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BLRBrennan
02-12-2018, 01:20
Hi sorry to spam yíall but I am planning a thru hike starting in mid March and looking into the Enlightened Equipment revelation quilt. Iíve looked online looking for answers but there are so many different opinions I figured Iíd just ask here. Anyways there are options like 20 degree 10 degree, 850 to 950 fill. All that good stuff. So anyone have any experience with this quilt on the AT? Thanks


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MuddyWaters
02-12-2018, 01:49
Yes.

What is your specific question?

A 20 ee quilt likely won't be warm enough for some nights starting in March and will been too hot by mid May

Hatchet_1697
02-12-2018, 08:43
I have a 20 and 40 EE Revelation, and depending on the WX I bring one or the other (both for stacking when winter camping). Muddy is right on which one to use when. Augmenting with a jacket, liner, etc. gets you a few degrees of warmth and are easy to shed as the weather gets warmer. But at some point the 20 will be too much until the WX cools. Mail drops might be your friend. Iíve used my EE 20 with thermals, wool socks, a Ghost Whisper jacket and Dutchware liner in SNP below 20 and slept great. But have also had bad nights at other times because the 20 was too warm, thatís why I picked up a 40. Hope that helps.


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dcdennis
02-12-2018, 11:08
if you are planning a thruhike, and dont already know the answer to this question, i am concerned for your safety.

Pastor Bryon
02-12-2018, 11:25
What's the rest of your setup look like, especially ground pad, sleeping pad, sleeping clothes, etc? Quilt temp rating is only as good as the other stuff you are using to sleep in/on. Also, make sure you have something to keep it dry. You will be in a wet environment, and keeping your quilt dry is essential.

I would email EE directly and talk with them if you are trying to make sense of this...they are very knowledgeable and helpful; but also keep in mind that at this point, if you are going to order one from them, you may not have it in time for your start date, much less to do a few practice nights at home prior to your start.

saltysack
02-12-2018, 11:42
if you are planning a thruhike, and dont already know the answer to this question, i am concerned for your safety.

[emoji23]


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colorado_rob
02-12-2018, 11:42
Just my own take on EE quilts, my wife and I use a double-quilt, the Accomplice, but I assume it's similar in build and quality to the Revelation....

We bought the 20 deg version, but after using it a few times, I think it's more like a high-20's comfort quilt (I am an experienced single-quilt user). So we added about 3 ounces of down to the central-torso area, now it is good to 20.

So, I'd say perhaps get the 10, or the 20 and add some down.

The thing I've learned about quilts is that it is a bit more work to stay warm when the temp is down to the quilt's lower limit (keeping it tight on the sides to stop cold air leaks), but on the flip side, it is easier to stay cool when the temp is way higher than the quilt rating (by being partially or mostly uncovered), if you follow.

DrL
02-12-2018, 12:09
The thing I've learned about quilts is that it is a bit more work to stay warm when the temp is down to the quilt's lower limit (keeping it tight on the sides to stop cold air leaks), but on the flip side, it is easier to stay cool when the temp is way higher than the quilt rating (by being partially or mostly uncovered), if you follow.

^This

This is my experience as well. It is also the reason I bought a FeatheredFriends Flicker with the full zip. The full zip allows me to sleeper warmer (easier?).

Have you looked at the Convert or the Conundrum by EE? I'd be tempted to buy one of those in a 850 fill, 10F version.

saltysack
02-12-2018, 12:11
Just my own take on EE quilts, my wife and I use a double-quilt, the Accomplice, but I assume it's similar in build and quality to the Revelation....

We bought the 20 deg version, but after using it a few times, I think it's more like a high-20's comfort quilt (I am an experienced single-quilt user). So we added about 3 ounces of down to the central-torso area, now it is good to 20.

So, I'd say perhaps get the 10, or the 20 and add some down.

The thing I've learned about quilts is that it is a bit more work to stay warm when the temp is down to the quilt's lower limit (keeping it tight on the sides to stop cold air leaks), but on the flip side, it is easier to stay cool when the temp is way higher than the quilt rating (by being partially or mostly uncovered), if you follow.

Iíve had similar experience with EE quilts, had 2 20* enigmas...great quilt but think rating is alittle off...i recently ordered a 20* HG burrow and incubator under quilt and debating having them add lil extra down.


