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Singerdinger
01-11-2018, 22:50
Hey y'all, thought I'd post my gear list for some feedback. Feeling pretty good about it. Thinking base weight will be 16-17lb after the rest of my uncalculated weights are added. Anything I'm missing or should change? Slap me silly! Anything with '??' I'm still on the fence about. Thanks!

Backpack:
Osprey Atmos AG 50 {4lb 5oz}
https://www.backcountry.com/osprey-packs-atmos-50-pack-2800-3200-cu-in

Shelter:
ENO Doublenest {1lb 3oz}
whoopie slings suspension system {4.5oz}
HammockGear Quest Hex Tarp {13oz}
100ft dyneema z-line 2mm {3.4oz} (extra line to be used for bear bagging)
6 Lineloc3 guy line tensioners {0.5oz total}
4 MSR Groundhog stakes {2oz total}
ENO bug net {1lb} (too heavy i know but borrowing from a friend to save a lil $$)

Cooking:
Jetboil (will also serve as a bowl for food) {11oz}

Water filtration:
Sawyer Mini w/ 2 Sawyer 1000ml reservoir bags {2oz total}

Sleeping bag:
Big Agnes 15* down {2lb 7oz} (ive slept in it every night for the past 1.5 years-- has a couple tears and some compression. I consider it a 25*)

https://www.rei.com/product/845211/big-agnes-bellyache-mountain-sl-sleeping-bag

Cocoon microfiber liner {8oz}
https://www.rei.com/product/850235/cocoon-microfiber-mummy-liner

Pad:
Thermarest NeoAir xLite - regular {12oz)

Clothing:
Frogg toggs rain suit {10.4oz}
1 polyester shirt
1 zip off pants
2 pairs socks -- Wigwam Outdoor Pro
https://www.wigwam.com/products/p-hiking-outdoor-pro-socks.aspx?productid=2386
1 fleece
1 Columbia floppy hat
1 Smartwool 150 base layer bottoms (5.6oz)
Gloves??
Beanie??
Base layer top??

**Shoes:
Trail runners (thinking I will need 4 pairs to get through the trail)
** I currently have older versions of these:**
- new balance minimus
- Asics gt 2000
-(trail runners)?? - looking for affordable suggestions
-(trail runners)?? - " "

Tevas sandals w/ EVA bottoms ( 13.2oz)
https://www.sierratradingpost.com/teva-original-universal-sport-sandals-for-men~p~6871h/?filterString=mens-shoes~d~146%2F&merch=prod-rec-prod-prod6871H


Water bottle:
1L Smartwater bottle (x2)

1.5L Nalgene?? {7.5oz}

Dry bags:
ZPack slim dry bag (x2-- one for sleeping bag, one for clothes)
ZPack food dry bag
ZPack Phablet Zip Pouch (for phone, charger, wallet)

Total dry bag weight: 3.37oz


Micellaneous:
-Headlamp and 2 extra AA batteries
-Biodegradable soap
-Spork
-First aid kit (alcohol swabs, gauze, Band-Aids, super glue, duct tape/electrical tape, vaseline)
-Pack cover
-cell phone, charger, wallet
- journal
- Kindle??
-toothbrush n paste {ZPack Ultralight toothbrush pack-- 0.71oz}
- multitool
- 2 Lightload ultralight towels {1oz total}


Total weight of itemized weights: 14lb 10oz

DuneElliot
01-11-2018, 22:59
The weight savings isn't worth it when it comes to the Sawyer Squeeze vs the Mini. I have used both and carry the Mini for a back-up if I'm hiking alone. I'd never use it as my main filter. The slightly larger Squeeze is much better.

Also, consider buying the Evernew bags vs the squeeze bags that come with the Sawyer filters. They are better quality and more reliable...just make sure to hold the neck when tightening caps and filters or it will develop a leak.

Singerdinger
01-11-2018, 23:33
Dang ok. I saw the squeeze advertised but didn't think much of it. I did Maine on a 3 week section hike and the Mini treated me well, so I thought 'screw it, its cheap, light, worked well in the past, and z-packs had a pretty good deal on bags so I can break a couple (3 pack of 1L Sawyer's for $10)'.

