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Goingforalittlewalk
12-15-2017, 03:40
What item did you take and wished you just left at home?
And after doing the AT, what item did you get or wished you had from the start?

I'm in the 'fill up my bag' planning stage.. after looking at others gear list etc..

Solar panels. ..40/60 on not taking it now.
Might get a bigger tarp..4x4 metre..after reading someone wished for it on them rainy days..

DuneElliot
12-15-2017, 09:37
Wind River Range...wished I'd taken a sleeping bag and not my hammock quilt...it was too narrow for ground sleeping.

Don't have anything I wish I'd left at home...I have a minimal set-up that is light but keeps me warm.

rocketsocks
12-15-2017, 10:26
Titanium spoon

skinnbones
12-15-2017, 10:54
Poncho was useless item for me.

rickb
12-15-2017, 11:07
Cutter Snake Bite Kit.

Anyone remember those? People are smarter now.

Just found it earlier this month during a round of de-cluttering. I am throwing out stuff by the car load, but for some reason I could not toss it and so relegated it to a corner of my desk — worse than useless — dangerous.

rocketsocks
12-15-2017, 12:37
Cutter Snake Bite Kit.

Anyone remember those? People are smarter now.

Just found it earlier this month during a round of de-cluttering. I am throwing out stuff by the car load, but for some reason I could not toss it and so relegated it to a corner of my desk — worse than useless — dangerous.The Whoopy cushion can be repurposed in Barbie and Kens dinner party set.

rocketsocks
12-15-2017, 12:39
...but “The Extractor” I still use for cupping sore muscles

Koozy
12-15-2017, 13:32
Wish I invested in ultralight gear the first time around. After even a few hundred miles, it was easy to rationalize the extra money would have been worth eliminating the discomfort of the extra weight.
Especially a lighter rain jacket, lighter sleeping bag, and lighter pack.

Wouldn't have brought anything more than a 1 liter water bottle and 1 liter bladder for water storage.

Wish I had brought a trowel, and had not depended on the privies. There was a time or 2 when I felt ashamed of my cathole efforts.

Wish I packed more premade food out of towns. A good sandwich, burrito or precooked meat in a tupperware can last for days, and is way more appetizing that the typical backpacker diet. Lived by that on the PCT.

Wish I didn't bring an extra shirt. Mastering the system of layers and maintaining dry clothes for camp was key.

I'm sure more would come to mind if I kept thinking about it....

SteelCut
12-15-2017, 13:34
Solar panels. ..40/60 on not taking it now.

There is a reason the AT is called The Green Tunnel. Leave them at home. Instead bring a USB battery backup that you can re-charge when you go into town for resupply.

DuneElliot
12-15-2017, 13:38
Titanium spoon

Absolutely love mine...only one of two pieces of gear I was given that piqued my interest in backing that I still use.

Slo-go'en
12-15-2017, 14:17
I bet a lot of people wish they brought more money.

Deadeye
12-15-2017, 14:19
fuel canister... stove didn't do much without it.

Bronk
12-15-2017, 14:19
Too many little items to list...lots of, "this is neat" or "I could use this" stuff that only weighed a couple of ounces that never ended up being used. After awhile I dumped out the contents of my pack every week and got rid of everything I hadn't used in the previous week.

Goingforalittlewalk
12-15-2017, 19:38
Too many little items to list...lots of, "this is neat" or "I could use this" stuff that only weighed a couple of ounces that never ended up being used. After awhile I dumped out the contents of my pack every week and got rid of everything I hadn't used in the previous week.

I've just started emptying my bag after a hike.....and relies I carry alot of pointless things...
Like the tupperware idea. ..been looking for a screw top beaker that would fit inside my cook pot.. can't find anything :(

fastfoxengineering
12-16-2017, 17:00
My "AT thru hike" gear list nowadays is tailored to moderately fast and moderately light hiking while setup to be warm, comfortable, and allow me to stay out of towns as much as possible.

I'm definitely not carrying a solar panel on the AT but be sure I do have my coffee cup.

