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misterfloyd
10-07-2017, 17:07
Hello,

In an effort to reduce weight I have been thinking about getting a quilt.

I move quite a bit, and am a restless sleeper.

I would like a 20 degree even though I would like to resume hiking in Virginia in June 2018. I know, what would I need that temp rating for in the summer? I just would like to get something that I can use around here in the spring and in the fall as well. One bag for all of that..... I can wish!!??

I just look at the straps, and I get that insulation gets squished when lying on top of it, but .......

I need to reduce weight if I want to hike long miles again.

So how many have reverted back to a bag from not being comfortable in a quilt.

All thoughts and comments are welcome...

Best To All

Floyd

Hatchet_1697
10-07-2017, 17:35
I left a bag for a 20 degree EE Revelation quilt while hiking Virginia, once it got warm I bought a 40 degree quilt because the 20 was just too hot. Iím not sure one temp TQ will do but a 20 is a good place to start. Quilts are easy to adjust / ventilate. VA weather is tricky sometimes.

I change sides a lot while sleeping and never had a problem with my Revelation TQ not covering me and Iím 6í 220lbs. An appropriate pad (or UQ if youíre hanging) is an important part of the system.

That all said I couldnít imagine going back to a sleeping bag. I like the modularity and lightweight ness of a quilt sleeping system.



Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro

DuneElliot
10-07-2017, 17:45
I use quilts above 40*...anything below that and I revert to a sleeping bag. After a week in the Winds in September I knew I needed a something different and bought a Versalite. I didn't get cold with my quilt, per se, but I constantly woke up to turn over and had to adjust it to stay warm and that was frustrating and I didn't get the best sleep. That particular quilt is awesome in my hammock but not so much for ground sleeping.

MuddyWaters
10-07-2017, 18:00
I use both.

Quilts really 30 F and up (20F and 40F)

Bag below 25 (10F)

25-30 just depends I have a 30F bag thats good there, or 20 F quilt will survive.

Ive stacked quilts in teens too, but its heavier than bag, and no one makes good enough hood for under 20f imo. I can use down clothing with 20 F quilt too, but outside of discussion here. Again, head insulation gets to be issue below 20F for me, leakage at neck,


But it all depends, is it 30F all day, and 20 F by 8 pm? Or is it 55F all day and reach 20 F at 530am? One is a hell of a lot colder overall and needs more insul., Even though min temp is same.

IslandPete
10-07-2017, 18:48
The quilt is the business! You won't look back. 20 deg, and if you're too warm, just stick your feet or arms out...

soumodeler
10-07-2017, 19:25
Quilt 40+, bag below 40.

I just feel more comfortable in a true bag when it gets colder versus a quilt. Personal preference I guess.

DuneElliot
10-07-2017, 19:26
The quilt is the business! You won't look back. 20 deg, and if you're too warm, just stick your feet or arms out...

Not for everyone...I love my quilt but it just doesn't work for me below 40įF, outside of my hammock, despite being a 10į quilt. Broad statements like that aren't helpful and convince people like me that all I need is a quilt which isn't true.

Puddlefish
10-07-2017, 19:40
I found it had a lot to do with wind and draft, which depends a lot on your tent and how and where you set it. I started with a 30 degree bag, with 40 degree quilt layered on top, which let me unzip my confining mummy bag. When it warmed up and I got past the big southern mountains I mailed the bag home and relied on the quilt. I also switch sides and move around, and found the brief episodes of cold air to be fairly trivial.

The quilt gathers at the neck and the feet, which draws in the sides along your body, fairly effectively keeping out drafts. I'd imagine matching the quilt to your height would be very important to make sure you're draft free. A few nights I got cold and had to use my down jacket as a jacket, instead of a pillow.

So, I guess it depends on the rest of your system.

Venchka
10-07-2017, 19:41
The quilt is the business! You won't look back. 20 deg, and if you're too warm, just stick your feet or arms out...
One size & one pice of advice does not fit all.
20 degrees is stretching the capabilities of a quilt.
Wayne

Venchka
10-07-2017, 19:50
Hello,

In an effort to reduce weight I have been thinking about getting a quilt.