Is ZPacks good with returns? For the extra $10-20, it'll probably be nice to have the squeeze and 2L evernew rather than what I've got now

Slo-go'en
01-11-2018, 23:57
+1 on the full size Sawyer. It flows with much less resistance so not only do you get water faster, the risk of exploding the squeeze bag is much less. I have yet to have a failure after extensive use. But the filter will eventually get clogged, so it's worth also carrying the backwash syringe.

Your sleep system (old sleeping bag/neoair mat) really isn't hammock compatible. It's definitely not cold weather compatible. Hope your not planning an early start and if you haven't actually tested this set up in the field, you should before committing to it.

Singerdinger
01-12-2018, 00:09
Ok cool I'll get myself the squeeze. I have always had a hammock and have done most of my backpacking with it, so I thought I'd stick with it, explore hammockforums.net, and figure out a modest setup without getting too techy. I wanted a pad rather than an UQ/TQ since there will be times I may stay in a shelter.

My thinking (maybe I'm wrong) is that: 25* bag + mediocre liner that will add 5* + NeoAir should be tolerable. I have a Smartwool baselayer bottom and could get a top too as some extra assurance during those first ~6 weeks of cold. Ill admit i have not field tested it yet and am planning to do so when I'm back home in a couple weeks. Hoping for an early March start.

JEgestad
01-12-2018, 04:20
100% don't get the mini, unless you want to train your arms and such :)

but a good idea, try make a lighterpack with your gear, much easier to see all with weight and stuff

mine is here just to get an idea how it looks https://lighterpack.com/r/9y14f8

Slo-go'en
01-12-2018, 12:34
Ok cool I'll get myself the squeeze. I have always had a hammock and have done most of my backpacking with it, so I thought I'd stick with it, explore hammockforums.net, and figure out a modest setup without getting too techy. I wanted a pad rather than an UQ/TQ since there will be times I may stay in a shelter.

My thinking (maybe I'm wrong) is that: 25* bag + mediocre liner that will add 5* + NeoAir should be tolerable. I have a Smartwool baselayer bottom and could get a top too as some extra assurance during those first ~6 weeks of cold. Ill admit i have not field tested it yet and am planning to do so when I'm back home in a couple weeks. Hoping for an early March start.

Well, good luck. I suspect you will freeze your butt off. The NeoAir doesn't give you a whole lot of insulation and is marginal in March even when used on the ground. Since liners are feet first entry, getting in and out of it in a hammock will be a real challenge.

gbolt
01-12-2018, 12:45
I am leaving mid March and also am a Hammocker. Here is my gear list: http://lighterpack.com/r/5osqvs if interested. I also have vlogged my gear and clothing on my YouTube Channel. It has been created from years on Whiteblaze and Hammockforums.

Vanhalo
01-12-2018, 12:47
You need a 25į top quilt and under quilt.
Keep the liner.

gbolt
01-12-2018, 12:53
It would probably help to give the winter list. Lol. http://lighterpack.com/r/oqvwj.
I also struggle with warmth in a Hammock and will never go back to a Pad. I am debating what to do about the Smokies and currently have the Thermarest Z-Lite that could be carried or shipped to Fontana. However, I am currently working on a DIY “Barco Lounger” that looks even more promising to possibly use the whole way. Hope this helps.

Vanhalo
01-12-2018, 13:14
I am leaving mid March and also am a Hammocker. Here is my gear list: http://lighterpack.com/r/5osqvs if interested. I also have vlogged my gear and clothing on my YouTube Channel. It has been created from years on Whiteblaze and Hammockforums.

Good reference for a hammock setup. Mine is very similar.

Singerdinger
01-12-2018, 15:17
Awesome, thanks for the gear lists. I am still biting my tongue on whether to throw down for the TQ/UQ set up. I know it would make my life a lot easier. And I already have a short thermarest z-lite fold up pad which could be carried for feet/leg insulation and a sitting pad. Im just stubborn... Lol

anyone looked into making an SPE (segmented pad extender) to bolster a pad-in-hammock setup? There's good diy advice out there from Sgt Rock and Just Jeffs, just interested to hear if anyones got some experience and how helpful it really was.