An Anker portable battery bank is much better for the AT than a solar panel. I just ordered a new one that is a wall charger/bank as one unit. Called the Anker fusion 5000mah.

Might not be be enough backup power for some but for me it's plenty and reduces the number of things I have to carry.



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shelb
12-23-2017, 23:22
Keep your pack to Under 30 pounds including 2 l of water and 4 days of food. If you aren't there, figure it ou!

Dogwood
12-24-2017, 00:36
R U directly coming from the UK to hike the AT? It makes a difference in what to bring and not to bring. It certainly can matter financially.

R U at all familiar with tarping? How so? Was it on a long hike... like the TGO Challenge? The AT weather for a typical NOBO thru can be wet for several days. You do have POSSIBLE AT lean to access but that's not an absolute. If you're in the bubble(high season) the strong tendency is for more hikers to hit the lean to's than capacity allows.

During that first really LD hike - an AT NOBO Thru - I went through a steep fast gear, trail knowledge, skill building, and LD trail life learning curve. I'll estimate at least 70% of the gear I started with I switched out by Harpers Ferry and it stayed that way until summiting Mt K.

Beyond the "items" - gear - that changed was mentality. I became more go with the flow, less stressed, more aware that LD hiking isn't just about hiking or gear. Ego fell away. How trail logistics like water carrying, fuel usage, how much food and what kind of food was carried changed.

Dogwood
12-24-2017, 00:42
Let me add. I'm an avid A frame config. tarper so not against tarps. Personally, I wouldn't want to always be under a flat or cat tarp as my only shelter of choice on a typical NOBO 5 day non stop rainy stretch as a new tarper. Have you looked into shaped tarps or tarptents?

Sarcasm the elf
12-24-2017, 00:58
Ego.


........

swjohnsey
12-24-2017, 10:44
A small MP3 player/radio that uses batteries.

colorado_rob
12-24-2017, 11:33
Ego.


........This! We hike all the time, year 'round, tough trails, we consider ourselves (my wife and I) a couple of very experienced and strong hikers, with a nice lightweight kit... thought the AT would be a piece of cake. Not! Kicked my butt in places, but got 'er done. Humbling experience! Doing it again for my wife's benefit (she was with me about 300 miles of first AT), but this time a bit more mentally prepared...

Dogwood
12-24-2017, 13:59
A small MP3 player/radio that uses batteries.

Me too. So much easier than a larger more complicated device that has so many things in one to listen to umpteen music and audio books with AAA Li batteries that also match a headlamp.

LazyLightning
12-24-2017, 17:53
There is a reason the AT is called The Green Tunnel. Leave them at home. Instead bring a USB battery backup that you can re-charge when you go into town for resupply.

don't they have solar chargers that can also be charged by a power source? .... I haven't looked around much yet but I'm pretty sure my buddy has something like that but maybe they aren't as efficient as a regular usb battery back up?

I was thinking it'd be nice to have the solar if needed even though I'm not expecting much sun charging, as long as it can also be charged by a power source.

Spirit Walker
12-24-2017, 21:35
What I sent home: candles and extra batteries for my flashlight (I went to bed at dark and rarely got up in the night, so one set of batteries lasted the whole trail.)

What i acquired: a 2 gallon water bag, to carry water from springs to where I was camped. That became essential when it got hotter and I wanted to wash up away from the water source and also when springs were 1/2 mile down from the ridge. I don't know if they even make the kind I used, but it was my best on-trail purchase.

What I didn't acquire but should have: hiking pole or poles. My knees were trashed from my first two thruhikes. I didn't start using a pole until a few years later.

