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MuddyWaters
09-03-2017, 08:49
A little early but
Appears hurricane irma will be a major storm, and impact AT somewhere in a week or so....

40209

saltysack
09-03-2017, 10:51
Not again....another reason to get the hell out of Fl! I hope it tracks easterly or my arse is toast...


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bstiffler
09-03-2017, 11:28
Not again....another reason to get the hell out of Fl! I hope it tracks easterly or my arse is toast...
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You and me both. About six months ago, I had a pretty good job offer in Johnson City like 10 miles from Irwin. I'm kicking myself now that I didn't take it. waiting to see if it opens up again.

bstiffler
09-03-2017, 11:35
last report I saw today shows it heading more nw and probably ended up around NC or Virginia sometime after next weekend if it makes landfall.

saltysack
09-03-2017, 11:40
You and me both. About six months ago, I had a pretty good job offer in Johnson City like 10 miles from Irwin. I'm kicking myself now that I didn't take it. waiting to see if it opens up again.

If I didn't have kids I'd be gone for sure! My youngest is in 6th grade and I'm 42....counting down till college. I'm out of hear! Western NC/TN/VA area has always appealed to me. Ready for a change and cooler weather. Early, live cheap retirement hear I come just need to convince the wife. [emoji51]


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MuddyWaters
09-03-2017, 11:47
If I didn't have kids I'd be gone for sure! My youngest is in 6th grade and I'm 42....counting down till college. I'm out of hear! Western NC/TN/VA area has always appealed to me. Ready for a change and cooler weather. Early, live cheap retirement hear I come just need to convince the wife. [emoji51]


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I intend to retire at 55-56, take early retirement (which aint much). But work contract probably half the year, and have most of year to take extended cheap trips.

I have a long bucket list.

ChrisMek
09-03-2017, 15:14
A little early but
Appears hurricane irma will be a major storm, and impact AT somewhere in a week or so....

40209

I am all set to do my New York SoBo section on September 8. I don't know what to do... I can postpone and start on September 14 but beyond that, I don't know when I can do it... I've been looking forward to this section for a year!!!

Do I go on the 8th and hope that the storms doesn't hit us or do I wait and start on the 14th and hope that it passes up New York within the week?



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Slo-go'en
09-03-2017, 15:40
I've been caught out on the trial in the remnants of a couple of hurricanes in New England. Typically heavy rain for 12 to 24 hours and it's gone. What's left of Harvey hasn't gotten here yet, but not much left of it anyway. If Irma skips up the coast, that might be a different story.

MuddyWaters
09-03-2017, 16:22
I am all set to do my New York SoBo section on September 8. I don't know what to do... I can postpone and start on September 14 but beyond that, I don't know when I can do it... I've been looking forward to this section for a year!!!

Do I go on the 8th and hope that the storms doesn't hit us or do I wait and start on the 14th and hope that it passes up New York within the week?



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You probably have a better idea about wed - thurs next week

Stone1984
09-03-2017, 16:53
I start the approach trail Sep 8th and will be on the AT for 10 days! I hope it stays away.

johnnybgood
09-03-2017, 17:07
Lots of variables in play to concern ourselves for now.
If it does swing up the coast the track won't be determined until Friday at the earliest.

rocketsocks
09-03-2017, 19:34
It's a brave man that can put an X on the ocean.

tflaris
09-03-2017, 19:40
Not again....another reason to get the hell out of Fl! I hope it tracks easterly or my arse is toast...


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I'm worried about my house.


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saltysack
09-03-2017, 20:18
I'm worried about my house.


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I hear ya....that's what insurance is for...


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DanTaylor
09-03-2017, 22:23
I live about 60 miles from the coast and have sat tight for a lot of storms. This one, depending on where they project landfall, I am thinking of packing up and leaving. This does not appear to be one to play with.

MuddyWaters
09-03-2017, 23:35
Good news, is that historically this storm in this location in sept would turn out to sea, and not make landfall most of time


Bad news is thats not what models are showing

Sarcasm the elf
09-03-2017, 23:38
I'm worried about my house.


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Same here, and I only bought it two weeks ago.

Traveler
09-04-2017, 06:50
As of this morning most of the tracking models are putting Irma somewhere between Cuba and the Bahamas by mid day Saturday, with only a few outlier models showing a turn up the coast. Too hard to predict this far out unfortunately but indications are starting to build its headed for the Gulf.

MtDoraDave
09-04-2017, 08:08
I filled up the gas cans for my generator yesterday. Hopefully that will work as hurricane prevention insurance. Simply buying the generator after Charlie, Francis, and Jean hit FL back to back to back worked to keep them away for over 10 years...

tflaris
09-04-2017, 09:24
I hear ya....that's what insurance is for...


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Sounds good in conversation. But the reality is completely different. Living a life interrupted and seeing the fruits of your labor destroyed is damaged is another.


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tflaris
09-04-2017, 09:26
Sounds good in conversation. But the reality is completely different. Living a life interrupted and seeing the fruits of your labor destroyed is another.


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Typo in sentence.

MuddyWaters
09-04-2017, 09:32
I hear ya....that's what insurance is for...


