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gracebowen
10-07-2017, 17:20
Stuff to make apex blanket 25 deg $70. 1.5. lb
Poly tarp. I know its poly. 7. 1.12. Lb
Stakes etc. 16. 1
Trowel. 2. .5
Sleeping pad. 17. 1.9
Travel air pillow. 5. ?

Keen sandals. 35. 2

I cant decide between the
One pack 50l backpack. 2.3 lbs. $35 and the
Mountaintop 40l. 2.1 lb and $35

So for numbers I used the heaviest most expensive.

So far im at 12 lbs and $185
Im fairly certain I have most of the other stuff I need floating around the house.
As ive been dreaming for the last year ive bought non cotton clothes I thought would work well on the trail.

I have used a poly tarp for shelter before on a cold night it rained and stayed dry. I also felt noticably warmer in my shelter.

https://hikingreviewed.com/best-hiking-backpacks-under-100/

I liked the teton sport scout the best but it was so heavy.

Open to suggestions except to ditch poly tarp and get a real shelter. I dont want to spend more than $300 on initial gear.
Yes you may think I wont finish due to lack of funds.
I may not finish for any number of reasons but at the very least I will have a nice section hike.

gracebowen
10-07-2017, 17:22
Well it didnt look like that when i pushed submit.
First number is price. Second is weight in ounces.

Uriah
10-07-2017, 17:23
...a sewing machine.

gracebowen
10-07-2017, 17:32
Forgot to add that I have 2 friends who already volunteered to make the blanket for me. Ive seen clothes they make and they are good. One even made her daughters wedding and bridesmaids dtrsses. The likelihood if them being around in 2 years is high. Ive known them both for over 10 years. Also my mom can help me. She sews ok.

Slo-go'en
10-07-2017, 20:16
Go with the 50L pack, there is still a lot of stuff you need to add. Food takes up a lot of space too.

Get a real tent. Let me repeat, get a real tent. Unless you plan to become a shelter dweller.

Huntmog
10-07-2017, 20:34
Don't get the mountaintop. I have a larger version as my loaner pack. I bought it when I was getting back into backpacking and can't imagine using on a thru. I'd also argue the weight is not accurate... unless they've really cut down.

SwathHiker
10-07-2017, 22:06
Grace, you might look at a Kelty Redwing. Go over to Amazon and use that Honey extension - add it to your Chrome browser and then set alerts to notify you of price drops. That's not too heavy. Another good one is the Osprey Talon 44 mens pack (little bigger than the womens). I used that no problem and it's on sale for $116. It's 2 pounds and 3 oz for the short torso which is what I use.

Look on GearTrade.com to collect up the stuff you need and get it used. You can get a great Klymit 20 degree down bag on Amazon for $149.

And there's nothing wrong with being a shelter dweller. Just bring a shower curtain to cut the wind chill like Grandma Gatewood (look her up). I've see many a thruhiker blow thru with nothing at all but the clothes on their backs begging for us to throw them oatmeal packets and energy bars as they ran by. Or stopped to stink the place up for a few hours in the night. Whatever. Get a good sleeping back and a pack you can carry. And a warm down jacket. Uniqlo has them super cheap. Uniqlo.com - I've used those before hiking. They are freezing without a rain shell over them but with a shell over them they are toasty and fine. Pick up an OR Helium II rain shell on clearance (last year's color) and some trail runners and the foregoing and you can grab some other stuff here and there out of hiker boxes, especially the ones down in the south from the people who drop out.

SwathHiker
10-07-2017, 22:07
Look at Uniqlo's jackets for certain as they have sales and you can get a decent ultralight down for $49.

SwathHiker
10-07-2017, 22:08
You can also get "dance pants" - nylon pants on amazon for $20 to stay warm over your regular pants but I'd skip that and look for OR Helium rain pants on clearance (last season colors)

SwathHiker
10-07-2017, 22:15
I also hiked about 800 miles in Keen Whisper sandals and really liked them but in April and May down south your feet will freeze in that icy water and muddy cold ground. Or are you going to change into those later? You don't want to carry them, they are crazy heavy. But you can put them in a bounce box and send it to yourself Priority Mail and as long as you don't open the box you can keep bouncing it further up the trail to yourself for free each time until it warms up. Or maybe you can buy some waterproof socks but then you might as well buy sneakers for the cost of those. REI Garage is the place to buy trail runners. Right before you go get them on clearance and you can return them if they break, and also the manufacturer will replace them along the trail for you if they break.

StichBurly
10-07-2017, 22:27
I also hiked about 800 miles in Keen Whisper sandals and really liked them but in April and May down south your feet will freeze in that icy water and muddy cold ground. Or are you going to change into those later?