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swatsullivan
02-12-2018, 12:23
I've camped with my EE 20* Revelation quilt about 10 or 15 times, more than half of those nights below freezing. I would say I was warm every night, but echo the sentiments of having to keep the sides tucked in on cold nights. I think if I thru hiked, I would want a pretty warm bag for the beginning and end of the trip.

The EE Revelation is my first down sleeping bag/quilt of any kind (and my first quilt), so I absolutely love how light it is. I've been carrying around the same North Face synthetic bag (maybe 30*) that I've had since middle school (early 80's). The quilt is a world of difference.

Dogwood
02-12-2018, 12:27
It's generally hard to receive the full advantages of 950 FP down with a Mar AT NOBO start. It's too humid and wet of a trail in general to begin. If you're new to quilts and have a sleep/shelter system set up that allows further moisture into the down it's compounded. If you don't have a good grasp of what I mean by quilt component sleep systems you should more strongly consider 850 FP in the 10* rating.

It depends on your cumulative sleep system set up warmth, but I too assert a 20* quilt generally isn't going to be enough warmth in Mid March. That temp rating might work for one having quilt knowledge taking the quilt temp ratings in their sleep system very near, to, or below that rating but it's not very typical.

Save gram weenieing quilts for later.

colorado_rob
02-12-2018, 12:38
We did have one single digit night last year just north of the GA/NC border, March 14th. A rumor was heard that it was darn close to zero at the next, higher, shelter. BUT: so what? We were fine in our 20 degree system. We took hot water bottles to bed with us, plus wore pretty much our entire kit of clothing.

My point is: you're not going to die, or even be severely uncomfortable if your kit doesn't get down (!) to the lowest temps you'll encounter. I use the "2-sigma" method, which is something like 95% for my gear planning, meaning if 5% of the time I'm outside the bounds of my system, that to me is a perfect place to be with my gear. I can handle minor discomfort, usually just minor inconvenience, one in twenty nights.

So, I do think a 20 degree system works for a mid-March start. But, you need a "real" 20 degree system. I just don't think the 20 degree EE quilt is quite there. Close though. Tough call. IF you get the 10 degree vs. the 20 in a regular length, looks like an extra 3 ounces. Again, tough call. As implied below, it also has to do with your tent system. If you plan on using shelters, I'd definitely get the 10. Shelters are c-o-l-d Cold.

Dogwood
02-12-2018, 12:56
I’ve had similar experience with EE quilts, had 2 20* enigmas...great quilt but think rating is alittle off...i recently ordered a 20* HG burrow and incubator under quilt and debating having them add lil extra down.


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Quilts on the ground and hanging require a different temp rating mindset than sleeping bags. Supposed temp ratings for quilts is not just about quilt manufacturer's assigned ratings possibly being a little off or over stated! *Every quilt user, one considering using a quilt, or promoter should get this into their heads - a quilt is a component in a sleep system. This is particularly significant to quilt usage; this highly affects the warmth of the systems.


I've seen sleeping bags slept in alone thrown on the ground or the floor of an AT lean or tent so many times. I can count on one hand how many times I've seen a zipper less quilt user do this. Quilts are a component in a sleep system more significantly so to realize than a sleeping bag sleep system!

saltysack
02-12-2018, 13:06
Quilts on the ground and hanging require a different temp rating mindset than sleeping bags. Supposed temp ratings for quilts is not just about quilt manufacturer's assigned ratings possibly being a little off or over stated! *Every quilt user, one considering using a quilt, or promoter should get this into their heads - a quilt is a component in a sleep system. This is particularly significant to quilt usage; this highly affects the warmth of the systems.


I've seen sleeping bags slept in alone thrown on the ground or the floor of an AT lean or tent so many times. I can count on one hand how many times I've seen a zipper less quilt user do this. Quilts are a component in a sleep system more significantly so to realize than a sleeping bag sleep system!

I realize this...i tend to sleep cold therefore opted for xtherm most of the time over std xlite while on the ground....As others have pointed out EE being optimistically rated and from my experience would agree....Iíll be sure to compare my thoughts as I use the HG burrow with same rating on the ground.