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My buddy has a rental house in key west.

10 yrs ago when we discussed it, he was paying $ 10,000/yr in premiums for hurricane

His deductible is 25%. His out of pocket not covered by insurance would be $100,000+ likely.

And, his downstairs is enclosed for more living area. Not legal anymore, but his property is grandfathered. He wouldnt be able to rebuild that at all. Thats where he stays when he goes to work on property improvements, etc.

saltysack
09-04-2017, 09:56
Sounds good in conversation. But the reality is completely different. Living a life interrupted and seeing the fruits of your labor destroyed is damaged is another.


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I feel your concern I'm less than .25 mile from the ocean in AB so I'm screwed also if it gets close. I have several century old live oaks around my house that would likely end up down on my house. We had to evacuate last year but luckily only had 80 mpd wind and didn't sustain any major damage.


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jefals
09-04-2017, 11:01
Not again....another reason to get the hell out of Fl! I hope it tracks easterly or my arse is toast...


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Hey, how's this for a Florida state motto?
"Florida - if you can't come to the beach - the beach can come to you"! (jus kidding...STAY SAFE)!

sketcher709
09-04-2017, 19:00
This is a very interesting site of weather geeks on a thread about Irma. The latest update within the last hour sows a decent possibility that Miami takes a direct hit then the storm rakes the state. One poster said it may then head to southern end of Appalachian mtns. These people seem technical, I do not understand much of what they are saying but have been able to glean who seems to know what they are talking about and also there is consensus which is a bit concerning. It almost seems a certainty, as certain as something can be this far out, that it will head to Florida as possibly a cat 4 or 5, perhaps it will cross the state and reland further up GA/SC/NC somewhere.

https://www.americanwx.com/bb/topic/50217-major-hurricane-irma/?page=99

I think if I were starting on the 8th I would have a contingency plan to take cover - could be quite a wicked rain storm. I'd also have my fingers crossed thy are all wrong and it gets shredded by Cuba and never comes back to life....

MuddyWaters
09-04-2017, 20:46
This is a very interesting site of weather geeks on a thread about Irma. The latest update within the last hour sows a decent possibility that Miami takes a direct hit then the storm rakes the state. One poster said it may then head to southern end of Appalachian mtns. These people seem technical, I do not understand much of what they are saying but have been able to glean who seems to know what they are talking about and also there is consensus which is a bit concerning. It almost seems a certainty, as certain as something can be this far out, that it will head to Florida as possibly a cat 4 or 5, perhaps it will cross the state and reland further up GA/SC/NC somewhere.

https://www.americanwx.com/bb/topic/50217-major-hurricane-irma/?page=99

I think if I were starting on the 8th I would have a contingency plan to take cover - could be quite a wicked rain storm. I'd also have my fingers crossed thy are all wrong and it gets shredded by Cuba and never comes back to life....
all anyone knows is what the models show. Courtesy of Wunderground (their logo is on their charts here)https://icons.wunderground.com/data/images/at201711_model.gif
Yeah, if I had a place in the keys, Id be gettin a little worried about now.

https://icons.wunderground.com/data/images/at201711_5day.gif
that and what HISTORICALLY storms this time of yr do, which this one aint. Models keep showing it tracking west, more west every update instead of following typical pattern, ie no steering front to oppose it. Today miami, tomorrow, New Orleans? Yesterday it was heading for atlantic coast somewhere from FL to ME

https://icons.wunderground.com/data/images/at201711_climo.gif

TexasBob
09-04-2017, 22:51
Local weather man in Houston says that a cold front passing through Texas and into the Gulf will steer the storm away from Texas and toward Florida. Good news for us, but unfortunately bad news for you guys. I hope it misses all of us.

MtDoraDave
09-05-2017, 19:18
I used to fear no storm because I'm right in the middle of the state.
...yup, 60 miles from either coast, between Homosassa and New Smyrna.
Charlie taught us that a storm can do pretty serious damage in the the middle of the state. Storms like THIS ONE are not to be taken lightly. If there is anything good to come out of the Texas disaster, it's that it should have removed many Floridians false sense of invulnerability for a year or two.
It's Tuesday and shelves are already bare at the lumber stores and the grocery stores. That's saying something.

johnnybgood
09-05-2017, 20:28
Looks like the islands of the Caribbean and vacation paradise southern Florida are sitting dead red for Irma's wrath. Even if this Hurricane goes through cycles of reorganization and weakens as it churns ever closer to the island chains, it will wreck havoc wherever it makes landfall.

Heed the warnings and take every precaution. Stay high and dry.