Depends on the weather that year2014 Start April 8 - Oct 25th Wore Chacos the whole way. No frozen feet.
2016 Start May 1- Oct 28 Wore Chacos until the Whites. No frozen feet. Switched to LonePeaks for the finish.

gracebowen
10-07-2017, 22:30
Im hoping to start Harpers Ferry late April 2020.
N to Katadin (sp)
Flip back to HF
S to Springer.

gracebowen
10-07-2017, 22:33
Im not set on shoes. The keens I looked at appeared tolerable. If I didnt need shoes to protect my feet I would rather be barefoot.

Venchka
10-08-2017, 07:46
Im not set on shoes. The keens I looked at appeared tolerable. If I didnt need shoes to protect my feet I would rather be barefoot.

Buy larger than you normally wear. At least a half size bigger. A wider width helps too. Your feet will grow. They need room.
Wayne


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rocketsocks
10-08-2017, 09:52
I commend you on dirt baggin' it, ya don't need top o' the line gear, unless you plan on going again and again and again, then I'd consider some upgrades.

Slo-go'en
10-08-2017, 12:15
The rocks of PA can really do a number on your feet, especially when your just starting out from HF. Many hikers complain how bad their feet hurt in PA. Trail runners with soft and flexible soles will kill your feet and likely result in stress fractures. If you get a boot which is too wide, your feet can roll inside the boot on those rocks and that is not good. I have narrow feet and that is a real issue with me.

When I left HF last year in late April, we had nice weather for a week or so. Then for most of PA it was cold and rainy. This year we had a horrible spring and it was cold and wet all the way into June. Of course, who knows what it will be like in 2020, but it's usually cold and wet in April and May along the east coast.

The good news is there won't be too many others on the trail that time of year so there's not much competition for shelter space. Last year I was part of a group of 4 going through PA and we stayed in a shelter nearly every night (usually just the 4 of us) which saved our butts. Having to camp in the rain every night after walking in it all day would have been a real pain. Between HF and NH, I rarely used my tent. I was rarely dry for long too.

I left HF with about 20 others from the Flip Flop festival on Sunday. With in a day or two, four of us were ahead of the pack and stayed ahead of everyone. The occasional fast thru hiker would catch up and pass us, but that was it. Probably half of those who left HF from the festival quit after a week. The rest stumbled along slowly behind us.

Our little group of four broke up at the Delaware Water Gap. The one lady in the group developed a stress fracture in one of her legs and could no longer walk. She could hardly even stand. The "Kid" in the group (it's sad with a 30's something is the kid in the group) wanted to meet up with his girl friend and had to start cranking out some big miles to meet her at the agreed time and place. I took a couple of zero days to visit my sister who lives near the water gap. That left the last guy in the group to continue on alone.

nsherry61
10-08-2017, 17:09
FWIW, I love poly tarps! Way to go. Make sure to use some rubber bands on one end or the other of your guy lines and the poly tarp will last a lot longer and be much quieter in heavy winds. Even if the poly tarps need to be replaced a couple times, they are still dirt cheap and work quite adequately.

Cheap backpacks are a disaster waiting to happen. If you read the reviews of most all of them, a disconcerting number, especially ones by people that have actually used the bags, have a lot of seam and zipper failures. Not what you want in the backcountry when a working backpack is central to the success of our trip. You can get all kinds of creative and keep yourself safe and mostly dry in a failed tarp. Heck, maybe a friend can even share a shelter with you. But, it's really hard to hike out two days with a backpack with split open seams or torn off shoulder straps.

Have fun!

DownEaster
10-08-2017, 17:34
I'd get the Primus OmniLite Ti stove with silencer head. The standard OmniLite Ti is an expedition-grade stove which facilitates real cooking, but with its simple 3-pronged flame spreader the stove sounds like a jet engine.

Time Zone
10-08-2017, 22:27
Trekking pole supported tent, probably. 20/20 foresight would lead me to know I'd be hiking with poles anyway - might as well save the weight of tent poles, plus it makes the rest of the tent more stuffable in the backpack. Only hesitation: the hybrid single-wall/double wall, how well does it do in heavy rain. Full inner tends to diffuse condensation drops that get knocked off the fly by heavy rain. That won't be the case with a hybrid tent that has the single wall over your head and double on the sides.

MtDoraDave
10-09-2017, 07:10
Trekking pole supported tent, probably. 20/20 foresight would lead me to know I'd be hiking with poles anyway - might as well save the weight of tent poles, plus it makes the rest of the tent more stuffable in the backpack. Only hesitation: the hybrid single-wall/double wall, how well does it do in heavy rain. Full inner tends to diffuse condensation drops that get knocked off the fly by heavy rain. That won't be the case with a hybrid tent that has the single wall over your head and double on the sides.