I move quite a bit, and am a restless sleeper.

I would like a 20 degree even though I would like to resume hiking in Virginia in June 2018. I know, what would I need that temp rating for in the summer? I just would like to get something that I can use around here in the spring and in the fall as well. One bag for all of that..... I can wish!!??

I just look at the straps, and I get that insulation gets squished when lying on top of it, but .......

I need to reduce weight if I want to hike long miles again.

So how many have reverted back to a bag from not being comfortable in a quilt.

All thoughts and comments are welcome...

Best To All

Floyd
Don't believe everything you read online.
Most modern sleeping bags are made without a side block baffle. The down can be moved to the top or bottom depending on the season.
I was in Wyoming after Labor Day. At or above 10,000'. I put the bag in Winter Mode: I moved the down to the top half of the bag. There was no down in the bottom left to squish under me. I was also sleeping on an R-5.7 Xtherm Large air mattress. Yes, that one. The bag of potato chips crinkly one. NOT! Internet myth. My Xtherm is silent.
The Great Outdoor Provision Co. (all over North Carolina) has a good selection of sleeping bags. I bought my 20 degree Alpinlite from their store n Charlotte.
Good luck!
Wayne

Huntmog
10-07-2017, 20:13
I went to an EE 20 bc I am a restless side sleeper. Ill never go back to mummy bags, but that's me. I'm not a solid sleeper at home and mummy bags had me all jacked up. I'd get in and feel warm but then I'd twist all around. Of course, some folks swear by mummy bags. Try it out and see. I use my 20 in all Virginia weather, except August when I use a cheap Costco quilt.

Venchka
10-07-2017, 20:19
One more thing:
All mummy bags are not created equal!
Read the internal dimensions. Some are form fitting while others offer ample room to toss and turn.
Pay attention!
Wayne

Puddlefish
10-07-2017, 21:10
One more thing:
All mummy bags are not created equal!
Read the internal dimensions. Some are form fitting while others offer ample room to toss and turn.
Pay attention!
Wayne

Wish I'd known that a few years back! I paid attention to length and was entirely ignorant of girth.

Venchka
10-07-2017, 21:31
Wish I'd known that a few years back! I paid attention to length and was entirely ignorant of girth.
Sorry. Next time?
Wayne

AllDownhillFromHere
10-07-2017, 21:40
Wish I'd known that a few years back! I paid attention to length and was entirely ignorant of girth.

There's a dirty joke in there somewhere. Also, you need better ignore filters.

Venchka
10-07-2017, 22:41
Loft keeps you warm. Here is a chart from BackpackingLight.
Some companies are conservative relative to loft and temperature rating. Some companies are way off!
https://backpackinglight.com/bpl_sleeping_bag_position_statement/
Shop smart.
Wayne

jjozgrunt
10-08-2017, 00:01
I bought an EE 30F for Australia, where unless you are hiking in the alpine regions you rarely need more, and in warmer weather I just used a poncho liner/woobie . When planning for the AT I realized that a 30F was not going to cut a early march start. After investigating I went and purchased an EE 50F quilt 1 size larger and wider than the 30F and with the winter pad straps. It essentially joins them together to give me a 10F rated quilt, which is very versatile at under 1kg. I like and would never go back to a bag, quilts work for me.

SWODaddy
10-08-2017, 07:55
makes sense - quilts are popular with the ounce counting demographic, so people try to make them as light as possible.

I have very broad shoulders and bought an X-wide EE 20deg quilt which I think is great. I've used it into the low 20s and was so warm I had to vent it periodically.

SWODaddy
10-08-2017, 08:01
makes sense - quilts are popular with the ounce counting demographic, so people try to make them as light as possible.

I have very broad shoulders and bought an X-wide EE 20deg quilt which I think is great. I've used it into the low 20s and was so warm I had to vent it periodically.