Peace !​

OkeefenokeeJoe
09-05-2017, 21:48
It's always funny to me how yankee transplants to the South (who seem to never grasp the most basic understanding that dinner is served at high noon and supper is the evening meal) magically become Hurricane experts when they relocate here. I was at The Home Depot today with a friend of mine from Pennsylvania and even he had to shake his head at the dozens of yankee "experts" just mouthing and prognosticating away in their loud-talking yankee-speak. Those of us who are native born to the Southern Coast, and have scores of years experience with hurricanes and tropical storms, understand that it to WAY too early to identify the path of either Irma or Jose. The common sense thing to do is to stay quiet, be observant (particularly keen on wildlife/animal behavior), and once a more defined path is established by weather authorities, take appropriate and responsible action.

rocketsocks
09-05-2017, 23:25
It's always funny to me how yankee transplants to the South (who seem to never grasp the most basic understanding that dinner is served at high noon and supper is the evening meal) magically become Hurricane experts when they relocate here. I was at The Home Depot today with a friend of mine from Pennsylvania and even he had to shake his head at the dozens of yankee "experts" just mouthing and prognosticating away in their loud-talking yankee-speak. Those of us who are native born to the Southern Coast, and have scores of years experience with hurricanes and tropical storms, understand that it to WAY too early to identify the path of either Irma or Jose. The common sense thing to do is to stay quiet, be observant (particularly keen on wildlife/animal behavior), and once a more defined path is established by weather authorities, take appropriate and responsible action.no wonder you're all over weight, yur eatin' two dinners!

gollwoods
09-06-2017, 01:32
Olga 1995 caused mudslides

I hear smoke

MuddyWaters
09-06-2017, 04:39
It's always funny to me how yankee transplants to the South (who seem to never grasp the most basic understanding that dinner is served at high noon and supper is the evening meal) magically become Hurricane experts when they relocate here. I was at The Home Depot today with a friend of mine from Pennsylvania and even he had to shake his head at the dozens of yankee "experts" just mouthing and prognosticating away in their loud-talking yankee-speak. Those of us who are native born to the Southern Coast, and have scores of years experience with hurricanes and tropical storms, understand that it to WAY too early to identify the path of either Irma or Jose. The common sense thing to do is to stay quiet, be observant (particularly keen on wildlife/animal behavior), and once a more defined path is established by weather authorities, take appropriate and responsible action.

By the time you kniw where its going, too late to do much

On coast, you should have pre cut plywood panels, all the time.
Install, bring things that fly away inside, and leave

bstiffler
09-06-2017, 06:09
Well most of the gas stations here are out of gas. Had to get up at 5 am to find a place that had any and it was 3.19 for premium. Last night most places had lines around the block. Hospital iWork at is talking about evacuating in next couple days depending on predictions today. The back up generator is on the first floor so if we get flooded we're done.

MtDoraDave
09-06-2017, 06:55
By the time you know where its going, too late to do much

On coast, you should have pre cut plywood panels, all the time.
Install, bring things that fly away inside, and leave


QFT

Okeefenokee Joe's attitude is very common, and yes, some people do panic early about storms approaching.

However, this storm is 400 miles wide with 185 mph winds near the center. To NOT take it seriously and prepare or evacuate is irresponsible.

Traveler
09-06-2017, 07:38
It's always funny to me how yankee transplants to the South (who seem to never grasp the most basic understanding that dinner is served at high noon and supper is the evening meal) magically become Hurricane experts when they relocate here. I was at The Home Depot today with a friend of mine from Pennsylvania and even he had to shake his head at the dozens of yankee "experts" just mouthing and prognosticating away in their loud-talking yankee-speak. Those of us who are native born to the Southern Coast, and have scores of years experience with hurricanes and tropical storms, understand that it to WAY too early to identify the path of either Irma or Jose. The common sense thing to do is to stay quiet, be observant (particularly keen on wildlife/animal behavior), and once a more defined path is established by weather authorities, take appropriate and responsible action.

Seems to me a Cat 5 hurricane would get more than a few yawns and a double order of hush puppies at dinner and supper from the grizzled storm vetted conks. But apparently this is not a big deal to the local natives, who apparently also drift into Home Depot looking for plywood along with everyone else. I wish you well in the coming storm, by the looks of this monster its not going to be fun.

Stone1984
09-06-2017, 09:12
Where are you guys getting the best info for this thing? I am a bit worried about starting my 10 day section hike on friday now. Still going out but looks like it is going to be a we hike.

Water Rat
09-06-2017, 10:12
Where are you guys getting the best info for this thing? I am a bit worried about starting my 10 day section hike on friday now. Still going out but looks like it is going to be a we hike.

NOAA Hurricane (http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/) is my go-to for hurricane info.

I visit windy.com to watch the info in action (it is an interactive map), but it is understandably not reliable more than a few days out. It's also good for other (rain, wind, snow) storms.

kestral
09-06-2017, 10:25
Where are you guys getting the best info for this thing? I am a bit worried about starting my 10 day section hike on friday now. Still going out but looks like it is going to be a we hike.
The great thing about section hiking is the ability to relocate a route if weather will be awful. Think about your 'plan B' and remain fluid. Enjoy your hike!

I'm considering my bail out plan from floridas east coast to include a hike maybe Virginia or North Carolina.

My best info for this thing? I combine many foreshadowings, gaze at the moon, then toss the magic bones to determine my plan. I phones weather app is helpful too. Bring an umbrella :).

tflaris
09-06-2017, 11:40
Plan for the worst. Hope for the best.


