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BowGal
03-05-2018, 15:46
Hi WB experts. While Iíve backpacked solo for 5-6 days 5-10x a year, Iíve always packed accordingly. Never had to deal with resupply or some other issues I have questions about.

1. Iím set on using a canister stove. Theyíve never let me down.
A 100g canister weighs approx 190g full. You can boil approx. 10L...which if my math is correct...thatíd give me 2L per day for five days (1L in am and 1L for dinner)
A 227 canister weighs 388g...and about 20L boiled water.

My question for experienced thru hikers: hiking the AT with all the plentiful resupply points, go with the lighter canister and replace every 4-5 days...or go with the 227g one and not have to worry about replacing fuel as often?

2. When I backpack for short trips, I dig a cat hole 30-40 feet from my sleeping area, brush my teeth and spit there. What do you do on the AT where there are people everywhere? Where ya spit your toothpaste? Dumb question, I know.

3. Trail magic/angels - is it assumed all trail angels do what they do for free? Do any of them get offended if one was to tip? Or if someone offers a shuttle, do you try to tip?

4. My hope is that I can stick with my tent most of the time. Not keen on shelters because I donít like mice...but get grumpy if I get no sleep from snorers. My hubby wears a Cpap mask at home...and if it werenít for that...well, Iím sure Iíd of put a pillow over his head.
Having said all that, it slate afternoon...I saunter into my expected stop for the night...and all tent pads are filled. If pads are all filled, do I have to move on, or can I pitch a tent somewhere...observing LNT of course.

5. Iím buying the Ursack plus the OPsak no odour bags. Curious, do I need to buy the Ursack Minor bag as well? Or can I get away with the no odour bags inside the Ursack?
Iíve been using the PCT method for a few years now...does the Ursack need to be hung PCT style, or can it be tied to a thick branch using the knots recommended by Ursack tutorial videos?

Thanks so much

AllDownhillFromHere
03-05-2018, 15:58
This might be dated info, but I think it holds true:

Re: cannisters - I'd lean towards taking the larger so that when Murphy's Law strikes and the store is closed, or its a Sunday, or they're out, you still have fuel.
Re: toothpaste - swallow it. If you use the "natural" kinds like Toms of Maine, it's really not that bad because there's not so much foam and hyper-minty "stuff"
Re: shuttle - if its more than a hitch, I'd offer to pay for gas, or buy lunch, etc. It lets them say yes or no without feeling like a taxi necessarily
Re: shelters - if you're at a shelter site, and the tent pads are full, move on - or sleep in the shelter with earplugs if needed. The tent pads are there for tents, and to keep the whole area from becoming 1 giant tent pad
Re: ursack - shelters generally have food hang ropes, and 99% of the time its mice, not bears. The food is 4' off the ground. Smokies and Shenandoah you need to do it more properly.

AllDownhillFromHere
03-05-2018, 16:01
Source: AT hiker and former MATC caretaker

nsherry61
03-05-2018, 16:33
2. Dentists suggest toothpaste is of minor if any use when brushing teeth other than fresh breath. It is the brushing that is important to your teeth. So, you can choose not use toothpaste and still maintain a healthy mouth. I was always taught to broadcast my toothpaste well away from camp. So, spit in a way that generates a mist of toothpaste that is widely dispersed.

5. Odor-proof sacks are NOT odor-proof, and although they may reduce pest infestation, they will not actually guard against it. In bear country, follow the URsack instructions. If you hang the bag and the bear gets it, you failed. If hung according to instructions, the bear cannot get the bag, just damage it.

Slo-go'en
03-05-2018, 16:51
I've read someplace it's not a good idea to swallow toothpaste. I spit mine out into the fire pit, if there is one.

Canisters - I ran out in the SNP and thought, not a problem I'll get one at the camp store. Camp store was closed for renovations and the wayside had none. They did have hot food though, so that worked out for that night. You will often find nearly empty canisters in hiker boxes since most people don't want to carry two and are afraid to run out, so they replace the nearly empty one every chance they get and toss the old one.