gbolt
01-12-2018, 17:09
Awesome, thanks for the gear lists. I am still biting my tongue on whether to throw down for the TQ/UQ set up. I know it would make my life a lot easier. And I already have a short thermarest z-lite fold up pad which could be carried for feet/leg insulation and a sitting pad. Im just stubborn... Lol
anyone looked into making an SPE (segmented pad extender) to bolster a pad-in-hammock setup? There's good diy advice out there from Sgt Rock and Just Jeffs, just interested to hear if anyones got some experience and how helpful it really was.
Most of that DIY advice came from the late 90’s to Early 2005. With the Cottage Industry Explosion and increase production of TQ and UQ’s, the use of Pad Extenders and Pads themselves have decreased. Most individuals, once they use an UQ, will not go back to a Pad. I had one hypothermic experience with a Pad in 58* night time temperature and I rushed to buy an UQ. I would suggest a 3/4, since you already know about the use of a Z-Lite Pad as a foot pad.

However, if someone insist on using a pad and extenders, please check out “Shugs” You Tube Channel for detailed insightful knowledge.

Goingforalittlewalk
01-13-2018, 01:07
DIY “Barco Lounger” that's sounds interesting. .but Googled it.... recline leather arm chair. .. are you really carrying one? :)

Me too Hammock and Underquilt
Thermarest Z-Lite cut up in 3-4 sections and put it in length ways in the hammock.. I'm tying elastic to rejoin when on the floor. Might say good bye to it.. when warmer and out the whites. Also have a small metal drink flask. Warm sleeping bag and drinkable water in the morning..

gbolt
01-13-2018, 10:01
DIY “Barco Lounger” that's sounds interesting. .but Googled it.... recline leather arm chair. .. are you really carrying one? :)

I thought about it, but was worried that I would lose my official ultralight Hiker card; so I am leaving it at home for some “arm chair hiking” or “Monday morning Second Guessing” of future thru’s! Jk

Here is probably the only You Tube DIY Vid so make sure you like his channel!:

https://youtu.be/W5SJ7wYjLZY

Shrewd
01-13-2018, 11:34
I always wince a bit when I see an ENO in a thruhiker Gear list, but if it works for you, rock on.

Ditch the mini, brother. Ive heard it said that giardia roulette is preferable to the flow rate of the mini. Shoot I was frustrated with the full size by the end. Almost everyone who starts with the mini upgrades to the full size.

Iíd recommend shorts over long pants but thatís a personal call. Def a lightweight beanie, unless your fleece has a hood. Gloves Iím iffy on but I used a pair for a bit in the south on some real cold days. You can always use socks but if itís raining.... Iíve heard the all weather gloves from Serius are nice.
I actually used the Patagonia thermal weight hoodie as a mid layer instead of a base layer in the cold. Coupled with the a windbreaker (luxury item) in real cold.
But I like that youíre starting minimal on clothes; this is an area where almost everyone overpacks.

Iíve heard New Balance fresh foam Hierros are good and affordable, but Iíve never tried em. Reach out to Altra and see if theyíll give you a thru hiker discount, just in case. (I met a few guys who did this with good results).

Avoid the nalgene, unless you do the hot water in the footbox thing. Or maybe use it as a foam roller.

Zip locks are your friend

The soap youíll probably get rid of. I carried Dr Bronners for weeks and never took the woods bath I thought I would. Once you get used to being dirty you kinda stop caring. Thatís what town is for.
Spoons rule and sporks drool (I hope itís a long handled one, just cause itís niccccce)

Kindle is a luxury item; thatís up to you. Is there an app for you phone you can use instead? Lots of ppl say not to bother because youíll pass our right away, but I actually carried a paperback a few times, and watched Netflix on my phone a bit as well.

The zpacks toothbrush is garbage, mine broke on the third or fourth day.

Multi tool is probably overkill but hey, I carried a light fixed blade so Iím a hypocrite

Two towels? Two..?




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Shrewd
01-13-2018, 11:45
If you must use a pad, check out Klymit. They make some hammock specific models that are interesting. Of course for a few sheckles more you can get an UQ

Hammockgear makes an Econ model thatís a great value


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Singerdinger
01-13-2018, 15:10
Shrewd, I appreciate it! Thank you.