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atraildreamer
09-06-2017, 11:47
A weather analyst was discussing the storm with a radio host. He pointed out that both the Tampa Bay area and Miami could flood out just like New Orleans and Houston, depending on the track of the storm. He attributed this to inadequate and out-of-date hurricane preparations.

tflaris
09-06-2017, 13:21
I hope we all make it out of this one.


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Sarcasm the elf
09-06-2017, 13:26
I hope we all make it out of this one.


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Seriously. The latest track is starting to look like this hurricane wants to do a full Thru hike.

rafe
09-06-2017, 14:00
Seriously. The latest track is starting to look like this hurricane wants to do a full Thru hike.

Could do a number on a few hundred miles worth, but it's not in the nature of hurricanes to travel great distances over land.

grubbster
09-06-2017, 14:15
Could do a number on a few hundred miles worth, but it's not in the nature of hurricanes to travel great distances over land.
No, but even at tropical storm status they can still have high winds and dump a butt load of water.

rafe
09-06-2017, 14:22
No, but even at tropical storm status they can still have high winds and dump a butt load of water.

Yes indeed, I still recall the aftermath of Irene, and what it did in Vermont.

Dogwood
09-06-2017, 15:16
Too early to firmly commit to where the hurricane will track or if it even will still be categorized as a hurricane once it hits landfall.

MtDoraDave
09-06-2017, 15:49
Yes, it's early to know for sure. These storms never seem to go where the forcast says they will.
However, it doesn't need to be much of a storm to blow trees over along the AT, trees are always falling across the trail as it is; add a bunch of water and bit more wind for an extended period, and you've got a mess.

saltysack
09-06-2017, 16:45
A buddy of mine owns a famous bar in USVI...**** is bad!!!


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Lnj
09-06-2017, 17:24
Getting concerned my daughter at GSU in Statesboro needs to be headed home this weekend.

TexasBob
09-06-2017, 18:21
......... The common sense thing to do is to stay quiet, be observant (particularly keen on wildlife/animal behavior), and once a more defined path is established by weather authorities, take appropriate and responsible action.

When the gators and the snakes are in your backyard that is a good indication the hurricane has arrived. :rolleyes:

Jeff
09-07-2017, 14:05
Chainsaw is sharpened and gas is on hand !!

Stone1984
09-07-2017, 14:08
Looks like my House will get hit by this while I am out on the trail. Looking like Greenville SC is gonna take a good hit.... Not good timing for me.

kbstock
09-07-2017, 15:52
Sounds good in conversation. But the reality is completely different. Living a life interrupted and seeing the fruits of your labor destroyed is damaged is another.


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As a former insurance agent.....my heart is with you....and with everyone involved....money cannot replace everything. Good luck!

John M
09-07-2017, 16:31
A buddy of mine owns a famous bar in USVI...**** is bad!!!


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As far as I'm concerned, Jost Van Dyke in BVI is paradise on earth. All the beachfront watering holes I loved there are gone. I'm afraid that all of the virgin islands has been devastated.

BobTheBuilder
09-07-2017, 17:01
I'm doing a section in PA in a few weeks. This thing will probably help with the water sources, but I would sure rather see it go away. If the intensity and track stay where they are, it's going to be a nightmare for Florida and South Carolina.

GaryM
09-07-2017, 17:55
Cancelled my section hike scheduled for next week. First reason is having to humker down here at home (Florida) second reason is Irma might be dumping on northern Georgia after mangling Florida. Only thing worse than riding out a hurricane at home is riding it out in a flimsy tent on the side of a mountain.
So, do you think Springer NOBO will be dry enough to hike after the 16th?

tawa
09-07-2017, 17:56
Leaving on Wednesday to head to West Virginia to hike and camp a few days before whitewater rafting down the upper and lower gauley!!
Sounds like we might be impacted as it moves north!!

MuddyWaters
09-07-2017, 20:42
Cancelled my section hike scheduled for next week. First reason is having to humker down here at home (Florida) second reason is Irma might be dumping on northern Georgia after mangling Florida. Only thing worse than riding out a hurricane at home is riding it out in a flimsy tent on the side of a mountain.
So, do you think Springer NOBO will be dry enough to hike after the 16th?

Not the water
Trees down is problem
Trail can be impassable

rocketsocks
09-07-2017, 21:11
Cancelled my section hike scheduled for next week. First reason is having to humker down here at home (Florida) second reason is Irma might be dumping on northern Georgia after mangling Florida. Only thing worse than riding out a hurricane at home is riding it out in a flimsy tent on the side of a mountain.
So, do you think Springer NOBO will be dry enough to hike after the 16th?even if you were to miss the blowdowns, flooded trails, scanty resupply, hiking in a tropical airmass is about the most uncomfortable thing I've ever done...sticky doesn't even begin to describe.

saltysack
09-08-2017, 12:27
"Making Florida safe again"https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170908/67ccf8416fa540e138f3b2265a0ffd5d.jpg



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Sarcasm the elf
09-08-2017, 16:07
Not the water
Trees down is problem
Trail can be impassable

I remember being on trail in MA a week after hurricane Irene struck. All the Sobos were shuttling down because VT was essentially impassible due to downed trees and washed out crossings.

To my great surprise, the many blowdowns in MA had already been cleared by the time I got there. To this day I have no idea how the MA maintainers did so much work in a single week.