It's possible to come to a shelter site and find no good tent sites left and the shelter nearly or completely empty, but only if it's not raining. If it's raining the shelter will be so full, not even a mouse will fit. If both the shelter and good tent sites are full (a common occurrence early in the season), you just end up tenting in a really crappy place.

Finding places to camp off the side of the trail is hit or miss. Depends on how picky you are. There are sections of the AT where it's only legal to camp at designated sites, like NJ/NY/CT and some other areas where the trial is a narrow corridor across private land, which is common in MA. A lot of other places it's just not practical due to the terrain and/or vegetation. I also believe you are at much higher risk of finding a Lyme infected deer tick if you camp in the brush off trail.

I'm really picky and rarely find places to camp that are not well established. Ideally you want to find a place where many others have camped, since that is probably the only good place for miles. Otherwise you'll have to clear a spot of tree limbs, brush, rocks and so on, then rough the site up again once you leave to make it so no one can tell you've been there. If it's getting late with the sun setting, the chances of finding a good camping spot is nil.

I've stopped offering a tip to people who pick me up hitch hiking. Without exception they refuse it. Most rides are relatively short, a few miles. A profuse thank you is enough. I gave a shuttle driver a 100 dollar bill for a 80 dollar ride and he asked if I wanted change. Damn right I wanted change. He was disappointed, but not offended.

In bear problem areas, there are bear boxes or cables to store your food. In non problem areas, most just hang their food from the rafters in the shelter or a tree limb if tenting. No real need for a Ursack or odor proof bags, but they can't hurt and gives you some peace of mind.

Dogwood
03-05-2018, 17:07
You can get better being resupply, fuel. and cook flexible. Every resupply incorporate 1 or 2 cook/no cook food/meal options. Learn to safely light, maintain, and cook over a small contained warming and ember cook fire. This way your can lasts longer.

Remember the wt printed on the can defines the wt of the product in the can which doesn't include the wt of the can. Same with food like canned meats.

AllDownhillFromHere
03-05-2018, 17:33
Please don't spit toothpaste into the firepit. It ends up there with pistachio shells, orange peels, tea bags, and aluminum cans. The caretakers and ridgerunners have to pack it out. On a 40 mile stretch from Bigelow to Piazza Rock I had a big black garbage back full of stuff including jeans, a frying pan, 1 lb. propane cannisters, in addition to the normal junk. Scattering mess (and spit) around creates more, because if 1 person does it, more people do

It makes smells that are oh-so interesting to critters. Either swallow the toothpaste, or cathole it, or spit it into the privy.

Dogwood
03-05-2018, 17:50
Don't bring your water to a long rapid boil. Let food finish off/cooking in hot water. Acquaint yourself with only boiling the amt of H2O currently needed for the meal. Opt for lower cook time foods. Warm the can in your pocket before using. If cold out use a fuel mix (Snow Peak Gold, Jet Boil, etc) f I r colder temps. All this adds up to using less fuel.

This way you stretch your fuel out more. On avg I get 9 -11 days heating of water for bfast and dinner out of a small SP Gold PtoIso can(about 4 oz). Throw in 2 small campfire warmed meals and 1-2 days cook/ no cook days and the 4 oz can lasts 15 days at least before needing another. Not that hard to fuel with 4 oz cans on an AT thru. You find a lot of partial cans in hiker boxes and at hostels for the taking too.

Dogwood
03-05-2018, 17:51
SP Gold ProIso

Slo-go'en
03-05-2018, 18:00
Please don't spit toothpaste into the firepit. It ends up there with pistachio shells, orange peels, tea bags, and aluminum cans. The caretakers and ridgerunners have to pack it out. On a 40 mile stretch from Bigelow to Piazza Rock I had a big black garbage back full of stuff including jeans, a frying pan, 1 lb. propane cannisters, in addition to the normal junk. Scattering mess (and spit) around creates more, because if 1 person does it, more people do


It makes smells that are oh-so interesting to critters. Either swallow the toothpaste, or cathole it, or spit it into the privy.