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Dogwood
02-12-2018, 13:14
If one buys a 20* EN rated sleeping bag and they aren't warm enough at 25* there's a shart storm of finger pointing. Yet, when that same person buys a 20* non EN rated quilt and they aren't warm enough at 25* w/ everything else being the same there is a tendency to ignore it or mansplain it away.

colorado_rob
02-12-2018, 13:30
If one buys a 20* EN rated sleeping bag and they aren't warm enough at 25* there's a shart storm of finger pointing. Yet, when that same person buys a 20* non EN rated quilt and they aren't warm enough at 25* w/ everything else being the same there is a tendency to ignore it or mansplain it away.Which makes perfect sense, does it not?

Dogwood
02-12-2018, 14:04
I realize this...i tend to sleep cold therefore opted for xtherm most of the time over std xlite while on the ground....As others have pointed out EE being optimistically rated and from my experience would agree....I’ll be sure to compare my thoughts as I use the HG burrow with same rating on the ground.


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Prime example.

Then, if you are opting for a heavier costlier pad(the xtherm over the xlite) because you're employing a quilt rather than the same temp rated sleeping bag, with everything else being equal, to make up for the lost sleeping comfort and warmth does it not make for more accurate comparison analysis to perceive a quilt or sleeping bag as a component in a sleep system?, especially when comparing costs, wts, and complexity/diversity? Is it not more accurate and fairer to compare total sleep system temp ratings, total costs, and total wt? It makes for a valid argument that warmth is lost in equally temp rated quilt alone verse sleeping bag alone comparisons. Well, if this is accurate than temp rating comparisons and assessments for quilts and sleeping bags should also be viewed differently.


You can't keep moving the goal posts.

Dogwood
02-12-2018, 14:06
https://whiteblaze.net/forum/images/Eloquent/miscgreen/quote_icon.png Originally Posted by colorado_rob https://whiteblaze.net/forum/images/Eloquent/buttonsgreen/viewpost-right.png (https://whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?p=2193595#post2193595) The thing I've learned about quilts is that it is a bit more work to stay warm when the temp is down to the quilt's lower limit (keeping it tight on the sides to stop cold air leaks), but on the flip side, it is easier to stay cool when the temp is way higher than the quilt rating (by being partially or mostly uncovered), if you follow.
^This

This is my experience as well. It also the reason I bought a FeatherFriends Flicker with the full zip. The full zip allows me to sleeper warmer (easier?).


+3

Dogwood
02-12-2018, 14:13
Which makes perfect sense, does it not?


It now makes sense to me after in the field cold all night shivering experiences but maybe not to the OP and certainly not to the many with vastly more experience who ignore it when promoting quilt lower costs, lower wts, greater diversity claims and when comparing temp ratings. Again, a quilt temp rating is not the sleep system rating significantly more so to understand than sleeping bag ratings.

Dogwood
02-12-2018, 14:19
Isn't this significant to grasp when temps are 20* maybe less which is what can be experienced on a mid March start or when deciding whether a 10* or 20* quilt is sufficient? I'm not really arguing with you CR. It's more of agreeing with you and adding to what you've said. :)

Sometimes we can forget not everyone is in the same place. Maybe the OP is less along than you CR or others on this thread in regards to quilt usage in the real world. :)

AllDownhillFromHere
02-12-2018, 14:55
It's a popular quilt, they must be doing something right.

Coffee
02-12-2018, 15:34
I have a EE Revelation 30F quilt. But I've never really used it below high 40s. It's very well constructed and I got the Long/Wide version so I can easily tuck in the sides under me. It weighs only 17 ounces (I ordered 950 down). I have actually used this quilt almost every night over the past six weeks. My apartment is cold, drafty and costs a fortune to heat so I set the thermostat at 50-55 and "live" in my Revelation 30 - when on the couch reading and when in bed sleeping.

I have a zPacks 10F that is what I take if I expect temps at or below freezing.

Maineiac64
02-12-2018, 21:24
I had EE rev 20 and went with a regular mummy bag for 40 or lower, especially below freezing, and a rev 30 for everything else. EE is now adding more down so the newer quilts might be closer to rating but for me they were 10-15 degrees optimistic.

colorado_rob
02-13-2018, 08:13
It's a popular quilt, they must be doing something right.they're doing a lot of things right, our EE quilt is an excellent piece of gear, well made, reasonably priced and very light. Only negative is the temp rating being optimistic. Easy to fix as already discussed.