SawnieRobertson
09-09-2017, 16:00
Irma is a rude party crasher. I wish we could ignore her, but mostly I wish that she would turn east and go for a long, northward swim in the Atlantic until she tires into oblivion. It COULD happen, y'know.

Slo-go'en
09-09-2017, 19:43
Well, it looks like the AT will be spared for the most part. Some of it will likely end up here in NE eventually as it moves up the Ohio river valley.

MuddyWaters
09-09-2017, 22:37
I remember being on trail in MA a week after hurricane Irene struck. All the Sobos were shuttling down because VT was essentially impassible due to downed trees and washed out crossings.

To my great surprise, the many blowdowns in MA had already been cleared by the time I got there. To this day I have no idea how the MA maintainers did so much work in a single week.

My hunting lease has a 3 mile loop atv trail on perimeter.
After a hurricane 15 yrs ago or so, it took us 3 weekends - 6 full days- of 10-12 people working with chainsaws and atv winches, and a few tractors to get it passable. Probably 150-200 or so trees down on the trail, some that required big saws because the root ball of tree was next to trail and it toppled onto it. 36-48" diameter. Big trees.

Hurricanes absolutely destroy trails.

saltysack
09-10-2017, 11:05
Gotta love the media...[emoji3]https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170910/2a49c543a4e052ae37c535102bb44fc1.jpg


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Curious G
09-10-2017, 11:25
A weather analyst was discussing the storm with a radio host. He pointed out that both the Tampa Bay area and Miami could flood out just like New Orleans and Houston, depending on the track of the storm. He attributed this to inadequate and out-of-date hurricane preparations.

Wrong. I was informed by a landscaper yesterday who heard it from a guy that certain world governments to go unnamed (Russia) can fire a laser by satellite into the ocean thereby causing a hurricane and then lead them likes dogs on leashes into target cities. They are in league with the richest 1% of America's power elites, corporations, the Illuminati, Skull and Bones, and the CIA in an elaborate profit scheme that centers around how insurance companies pay out where large scale disasters occur, where relief is delivered, taxes, tax breaks, funding, donations, blah, etc., etc. Which seems more realistic when you think about it.

BillyGr
09-10-2017, 16:36
I remember being on trail in MA a week after hurricane Irene struck. All the Sobos were shuttling down because VT was essentially impassible due to downed trees and washed out crossings.

To my great surprise, the many blowdowns in MA had already been cleared by the time I got there. To this day I have no idea how the MA maintainers did so much work in a single week.

Perhaps not as much issue with the MA section?

In terms of the more "populated" areas where damage was more severe, it seemed to be areas in the NY Catskills/Schoharie Valley and then the Adirondacks, plus areas in VT like Wilmington, which is not far from the trail - don't remember hearing much about areas in MA (but that could just be the news stations covering the worst spots, since there were several of those)?

Chris_Cates
09-10-2017, 18:42
Sucker. All of that is just disinformation to keep you from suspecting our reptilian overlords.

Chris_Cates
09-10-2017, 18:44
Wrong. I was informed by a landscaper yesterday who heard it from a guy that certain world governments to go unnamed (Russia) can fire a laser by satellite into the ocean thereby causing a hurricane and then lead them likes dogs on leashes into target cities. They are in league with the richest 1% of America's power elites, corporations, the Illuminati, Skull and Bones, and the CIA in an elaborate profit scheme that centers around how insurance companies pay out where large scale disasters occur, where relief is delivered, taxes, tax breaks, funding, donations, blah, etc., etc. Which seems more realistic when you think about it.

Sucker. All of that is just disinformation to keep you from suspecting our reptilian overlords.

Reposted because I couldn't figure out how to edit.

OkeefenokeeJoe
09-10-2017, 19:26
Well the professional weather prognosticators and turd-casters on TV have managed to miss it again. They were hoping for mayhem and catastrophe and got nothing for their money. Right now, on the weather channel, they are scrambling to explain why the anticipated destruction is not occurring. One weatherman a few minutes ago still would not throw in the towel and was so bold to exclaim that "it (massive destruction) was right around the corner and could happen at any minute."

Lesson to remember ... when it comes to Atlantic coast hurricanes, listen to the old timers that have a few scores (that's 20 years for you millennials) of hurricane experience under their belt. I've been reading hurricanes since Helene and Alma, and Ella in 1958. Never was any reason (for me) to evacuate for a single one over the years (except maybe Dora in 1964). I said very early this past week that Irma would, most likely, make a westerly turn and head up the west coast of Florida and gradually dissipate as it traveled northward. Guess who was right? My yankee friends told me I was silly to stay and hastily evacuated the area. "Go ahead," I said. "I'll keep an eye on your property until you get back." I drove by the interstate a couple of days ago and I don't think there has been so many yankees fleeing since Bull Run, or maybe Vicksburg. Sad. All over media hyping an unfounded catastrophic event.

The media hypes these hurricanes to get people to evacuate and move out. They want footage of empty grocery store shelves, backed up interstates, lines at gas stations, babies crying, congested evacuation shelters, and Coopers Hawks in taxis. That, my friends, means $$$ to the networks. Sad, but true.