KDogg
12-24-2017, 22:55
Don't take anything that is redundant to your smart phone. So...no camera (unless you are a camera guru), get guthooks for maps, no music player, etc. I sent most of my awol guide home, sent a camera home, sent a music player home. No solar panel (and no stove with usb charger...dumb), get a 10,000 mAh battery and learn how to keep it charged (easy to do). Definitely hiking poles and learn how to use them properly (watch videos on youtube). Make a homemade water scoop (out of a small bottled water container)(folks will be borrowing it from you). As some have already said, go ultralight if you possibly can. You will not get used to a heavy pack. It will be as heavy at the end as it is at the start.

fiddlehead
12-24-2017, 23:02
For my 1st AT thru hike (1977) We ditched the $5 tube tent and bought a $20 pup tent at K-mart. Kept the bugs out much better.
The only other thing I remember was that we should have never brought travelers checks.
They got wet and the word "VOID" showed up on them once they did.
That created a few problems.

Other than that, we didn't really take anything extra as we had been trained by someone who knew that weight would be a big problem.
(but once our Optimus stove blew up from using unleaded fuel, instead of Coleman, we had to build fires the rest of the way)

Things I've found on the trail: climbing rope, big bag of carrots, sombrero.

LAF
12-25-2017, 14:00
... a homemade water scoop (out of a small bottled water container)(folks will be borrowing it from you)...

you might be surprised how valuable this little thing can be; I used a cutoff Dasani bottle that my Smartwater bottle fit inside. Can't tell you how many times it was borrowed :-) Definitely comes in handy.

Venchka
12-25-2017, 14:33
don't they have solar chargers that can also be charged by a power source? .... I haven't looked around much yet but I'm pretty sure my buddy has something like that but maybe they aren't as efficient as a regular usb battery back up?
I was thinking it'd be nice to have the solar if needed even though I'm not expecting much sun charging, as long as it can also be charged by a power source.
Think about that for just a moment.
It works the other way around. The solar panel charges a battery that can charge your devices. The same kind of battery that you can charge whenever you find an outlet.
Solar panels work best west of the Mississippi. The sun works better out there. :sunWayne

Venchka
12-25-2017, 14:39
I've just started emptying my bag after a hike.....and relies I carry alot of pointless things...
Like the tupperware idea. ..been looking for a screw top beaker that would fit inside my cook pot.. can't find anything :(
What size pot do you have?
What size beaker are you looking for?
I buy these at The Container Store, or at their online shop. One fits in a Snow Peak 750 ml titanium cup. 8 ounce. Leak proof!
https://www.containerstore.com/s/preserve-snack-container/d?productId=10036803&q=preserve
Wayne

Goingforalittlewalk
12-25-2017, 15:27
Some good ideas to take...

Solar panels. . I like not needing to head to town... getting a 10.000 power bank.. (small solar panels with built-in battery.. never work well for me)

I have my visa interview 9th Jan. ..if ok will be flying from UK to JFK to Atlanta the rest is still in planing lol

Tarp.. with hammock.. I've spent a few days under one, only problem are wet lines....
I've just hiked in Scotland and use the tarp as a tent with trekking pole.. worked well.
Just got a small mp3 player off amazon £12, miro usb charger.
I'm working on my water filter setup...
I have a sawyer mini... but Ive read people bump them and get the squeeze because of water flow... I normally just fill a bottle and squeeze that... but I know it takes ages... so I might get a new one...

(It's Christmas day.. so merry Christmas. .thermal top is off my list.lol)

Goingforalittlewalk
12-25-2017, 15:38
What size pot do you have?
What size beaker are you looking for?
I buy these at The Container Store, or at their online shop. One fits in a Snow Peak 750 ml titanium cup. 8 ounce. Leak proof!
https://www.containerstore.com/s/preserve-snack-container/d?productId=10036803&q=preserve
Wayne

I have a 800ml 10x10mm pot.. and I wanted a tub to fit in when not in use. . But I'm now going with a bottle. .. I like pasta sauce and will transfer from the glass jar and take a tubawere tub... keep things in.. swap out for food storage.

Elaikases
12-25-2017, 18:22
Wish I invested in ultralight gear the first time around. After even a few hundred miles, it was easy to rationalize the extra money would have been worth eliminating the discomfort of the extra weight.
Especially a lighter rain jacket, lighter sleeping bag, and lighter pack.

Wouldn't have brought anything more than a 1 liter water bottle and 1 liter bladder for water storage.