KCNC
02-13-2018, 08:55
I have a EE Revelation 30F quilt. But I've never really used it below high 40s. It's very well constructed and I got the Long/Wide version so I can easily tuck in the sides under me. It weighs only 17 ounces (I ordered 950 down). I have actually used this quilt almost every night over the past six weeks. My apartment is cold, drafty and costs a fortune to heat so I set the thermostat at 50-55 and "live" in my Revelation 30 - when on the couch reading and when in bed sleeping.

I have a zPacks 10F that is what I take if I expect temps at or below freezing.

I've got an EE Rev in 40 degree. It's long and wide for more efficient stacking. Still deciding what I want for a cold quilt (something in the 0-10 range, probably) I sleep warm and don't intend any sub-zero expeditions, but you never know what shenanigans might ensue. Always good to have options. :)

TX Aggie
02-13-2018, 09:24
I have an EE Revelation 20* in 950 and have used it in my hammock down to the high teens wearing just poly pro base layer and was perfectly comfortable. Iím not sure if they are typically warmer in a hammock system vs a pad or not, but Iím very happy with mine.

Venchka
02-13-2018, 11:24
if you are planning a thruhike, and dont already know the answer to this question, i am concerned for your safety.
BINGO! Not to mention the EE quilt delivery time. AND inadequate time for testing your sleep system.
I also wonder what other bits of critical gear and preparation that arenít done yet?
No worries. Go for it!
Wayne

MuddyWaters
02-13-2018, 13:25
BINGO! Not to mention the EE quilt delivery time. AND inadequate time for testing your sleep system.
I also wonder what other bits of critical gear and preparation that aren’t done yet?
No worries. Go for it!
Wayne

Maybe the op meant mid March 2019?

colorado_rob
02-13-2018, 13:37
Yikes! Ridiculous, yet not unexpected cynicism. The OP asked a fair question about EE quilts and their warmth, and he got some solid opinions. Get a life ye curmudgeons. Or at least get out and do some hiking.

D2maine
02-13-2018, 14:11
if you are planning a thruhike, and dont already know the answer to this question, i am concerned for your safety.

that is just silly - every year there are many hundreds of examples of people with no prior experience completing an AT thru hike

D2maine
02-13-2018, 14:14
Hi sorry to spam yíall but I am planning a thru hike starting in mid March and looking into the Enlightened Equipment revelation quilt. Iíve looked online looking for answers but there are so many different opinions I figured Iíd just ask here. Anyways there are options like 20 degree 10 degree, 850 to 950 fill. All that good stuff. So anyone have any experience with this quilt on the AT? Thanks


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20 degree quit is fine it will be a little cold on the coldest night and too warm on the hottest but will fit the majority of conditions. 800-850 fill is fine, 950 is not worth the extra cost just to gain a slight savings in weight/pack slightly smaller.

MuddyWaters
02-13-2018, 14:32
that is just silly - every year there are many hundreds of examples of people with no prior experience completing an AT thru hike
Of course but the OP is leaving in mid March....4 wks.
Which indicated his knowledge gathering and procurement of gear is little behind normal schedule.

At least to those that noticed that detail.

D2maine
02-13-2018, 15:35
Of course but the OP is leaving in mid March....4 wks.
Which indicated his knowledge gathering and procurement of gear is little behind normal schedule.

At least to those that noticed that detail.

4 weeks would hardly effect "safety". i am sure the OP is smart enough to purchase a quilt or bag in time to go on his hike (even if that means from another vendor) rather than starting the trail with nothing. Hell even starting with nothing the OP would quickly realize the mistake and could easily rectify the issue at any number of outfitters located near the beginning of the trail.

to call into question somebody's "safety" because they were asking about quilt options a full month prior to leaving on the hike is just silly.

BLRBrennan
02-13-2018, 15:55
Hey everyone Iím sorry I havenít replied at all, been a little busy and thereís a good conversation. I did end up going with the 10 degree because I am planning on sleeping in shelters occasionally. Also I am a bit of a cold sleeper and it only added about 3 ounces. I did have a bag I was planning on using ended up giving It to my friend because wasnít 100 percent happy with it so that is why this is so last minute. Anyways thanks for all of your guys help. Hope to see some of you on the trail!


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Venchka
02-13-2018, 15:59
Good luck!
Wayne

Traillium
02-14-2018, 00:28
Good luck!
Wayne

So Ö would you advise a synthetic quilt instead of a down quilt for wet conditions (such as the AT)?