So, here I am again, out on the coastal marshes by myself, on the hallowed grounds of the deep South. It's really kind of quiet and nice to be alone like this; however, short-lived. By next Tuesday the transplants will, once again, start returning and talking loudly about how they barely escaped death. I'll just nod my head and turn a deaf ear.

egilbe
09-10-2017, 19:43
I take it you moved from Georgia, then?

saltysack
09-10-2017, 20:01
Well the professional weather prognosticators and turd-casters on TV have managed to miss it again. They were hoping for mayhem and catastrophe and got nothing for their money. Right now, on the weather channel, they are scrambling to explain why the anticipated destruction is not occurring. One weatherman a few minutes ago still would not throw in the towel and was so bold to exclaim that "it (massive destruction) was right around the corner and could happen at any minute."

Lesson to remember ... when it comes to Atlantic coast hurricanes, listen to the old timers that have a few scores (that's 20 years for you millennials) of hurricane experience under their belt. I've been reading hurricanes since Helene and Alma, and Ella in 1958. Never was any reason (for me) to evacuate for a single one over the years (except maybe Dora in 1964). I said very early this past week that Irma would, most likely, make a westerly turn and head up the west coast of Florida and gradually dissipate as it traveled northward. Guess who was right? My yankee friends told me I was silly to stay and hastily evacuated the area. "Go ahead," I said. "I'll keep an eye on your property until you get back." I drove by the interstate a couple of days ago and I don't think there has been so many yankees fleeing since Bull Run, or maybe Vicksburg. Sad. All over media hyping an unfounded catastrophic event.

The media hypes these hurricanes to get people to evacuate and move out. They want footage of empty grocery store shelves, backed up interstates, lines at gas stations, babies crying, congested evacuation shelters, and Coopers Hawks in taxis. That, my friends, means $$$ to the networks. Sad, but true.

So, here I am again, out on the coastal marshes by myself, on the hallowed grounds of the deep South. It's really kind of quiet and nice to be alone like this; however, short-lived. By next Tuesday the transplants will, once again, start returning and talking loudly about how they barely escaped death. I'll just nod my head and turn a deaf ear.

[emoji23]


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saltysack
09-10-2017, 20:04
SEVERE DAMAGE at the YUPPY Club down from my house...Atlantic Beach Country Club....[emoji23]https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170911/e1ed0851f1b92be9702390c6ad949502.jpg


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rafe
09-10-2017, 21:33
I remember being on trail in MA a week after hurricane Irene struck. All the Sobos were shuttling down because VT was essentially impassible due to downed trees and washed out crossings.To my great surprise, the many blowdowns in MA had already been cleared by the time I got there. To this day I have no idea how the MA maintainers did so much work in a single week.

Irene did major damage in Vermont, however. Mostly due to flooding and several rivers running over their banks. Downtown Brattleboro was underwater.

rocketsocks
09-10-2017, 21:41
Well the professional weather prognosticators and turd-casters on TV have managed to miss it again. They were hoping for mayhem and catastrophe and got nothing for their money. Right now, on the weather channel, they are scrambling to explain why the anticipated destruction is not occurring. One weatherman a few minutes ago still would not throw in the towel and was so bold to exclaim that "it (massive destruction) was right around the corner and could happen at any minute."

Lesson to remember ... when it comes to Atlantic coast hurricanes, listen to the old timers that have a few scores (that's 20 years for you millennials) of hurricane experience under their belt. I've been reading hurricanes since Helene and Alma, and Ella in 1958. Never was any reason (for me) to evacuate for a single one over the years (except maybe Dora in 1964). I said very early this past week that Irma would, most likely, make a westerly turn and head up the west coast of Florida and gradually dissipate as it traveled northward. Guess who was right? My yankee friends told me I was silly to stay and hastily evacuated the area. "Go ahead," I said. "I'll keep an eye on your property until you get back." I drove by the interstate a couple of days ago and I don't think there has been so many yankees fleeing since Bull Run, or maybe Vicksburg. Sad. All over media hyping an unfounded catastrophic event.

The media hypes these hurricanes to get people to evacuate and move out. They want footage of empty grocery store shelves, backed up interstates, lines at gas stations, babies crying, congested evacuation shelters, and Coopers Hawks in taxis. That, my friends, means $$$ to the networks. Sad, but true.

So, here I am again, out on the coastal marshes by myself, on the hallowed grounds of the deep South. It's really kind of quiet and nice to be alone like this; however, short-lived. By next Tuesday the transplants will, once again, start returning and talking loudly about how they barely escaped death. I'll just nod my head and turn a deaf ear.
I hope yur car don't start

rafe
09-10-2017, 21:41
Yeah, this is just totally normal...

rocketsocks
09-10-2017, 21:47
Yeah, this is just totally normal...yup, just a bunch of sensational TV for dough.

rafe
09-10-2017, 21:56
Nothing to see here, obviously...

Sarcasm the elf
09-10-2017, 21:57
Nothing to see here, obviously...



http://www.drstuspodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Move-Along-2.jpg

Sarcasm the elf
09-10-2017, 22:27
Irene did major damage in Vermont, however. Mostly due to flooding and several rivers running over their banks. Downtown Brattleboro was underwater.