Wish I had brought a trowel, and had not depended on the privies. There was a time or 2 when I felt ashamed of my cathole efforts.

Wish I packed more premade food out of towns. A good sandwich, burrito or precooked meat in a tupperware can last for days, and is way more appetizing that the typical backpacker diet. Lived by that on the PCT.

Wish I didn't bring an extra shirt. Mastering the system of layers and maintaining dry clothes for camp was key.

I'm sure more would come to mind if I kept thinking about it....

I've found a number of times I was glad to have three liters of water. I'm beginning to think it is really a matter of seasons and luck. I've met people who were halfway through and only carrying one liter (in early April. I was on a section hike and the fastest of the early starts were starting to overlap us).

Venchka
12-25-2017, 18:56
I have a 800ml 10x10mm pot.. and I wanted a tub to fit in when not in use. . But I'm now going with a bottle. .. I like pasta sauce and will transfer from the glass jar and take a tubawere tub... keep things in.. swap out for food storage.
Okay. I use the container I linked to instead of Tupperware. The screw on lid doesn’t leak. I suppose 8 ounces might not be enough capacity.
Good luck!
Wayne

Flakes
12-25-2017, 20:31
I have been buying ultra light gear in order to justify one big weight. Lots of zpack stuff. But I have a 1 pound 8 ounce CPAP machine and a 3 pound 4 ounce lithium 54000 mAh portable power charger to keep it going. If I could leave it behind I would, but of course I have to be able to sleep.

KDogg
12-25-2017, 21:13
I'm chuckling a bit about the solar panel "debate". They do not work on the A.T. If you bring them you will either be leaving them in a hiker box or sending them home. Seriously, how many times do folks need to be told this? I didn't use sunscreen (I normally need to) after the first few weeks when the trees filled in.

Astro
12-25-2017, 21:20
I have been buying ultra light gear in order to justify one big weight. Lots of zpack stuff. But I have a 1 pound 8 ounce CPAP machine and a 3 pound 4 ounce lithium 54000 mAh portable power charger to keep it going. If I could leave it behind I would, but of course I have to be able to sleep.

Not for sure what your weight situation is, but when some people loose weight they no longer need the CPAP machine. Perhaps something you might be able to send home part of the way up the trail. Just something to keep in mind.

egilbe
12-25-2017, 21:24
I took a nice Anker double panel solar charger with me in the HMW. Never had enough sunshine or time enough in the sunlight to charge anything. Stopped at Caratunk B&B and talked to Paul (Boulder) about it. He confirmed that it was pretty useless on the AT, but if I ever hiked the PCT, it would useful.

nsherry61
12-25-2017, 21:33
I have been buying ultra light gear in order to justify one big weight. Lots of zpack stuff. But I have a 1 pound 8 ounce CPAP machine and a 3 pound 4 ounce lithium 54000 mAh portable power charger to keep it going. If I could leave it behind I would, but of course I have to be able to sleep.
Mandibular Advancement Device!!

They may not work for you, but they apparently work as well as a CPAP for about 1/2 the people otherwise on CPAP. I've had great luck with mine. Took some time to get used to, just like the CPAP, but with mine, I traveled in Europe for three weeks this summer with no sleep apnea issues. It was shocking and amazing how well it worked.

Talk to you dentist about one or live dangerously and buy one off the internet and try it out so see if it works for you. A MAD is small enough to fit in your mouth and only about 2 or 3 oz, much smaller and lighter than a CPAP.

jgillam
12-25-2017, 22:24
Mandibular Advancement Device!!

They may not work for you, but they apparently work as well as a CPAP for about 1/2 the people otherwise on CPAP. I've had great luck with mine. Took some time to get used to, just like the CPAP, but with mine, I traveled in Europe for three weeks this summer with no sleep apnea issues. It was shocking and amazing how well it worked.

Talk to you dentist about one or live dangerously and buy one off the internet and try it out so see if it works for you. A MAD is small enough to fit in your mouth and only about 2 or 3 oz, much smaller and lighter than a CPAP.As a 10 year CPAP user, I completely agree with this. While researching portable CPAP machines, I discovered MADs and have been using it while camping and some at home. I bought a Pure Sleep brand devise and like it.