When it comes to used toothpaste I have to disagree with you. Charcoal is a good odor absorbent and filter. The next fire takes care of anything else. Just try to get it into the pit and not on the rocks. Better then spitting it out into the woods. As for non combustible actual physical trash, yea agree 100%.

MtDoraDave
03-05-2018, 20:20
My last section, last November, some of the SOBO thrus were still working their way down... One of them was using the extra large canister. The one that's like 6-8" tall!
I guess a time comes in a thru where worrying about a few grams becomes less important than knowing you have enough fuel. ...or maybe that's all that the store had in stock.
Even though I just do a week at a time, I usually bring the large (medium) cannister.

Slo-go'en
03-05-2018, 21:33
My last section, last November, some of the SOBO thrus were still working their way down... One of them was using the extra large canister. The one that's like 6-8" tall!
I guess a time comes in a thru where worrying about a few grams becomes less important than knowing you have enough fuel. ...or maybe that's all that the store had in stock.
Even though I just do a week at a time, I usually bring the large (medium) cannister.
If he had gone to a Walmart, often that's the only size (humongous) left in stock. I have one for that reason.

CarlZ993
03-05-2018, 21:55
1. 1L of boiled water for breakfast & also for dinner? Lot of water!! Most meals would take about 2 C or 500 ml. Some canister stoves are more fuel efficient than others. The JetBoils, Reactors, & Windburner integrated stoves (pot/stove combos) are very efficient but tend to be heavy. The Soto Windmaster stove is very efficient as well as light (my preference).
2. Brushing your teeth: Most of the way, I used just a dab of toothpaste powder and would spit it out away from camp a bit. As my hike went on, I ran out of powder and just used toothpaste (rarely) or simply dry brushed. I didn't like the idea of the toothpaste smell in my beard (a problem that you shouldn't have to worry about).
3. I often tipped. Or tried to.
4. Three words: earplugs, earplugs, earplugs. I carried two sets as there are some snorers in this world that are very LOUD! At one camp, a guy pitched his tent 50 yrs away from me & I could still hear him.
5. Odor-proof bags aren't. If they truly were odor-proof, you wouldn't be able to purchase any of them as they would all be bought up by the drug-trafficking business. Most hikers that I saw thru-hiking used a bear bag from Zpacks. I'd typically hang it using the PCT method.

Good luck on your hike.

KDogg
03-05-2018, 22:12
Four to five days sounds about right for the small canister. I always went with the small one. It is significantly lighter than the bigger size. When we were in PA, all the stores ran out of canisters though. My hiking partners and I shared what we had until we ran out. My backup was to buy a solid fuel (exbit) stove at Walmart. It worked fine and got me over the hump until we got past the shortage. This episode was a bit stressful but I never lacked for hot food.

BowGal
03-06-2018, 06:42
Thank you everyone for your input and advice.

MuddyWaters
03-06-2018, 07:38
2 L per day is way too much.

1L is a lot

I only boil 2cups for dinner. I can get 22 boils out of small 110 g canister.
Couple that with town meals, one or two no cook dinners, and thats about a month

Try using low heat and a windscreen.
Instead of high. Which wastes much of fuel.


You also only need 1.5 cup hot water, then add a little cool to adjust consistency and cool it to eating temp if freezer bagging or MH. 2 often makes soup. Easier to add a little more, than add potatoe flakes to soupy dinner to make edible. Too much water dilutes taste.


If fuel is low, you can stretch it if smart by not heating to boiling, etc. Theres ways to manage and extend fuel. If you dont need to great, theres a town every 3 -4 days. But centering a hike around "wheres the x" gets old .

Dogwood
03-06-2018, 09:24
Wow, just wow. You folks go through a 4 oz can every 4-5 days? I'm trying to wrap my head around that. That means every 5 day resupply, which could be going to town that often, you're seeking a new can. Id be looking to extend that usage between having to find another 4 oz can or if you're that gung ho on rampant iso consumption buy the larger 8 oz can.

MW is right. For solo use nearly 8.5 cps(2 L) of water even if heating H2O morn, afternoon, and evening is excessively high. It's translating into much higher than needed fuel use.

Treat or filter your non heated drinking water. it will save much wt in fuel and having to find cans.