Look at the Tarptent Notch. Completely rainproof in my experience. (I've only used one for 2 hikes, but my hiking partner has used his for the 3 years we've been doing this) If that's too tight a fit for you, the Stratospire 1 is considerably larger and the vestibules are larger - with the penalties being that it weighs more, takes a bit longer to set up, and costs a bit more.

Time Zone
10-09-2017, 07:28
I sort of have something now. With REI gift card and sale, a Sierra Designs Tensegrity 1 FL joined my quiver of shelters for a mere $40. It has one small hoop pole at the feet but is otherwise trekking pole supported. If I hadn't had that reason to shop there, I'd likely have gone to a cottage manufacturer, probably SMD (Skyscape Scout) but I'm not certain. But I was pleased to find something like what I did at REI.

SwathHiker
10-14-2017, 13:05
Go Lite used to make good stuff for reasonable prices and now they are using the name My Trail - check out their stuff at mytrail.com. They have a cheap ultralightish pack and down jackets, shoes. Especially if they have a sale. Steep and Cheap is also a great way to get stuff. They have a browser extension that will notify you of their flash sales as they happen all day long and sierratradingpost.com always has last year's gear for cheap. Much cheaper than elsewhere often. I've gotten stuff there for about a third of the price elsewhere - packs, smartwool long underwear, bridgedale coolmax socks which are awesome, Ghost Whisperer down jackets which are warm and super light, etc. All at sierratradingpost. But check out mytrail.com for their packs.

SwathHiker
10-14-2017, 13:06
We should start a thread of places to find great gear at discount prices.

SwathHiker
10-14-2017, 13:07
Travelcountry.com is another

SwathHiker
10-14-2017, 13:08
I'll do it

gracebowen
02-22-2018, 02:10
So I was gifted a tarptent from a fellow wb'er.
1lb 6 oz.

I went ahead and bought a 4.5 lb Teton for $40 It's non returnable and not under warranty. As soon as I get it I an going to see if there's anywhere to modify it to lower weight.

Thanks to Dutch's sale my Apex was $53.
I also spent about $10 on things for a as yet unnamed diy project.

I'm finally making what feels like forward progress in the gear department.

fiddlehead
02-22-2018, 06:32
I would probably buy the same stuff I'm using now
Feathered Friends "Hummingbird" sleeping bag.
Integral Designs "Sil Shelter" (haven't seen a better design in 20 years)
I did buy a new pack last year as my Go-Lite breeze wore out, I bought a "Burn" by Mt. Laurel Designs. I bought their medium, but probably should;ve gotten the large. Pack is big enough but the opening is sometimes too small.
My stove is fine: "Pocket Rocket"
My cookit: Evenew pot handle has now been re-riveted onto it's 4th aluminum 1.3 lilre pot now. (again I haven't seen a better handle design in 20 years)
My long johns: I have switched over to Merino Wool as they don't stink like the old polypro.
My Frogg Toggs are good, but the newer lightweight ones are much lighter. (are they as durable? Probably not, but they are cheap, so have a spare jacket ready anyway)
What else? My Photon II microlite is all I've needed for light on my last 4 thru-hikes.
Haven't seen anything lighter or better.
Still using my cheap blue pad although I would switch to a blow up thermorest or something if they get to be under 6 oz. someday (I'm sure that day is coming)
So, what's new out there they I would switch too? Not much.
I'm happy with my gear.

NOw if I could have a new right knee? (not the implant kind, just the one I was born with, but new)

Dogwood
02-22-2018, 10:26
If I was buying my gear today it would be most about buying less.

Wyoming
02-24-2018, 14:44
If I was buying my gear today I would buy??

New Stuff!!!!

On a serious note. Hmm.

I hated the ZPack Soloplex I purchased. Fortunately it is mostly worn out now. It was a huge pain to set up on anything but perfect ground, would blow down in a big wind, and was microscopic in interior space. I notice they have come up with an external pole system which makes it nearly freestanding which is a good improvement. But I have switched to a fastfly setup from BigAgnes which weighs the same as the Soloplex/pole setup (and the BigAgnes is a 2 person tent!) and has about 3 times the interior room and one can actually sit all the way up in it which is impossible in a Soloplex.

I would design my own pack by using parts from a Zpack Arcblast and a ULA Ohm 2.0. Which I have sort of done by using parts from both of those packs I own. Both have great features but both have big faults. The norm I guess.

I would like carbon fiber poles but I am too cheap so far. But they save you 1/2 lb. My problem is I tend to break poles occasionally and having the Leki guarantee is invaluable.

I want to go back to about 30 yrs old and do it all over again. Just another thing I can't afford.

nsherry61
02-25-2018, 09:51
. . . I want to go back to about 30 yrs old and do it all over again. Just another thing I can't afford.
30? Hell, 19, so long as I get to keep my accumulated wisdom.