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fastfoxengineering
12-26-2017, 06:04
I've been using Sawyer filters for a while.

Started with a squeeze. Busted the seams on three Bags. Then let it freeze. Got 3 seasons out of that filter.

Mini came out. Used it on the Long Trail. Hated every second of it. Used in conjunction with smart water bottles. Reduced flow rate and need to backflush so often slowed me down and took way too much effort as a thru hiker.

Bought another full size squeeze. Use with smart water bottles and evernew bags.

Made a DIY gravity setup for it. And for the low additional weight of the gravity system, I don't think I could leave it home on a long hike. It's really not that much extra kit and makes filtering water a break rather than a chore.

So for me. Gravity setup

However my inner gram weenie cringes at this cause I know I could just filter on the go straight from the water bottle but that system has it's down sides as well. Mainly unscrewing/screwing the filter a million times a day to let air back in the bottle

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rocketsocks
12-26-2017, 12:08
my wife, my girlfriend.

Hollywood44
12-26-2017, 15:58
books...heavy arse books!!

stilllife
12-26-2017, 18:10
I have been buying ultra light gear in order to justify one big weight. Lots of zpack stuff. But I have a 1 pound 8 ounce CPAP machine and a 3 pound 4 ounce lithium 54000 mAh portable power charger to keep it going. If I could leave it behind I would, but of course I have to be able to sleep.

Have you tried Theravent nose strips. They are for snoring but I use them for my apnea. It works for me. It allows just enough back pressure to keep your pipe open.

jj dont play
12-26-2017, 18:38
Things I ended up getting rid of and could have done without day one: pants (no I didn't go bottomless, shorts is all you need), puffy jacket (I never actually "needed" mine but this all depends on when you start, weather that year, and how fast you do the AT), stove, first aid supplies (everyone else will be carrying way too much and not hesitate to hook you up should you be in need), beanie (again I didn't experience much cold weather due to pace and timing), Spot (I took it for my mom's saniety but maybe turned on twice)


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LAF
12-27-2017, 10:05
... first aid supplies (everyone else will be carrying way too much and not hesitate to hook you up should you be in need)...)Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
relying on what someone else will be carrying is bad practice

lesliedgray
12-27-2017, 10:50
you might be surprised how valuable this little thing can be; I used a cutoff Dasani bottle that my Smartwater bottle fit inside. Can't tell you how many times it was borrowed :-) Definitely comes in handy.

Cut how?


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BuckeyeBill
12-27-2017, 12:13
https://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/images/Eloquent/miscgreen/quote_icon.png Originally Posted by jj dont play https://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/images/Eloquent/buttonsgreen/viewpost-right.png (https://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?p=2185747#post2185747)

... first aid supplies (everyone else will be carrying way too much and not hesitate to hook you up should you be in need)...)Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk



relying on what someone else will be carrying is bad practice

I agree with LAF on this. If you can't carry the bare minimum, why should we use our supplies on you? If your going to be like this, then have a list of area hospitals and EMS services and you can use their overpriced supplies. I don't mean this in a condescending way nor am I yelling at you. It just seems to me that too many people are only thinking like you. What happens when you come across another hiker that needs first aid or you need it. Neither one of you have a kit. I guess you just sit there and bleed.

LAF
12-27-2017, 12:27
Just cut the upper 1/3, maybe a little less off. Works great as a scoop, weighs very little, and was easy to carry since smart water bottle fits inside nicely


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jj dont play
12-27-2017, 12:41
https://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/images/Eloquent/miscgreen/quote_icon.png Originally Posted by jj dont play https://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/images/Eloquent/buttonsgreen/viewpost-right.png (https://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?p=2185747#post2185747)

... first aid supplies (everyone else will be carrying way too much and not hesitate to hook you up should you be in need)...)Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk




I agree with LAF on this. If you can't carry the bare minimum, why should we use our supplies on you? If your going to be like this, then have a list of area hospitals and EMS services and you can use their overpriced supplies. I don't mean this in a condescending way nor am I yelling at you. It just seems to me that too many people are only thinking like you. What happens when you come across another hiker that needs first aid or you need it. Neither one of you have a kit. I guess you just sit there and bleed.

