesota winters. If you haven't checked out his channel, I'd recommend it.

Personally I wasn't sure if winter hammock camping was for me, so I just modified an existing 0* sleeping bag to work as a PeaPod. I added an extender to give me some more room. Below is a link to a video by TZBrown over on Hammockforums where he shows adding an extender to an existing synthetic bag.

https://youtu.be/dGnnLJgp88s

Finally if you aren't on Hammockforums, come check it out. There are often people that meet locally (called group hangs) and that is a great way to pick up ideas on winter hammocking.