1) yeah I already had the Eno Doublenest and it seems like most hammock insulation setups can work with it, so I didn't bother going too deep into research, since there were already enough other things to figure out :-P

I'm working on creating a viable, but cringeworthy hammock insulation set up. Any true hammocker is scolding me at this point. Any thoughts on the using: NeoAir in an ENO hotspot with a dutchware winter sock? Might get winter sock regardless, and try out the hotspot and return it if it's complete garbage (which it might definitely be). Not sure why I'm so outwardly jaded against using the TQ/UQ setup (probably would get a HG Burrow 20 w/ Econ UQ or a 3/4s UQ w/ my thermarest Sol as leg protection), but I feel like it would be nice to explore my options before settling for it. I'll check the klymit pads for sure.

At some point, i realize I'm spending the same money as I would on an UQ, but on different things (winter sock, extra base layer, etc) so why not just get the UQ... I'm gettin there.

2) the serius all weather gloves look sweet. Looks like a nice compromise btwn bulkiness and material.
I have a Columbia 100% poly balaclava I may also bring just for sleep gear during those first few cold weeks, but a lightweight beanie would be nice on the trail during March.
Those NB look good too. I'll have to read up but thats definitely the price range I'd like for trail runners. I need something sturdy and reliable, but at the same time, they could be ruined in a month.
And im going to pick up a Squeeze and return the mini ASAP. I used a mini on a 3 wk section hike, so i had some confidence in it, but 3 weeks is different than 4-5 months. Probably will get a 2L Evernew bag to go with it.

3) I think you're right that the Nalgene is overkill. And the extra 8oz I'm taking off my total weight gives me room to spare for either more clothing, shelter insulation, or luxury. Two 1L plastic bottles will do just fine.

4) probably right about the Kindle... I'll be passing out or journaling if I'm not with other people.

And I'm already on the 1x/wk shower grind, so I should stop lying to myself about soap ... :-D

I found an old Swiss that I'm gonna bring as my knife. I like a multitool , cause in this case, the scissors could be handy for any possible flappers.

As an old towel I used to know said, "don't forget to bring a towel," and so i thought it wouldn't be so crazy to bring an extra 12x24" Lightload towel. An extra 0.5-1oz won't kill me... Yet. But now that you mention it I can't really justify what i would do with the second towel...

Singerdinger
01-13-2018, 18:01
Note to self definitely no go on the hotspot. The klymit hammock v insulated looks promising but doesn't seem to be reliable down to 30* temps since the reviews vary. Maybe the klymit hammock v insulated pad + Dutch winter sock + 20* mummy bag (since mummy bags may do better w/ klymit pads than TQ do b/c the pads width and pad design allows space for bag to sink in) + Smartwool 150 base layer top and bottoms... = Success?

But, at that point, I'm spending $130 on the pad and $70 on the sock. I'm not too far off from what I'd spend on a decent UQ and TQ.

I'd love a PeaPod but unsure of how it would perform during summer... Probably much too hot. I love the one piece simplicity of it though.

I want simplicity in my design and can compromise a little bit of comfort, but do not want to worry about receiving mail drops to get summer shelter insulation, because I set up with colder gear that won't translate well into summer climate. All I can do is buy some stuff and try it and decide my path...

Vanhalo
01-13-2018, 18:08
The thing about UQs...they seem to have a larger temp range...more so than TQs.

My partial UQ Jacks 'r' Better Greylock 3 (+1 oz) has taken me from 60į-10į

In the past few days I have switched between 3 different temp rated TQs keeping the Greylock 3 as an UQ in each instance.

DuneElliot
01-13-2018, 19:04
I have the Klymit Stative V Lite and it has served me well into the 20s, on the ground. I think it's an awesome pad but never tried it in a hammock as I have an UQ

gracebowen
01-13-2018, 21:09
Rather than the Kindle I'd put Kindle app on phone if it's not there already and carry an extra battery bank.

Singerdinger
01-13-2018, 22:56
Good people,
I think I may go with a peapod set up with the Wiggys Ultralight center zip and get a Dutch Summer Sock which, in worst case scenario, could add a little boost to my temp rating if it is turned the right way to block wind and also eliminate my need for the ENO bug net later on. Wiggys ultralight weighs in at 4lb (some talk about the variability of Wiggy's weights, so maybe closer to 4.5lb). But, after dropping the weight from my current bag, pad, and Eno bug net, I will only gain about 2lbs extra which I am willing to take for a comfortable, simple set up. Also dropping my Nalgene 1.5L which was 7.5oz and included in my base weight calculation to help cut the load as an easy compromise for using such a heavy bag.