Point is what are you really going to carry? Other than a few little bandaids and Advil?
Everybody carries to much
I.E.I needed cold medicine, not a huge deal I could tough it out until town. Turns out a guy had like 2lbs. of it haha and was glad to give it away

Bad cut? Burn? Break? Most of these can be addressed short term with things you'll already have available. Cloth, branches, water, etc. you aren't going to be able to "fix" anything really bad you just need to be able to stabilize the situation (tourniquet, splint, etc) until you can get to town.
A lot of people have enough gear to do a surgery and no clue how to use it.

Also instead of a cut down bottle for a scoop. A ziploc is lighter and works just as good.


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lesliedgray
12-27-2017, 12:46
Just cut the upper 1/3, maybe a little less off. Works great as a scoop, weighs very little, and was easy to carry since smart water bottle fits inside nicely


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[emoji106]Thnx


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LAF
12-27-2017, 12:50
[emoji106]Thnx


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And having the smart water bottle fit inside something else helps me get my water bottle out and in of my side pockets whether in the move or standing still - ziplock doesn’t do that for me.


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DownEaster
12-27-2017, 16:00
Just cut the upper 1/3, maybe a little less off. Works great as a scoop, weighs very little, and was easy to carry since smart water bottle fits inside nicely
I don't understand why you'd want the extra weight, unless you're going stoveless. You can use your mug or pot to scoop up water. You're going to be heating it to boiling temperature anyway, thus no contamination worries.

LAF
12-27-2017, 16:48
I don't understand why you'd want the extra weight, unless you're going stoveless. You can use your mug or pot to scoop up water. You're going to be heating it to boiling temperature anyway, thus no contamination worries.
Don't carry a mug, and as to pot, "pot" is stashed in my pack and would be difficult to get to and it doubles as my mug (why would I want to carry both a pot and a mug, that's a lot more wt than a small piece of plastic), not to mention an inflexible pot or mug isn't always as workable for getting water as is something that is flexible - I don't just get water when I get to a place to stay for the night, and most often carry little water and many sources of water along the way it helps to have a flexible scoop. A small piece of plastic carried on the outside of the pack is easy to get to. As someone mentions, a ziplock works well to, except that it doesn't provide me with the added benefit I get of the ease added in retrieving and replacing my water bottle while drinking on the move - it really does remove a small source of frustration for me. It's just what works for me and why. Some folks can't go without both a mug and a pot, I'm quite happy doing so. As it stands, my BPW for cooler, shoulder season runs around 10.5 lbs. Could it get a lot lighter than that? Sure, but I carry separate clothes for sleeping as I can't do without that, others can. And the beat goes on :-) We all have our comfort levels and what makes us happy on the trail. Sometimes I learn something from someone that makes it into my kit, or a way of doing something that suits my nature, sometimes not. That's why I love this forum, so many ideas, some work for me, some don't :-)

DownEaster
12-27-2017, 19:31
(why would I want to carry both a pot and a mug, that's a lot more wt than a small piece of plastic)
Lots of people want to have food and beverage simultaneously: coffee with their oatmeal, or whatever.

not to mention an inflexible pot or mug isn't always as workable for getting water as is something that is flexible
My mug is an Ozark Trail collapsible job ($1.42 at Walmart), so if you're looking to add a mug to your gear for that beverage-with-meal experience, you can make it a flexible one. And it'll squish down to fit in any mesh pocket on the outside of your pack. Sterilize (and also preheat) with some boiling water when you're making your cocoa at the end of the day's hiking.

Dogwood
12-28-2017, 00:50
...Make a homemade water scoop (out of a small bottled water container)(folks will be borrowing it from you). As some have already said, go ultralight if you possibly can...


you might be surprised how valuable this little thing can be; I used a cutoff Dasani bottle that my Smartwater bottle fit inside. Can't tell you how many times it was borrowed :-) Definitely comes in handy.