MuddyWaters
02-14-2018, 01:48
4 weeks would hardly effect "safety". i am sure the OP is smart enough to purchase a quilt or bag in time to go on his hike (even if that means from another vendor) rather than starting the trail with nothing. Hell even starting with nothing the OP would quickly realize the mistake and could easily rectify the issue at any number of outfitters located near the beginning of the trail.

to call into question somebody's "safety" because they were asking about quilt options a full month prior to leaving on the hike is just silly.

I don't recall anyone. Questioning anyone's safety. Only preparedness....

sethd513
02-14-2018, 06:53
Iíve had a 20* enigma for a few years. Comfortable (to me) with an xtherm to about 27ish. I sent it in to get overstuffed. They said itís now rated to about 12. If I was going to be out for extended time with a temp ranging for 10-25 at night I would absolutely bring my rev 40* to layer them together. Even if the 40 stayed in the bag when it could itís 15oz that is worth it to me. The wind could be howling. 99% of your gear could be wet. Who knows I sure donít.

Iíve never been down south that time of year but anything can happen anywhere anytime of year. Itís not like you are taking a trip to the Caribbean and you can just grab an extra towel from the rack when you need it. Yes Iíd assume if you can make it through the night the likeliness of a town the next day isnít out of the cards but still. Like everyone is saying you gotta know your gear, and if you donít youíre gonna find out real quick if it works or not. Quilts are finicky in my opinion but best for 3 season.


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egilbe
02-14-2018, 08:03
My girlfriend and I've had our 20* Accomplice down into the teens, in a tent. We were warm, but we were wearing our lightweight puffy jackets with hoods while we slept. I think the temps on EE quilts are pretty close. If it gets any colder than that, we switch to -30F sleeping bags.

MtDoraDave
02-17-2018, 09:18
So … would you advise a synthetic quilt instead of a down quilt for wet conditions (such as the AT)?

I realize you were asking Wayne, but I'll pipe in.
A lot (most?) of the hikers seem to use down. I understand the concern with moisture, but stuffed size and weight seem to win out in most people's decision making.
I, too, chose down - and I am very careful about keeping it dry. I bought a "dry down" bag, and I keep it in a trash bag after it's put inside it's water resistant stuff sack.

I have seen some kids (boy scouts?) hiking with the inexpensive synthetic bags rolled up and strapped to the outside of their packs.... but it's a rare sight to see an adult who has chosen to spend some money on his/her desired activity with a bulky and heavy synthetic sleeping bag hiking along the trail (or in a shelter).

Traillium
02-17-2018, 10:22
I realize you were asking Wayne, but I'll pipe in.
A lot (most?) of the hikers seem to use down. I understand the concern with moisture, but stuffed size and weight seem to win out in most people's decision making.
I, too, chose down - and I am very careful about keeping it dry. I bought a "dry down" bag, and I keep it in a trash bag after it's put inside it's water resistant stuff sack.

I have seen some kids (boy scouts?) hiking with the inexpensive synthetic bags rolled up and strapped to the outside of their packs.... but it's a rare sight to see an adult who has chosen to spend some money on his/her desired activity with a bulky and heavy synthetic sleeping bag hiking along the trail (or in a shelter).

Iíll disregard ó with respect ó your last paragraph. Iím talking about modern lightweight synthetic quilts, not ďbulky and heavy synthetic sleeping bagsĒ.

Compare 3 versions of Enlightened Equipment Enigma quilt: all 20 degree, Long length, Regular width (as fits me):

EE Enigma 950 down ($474) 18.84 oz
EE Enigma 750 down ($376) 20.32 oz
EE Enigma Apex (Climashield) ($263) 30.72 oz

The price differences are dramatic. The weights are significant. What I cannot compare is the compressibility, though I suspect itís noticeable ó and as Iíve noted elsewhere (cooksets) ó perhaps of more significance to me.

So Iím Ďpaying the priceí of weight and volume to carry synthetic. I am also gaining some security of warmth during continued wet times. (I follow procedures similar to MtDoraDaveís to maintain dryness.)

Comments?

[BTW, Iíve just finished a DIY Climashield underquilt with materials bought (and excellent sewing advice) from Gerrit Hofman at HOGS Hofman Outdoor Gear Supply up here in Canada. Iíve yet to test it outside, as itís a 32 degree F construction and it was down to about 10 degrees F last night. The total cost is less than half what I paid for the EE Enigma Apex topquilt (admittedly a more complex sewing design). As a senior on a fixed income, thatís significant. Total production time: 7 hours. Finished and compressed size: about 2 nalgenes, and weighing 590 grams. About the same size and weight as the awkward inflatable pad Iíve been using.]