I didn't see it firsthand but believe me I remember. The trail in MA had a rather impressive number of blowdown, but it was nothing compared to what happened in VT, which was effectively impassable according to the handful of sobo's I talked to that made it through or around. The weekend after Irene we also got something like 4-6 inches of additional rain in the area which I was told was the remnants of another tropical storm. My wife and I were on trail and ended up bailing, only to find Rte 7 in Great Barrington underwater in sections and to find our neighborhood on the southern Housatonic submerged with the fire department staging a "rescue" a few houses down from me when we returned.

RuthN
09-10-2017, 22:52
Why don't you join me in handing out food and clothing to people who lost everything in Harvey? Southern hospitality and all that.

RuthN
09-10-2017, 22:54
My comment was directed at OkeefenokeeJoe. ^

TexasBob
09-10-2017, 23:12
.... I said very early this past week that Irma would, most likely, make a westerly turn and head up the west coast of Florida and gradually dissipate as it traveled northward. Guess who was right?............

You didn't say it on Whiteblaze and my guess is you didn't say it at all until you saw it on TV while you were watching one of them dad blame, whipper snapper, wet behind the ears, infernal, no good, polecat, yankee weather men you dislike so much.

Stone1984
09-11-2017, 06:39
Looks like the rain is finally here made it to mountain crossing hostel yesterday. Not sure if trail will be hikeable today due to weather. Supposed to be bad winds today, not sure though

JC13
09-11-2017, 08:08
Looks like the rain is finally here made it to mountain crossing hostel yesterday. Not sure if trail will be hikeable today due to weather. Supposed to be bad winds today, not sure thoughIt was supposed to be really bad on Blood Mountain last night. I'm assuming you made it to Walasi-Yi yesterday?

rafe
09-11-2017, 08:42
As of Monday AM: 5.7 million without power in FL, 166,000 in Georgia. Irma now a tropical storm. Florida was spared, somewhat. Puerto Rico and other islands in the Caribbean were devastated.

coach lou
09-11-2017, 13:11
I'm starting to see pics of St. John....wish I had some ways and means to give some real help.:sun

soilman
09-11-2017, 18:11
I may be a dumb Yankee but I postponed my NOBO thru hike of the BMT on Friday after seeing projections that Irma may track up thru GA and TN. I was supposed to leave Springer Mt tomorrow. I did not want to be walking thru pouring rain and wind. I do have some experience with hurricanes and the AT. Two score and 1 year ago in August I was on Bear Mt in CT when a guy came running up the trail and said a hurricane was coming and to get off the trail. While I was a young, naive Midwesterner I figured anyone who would come up a mountain to warn hikers must be taken seriously. We spent two days holed up in the basement of a church in Kent, CT while hurricane Belle dropped 7 inches of rain on the area. In 2010 near the end of my AT thru hike I stopped at White House landing for lunch. Bill and Linda advised us to seek shelter that night as a hurricane was supposed to drop 5 inches of rain. We stayed at Wadleigh Stream LT that night. When I went to sleep that night the stream was just an innocent riffle. When I awoke the next morning it was raging and considerably closer to the shelter. In addition before I left that morning a tree fell about 25 feet from the shelter. I walked the LT in 2013 and saw the damage from Irene. The GMC was still doing trail work to repair the damage. So based on my experience, weather forecasts, alerts from the GSMNP, ATC, and ATPO I painfully called my shuttle driver and rescheduled my shuttle for next week. Hoping for the best.

middle to middle
09-11-2017, 18:21
Hay goof luck. It looks good !

egilbe
09-11-2017, 18:41
Well the professional weather prognosticators and turd-casters on TV have managed to miss it again. They were hoping for mayhem and catastrophe and got nothing for their money. Right now, on the weather channel, they are scrambling to explain why the anticipated destruction is not occurring. One weatherman a few minutes ago still would not throw in the towel and was so bold to exclaim that "it (massive destruction) was right around the corner and could happen at any minute."

Lesson to remember ... when it comes to Atlantic coast hurricanes, listen to the old timers that have a few scores (that's 20 years for you millennials) of hurricane experience under their belt. I've been reading hurricanes since Helene and Alma, and Ella in 1958. Never was any reason (for me) to evacuate for a single one over the years (except maybe Dora in 1964). I said very early this past week that Irma would, most likely, make a westerly turn and head up the west coast of Florida and gradually dissipate as it traveled northward. Guess who was right? My yankee friends told me I was silly to stay and hastily evacuated the area. "Go ahead," I said. "I'll keep an eye on your property until you get back." I drove by the interstate a couple of days ago and I don't think there has been so many yankees fleeing since Bull Run, or maybe Vicksburg. Sad. All over media hyping an unfounded catastrophic event.

The media hypes these hurricanes to get people to evacuate and move out. They want footage of empty grocery store shelves, backed up interstates, lines at gas stations, babies crying, congested evacuation shelters, and Coopers Hawks in taxis. That, my friends, means $$$ to the networks. Sad, but true.