Anyone have experience with Wiggys bag? From what I read, they are bulky and a pain in the ass to compress. But, there seems to be an interesting cult-ish following and many people swear by them. I got the idea from reading Fourdog's post about diy PeaPods so I know it can work. But fitting a packed 11x20" compression sack into my bag will make for a packing challenge...

Singerdinger
01-13-2018, 22:58
https://www.wiggys.com/sleeping-bags/ultra-light-hammock-sleeping-bag-center-zip/

https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php/27503-Diy-Peapod-Systems

Singerdinger
01-13-2018, 23:00
Still have a liner, which I am not sold on cutting yet, since it could be useful as a summer sleeping option when the Wiggys bag could act more as an UQ than a pod. Thoughts?

Singerdinger
01-13-2018, 23:02
Rather than the Kindle I'd put Kindle app on phone if it's not there already and carry an extra battery bank.

Yeah I see what you're saying, but I hate reading for periods of time from a phone screen (like ive been doing on these forums... :-P ) If it comes down to it, I will just cut it and stick with a journal and maybe a plastic harmonica

Shrewd
01-14-2018, 00:00
Iíd really recommend a UQ man.

I brought one and spent maybe 5 nights on the ground. 2 were in the Smokies and the third was when I still had my pad. Two were ****ty nights with no pad indoors.

But weigh 2 nights against 5 to 6 months.

Also, if itís below 25 to 30 youíre gonna be cold no matter what pad you use unless you go with the XTherm.


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Shrewd
01-14-2018, 00:04
Also, youíre fighting getting an UQ and other stuff cause youíre in a budget but the more options you dig up the more you end up spending.

Youíre about to embark on a half year journey where youíll spend thousands of dollars.

Bud, spend the money and ensure your sleep system is top notch. Itís going to be YOUR HOME for six months.


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AllDownhillFromHere
01-14-2018, 00:14
+1 for the paper journal. The batteries never die, it works after it gets wet, and 50 years from now can still be read.

Singerdinger
01-14-2018, 01:28
Iíd really recommend a UQ man.

I brought one and spent maybe 5 nights on the ground. 2 were in the Smokies and the third was when I still had my pad. Two were ****ty nights with no pad indoors.

But weigh 2 nights against 5 to 6 months.

Also, if itís below 25 to 30 youíre gonna be cold no matter what pad you use unless you go with the XTherm.


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I hear you, man. I can't argue with that. By the time I add up costs of all these different pieces of equipment just to avoid an UQ/TQ set up, I will spend the same amount of money as I would getting the UQ/TQ. You need to understand though, sometimes, it's hard being a silly hipster... B-)

I already own a thermarest Sol and can bring that along (maybe cut it in half) with a partial UQ and call it a day. And I'd have a partial pad for the emergency or possible ground camp. I've been watching a lot of Shug's videos and see the merit in underquilts and top quilts and that they really aren't hard to use, set up, get a feel for. Down is an awesome material and it's clear as day why almost all serious backpackers use it.

But Wiggys, man.... LOL I have been laughing my rear end off reading threads about them and the hilarious hell bent Wiggys owners and even coming across a couple threads where Jerry comes in for the kill to tell you you're an idiot. There's something so beautiful about it. No one wants to admit that they are good, because they know some crazy Wiggys owner is waiting in the wings to fight for their right to Wiggy!

I really like the idea of pods. Maybe one day I'll own an actual Speer peapod and will be satiated. I really do appreciate the words of advice, Shrewd. Not everyone wants to put up my bs. You're a good man.

Shrewd
01-14-2018, 01:50
Iím from philly, I can appreciate a hipster, even if I wonít drink a PBR.

Iíd never heard of wiggys but after checking out the website I canít help but scoff. The only picture of it being used in a hammock was crap; the hammock is so tight itís practically a bridge hammock and heís not laying on an angle. Iíd be curious to see more but it seems like a gimmick to me. There are plenty of people who have comfortably camped in a hammock with a pad. My buddy did the whole way with a neoair and a warbonnet Blackbird.
I didnít enjoy the same
Combo, but he swore by it.