Couldn't either of you have used a cook pot as a scoop? Or, a stick, hollowed reed(cane can work), straw, piece of bamboo, empty snack or sandwich sized Ziploc, etc to also capture water.,,even from a seep? Would avoid redundancy if you already have any of these available which is what you sagaciously advised in the first place. :)

Flakes
12-28-2017, 00:55
Have to agree with this. I thought I was being clever by installing the red cross first aid app on my phone. Turns out that 99% of first aid instructions involve “get them stabilized and call 911”

Baskets
02-23-2018, 19:44
I started with a Jetboil, but got rid of it in CT , maybe bring a small MP3 player for music / podcasts

Dogwood
02-23-2018, 23:18
I took a nice Anker double panel solar charger with me in the HMW. Never had enough sunshine or time enough in the sunlight to charge anything. Stopped at Caratunk B&B and talked to Paul (Boulder) about it. He confirmed that it was pretty useless on the AT, but if I ever hiked the PCT, it would useful.

And, there you have it...a more accurate assessment of why a solar panel fails for most on the AT. They expect to consistently charge it on the fly while hiking. It's not that they can't work! I've seen them work many times within AT NOBO and SOBO and summer hiking time frames to know otherwise. We want them to work in specific ways. It's the user's self imposed inflexible applications of them that is often the cause of failure.

Another reason why they don't work out on the AT again is not the solar panel but expectations of high energy availability for high device usage. There is a expectation of always having to be "connected."

I've witnessed too many times others as well as myself getting badly sunburned on the AT in late spring and through summer. To assume the AT is always a shaded green tunnel is absolutely incorrect!

Dogwood
02-23-2018, 23:28
When using one device for map apps, regular music and high camera usage, always being left on, phone, browsing, watching movies, audio books, weather reports, compass,
etc etc that equals eggs all in one basket high usage. Then, we blame the device or the solar panel. It's our usage that is most to blame.

putts
02-23-2018, 23:32
Next time I'm taking the sub7 hammock just for extra comfortable breaks/naps. I'll still tent at night. I'm not UL, and don't "crush" miles...obviously

Singto
02-24-2018, 00:31
Lots of people want to have food and beverage simultaneously: coffee with their oatmeal, or whatever.

My mug is an Ozark Trail collapsible job ($1.42 at Walmart), so if you're looking to add a mug to your gear for that beverage-with-meal experience, you can make it a flexible one. And it'll squish down to fit in any mesh pocket on the outside of your pack. Sterilize (and also preheat) with some boiling water when you're making your cocoa at the end of the day's hiking.

Nice tip, was looking at Sea to Summit mug costing almost 10 times more. Thank you!

fastfoxengineering
02-24-2018, 02:55
When using one device for map apps, regular music and high camera usage, always being left on, phone, browsing, watching movies, audio books, weather reports, compass,
etc etc that equals eggs all in one basket high usage. Then, we blame the device or the solar panel. It's our usage that is most to blame.I've been looking for a dedicated MP3 player for my upcoming hike.

The old sansa clips were awesome. The news ones don't have the same positive reviews.

Any recommendations?

I would like to reserve the use of my phone to Guthooks and communication. Mostly riding on airplane mode and conserving battery.

Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk

Singto
02-24-2018, 06:44
I've been looking for a dedicated MP3 player for my upcoming hike.

The old sansa clips were awesome. The news ones don't have the same positive reviews.

Any recommendations?



I would like to reserve the use of my phone to Guthooks and communication. Mostly riding on airplane mode and conserving battery.

Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk

I have a Sansa Clip +.....excellent player. It's getting old so I've purchased a Ruizu which is almost a clone of the Sansa. Sounds really good and menus are fairly intuitive. I wanted one with radio as my phone doesn't have such. Here's the model that I bought:

https://www.amazon.com/RUIZU-X50-Bluetooth-Sweat-proof-Lossless/dp/B0776WPJPX/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1519468914&sr=8-2-spons&keywords=ruizu+mp3+player&psc=1

Dogwood
02-24-2018, 09:00
I've been looking for a dedicated MP3 player for my upcoming hike.