Shrewd
03-06-2018, 09:35
Hi WB experts. While Iíve backpacked solo for 5-6 days 5-10x a year, Iíve always packed accordingly. Never had to deal with resupply or some other issues I have questions about.

1. Iím set on using a canister stove. Theyíve never let me down.
A 100g canister weighs approx 190g full. You can boil approx. 10L...which if my math is correct...thatíd give me 2L per day for five days (1L in am and 1L for dinner)
A 227 canister weighs 388g...and about 20L boiled water.

My question for experienced thru hikers: hiking the AT with all the plentiful resupply points, go with the lighter canister and replace every 4-5 days...or go with the 227g one and not have to worry about replacing fuel as often?

2. When I backpack for short trips, I dig a cat hole 30-40 feet from my sleeping area, brush my teeth and spit there. What do you do on the AT where there are people everywhere? Where ya spit your toothpaste? Dumb question, I know.

3. Trail magic/angels - is it assumed all trail angels do what they do for free? Do any of them get offended if one was to tip? Or if someone offers a shuttle, do you try to tip?

4. My hope is that I can stick with my tent most of the time. Not keen on shelters because I donít like mice...but get grumpy if I get no sleep from snorers. My hubby wears a Cpap mask at home...and if it werenít for that...well, Iím sure Iíd of put a pillow over his head.
Having said all that, it slate afternoon...I saunter into my expected stop for the night...and all tent pads are filled. If pads are all filled, do I have to move on, or can I pitch a tent somewhere...observing LNT of course.

5. Iím buying the Ursack plus the OPsak no odour bags. Curious, do I need to buy the Ursack Minor bag as well? Or can I get away with the no odour bags inside the Ursack?
Iíve been using the PCT method for a few years now...does the Ursack need to be hung PCT style, or can it be tied to a thick branch using the knots recommended by Ursack tutorial videos?

Thanks so much

Most people tend to use the smaller canisters. Sometimes you wonít have a choice because the store you buy them in only stocks one. I found myself boiling more water towards the end because my buddy and i always had tea time after dinner.

I liked not having to worry about or conserve my fuel, so I went with the medium size - it still fit inside my pot (gsi soloist)

Good on you for even thinking about your toothpaste; lots of people just spit it out wherever, same when cleaning their lots.

Personally I just swallowed my toothpaste.

Itís generally free. Some shuttles arenít, however. I always had a bit of cash on me but rarely used it. I doubt theyíd get offended but I also doubt theyíd take your money.

You can set up your tent where ever you like. There are almost always clear spaces around shelters for tents. I hung my hammock near but not too near a shelter most nights. Maybe bring ear plugs?

Most people just throw their stuff in a dry bag and call it good. I used ziplocs but only for organization, and hung my bag from my hammock strap and never had a creature get in there.

Regardless the pct method works great so long as you can find a good branch.

Prepare to have people tell you the ďright wayĒ to hang a bag at a spot where there are many bags hung laughably bad

Dogwood
03-06-2018, 09:35
Lol. I wonder if the same spoiled folks moan about the AT lean to's that are .4 or more mile off the main path, or that unique waterfall a whopping .6 miles is too far, or the spotty cell reception. Gotta take those selfies and check email every 2 hrs Capone. :p

illabelle
03-06-2018, 10:08
....4. Three words: earplugs, earplugs, earplugs. I carried two sets as there are some snorers in this world that are very LOUD! At one camp, a guy pitched his tent 50 yrs away from me & I could still hear him. .... Good luck on your hike.

WOW! That's some supernatural snoring if you could hear it from 50 years away!!
:D

Berserker
03-06-2018, 10:37
I am but a lowly section hiker, a peasant really. I bow at the feet of the mighty thrus and am thankful everyday when they acknowledge my existence. So knowing that I'll throw out whatever tiny crumbs of wisdom I can.

In all seriousness though (I'm in a weird mood today...sorry), see my input below.


1. Iím set on using a canister stove. Theyíve never let me down.
Actually can't help out here too much as I use alcohol, but I can say that on most of the trail canisters are fairly easy to come by.