Without the accumulated experience I don't need to just repeat the past. I'll just keep suffering and limping along as I slowly die. Life is a journey after all.

Elaikases
02-25-2018, 11:50
I would probably buy the same stuff I'm using now
Feathered Friends "Hummingbird" sleeping bag.
Integral Designs "Sil Shelter" (haven't seen a better design in 20 years)
I did buy a new pack last year as my Go-Lite breeze wore out, I bought a "Burn" by Mt. Laurel Designs. I bought their medium, but probably should;ve gotten the large. Pack is big enough but the opening is sometimes too small.
My stove is fine: "Pocket Rocket"
My cookit: Evenew pot handle has now been re-riveted onto it's 4th aluminum 1.3 lilre pot now. (again I haven't seen a better handle design in 20 years)
My long johns: I have switched over to Merino Wool as they don't stink like the old polypro.
My Frogg Toggs are good, but the newer lightweight ones are much lighter. (are they as durable? Probably not, but they are cheap, so have a spare jacket ready anyway)
What else? My Photon II microlite is all I've needed for light on my last 4 thru-hikes.
Haven't seen anything lighter or better.
Still using my cheap blue pad although I would switch to a blow up thermorest or something if they get to be under 6 oz. someday (I'm sure that day is coming)
So, what's new out there they I would switch too? Not much.
I'm happy with my gear.

NOw if I could have a new right knee? (not the implant kind, just the one I was born with, but new)

I read an in depth review and it appears the Sil Shelter has no floor and no bug screen?

https://backpackinglight.com/00163-2/

Did you use this on the AT or for general backpacking?

Elaikases
02-25-2018, 11:54
Still, with the bug liner added, the Sil Shelter looks inexpensive. http://www.moontrail.com/integral-designs-silshelterbugliner.php

It goes from 40 square feet internally to a lot less space, and the liner adds about a pound, so that it starts to get into the weight range of the new version of the Copper Spur -- but had less than half the price.

blw2
02-25-2018, 16:44
30? Hell, 19, so long as I get to keep my accumulated wisdom.

Without the accumulated experience I don't need to just repeat the past. I'll just keep suffering and limping along as I slowly die. Life is a journey after all.

aint that the truth.....could be fun to go back knowing what I know now.....I've thought the same thing many times. although it might be a paradox in a way.... all the great things that we have and love now probably wouldn't be. We'd go into things with a different mindset, different goals, different approaches to things....and therefore we'd end up in a different place. Very interesting thing to ponder.....

Wyoming
02-25-2018, 22:34
30? Hell, 19, so long as I get to keep my accumulated wisdom.

Without the accumulated experience I don't need to just repeat the past. I'll just keep suffering and limping along as I slowly die. Life is a journey after all.

Ahh...well I was pretty much a complete idiot when I was 19 - a common affliction I know. So I would not wish that person on anyone.

And I would be pretty concerned about the damage a 19 year old could do with the knowledge of the 63 year old me. Sort of like putting an assault rifle in the hands of a child - and we know where that leads. I might end up in charge of everything - none of you would want that to happen :) Or maybe I would end up being a doctor like my mother wanted - it was actually a good idea but sounded boring at the time.

I just picked 30 because I miss being sprightly. Every day is a challenge anymore.

nate.2346
03-01-2018, 18:05
Look at Uniqlo's jackets for certain as they have sales and you can get a decent ultralight down for $49.
How's the quality on these?

Dogwood
03-01-2018, 20:10
Don't discount evolution.

What we'd buy today isn't what we'd likely or could buy in the past. So, it can't be assumed we would necessarily have been any more kit "right" in the past. What we knew then is less than what we know now. Markets and tech have evolved too.

This is the great gear merry go round that riders assume will get them to that Nirvana kit that always seems just one more revolution ahead. It keeps us in our saddles on the merry go round locked into a cycle of buying, consumption, dissatisfaction, perfection seeking, and rebuying cycle of endless shopping.

MuddyWaters
03-01-2018, 20:17
If i wanted different gear

I would have different gear.

There are a few different things i might like to have for limited circumstances, but I wont allow myself to buy them because I just wouldnt use them enough.

globetruck
03-02-2018, 01:49
I would design my own pack by using parts from a Zpack Arcblast and a ULA Ohm 2.0. Which I have sort of done by using parts from both of those packs I own. Both have great features but both have big faults. The norm I guess.



Just curious - what are your big faults with the Arc Blast? Iíve been thrilled with my Arc Haul after 350 miles so far.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

CalebJ
03-02-2018, 09:47
If I was buying my gear today it would be most about buying less.

Same here. Over the last 25 years (and particularly the last 5) my gear has gotten steadily simpler, lighter, and in many cases, cheaper. If I were to start over now, I would skip a lot of the more expensive things I've bought and focus on the basics.