Sorry, phone issues - first sentence was cut off and should read:

I think (in my completely non-scientific opinion) a lot of people's problems with quilts originate in not buying one wide enough. A few of the manufacturers are guilty of sizing their quilts on the slim side to make them lighter as well.

Bronk
10-08-2017, 08:53
I have a 30 degree mummy bag that weighs 2lbs 2 ounces. When I first got it I used it like a sleeping bag and felt like I was trapped in a sock. The last couple years I've just been leaving it unzipped and using it like a quilt.

misterfloyd
10-08-2017, 08:55
Thank you all for your replies and sharing your exeriences.

Venchka: Did not know Great outdoor has WM bags. My other alternative was this or a FF bag. Am aware of size and fitting, but it is always good to hear it from others.

FYI: I have the costco down throw and used it in Pisgah NF with the BSA a few weeks back. I think it got down to high 50's. Now I just wrapped myself up like a burrito, no toe box or anything. I was cold. The times I spent still, and really made certain the quilt was tucked under, it was not so bad. But when not..........

I know the above is comparing apples to a freight train, but that is my only experience.. if you want to call it that.

Is there any mass produced quilts from bigger manufactures to try first before taking the plunge? I know I could resell a quality one, but I hate doing so.

Thank you all for your comments and help......never realized I was so stuck in my ways (LOL)
Best
Floyd

Bronk
10-08-2017, 08:56
One more thing:
All mummy bags are not created equal!
Read the internal dimensions. Some are form fitting while others offer ample room to toss and turn.
Pay attention!
Wayne
This is the main issue I have with my mummy bag. It is plenty long enough but when it is zipped up it is really tight around my shoulders.

Venchka
10-08-2017, 09:20
I just checked the WM site. Great Outdoor Provision Co. is still listed as a dealer. Call ahead for current inventory.
Little River Trading Co. in Maryville, TN is also a WM dealer.
WM has added quilts to their inventory.
Wayne


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DownEaster
10-08-2017, 18:04
People have different sleeping habits, and those result in different experiences. In my case, I grab the covers around my neck when I sleep. (To keep drafts from my neck, perhaps? To avoid getting my face covered? I can't exactly query my sleeping self.) I sleep on my side, rotating between left and right. When I turn, I drag the covers with me. Grabbing the neck of a mummy bag doesn't cause an issue. Grabbing a quilt when turning means I'll pull one end off the pad, dumping out all the warmth on that exposed side.

So yeah, I've tried a quilt and have gone back to sleeping bags.

Ethesis
10-08-2017, 21:41
My wife has decided to go back to a bag from a quilt

taylorshiver
10-10-2017, 13:18
This thread is not helping my decisiveness about whether I want to try out a quilt or not.

BuckeyeBill
10-10-2017, 13:42
Quilts are just like blankets at home. If you toss and turn there you will on the trail. I like the ability to change positions without feeling like I am in a cocoon. I still have my TT Notch and use quilts in it, but my hammock is more comfortable. Quilts have a foot box to keep your feet warm and keep them covered when you pull the the top up around your neck. If your not using a hammock, you should have a sleeping pad or mattress with a high R rated to keep your backside warm especially in cold weather. With a hammock you can use your mattress/pad or get an under quilt for that same reason. I have a winter and a summer under quilt. If you get warm using you quilt you can always stick an arm or your feet out.

The choice is yours my friend because what works for me, may not work for you. Good luck.

Puddlefish
10-10-2017, 13:43
This thread is not helping my decisiveness about whether I want to try out a quilt or not.

I suspect, as with most gear, it depends on the rest of your gear, and if you can fit it into a cohesive overall system, for the seasons, the places you hike, and your overall backpacking style.

colorado_rob
10-10-2017, 13:44
This thread is not helping my decisiveness about whether I want to try out a quilt or not.Yeah, quilts are fantastic, but not for everyone. There is a bit of a "learning curve" making that switch.

I switched to quilts for the AT a few years ago, glad I did, they work great for me and save weight as a bonus.

To answer the OP, I, for one, will never go back to using a bag except in the dead of frigid winter high in the mountains, when I pair my 32 degree bag with my quilt on top of that, making a -25 degree or so system that's lighter than my older WM -25 degree bag.