2. When I backpack for short trips, I dig a cat hole 30-40 feet from my sleeping area, brush my teeth and spit there. What do you do on the AT where there are people everywhere? Where ya spit your toothpaste? Dumb question, I know.
I don't use toothpaste.


3. Trail magic/angels - is it assumed all trail angels do what they do for free? Do any of them get offended if one was to tip? Or if someone offers a shuttle, do you try to tip?
I've gotten rides before, and do not offer tips. I have paid it back though by giving thrus rides into town.


4. My hope is that I can stick with my tent most of the time. Not keen on shelters because I donít like mice...but get grumpy if I get no sleep from snorers. My hubby wears a Cpap mask at home...and if it werenít for that...well, Iím sure Iíd of put a pillow over his head.
Having said all that, it slate afternoon...I saunter into my expected stop for the night...and all tent pads are filled. If pads are all filled, do I have to move on, or can I pitch a tent somewhere...observing LNT of course.
This one depends on the lay of the land and the local regulations. In a good portion of the South (not including GSMNP and SNP) there are usually camp spots in close proximity to shelters where if you get to the shelter and it's full you can typically hike a little further up or back and find something. Often times you could just hike into the woods off trail and make camp too. There are many areas of the trail where camping is prohibited except for in designated spots (GSMNP, SNP, the White Mountains, MA, CT, and some other areas), and you would likely have to stay in the shelter there. As others have mentioned bring ear plugs. I also like to use a sleeping mask if I'm in a shelter because then people turning on their headlamps doesn't wake me up.


5. Iím buying the Ursack plus the OPsak no odour bags. Curious, do I need to buy the Ursack Minor bag as well? Or can I get away with the no odour bags inside the Ursack?
Iíve been using the PCT method for a few years now...does the Ursack need to be hung PCT style, or can it be tied to a thick branch using the knots recommended by Ursack tutorial videos?
Can't offer a lot of input on this one other than to say that very few people use a Ursack on the AT. Most areas that have bear problems have storage provided (cables, boxes and/or poles). For areas that don't you can usually hang a normal sil-nylon drybag using the PCT method.

BowGal
03-06-2018, 10:48
Keep in mind, when I gave my “2L boiled water per day”, that is when I’m backpacking for 4-5 days. As I’m not worrying about resupply, I tend to bring Mac and cheese which takes more water and fuel to boil...and I boil water at night to wash my face. I try to use the whole canister cuz I hate having half a dozen canisters with bits of fuel in each.

I realize going forward on a thru hike attempt, I need not bring water to a boil, won’t be needing water at night to wash (embrace the stink), and I’ll be using a homemade cozy for putting packets of food in to continue cooking.
The other thing is that there is a greater selection of meal ideas available in the US than where I live in Canada. We don’t have tuna and chicken in packets....no single serve Spam. Up here in Canada, most Knorr meals require milk....so either you have to bring powdered milk, or get stuck eating expensive dehydrated meals that so-so.

BowGal
03-06-2018, 10:49
*that are so-so in taste.

Thank goodness for YouTube videos...have so many food idea options going forward.

DownEaster
03-06-2018, 11:29
I'm not giving up the gum health benefits of baking soda + peroxide toothpaste for 5 straight months. Boy Scout practice is to "broadcast" toothpaste in a wide arc so there's very low concentration on any particular bit of ground. I go further from camp than most for my hygiene needs, though.

evyck da fleet
03-06-2018, 13:31
1) whichever canister is available. The larger one if my next resupply town or two might be small and not have a outfitter. I did not mind carrying a small and large canister when one was about to run out.
2) toothpaste near my tentsite covered with water so itís not near the ground surface or noticeable.
3) if Iím hitching I offer something. Sometimes hostels will have someone drop you back at the trail thatís not related to the hostel and then itís usually expected.
4) squeeze in if you can or move on. Itís kind of like a shelter in the rain.

Shrewd
03-06-2018, 13:49
Keep in mind, when I gave my ď2L boiled water per dayĒ, that is when Iím backpacking for 4-5 days. As Iím not worrying about resupply, I tend to bring Mac and cheese which takes more water and fuel to boil...and I boil water at night to wash my face. I try to use the whole canister cuz I hate having half a dozen canisters with bits of fuel in each.