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DuneElliot
01-14-2018, 09:24
Get the UQ/TQ combo and then carry a very light half CCF pad you can use as a sit-pad and in emergencies you can sleep on it. I carry one for my dogs...if I'm hammocking and have to go to ground they donate it to my cause!

Femadog
01-14-2018, 11:41
Depends on season but like others have said, if you are going to hammock the trail, spring for the UQ. The hammock is a compromise otherwise.... I carried a TR xlite womens mattress (just the right length for a 6' person going UL) "just in case" and never ended up using it on any of my section hikes. I can swap out the 20 degree UQ and TQ for a Loco Libre Operator set that's rated for 50 degrees in warmer weather saving a couple of pounds.

My list after lot's of trial and error for balancing weight and comfort (more important as I age ungracefully).

https://lighterpack.com/r/6nqnxq
(https://lighterpack.com/r/6nqnxq)
JM2C

OCDave
01-14-2018, 12:49
Hey y'all, thought I'd post my gear list for some feedback. Feeling pretty good about it. Thinking base weight will be 16-17lb after the rest of my uncalculated weights are added. Anything I'm missing or should change? Slap me silly! Anything with '??' I'm still on the fence about. Thanks!
...Shelter:
ENO Doublenest {1lb 3oz}
...
HammockGear Quest Hex Tarp {13oz}
...
ENO bug net {1lb} (too heavy i know but borrowing from a friend to save a lil $$)
...Big Agnes 15* down {2lb 7oz} (ive slept in it every night for the past 1.5 years-- has a couple tears and some compression. I consider it a 25*)

...

...
Pad:
Thermarest NeoAir xLite - regular {12oz)

...



Singerdinger,

What is your camping experience with this set-up? I could make due on a mild weather weekend with the above but for long distance-hike or extended outdoors adventure you need more suitable shelter.

The ENO DN is too short to allow a comfortable lay. Many better gathered-end hammocks from which to choose. Do not consider anythind less than 10" long. Note: a longer hammock will also require a better bug-net. I like the Butt-in-a-sling Buginator on my Wilderness Logics LightOwl. Not only considerably more comfortable but more compact and lighter than the ENO option.

Your tarp should have doors. You can add door accessories or improvise wind protection on the fly or, you can be realistic on the front end and plan for less than perfect weather. The Warbonnet Superfly is the most popular and arguably the best value hammock tarp with doors.

A sleeping bag with pad will work but, is a major pain in the arse. Invest in a set of 20* quilts. Twenty-degree quilts will provide the safest range of insulation so if you can afford just one set make it 20*. If you can swing it, swap out the 20* underquilt for 40* as night-time temps allow to reduce weight and bulk.

My own hammock experience started with everything you have listed above (though my tarp was the ENO ProFly). Every item was replaced because of specific bad experiences and equipment inadequacies. It will not be inexspensive to replace your entry level items but, the investment will increase the likelihood that you will acheive your hiking goals.


Good Luck

Slo-go'en
01-14-2018, 15:37
The simple solution to all this is just buy a nice 2 pound tent and be done with it. You can use the bag/liner/pad you got now. Switch over to the hammock when it gets hot and you don't need all the accessories to keep warm.

Shrewd
01-14-2018, 16:48
Thatís not a bad idea really, unless youíre committed to the hammock like (I totally am).

I agree with the comments above about ENOs.

How tall are you, by the way?


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Singerdinger
01-14-2018, 16:51
Well I just "caved" and did what I probably should've done a couple months back when I decided to commit to the hammock....

Now the proud owner of (when it arrives):
HG Econ Burrow 20 w/ 55" width and snaps
HG Econ Incubator 20
WB Traveler XL w/ whoopie sling ridgeline
Dutch Summer Sock w/ zipper

Will most likely cut my thermarest Sol in half and bring it as a sit pad/emergency sleeping pad.

And will be returning the NeoAir to REI.

Let the fun begin!

Note: I still have dreams about being a Wiggys guy

Singerdinger
01-14-2018, 16:53
Thatís not a bad idea really, unless youíre committed to the hammock like (I totally am).

I agree with the comments above about ENOs.

How tall are you, by the way?