Not sure about zpacks bags/quilts, but I bought a Katabatic gear quilt, kinda expensive, the Alsek, about $500, 21 deg rated, 1lb-4oz. It has a side tie-down system that keeps the side from pulling off of your sleeping mat. I "engage" this system on colder nights, like around or below freezing. Above that (35+, say), I don't bother with the attachments. This quilt has kept me warm down to the low 20's, as advertised.

Then, I bought a EE double quilt for my wife and I, and though its temp rating was optimistic, we absolutely love that one too. It also has a side-attach thingie, but it is wide enough the side never seem to pull up, so we don't bother using it. It was rated at 20 deg, but originally was chilly below about 30. I added some down to the upper bag center area and that made it into a true 20 degree quilt. We actually used it to the single digits on the AT in early March this year.

So, summary, brand wise: can't beat Katabatic gear, top TOP quality. EE quilts are made well, but optimistic on the temp rating, so buy one notch lower (10 in lieu of 20, etc) if you go with EE. OTOH, EE's are quite a bit less expensive than Katabatic gear quilts, so buying a 10 EE vs. 21 Katabatic gear might be a tie.

Again, no experience with Zpacks quilts, though I certainly love everything else they make.

Venchka
10-10-2017, 14:39
"Quilts save weight."
There is no free lunch.
Quilts save weight by cutting off a few things that some of us enjoy having.
Quilts are great in conditions when a sleeping bag is not really needed.
Your body squashes the down on the bottom of a sleeping bag. DUH! Buy a bag without a side block baffle and move the down to the top in cold weather. Or to the bottom in hot weather.
Pay attention to the loft in both quilts and sleeping bags. Loft keeps you warm. Down fill power is a mirage. Read the fill power testing procedure.
This Loft Table from BackpackingLight is a starting point. Some bag makers, Western Mountaineering for one, use more conservative loft figures relative to the temperature rating of their bags.
https://backpackinglight.com/bpl_sleeping_bag_position_statement/
EN numbers: Read the testing procedure. Know what you should do to equal the EN rating.
Make informed decisions. Good luck!
Wayne

colorado_rob
10-10-2017, 14:52
"Quilts save weight."
There is no free lunch.
Quilts save weight by cutting off a few things that some of us enjoy having.
Quilts are great in conditions when a sleeping bag is not really needed.
Your body squashes the down on the bottom of a sleeping bag. DUH! Buy a bag without a side block baffle and move the down to the top in cold weather. Or to the bottom in hot weather.
Pay attention to the loft in both quilts and sleeping bags. Loft keeps you warm. Down fill power is a mirage. Read the fill power testing procedure.
This Loft Table from BackpackingLight is a starting point. Some bag makers, Western Mountaineering for one, use more conservative loft figures relative to the temperature rating of their bags.
https://backpackinglight.com/bpl_sleeping_bag_position_statement/
EN numbers: Read the testing procedure. Know what you should do to equal the EN rating.
Make informed decisions. Good luck!
Wayne Yep, all about loft! The only thing greater fill power gets you is slightly less fill weight for the same loft. Agree that "fill power" is not very accurate.

But I have owned about 10 sleeping bags in my life (12?), and the only bags that I've owned that allow one to shift down from the bottom to the top at Western Mountaineering bags, of which we've owned 5 (A Puma, two UL 20's, one other 20 (forget its name) and a -10, (also forget its name). My MHW and Marmot bags do NOT allow this shift and hence waste down weight below the body. All of these bags also waste fabric weight below the body.

And even with those bags that allow the down shift, it's tough getting all of the down to the top, I've tried.

Quilts are the most efficient weight wise, sorry. WM's come close if used correctly, and perhaps other bags allow the down shift.

This all assumes you don't need or use a hood. Some do! Get a bag if so. My quilts are sized and the way I sleep are such that on the coldest nights, my head is nicely tucked in. Our quilts also have a little snap thingie that cinches the quilt around your neck and has a draw cord for adjustment. This system works very very well for me.