Venchka
02-17-2018, 14:18
So Ö would you advise a synthetic quilt instead of a down quilt for wet conditions (such as the AT)?
I would use a synthetic quilt in higher temperatures not wetter conditions.
Wayne

Venchka
02-17-2018, 14:28
I didnít see your comparison until now.
1. I donít believe in 950 Down for a variety of reasons starting with the testing process.
2. Personal choice on your list: 750 Down.
Iím in awe of your DIY talent. Would that I could do that.
All the best to you!
Wayne

saltysack
02-18-2018, 23:32
Iíll disregard ó with respect ó your last paragraph. Iím talking about modern lightweight synthetic quilts, not ďbulky and heavy synthetic sleeping bagsĒ.

Compare 3 versions of Enlightened Equipment Enigma quilt: all 20 degree, Long length, Regular width (as fits me):

EE Enigma 950 down ($474) 18.84 oz
EE Enigma 750 down ($376) 20.32 oz
EE Enigma Apex (Climashield) ($263) 30.72 oz

The price differences are dramatic. The weights are significant. What I cannot compare is the compressibility, though I suspect itís noticeable ó and as Iíve noted elsewhere (cooksets) ó perhaps of more significance to me.

So Iím Ďpaying the priceí of weight and volume to carry synthetic. I am also gaining some security of warmth during continued wet times. (I follow procedures similar to MtDoraDaveís to maintain dryness.)

Comments?

[BTW, Iíve just finished a DIY Climashield underquilt with materials bought (and excellent sewing advice) from Gerrit Hofman at HOGS Hofman Outdoor Gear Supply up here in Canada. Iíve yet to test it outside, as itís a 32 degree F construction and it was down to about 10 degrees F last night. The total cost is less than half what I paid for the EE Enigma Apex topquilt (admittedly a more complex sewing design). As a senior on a fixed income, thatís significant. Total production time: 7 hours. Finished and compressed size: about 2 nalgenes, and weighing 590 grams. About the same size and weight as the awkward inflatable pad Iíve been using.]

Your prices seem off on EE Enigma and donít offer 750 down.


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Traillium
02-19-2018, 00:09
Your prices seem off on EE Enigma and donít offer 750 down.


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Taken right off their website. In Am$ too, I think.

Cheyou
02-19-2018, 06:04
Taken right off their website. In Am$ too, I think.



I think you ned to check you facts and figures. No 750 down and. Reg reg 850 down 20į quilt is $290 us

Hatchet_1697
02-19-2018, 08:04
EE doesnít use 750, lowest is an 850.

Specs are here: https://support.enlightenedequipment.com/hc/en-us/articles/115002191668-Enigma

Off the shelf prices are here: https://enlightenedequipment.com/quilts-on-the-shelf/

Custom built prices maybe...


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JC13
02-19-2018, 09:18
I use the APEX Enigma, have 2 actually. I like them for the East Coast because of the dampness. I have a 40* Reg/Reg and a 50* Long/Wide. The plan is when we start doing colder weather camping, pickup a 850 fill short/slim Enigma for the wife and a 850 fill reg/reg for myself to layer inside the 40* and 50* respectively. The weight for the combo and added versatility is only ~26oz for 20* temp rating.

I took the 40* on the Pinhoti Trail last week for some very damp days with nights in the low 40s. I used a 1.3R pad as I haven't grabbed a cold appropriate one and was comfortable every night. The coldest night I was wearing: merino wool tshirt, UA cold gear tights, darn tough boot socks, my synthetic MH puffy and a MH toque. The only time I ever felt cold was occasionally my hands would slip out from under the quilt and I would wake up with a cold hand.

I sleep hot so YMMV.

cmoulder
02-19-2018, 09:32
I think you ned to check you facts and figures. No 750 down and. Reg reg 850 down 20į quilt is $290 us

Correct. Only 850-900-950.