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I'm right at 6' and 150lbs

Singerdinger
01-14-2018, 16:59
The simple solution to all this is just buy a nice 2 pound tent and be done with it. You can use the bag/liner/pad you got now. Switch over to the hammock when it gets hot and you don't need all the accessories to keep warm.

I think hammocking is really well suited to East coast (esp AT) hiking. When I'm ready for a ling term adventure out west, I will become a tent man.

I also have an 8' diameter yurt I built when I'm in places w/o trees when car camping or aren't long distance hiking :-P

Shrewd
01-14-2018, 22:31
Is your traveler an 11 footer? Iíve found that to be pretty important, being 6í3


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Singerdinger
01-15-2018, 02:27
Is your traveler an 11 footer? Iíve found that to be pretty important, being 6í3


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Yeah I went with the 11' traveler. I'm on the cusp at 6' and everyone seems comfier with a bigger hammock. Hell, the thing is only 12oz so I didn't feel too bad about the extra oz or two. Happy to have a dutch summer sock too. Seems like a versatile piece; I'm excited to put her to the test!

Jayne
01-15-2018, 16:13
Well I just "caved" and did what I probably should've done a couple months back when I decided to commit to the hammock....

Now the proud owner of (when it arrives):
HG Econ Burrow 20 w/ 55" width and snaps
HG Econ Incubator 20
WB Traveler XL w/ whoopie sling ridgeline
Dutch Summer Sock w/ zipper

Will most likely cut my thermarest Sol in half and bring it as a sit pad/emergency sleeping pad.

And will be returning the NeoAir to REI.

Let the fun begin!

Note: I still have dreams about being a Wiggys guy

I think that you'll be really happy with that set up. The summer sock is a bit of a pain getting in and out of but it definitely keeps the wind and rain out of your UQ, which is worth the 8 oz. I also carry a thermarest sol sit pad myself and use it to prevent cold butt syndrome in addition to sitting on during the day.

Singerdinger
01-15-2018, 21:36
Right on! Yeah I like multi-purpose items (like most people here...) and the summer sock does it. And I am definitely a little hesitant about having numerous down pieces, but at least it has a dwr coating, and after the season, I can recoat it. Do most people recoat their TQs and UQs each year? The internet seems to have mixed opinions about the longevity of dwr coatings. And I'd rather be paranoid and meticulous about general care rather than experience a wet-out down the road

Jayne
01-16-2018, 13:04
I have never recoated the DWR on my quilts, although the process doesn't look too hard. My mindset is that I don't ever want to rely on DWR so I go to lengths to make sure that they stay dry and the DWR is a bonus against unexpected drips and splashes. If you're using a summer sock, you may want to recoat that periodically (or just replace it if your budget allows - they are very light weight and susceptible to wear and tear.)

Shrewd
01-16-2018, 17:10
My underquilts have treated down.

They frequently got wet in bad rain storms and never was the warmth compromised.

Youíll be fine


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QiWiz
01-18-2018, 15:06
You are missing an ultralight cathole trowel. Just sayin . . .

fastfoxengineering
01-18-2018, 16:09
You are missing an ultralight cathole trowel. Just sayin . . .Yupp! Im digging this push for everyone to carry a trowel. Nope, not essential and you can use other methods. But it promotes good hiking practices. It is constructive and positive to the trail. Thanks QiWiz, your little trowels have made a lasting impact.



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Thefurther
01-18-2018, 16:32
mountain crossing here in ga has a huge sale going on for trail runners . i think they 50 percent off . they are last years but who cares ... Donald " grateful " ballard

Shrewd
01-18-2018, 20:07
Lots of ppl say theyíll just use a stake or stick...man dig through that rooty soil a few times and youíll find it can even be difficult WITH a trowel.

I actually carried QiWizís big dig the whole way.


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DuneElliot
01-19-2018, 10:58
Lots of ppl say theyíll just use a stake or stick...man dig through that rooty soil a few times and youíll find it can even be difficult WITH a trowel.

I actually carried QiWizís big dig the whole way.


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There are definitely high alpine mountain hikes in Wyoming that my Big Dig had issues getting deep enough...ground was so hard and filled with roots...got there though, just a lot of work so I can't imagine digging a deep enough hole with a stick or a heel.