WM UL 20 degree bag, 1lb 9 ounces, measured, keeps me warm to low 20's. Katabatic Gear Alsek, rated to 21, keeps me warm to low 20's. Same comfort, 5 less ounces. Actually better comfort in warmer weather easier to adjust to warm temps in a quilt.

Pros and cons! To each his own. But only if one has tried a quilt under varying conditions should one venture an opinion on bags vs. quilts.

Starchild
10-10-2017, 14:59
Yes and no. It all depends on the hike. Nothing is as weight sensitive as a thru hike, but doing a thru hike can easily blind oneself when doing other hikes. The main goal is to maximize comfort, and in this it involved hiking comfort (weight carried) vs sleeping comfort. On a thru hike the main 2 activities one will be doing is hiking and sleeping. All others pale in comparison. In addition one will get trail legs, or refugee mode, where the body kicks into a higher gear and allows superhuman distances to be regularly done with ease. In that it makes sense to go lighter, for comfort and for the extra distance it translates to per day. Also sleep is hard and fast, so some discomfort in sleep system is quickly absorbed by the need to sleep.

But that all stops after the thru, and it will take almost the same time to develop the trail legs to gain those advantages. As such one must reconsider their gear choices and not be afraid to carry more then thru-hiker weight, as it is a very different hike. A good night sleep in comfort is important and a full bag can help that a lot, and there is nothing wrong nor little to be gained by going further by reducing comfort.

Runner2017
10-11-2017, 08:52
Temp rating is not just about air temp but also you need to throw in wind chill factor. For example, air temp is 30F, but with 35 mph wind the effective temp now drops to 14F. Can your 20F quilt handle it? That's the question.

colorado_rob
10-11-2017, 09:01
Wind chill should not be much of a factor in a tent. A bit of an effect, but 2nd order I believe.

Venchka
10-11-2017, 09:53
Buy a quilt. Save weight.
Quilts belong in a tent. Gain weight.
Hmmmmm....
I still remember Just Billís thorough explanation of why a full featured mummy sleeping bag is the lighter choice at and below 20 degrees Fahrenheit. Unfortunately, WhiteBlaze doesnít remember where it is.
There is no wrong answer.
Wayne


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QiWiz
10-11-2017, 10:36
I use quilts down to about 25 degrees F. Below that, I use a sleeping bag. I should add that I view sleeping insulation (quilt or bag) as just the last layer you "put on" at night. So when it's cool or cold, I am usually wearing all or most of what I wear in camp to go to sleep in. A key feature of the quilts that I use and like is the ability to cinch the top around your neck. This retains heat but also helps to draw in the sides of the quilt around your body to reduce cold air invasion. A good hat or hood to wear at night is also key to warmth in a quilt system.

colorado_rob
10-11-2017, 10:41
Buy a quilt. Save weight.
Quilts belong in a tent. Gain weight.
Hmmmmm....
I still remember Just Billís thorough explanation of why a full featured mummy sleeping bag is the lighter choice at and below 20 degrees Fahrenheit. Unfortunately, WhiteBlaze doesnít remember where it is.
There is no wrong answer.
Wayne


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk You don't use a tent Wayne? I do, tried everything else, tarps alone w/o bug netting just don't work for me, nor does cowboy camping on at least 50% of my nights out, so I bought a tent that's 15 ounces (zpacks solo+) including a bug netting. So, 15 ounce tent, 24 ounce pack and 20oz quilt, total big three of 59 ounces, or 3lb 11 ounces. Are you anywhere CLOSE to that at full comfort down to 20 degrees?

saltysack
10-11-2017, 12:00
Thank you all for your replies and sharing your exeriences.

Venchka: Did not know Great outdoor has WM bags. My other alternative was this or a FF bag. Am aware of size and fitting, but it is always good to hear it from others.

FYI: I have the costco down throw and used it in Pisgah NF with the BSA a few weeks back. I think it got down to high 50's. Now I just wrapped myself up like a burrito, no toe box or anything. I was cold. The times I spent still, and really made certain the quilt was tucked under, it was not so bad. But when not..........