So, here I am again, out on the coastal marshes by myself, on the hallowed grounds of the deep South. It's really kind of quiet and nice to be alone like this; however, short-lived. By next Tuesday the transplants will, once again, start returning and talking loudly about how they barely escaped death. I'll just nod my head and turn a deaf ear.
Haven't heard from you in awhile. Is everything OK after that little blow?

I may be a dumb Yankee, but I seem to remember who won that disagreement between the Union and the criminal confederacy. I can also drive in the snow.

Traveler
09-12-2017, 07:42
Odd what opinions pass as facts to some people.

KCNC
09-12-2017, 09:06
Southeastern NC has been getting HEAVY rain all morning. Not going to be a good day on the southern part of the trail today as the remnants of Irma move off to the northwest. Roads here are flooded and rains aren't expected to abate until mid-afternoon.

saltysack
09-12-2017, 12:46
Well that turned out to be a pretty rough storm for NE Fl but mainly due to surge which the weather forecasters got wrong.....my folks live on the St.Johns river which flooded to heights not seen in many years...actually had boat float over their dock and end up in the neighbors yard...about a $250,000 ouch!

https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170912/b4d31765cbcd502b477b88021ea85c04.jpg


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gpburdelljr
09-12-2017, 13:05
Well the professional weather prognosticators and turd-casters on TV have managed to miss it again. They were hoping for mayhem and catastrophe and got nothing for their money. Right now, on the weather channel, they are scrambling to explain why the anticipated destruction is not occurring. One weatherman a few minutes ago still would not throw in the towel and was so bold to exclaim that "it (massive destruction) was right around the corner and could happen at any minute."

Lesson to remember ... when it comes to Atlantic coast hurricanes, listen to the old timers that have a few scores (that's 20 years for you millennials) of hurricane experience under their belt. I've been reading hurricanes since Helene and Alma, and Ella in 1958. Never was any reason (for me) to evacuate for a single one over the years (except maybe Dora in 1964). I said very early this past week that Irma would, most likely, make a westerly turn and head up the west coast of Florida and gradually dissipate as it traveled northward. Guess who was right? My yankee friends told me I was silly to stay and hastily evacuated the area. "Go ahead," I said. "I'll keep an eye on your property until you get back." I drove by the interstate a couple of days ago and I don't think there has been so many yankees fleeing since Bull Run, or maybe Vicksburg. Sad. All over media hyping an unfounded catastrophic event.

The media hypes these hurricanes to get people to evacuate and move out. They want footage of empty grocery store shelves, backed up interstates, lines at gas stations, babies crying, congested evacuation shelters, and Coopers Hawks in taxis. That, my friends, means $$$ to the networks. Sad, but true.

So, here I am again, out on the coastal marshes by myself, on the hallowed grounds of the deep South. It's really kind of quiet and nice to be alone like this; however, short-lived. By next Tuesday the transplants will, once again, start returning and talking loudly about how they barely escaped death. I'll just nod my head and turn a deaf ear.
You've rolled the dice on hurricanes and survived by luck, not skill. Some people do the same thing wrong for years, and call it experience.

PennyPincher
09-12-2017, 13:42
Perhaps not as much issue with the MA section?

In terms of the more "populated" areas where damage was more severe, it seemed to be areas in the NY Catskills/Schoharie Valley and then the Adirondacks, plus areas in VT like Wilmington, which is not far from the trail - don't remember hearing much about areas in MA (but that could just be the news stations covering the worst spots, since there were several of those)?

I don't know if it was just as bad in MA as in other sections but there were HUGE trees on the ground and you could see where they had been cut through for the trail. It really was quite impressive when I went through there to see how much damage had been done and how much had been done to maintain the trail.

Lauriep
09-12-2017, 14:57
(9/1​2/2017) TROPICAL STORM IRMA UPDATE
Tropical Storm Irma passed by the southern parts of the Appalachian Trail late last night and into the early morning hours. As the weather clears, please be very careful as you venture back out onto the A. T. In the coming days, the trail will be assessed for damage by volunteers and staff. Be aware that trees that have fallen during high winds may have significant strains and binds that may not be readily apparent and can be very dangerous. Also be aware of slippery footing, potential landslides, and trees that may still have fall potential. Closures still may exist on lands adjacent to the trail.

Please report any significant damage to Appalachian Trail Conservancy’s southern regional office in Asheville, North Carolina at (828) 254-3708.

Curious G
09-12-2017, 15:29
Sucker. All of that is just disinformation to keep you from suspecting our reptilian overlords.

Reposted because I couldn't figure out how to edit.

We're doomed.

MtDoraDave
09-13-2017, 08:20
I made it through okay. Lost a few shingles and power was out for 48 hrs. Still hard to find gas as most gas stations are still out from the panic before the storm.

Some areas nearby had tornadoes do some serious damage. Lots of tornadoes spun off of this thing. I'm sure the news is showing pictures and video of the damage.

It's pure luck, or the will of a higher power if you wish, that the coast of cuba took such a hit and took a lot of umph out of this massive storm. I was anticipating the worst case scenario from this monster; a very large portion of the state leveled like south Florida was from Andrew.