The old sansa clips were awesome. The news ones don't have the same positive reviews.

Any recommendations?

I would like to reserve the use of my phone to Guthooks and communication. Mostly riding on airplane mode and conserving battery.

Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk

Since I dont always want to take a eggs all in one basket approach on trail because my camera, audio books, compass, and music usage can be periodically very high and want features of these activities that a "smart phone" isn't yet smart enough to always provide or I'm comfortably old school in some ways at some times I too sometimes want a dedicated MP3 player. I liked the Li AAA battery operated ones by Sansa. It took some hunting and scorns from electronics guru millenials like I was asking where the Model T Fords were located but i recently found a AAA battery RCA mp3 player at Target under tbe dust that cost less than $20 that includes easy rip software for FREE music downloads. It hold 3000 songs and a bunch of books plenty enough for on trail.

Maybe I'm doing it all wrong though.

sarac
02-24-2018, 13:30
Have this small, custom-made powerful flashlight which was very useful.

binderdundat
02-26-2019, 23:20
After reversing my decision to head south back to my home state of Florida from Rutland, VT to avoid probate court routed abuse of my basic rights to decisions regarding my own person, I skimmed through the northbound route to the next state over, New Hampshire, surviving on handouts and with only a daypack, some hygiene products, and an discarded mountain dew bottle for water. I was without my ID cards as my then court-appointed guardian had destroyed them all in a fit of rage. Today, I'm back in possession of both my rights and new ID cards. But now with increasing populations of Lone Star ticks and a broken ankle to boot, I think I'll stick with private vehicles and the highways for any future interstate travels. Still, had I been traveling with a full-sized pack and all the resources I could use, the neuralgia I'd developed in my shoulders during my last bug out to avoid my then better half's overstepping judgment would have grounded my flight within a day. Sometimes less is more.

KnightErrant
03-03-2019, 19:09
For my first month I wore every stitch of clothing I brought with me because I'm a pansy about the cold, but once in VA by late May, I kept only my bare minimum of clothing. Had a town dress for a few weeks but ended up leaving that at home too (Pearisburg) and just wearing my Toggs for laundry. Also switched out my larger journal for the lightest Moleskin kind because my multi-page-per-night journaling habit died after the first month. Also switched my cheap plastic spork for a long-handled titanium spoon because I was jealous of hikers around me who could eat out of MountainHouse/freezer bags without getting their hands all dirty.

Also enjoyed hot meals/coffee for the cold weeks at the beginning, but happily ditched my cook setup in VA and ate cold-soaked food out of a Talenti jar the rest of the way.

I also never used gaiters but I think I'd get some dirty girls if I was going to do it again, particularly for PA-VT. Every outfitter I'd think about it, but then I'd decide against them because I didn't like the colors/patterns, but before my next long hike I'll probably order some online that I like.

elray
03-03-2019, 21:36
My wife and I bought Dirty Girls after ditching our old nylon three quarter gaiters at the first opportunity, best couple of ounces I ever invested in, wouldn’t be without them now. We wear only trail runners of course.

bighammer
03-06-2019, 00:59
My wife and I bought Dirty Girls after ditching our old nylon three quarter gaiters at the first opportunity, best couple of ounces I ever invested in, wouldn’t be without them now. We wear only trail runners of course.

Googled "dirty girls" and had some very interesting results, but nothing backpacking related. What are they?

fastfoxengineering
03-06-2019, 01:13
Googled "dirty girls" and had some very interesting results, but nothing backpacking related. What are they?For real lol.

Dirty Girl GAITERS.



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MuddyWaters
03-06-2019, 06:27
books...heavy arse books!!

I remember a kid whos well meaning aunt gave him several books at his dropoff. His pack was 42 lbs.

He burned those books first night.

jefals
03-06-2019, 07:42
if I left now, I'd be takin a couple of hernias with me, and I'd damn sure be wishing I didnt!