I know the above is comparing apples to a freight train, but that is my only experience.. if you want to call it that.

Is there any mass produced quilts from bigger manufactures to try first before taking the plunge? I know I could resell a quality one, but I hate doing so.

Thank you all for your comments and help......never realized I was so stuck in my ways (LOL)
Best
Floyd

Buy quality and shouldnít loose much $$..weather itís a WM bag or EE quilt etc...why buy twice


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Alligator
10-11-2017, 12:19
Switch back to a bag in the fall every year. Basically at about 40F. I could probably go to about 20-30 with a better quilt. Width is definitely an important factor, add in whether you toss and turn a lot, gotta avoid letting drafts in. At the lowest temps, consider thoughtfully the r-value of your pad. Self-inflating pads can be pretty low in that regard.

Venchka
10-11-2017, 12:35
You don't use a tent Wayne? I do, tried everything else, tarps alone w/o bug netting just don't work for me, nor does cowboy camping on at least 50% of my nights out, so I bought a tent that's 15 ounces (zpacks solo+) including a bug netting. So, 15 ounce tent, 24 ounce pack and 20oz quilt, total big three of 59 ounces, or 3lb 11 ounces. Are you anywhere CLOSE to that at full comfort down to 20 degrees?

I canít touch that number. Donít plan to either.
33 ounce Wide Body Jumbo Jet 20 degree bag. Current comfortable night low temperature is 12 degrees Fahrenheit. Looking forward to 10 degrees.
My last two nights in Wyoming. First night tent fly only. Second night spent sleeping on the fly.
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20171011/8bed9df371683b3d6c5bef71becf98fa.jpg
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20171011/4174b3357d88f545974ca8074e5e0776.jpg
Different strokes for different folks.
Itís all good. Being out there is what matters.
Wayne


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Maineiac64
10-11-2017, 12:52
Switch back to a bag in the fall every year. Basically at about 40F. I could probably go to about 20-30 with a better quilt. Width is definitely an important factor, add in whether you toss and turn a lot, gotta avoid letting drafts in. At the lowest temps, consider thoughtfully the r-value of your pad. Self-inflating pads can be pretty low in that regard.

This is what I came to say.

colorado_rob
10-11-2017, 13:22
I canít touch that number. Donít plan to either.
33 ounce Wide Body Jumbo Jet 20 degree bag. Current comfortable night low temperature is 12 degrees Fahrenheit. Looking forward to 10 degrees.
My last two nights in Wyoming. First night tent fly only. Second night spent sleeping on the fly.

Different strokes for different folks.
Itís all good. Being out there is what matters.
Wayne


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Nice looking bag! I had one just like it, I think. WM Alpinlite, correct? Comfy and roomy. Not beating a dead horse, but I did sell mine to a lady here on WB after I got comfy with my 21 deg quilt.

And yes, It's all good and all about being out there! Heading out tomorrow to Canyonlands for four days. I hope our actual paths cross sometime! We think a lot alike despite our bantering.

DuneElliot
10-11-2017, 14:34
Nice looking bag! I had one just like it, I think. WM Alpinlite, correct? Comfy and roomy. Not beating a dead horse, but I did sell mine to a lady here on WB after I got comfy with my 21 deg quilt.

And yes, It's all good and all about being out there! Heading out tomorrow to Canyonlands for four days. I hope our actual paths cross sometime! We think a lot alike despite our bantering.
Completely off-topic but I was in Canyonlands a couple of weeks ago...that place is just awe-inspiring.

Venchka
10-11-2017, 15:50
Completely off-topic but I was in Canyonlands a couple of weeks ago...that place is just awe-inspiring.

Agreed. Itís on my short list.
Wayne


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Venchka
10-11-2017, 18:01
Rob,
Right you are. Alpinlite Long. Iím only 5í-8Ē. The Long version is overkill for me. I couldnít resist a deal.
One of these days weíll run smack into each other.
Wayne


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LittleJimmy
10-14-2017, 16:53
The quilt is the business! You won't look back. 20 deg, and if you're too warm, just stick your feet or arms out...