I'm old enough to remember when 550 was common and 750 was considered ethereally light. :)

I've got an older Enigma made with 800 duck down and it is perfectly fine for me. My most-used quilt.

egilbe
02-19-2018, 10:04
Hiked up Kearsarge North and spent the night in the fire tower during the snow storm that blew through. GF had a 30* Katabatic flex quilt and I had my 30* EE Prodigy and we through our 20* Accomplice over both of us. We slept on Thermorest Z-lite Sol and a Ridgerest with our Exped Synmat Hyperlight duo on top. We stayed nice and toasty. The temps were in the low teens, I believe. Woke up a few times due a draft on my back, but shifted the inner quilt back over and it was fine. Woke up with snow blowing on my face through the cracks in the windows. Moving the bed over solved that problem. Kept our water bottles between us in insulated bottle boots and they were still lukewarm in the morning. Slept in baselayers.

The sleep system wasuch lighter stacking quilts than lugging 8 pounds of feathers up the mountain.

kevperro
02-19-2018, 11:07
I used a 30 deg. Feathered Friends bag (32 ounces) in 1994 hiking from Maine to Harpers Ferry. Started in late August and finished in early December. It was snowing when I left the trail and temps regularly were in the 20s. Hell... is was cold many nights throughout the trip. I still have that bag and my wife uses it when we hike. I'm too fat to fit in it anymore and use a synthetic quilt (30 deg.) which I supplement with down jacket, footies, and hood as needed.

I'd have no problem using a 20 deg. quilt. I wouldn't bother buying a 2nd warmer quilt until you found you really needed it. You have no idea what is going to happen so buy the right gear for the conditions you start in and there is nothing to stop you (other than $$) from swapping it out later if you have the need. You will be in better shape, more knowledgeable about your needs, and there is nothing these days that stops you from shopping while you are on the trail and having an item drop shipped to resupply point as needed.

kevperro
02-19-2018, 11:11
I’ll disregard — with respect — your last paragraph. I’m talking about modern lightweight synthetic quilts, not “bulky and heavy synthetic sleeping bags”.

Compare 3 versions of Enlightened Equipment Enigma quilt: all 20 degree, Long length, Regular width (as fits me):

EE Enigma 950 down ($474) 18.84 oz
EE Enigma 750 down ($376) 20.32 oz
EE Enigma Apex (Climashield) ($263) 30.72 oz

The price differences are dramatic. The weights are significant. What I cannot compare is the compressibility, though I suspect it’s noticeable — and as I’ve noted elsewhere (cooksets) — perhaps of more significance to me.

So I’m ‘paying the price’ of weight and volume to carry synthetic. I am also gaining some security of warmth during continued wet times. (I follow procedures similar to MtDoraDave’s to maintain dryness.)

Comments?

[BTW, I’ve just finished a DIY Climashield underquilt with materials bought (and excellent sewing advice) from Gerrit Hofman at HOGS Hofman Outdoor Gear Supply up here in Canada. I’ve yet to test it outside, as it’s a 32 degree F construction and it was down to about 10 degrees F last night. The total cost is less than half what I paid for the EE Enigma Apex topquilt (admittedly a more complex sewing design). As a senior on a fixed income, that’s significant. Total production time: 7 hours. Finished and compressed size: about 2 nalgenes, and weighing 590 grams. About the same size and weight as the awkward inflatable pad I’ve been using.]

I'd stick with down. I have a synthetic quilt so I'm sort of a hypocrite but plenty of people have hiked the entire trail with down bags and lived to tell of it.

Traillium
02-19-2018, 11:19
Your prices seem off on EE Enigma and donít offer 750 down.


I admit my mistake. No 750 Enigma. Only 850/900/950 as Saltysack & Cheyou corrected me. Sloppy transcribing on my behalf. Sorry.

saltysack
02-19-2018, 11:31
I admit my mistake. No 750 Enigma. Only 850/900/950 as Saltysack & Cheyou corrected me. Sloppy transcribing on my behalf. Sorry.

No worries....only reason I posted as Iíve bought 2 Enigmas and they were around $300 w 850......


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Traillium
02-19-2018, 18:06
Hereís my almost-finished DIY looong underquilt using Climashield Apex from HOGS equipment in Brandon, Manitoba. https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180219/b03a2f228fe6a7d850d48812157130e9.jpg

wordstew
02-21-2018, 08:47
Check out the Thermarest Proton technical blanket.
It's waterproof, I throw it over my 20 degree UGQ top quilt (2oz overstuffed footbox) and have slept comfortable down to 6 degrees F.
I bought it onsale for $52.00