I realize going forward on a thru hike attempt, I need not bring water to a boil, wonít be needing water at night to wash (embrace the stink), and Iíll be using a homemade cozy for putting packets of food in to continue cooking.
The other thing is that there is a greater selection of meal ideas available in the US than where I live in Canada. We donít have tuna and chicken in packets....no single serve Spam. Up here in Canada, most Knorr meals require milk....so either you have to bring powdered milk, or get stuck eating expensive dehydrated meals that so-so.

I made easy mac almost every night for dinner at the end, I used the same amount of water as I would for a rice side or something.

I didnít even measure, just pour until it the noodles are jusssssst submerged, still once or twice while boiling, get a rolling boil and turn the stove off and put pot in my cozy.

Give it 10 minutes and itís cooked and absorbed all the water


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Sarcasm the elf
03-06-2018, 14:07
My last section, last November, some of the SOBO thrus were still working their way down... One of them was using the extra large canister. The one that's like 6-8" tall!

I was at the Doyle over the weekend and there was one of those giant canisters collecting dust on a shelf. I wonder if it was the same one. :D

AllDownhillFromHere
03-06-2018, 15:16
Funny thing about fuel. Everyone laughs at the guy who carries too much, until they need to borrow some.

Source: happened to me in the Smokies with my 1L fuel bottle of whitegas.

Sarcasm the elf
03-06-2018, 15:21
Funny thing about fuel. Everyone laughs at the guy who carries too much, until they need to borrow some.

Source: happened to me in the Smokies with my 1L fuel bottle of whitegas.
Same with TP.

BillyGr
03-06-2018, 16:09
Seems the water amount (1L in AM 1L in PM) could be a possibility, if:

- Someone likes a lot of drink in the morning (after all, if you were buying out many places that sell coffee/tea have sizes up to 20-24 oz. for their largest, which is 1/2-3/4 of a L right there). Add a little for something like oatmeal and you are pretty close (plus maybe a little to clean if one is not cooking in a bag).
- Doing the sides for dinner and either actually cooking them or following the directions which may call for 2 cups (again, about 1/2L) of water and then again wants hot water for something else like a drink or maybe for self cleaning (which some may still do a bit, or at least plan to do when they start).

Probably too much for many, but not impossible.

4eyedbuzzard
03-07-2018, 18:37
Funny thing about fuel. Everyone laughs at the guy who carries too much, until they need to borrow some.

Source: happened to me in the Smokies with my 1L fuel bottle of whitegas.
Same with TP.And maps, or tweezers, or toenail clippers, or matches, or ... I'd rather carry a few extra ounces - we aren't talking pounds here - and actually be prepared for an extra night out or occurrence. I sometimes wonder if it's just forgetfulness or miscalculation or trying to shave off more grams than is practical.

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Venchka
03-07-2018, 20:21
Checking out food and fuel supply in my local Big Box Sporting Goods Store (Academy) yesterday.
110 gram GSI canisters: $4.
230 gram JetBoil canisters: $5.
They can be mailed if done correctly.
Think about it.
Wayne

egilbe
03-07-2018, 20:30
My gf and I use a medium size canister, for two people, lasts a week, 7 days. Just about an oz of fuel a day.

AllDownhillFromHere
03-07-2018, 22:47
And maps, or tweezers, or toenail clippers, or matches, or ... I'd rather carry a few extra ounces - we aren't talking pounds here - and actually be prepared for an extra night out or occurrence. I sometimes wonder if it's just forgetfulness or miscalculation or trying to shave off more grams than is practical.
Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

Except, "take care of the ounces and the pounds take care of themselves". But I definitely hear you.

Bansko
03-08-2018, 12:38
Fuel: You're going to use less than you think. I used both small and large at times, but I could get by about week with the small ones. You may find, as I did, that you sometimes choose to not fire up the stove at all.

Odor-proof bear sack: Completely unnecessary. Just go with hanging your food bag.