What pad are you using at 20 degrees?

Jim Adams
10-14-2017, 20:41
I use a 0* quilt and will NEVER go back to a bag. I ground sleep, usually with a tarp but occasionally in tents. I lay straight on top of my sleeping pad and pull it over me. the bottom is boxed in like a mummy and I put my feet in the box and pull the quilt over me. I can roll on my sides, turn onto my stomach or lie on my back. I have put down a piece of tyvek on the snow, layed my mat on the tyvek and layed down on the mat and pulled my quilt over me at 6*F and sleep comfortably all night long. Too hot? Only cover up enough to stay warm. THE SINGLE BEST PIECE OF EQUIPMENT I HAVE EVER BOUGHT BUT DONT GO CHEAP! Buy a quality quilt.

Bronk
10-15-2017, 11:09
Quilts are just like blankets at home. If you toss and turn there you will on the trail. I like the ability to change positions without feeling like I am in a cocoon. I still have my TT Notch and use quilts in it, but my hammock is more comfortable. Quilts have a foot box to keep your feet warm and keep them covered when you pull the the top up around your neck. If your not using a hammock, you should have a sleeping pad or mattress with a high R rated to keep your backside warm especially in cold weather. With a hammock you can use your mattress/pad or get an under quilt for that same reason. I have a winter and a summer under quilt. If you get warm using you quilt you can always stick an arm or your feet out.

The choice is yours my friend because what works for me, may not work for you. Good luck.
Just like with a mummy bag, you have to learn how to sleep with a quilt. When I first tried a mummy bag it was very frustrating trying to move around inside it until I learned that you wear the bag just like you wear a sock...you don't try to move around inside it, you allow the bag to move with you as you change position. With a quilt it is exactly the opposite, you move underneath it while leaving the quilt in place, otherwise you're going to let cold air in and warmth out.

blw2
10-15-2017, 20:48
Just like with a mummy bag, you have to learn how to sleep with a quilt. When I first tried a mummy bag it was very frustrating trying to move around inside it until I learned that you wear the bag just like you wear a sock...you don't try to move around inside it, you allow the bag to move with you as you change position. With a quilt it is exactly the opposite, you move underneath it while leaving the quilt in place, otherwise you're going to let cold air in and warmth out.

I've sort of looked at the bag the same way
...problem though is that during the night my tossing and turning isn't always conscience, so inevitably the blasted thing will end up twisted....sometimes so as to give harry Houdini a run...
that's why I can't imagine ever going back to a bag.
The only reason I can even imagine might be some sub zero arctic type situation where maximum warmth is required.

Sovi
10-15-2017, 20:56
Wish I'd known that a few years back! I paid attention to length and was entirely ignorant of girth.

I had the same problem with mine, but I found that I can lie comfortably in any position, unless i want to bend 1 leg and keep the other straight. The restriction in my bag forces me to bend both legs or keep both straight.

egilbe
10-15-2017, 21:06
I use a 20* EE quilt with my gf until it hits the hi teens and then we switch to -30 sleeping bags which are way overkill for anything higher than 0 degrees. It doesnt matter, shes warm and happy and is surprised that she can enjoy Winter camping/hiking.

DownEaster
10-16-2017, 01:38
I've sort of looked at the bag the same way
...problem though is that during the night my tossing and turning isn't always conscience, so inevitably the blasted thing will end up twisted....sometimes so as to give harry Houdini a run...
that's why I can't imagine ever going back to a bag.
Bronk's advice that "you wear the bag just like you wear a sock" is easier to follow if the bag fits more like a sock. So more girth (roominess) than your body needs means more potential to get twisted in the excess material.

Many people think they need a roomy sleeping bag for comfort. I've found that the most comfortable bag has enough room for me to adjust my arm positions, and no more.

DuneElliot
10-16-2017, 11:15
Size does help...I can move around in a mummy bag just fine without getting all twisted up, but I'm petite and the bags are always sized up.