Shrewd
01-19-2018, 12:01
Likewise.
I confess a few times, due to....time constraints I ended up walking a few yards away to dig a hole just for the TP.

There just wasnít enough time!


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DuneElliot
01-19-2018, 12:36
Likewise.
I confess a few times, due to....time constraints I ended up walking a few yards away to dig a hole just for the TP.

There just wasn’t enough time!

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That's when you dig a hole post business and push it in with a stick...time constraints are not an excuse to not bury it.

GolfHiker
01-20-2018, 14:14
You have a solid gear list, and you've gotten some great responses. Really covered the "sleeping" & hammock gear very nicely, as well as the Sawyer Mini, and needs no further input. All I would tell you is what I saw last year, which does not make your choices right or wrong.... Nalgene- great product, but almost no one carries it... Smart Water & Gator-Ade. Teva Sandles- not so much, when you consider weight of other camp shoes. I loved my Vivo Barefoot, w/o the sock... Frogg Toggs- can't recall ever seeing a FT set on a thru and for sure no rain pants. Rain Gear is all over the place, considering weight, cost and need. Just know that nothing short of a top line $$$ jacket will really work. Wind, warmth, yes, but for rain most are just filtering the water a little longer. Trail Runners are King. It's all about the fit for you, but I did the entire hike in Hokas. 6 pair, although I could have made it on 4 or 5 if I pushed it. Not one single blister or even a hot spot. It was worth the few extra dollars to be so comfortable.

Start out with your very best choices and be flexible to changes as you go, and you'll do just fine.

Singerdinger
01-20-2018, 19:35
You have a solid gear list, and you've gotten some great responses. Really covered the "sleeping" & hammock gear very nicely, as well as the Sawyer Mini, and needs no further input. All I would tell you is what I saw last year, which does not make your choices right or wrong.... Nalgene- great product, but almost no one carries it... Smart Water & Gator-Ade. Teva Sandles- not so much, when you consider weight of other camp shoes. I loved my Vivo Barefoot, w/o the sock... Frogg Toggs- can't recall ever seeing a FT set on a thru and for sure no rain pants. Rain Gear is all over the place, considering weight, cost and need. Just know that nothing short of a top line $$$ jacket will really work. Wind, warmth, yes, but for rain most are just filtering the water a little longer. Trail Runners are King. It's all about the fit for you, but I did the entire hike in Hokas. 6 pair, although I could have made it on 4 or 5 if I pushed it. Not one single blister or even a hot spot. It was worth the few extra dollars to be so comfortable.

Start out with your very best choices and be flexible to changes as you go, and you'll do just fine.


Awesome info thanks. Looking at the Hoka Mafate Speed 2s right now. They look bad ass. Going to give the frogg toggs a shot, and once they fall apart, hopefully I'll come across a good town or put in an order for mail drop.

I'm trying to figure out what my best options are for trail runner sock set ups early on the trail-- best ways for dealing with rain, snow, ice, muck, drying out (if possible) time. In worst scenarios, I was thinking: hiking socks, then bread bag, then polypropylene liner, then shoes. But ideally, I won't use the bread bag unless I'm in dire straits.

Also just got a $25 coupon for a new pair of darn tough socks after sending my tattered, 4 year old ones back to them. My new Wigwam Outdoor Pros are comfy and seem durable but are shorter than mid calf and are not as warm as a heavy wool sock-- they will be great for summer, but will need the liner at minimum to be a good cold weather sock.

Just picked up a S2S trowel at 3oz. Sorry QiWiz, for not supporting the cottage industry :( I will be thinking of yall on that first post- lunch duke-dropping sesh when that trowel will be very handy.

GolfHiker
01-21-2018, 11:59
Quick comment on the Hokas. I don't know anything about the Mafate Speed, could be perfect. I have the Hoka Challenger, which is still in production. I wear 9.5 Hoka running shoes, and got the Challenger @ 10.5. I also swapped out the Hoka insert for a Sole insert. Altogether, a perfect fit with tons of comfort and good stability. I would finally note that I carried 3 pair of socks. 1 Injingi toe socks, 2 Darn Tough. I kept one pair of DT clean/dry for camp & sleeping, and swapped out the other two every few days. Worked for me.