Tent space: I spent four nights within a quarter mile of a shelter during my thru hike - They're a little too urban for my tastes. Sometimes finding a tent spot was easy, and sometimes it was difficult. Some of the spots I found were pristine and beautiful, and some less so. I did quite a bit of stealth camping, but it can be a challenge in places. Don't wait until just before sundown to start looking, as I did a little too often.

Rides: I did a lot of hitchhiking, walking while I hitched. That required caution on roads with no shoulders though. At times I had to walk against traffic for self-preservation. If I got a ride, that was great. I usually didn't offer money, but sometimes did if people seemed a little down on their luck, or if it was a longer ride. You get a feel for what is appropriate.

LazyLightning
03-08-2018, 22:13
Fuel: You're going to use less than you think. I used both small and large at times, but I could get by about week with the small ones. You may find, as I did, that you sometimes choose to not fire up the stove at all.

Odor-proof bear sack: Completely unnecessary. Just go with hanging your food bag.

Tent space: I spent four nights within a quarter mile of a shelter during my thru hike - They're a little too urban for my tastes. Sometimes finding a tent spot was easy, and sometimes it was difficult. Some of the spots I found were pristine and beautiful, and some less so. I did quite a bit of stealth camping, but it can be a challenge in places. Don't wait until just before sundown to start looking, as I did a little too often.

Rides: I did a lot of hitchhiking, walking while I hitched. That required caution on roads with no shoulders though. At times I had to walk against traffic for self-preservation. If I got a ride, that was great. I usually didn't offer money, but sometimes did if people seemed a little down on their luck, or if it was a longer ride. You get a feel for what is appropriate.

Wait a minute, I thought your always supposed to walk against traffic? ... Bikes go with it but I always walk against except in certain sketchy situations with more shoulder room walking with it or something like that. Don't you want to see the traffic coming to help with a quicker reaction rather then hearing it behind you and turning around to see? ..... I always thought the right way was to walk against it when you can

egilbe
03-08-2018, 22:26
Suppose to walk against traffic for safety, but that does work hitchhiking.

gracebowen
03-09-2018, 02:48
I just make my knorr with water even if it calls for milk. Sometimes I'll add a splash of milk but rarely the full amount called for.

DownEaster
03-09-2018, 04:30
I tend to go the other way and add more milk and less water than called for. You can get Nestle Nido Fortificada (powdered whole milk) in Walmart stores.

AllDownhillFromHere
03-09-2018, 11:19
I just make my knorr with water even if it calls for milk. Sometimes I'll add a splash of milk but rarely the full amount called for.
I make everything on the trail with water even if it calls for milk. It's just calories, and it has to be palatable; you're not making gourmet food.

Shrewd
03-09-2018, 11:49
Likewise, I never added milk to anything


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DownEaster
03-10-2018, 04:18
I make everything on the trail with water even if it calls for milk. It's just calories, and it has to be palatable; you're not making gourmet food.
I try. My GSI Extreme Mess Kit is advertised for "gourmet backpacking". I've made pasta and fresh Alfredo sauce in it, fresh curry, and also giant muffins (from a mix, so not gourmet but still a nice treat on the Trail).

Shrewd
03-10-2018, 10:58
By all means try.

Itís just that after a certain amount of time youíll come accustomed to hiking all day. At which point when you get to camp your probably only care about setting up, eating, and sleeping.

Boiling water for Mac n cheese then letting it sit in your pot cozy is a lot faster and easier than preparing something nice that youíll inhale in seconds.

Itís kind of a thru hiking vs
camping thing. It eventually happens to everyone who makes it far enough


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Dogwood
03-10-2018, 11:12
I make everything on the trail with water even if it calls for milk. It's just calories, and it has to be palatable; you're not making gourmet food.

Same thing can be done when mac N cheese calls for butter. You're often so damn hungry you'll eat it and enjoy it. Put some butter in it in the form of added cheese.

https://www.google.com/search?q=brian+regan+pop+tarts&oq=brian+tegan+po&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0l3.11986j0j7&client=ms-android-att-us&sourceid=chrome-mobile&ie=UTF-8

Dogwood
03-10-2018, 11:16
Likewise, I never added milk to anything


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Maybe, you do...the coagulated version of milk. It's called cheese.;)

AllDownhillFromHere
03-10-2018, 12:53
By all means try.
It’s just that after a certain amount of time you’ll come accustomed to hiking all day. At which point when you get to camp your probably only care about setting up, eating, and sleeping.
Boiling water for Mac n cheese then letting it sit in your pot cozy is a lot faster and easier than preparing something nice that you’ll inhale in seconds.
It’s kind of a thru hiking vs camping thing. It eventually happens to everyone who makes it far enough

I find M&C is a good "base", to which you can and should add things like extra real cheese off your cheese block, canned tuna, chicken or sardines if you're a carnivore, and fresh or dried veggies.

MtDoraDave
03-11-2018, 08:38
On this subject, I have never added milk to any Knorr meal on the trail, but I often do add a packet of mayonnaise. Mayo is made from oil and egg yolks, so it's like adding the oil the directions call for. A few extra calories and a bit of extra protein.

Also, I figured out eventually, that if the Knorr meal calls for 2 cups of liquid, go with about 1.5 cups or I get Knorr soup.

bigcranky
03-11-2018, 12:32
I often carry a small bag of powdered milk, which can be added to granola in the morning, or toss some into the Knorr dinners. Not necessary, but it's light weight and adds some flavor and protein and fat.

AllDownhillFromHere
03-11-2018, 16:44
On this subject, I have never added milk to any Knorr meal on the trail, but I often do add a packet of mayonnaise. Mayo is made from oil and egg yolks, so it's like adding the oil the directions call for. A few extra calories and a bit of extra protein.
Also, I figured out eventually, that if the Knorr meal calls for 2 cups of liquid, go with about 1.5 cups or I get Knorr soup.

I put in as much liquid as possible, since I'm probably dehydrated anyway, and the broth goes down well.

Elaikases
03-11-2018, 22:18
Same thing can be done when mac N cheese calls for butter. You're often so damn hungry you'll eat it and enjoy it. Put some butter in it in the form of added cheese.

https://www.google.com/search?q=brian+regan+pop+tarts&oq=brian+tegan+po&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0l3.11986j0j7&client=ms-android-att-us&sourceid=chrome-mobile&ie=UTF-8

I find that butter in a ziplock is good for at least four days without going bad. I've always finished it off by then, so I don't know if it would last longer (though I and my wife are both using the butter). Others use olive oil for the same calorie/flavor/oil for food.

RevDrDan
03-11-2018, 23:38
If you run out of fuel, no big deal. On dry days fill a sandwich bag with dry sticks. A few the size of matchsticks, a few the size of a pencil, a few the size of your little finger, the rest the size of your index finger. Don't need any longer than your index finger. Clear out a spot in the dirt, make a tepee inside of 3 tent pegs positioned to sit your cook pot on. Rub camp soap on the outside of the pot. When you are done, simply wet and wash off the soap and black soot. (It works better if you have a piece of aluminum to wrap around the tent pegs with some small holes at the bottom. (To get dry twigs always pull them off of branches that are sticking up in the air and not laying on the ground.

Tooth paste---Fill mouth with rinse water and spew into a fine mist. or Spit in the fire ring.

MIce, Make a mouse preventer with a jar lid. Punch a hole in the middle. Tie a not in the hang string 5 inches to a foot above your food bag. Hang it in the shelter or 15-18 feet off the ground. Make sure to put trash and soap, toothpaste etc in the food bag. Leave pack zippers opened half an inch. Better they climb in nosing around than chew through to get a piece of forgotten gum or crumbs.

RevDrDan section hiker completed trail 2007 www.smithfieldbaptist.org

Snoring--- Ear plugs or radio with ear buds.

Dogwood
03-11-2018, 23:43
The Rev speaks...listen and learn.

AllDownhillFromHere
03-12-2018, 08:11
If you run out of fuel, no big deal...

There is so much wrong with the first two paragraphs, yet +1 for leaving the pack zipper open.