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Ahmeyer
04-05-2018, 17:49
I have always just been a day hiker and wanted to upgrade my pack as I plan to do the Long Trail this summer. I just got the 2018 Osprey Aura 50 and I hate it! The hip belt cuts into my hips and I can't get the shoulder straps to adjust properly. I have watched endless videos and nothing is working. I think it just doesn't fit my body properly, I have wide hips and a long torso for my height. I am going to return it, but now I don't know what to do. Can someone suggest a lightweight pack that will be comfortable in the summer heat and in the rain in Vermont? I was looking at the zpack arc blast since I really like the idea of having air flow as I sweat a lot and will be hiking mostly in July and August. However, I am really nervous about ordering such an expensive pack without being able to try it on. Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated. If it matters my base weight - minus the back - is currently 11.5 lbs.

MuddyWaters
04-05-2018, 19:39
Who told you you couldnt return a pack you buy mailorder to try?

Slo-go'en
04-05-2018, 19:47
Might be worth a ride down to Manchester Center and visit the EMS there. See if they have a Aura 50 on the rack and have them fit it. Or bring yours, they probably be happy to help even if you didn't buy it there. At the vary least, you can try on different packs to see how they fit.

DuneElliot
04-05-2018, 19:51
ZPacks has a return policy of 30 days so you can order it and try it and return it if necessary. I know of almost no one who doesn't like the Arc line-up. I have the dyneema version as I wanted a slightly tougher pack with very little weight penalty. I love it but I am also very boney and had to build my own lumbar pad for some cushion at the back...everyone else finds the ZPacks extra lumbar pad perfectly adequate.

JERMM
04-05-2018, 20:17
Might be worth a ride down to Manchester Center and visit the EMS there. See if they have a Aura 50 on the rack and have them fit it. Or bring yours, they probably be happy to help even if you didn't buy it there. At the vary least, you can try on different packs to see how they fit.

Ahmeyer go to an outfitter like EMS and get properly measured and fitted or you will be ordering and returning over and over. Everyone here will have a suggestion as to what which pack is more comfortable, I fit packs everyday, there isn't a one fits all. A pack that fits me and is comfortable for me might not fit or be comfortable for you. Try on different packs with weight, take your own gear, wear the packs in the store for 15-20 min or more, you'll soon know if it's right for you or not.

Suzzz
04-05-2018, 21:02
Fit is more important than brand. As the others have said, go to a shop with professionals who know how to properly fit a backpack. It makes all the difference. If they won't help fit your own pack, they might have the same model and could possibly show you how to ajust it. Sometimes management won't allow staff to help with products bought elsewhere, but in my experience staff usually do their best to help.

Ahmeyer
04-05-2018, 21:35
I'm sorry - I should have clarified in my original post that the Osprey was fit to me at a shop. I wore it around with weight and thought it would work but when I wear it for longer than two hours I can't stand it. That is why I was looking at light weight alternatives that aren't available in REI type stores. Mostly I am just looking to see if there are cottage brands that have pretty good reviews. Since I don't have a lot of experience Zpacks is really the only one I have come across so I was wondering if there are others that people are happy with.

MuddyWaters
04-05-2018, 21:52
I'm sorry - I should have clarified in my original post that the Osprey was fit to me at a shop. I wore it around with weight and thought it would work but when I wear it for longer than two hours I can't stand it. That is why I was looking at light weight alternatives that aren't available in REI type stores. Mostly I am just looking to see if there are cottage brands that have pretty good reviews. Since I don't have a lot of experience Zpacks is really the only one I have come across so I was wondering if there are others that people are happy with.
Fitting a pack isnt hard.
But...conventional packs are different than light weight.
Id say on ALL light wt packs, you dont want straps to wrap the shoulders.
Have strap attachment even with top of shoulders, when belt is supporting wt. Then on some, like ULA circuit, you shape the stay to your back for best comfort.

Gossamer gear, six moon designs, ula, zpacks, chris zimmer, KS ultralight, mld all make good gear. Slightly different, but good.

But the overriding thing to remember, is a conventional pack will feel lighter, than an overloaded lightweight pack. Stay at least 5-10 lbs UNDER whatever a mfg says their max is for best results. And normal should be less than that.

The absolute best place to try packs, is at home.
(Just like shoes!!!)
Load up, practice loading different ways
Walk around
Compare side by side
Take hrs if you need
A clear winner will emerge

Yeah,you will spend $20 a pop return shipping
$40-$80.....Small price to pay get the best pack for you
Changing later costs much more.

Where you think the hikers getting new packs in towns all the way up to damascus got their original packs from? A lot from..... REI.

Venchka
04-05-2018, 22:04
Give ULA a chance and a call. Ask them how to measure you for their packs. You can specify hip belt and pack frame size separately. Ask for the S-shape shoulder pads. I had a Catalyst briefly and liked it a lot. Then my granddaughter talked me out of it. She likes it too.
Good luck.
Wayne

BuckeyeBill
04-06-2018, 13:05
+1 on what Wayne said. ULA (https://www.ula-equipment.com/) is a great company to deal with on fitting issues.

MuddyWaters
04-06-2018, 13:53
I believe Ula has some videos out there showing you the fit of their packs.
I don't ever think I've seen them specifically say to bend the stay of circuit to match your back
But it makes a tremendous difference if you do

Match the curve in the small of the back
Bend it out away from the tailbone a little so it doesn't dig into your butt
Bend it out away from the shoulder blades a little at the top as well
And the pack will ride right in the small of your back

Venchka
04-06-2018, 16:29
I believe Ula has some videos out there showing you the fit of their packs.
I don't ever think I've seen them specifically say to bend the stay of circuit to match your back
But it makes a tremendous difference if you do

Match the curve in the small of the back
Bend it out away from the tailbone a little so it doesn't dig into your butt
Bend it out away from the shoulder blades a little at the top as well
And the pack will ride right in the small of your back
Back in the Land Before Time, my Dana Design internal frame pack arrived with instructions for reshaping the primary stay that followed the users spine.
Everything old is new again.
Wayne

DuneElliot
04-06-2018, 21:46
I believe Ula has some videos out there showing you the fit of their packs.
I don't ever think I've seen them specifically say to bend the stay of circuit to match your back
But it makes a tremendous difference if you do

Match the curve in the small of the back
Bend it out away from the tailbone a little so it doesn't dig into your butt
Bend it out away from the shoulder blades a little at the top as well
And the pack will ride right in the small of your back

I never could get mine bent right. I really didn't like the ULA Circuit for me...the Arc Haul was and is a better fit for my body

Shrewd
04-08-2018, 10:05
Ill second giving ULA a call, especially if youre hoping to avoid spending cuben fiber money.

Theyre really easy to work with and theyll help find a good size for you. A little over a year ago I talked with a lady who was torn between sizes and Chris over at ULA sent her two after she paid for one so she could return which one didnt fit. Great people to work with.

Gossamer Gear has some good options as well.


This might be a strange suggestion, but did you try on any mens ospreys?

Ahmeyer
04-09-2018, 22:30
Follow up - thank you everyone who gave me advice. After thinking about it I went to a different shop, one that is a little more focused on actual hiking, and tried on everything they had. Turns out I really don't like anything with a "trampoline" back, ie. Osprey Eja, Aura, Lumina, Zpacks, etc. I ended up with a HMG Windrider and it's snug and super comfortable. It is exactly the opposite of what I thought I would want, so to everyone who said you need to find what works for you and not rely on other peoples opinion - you could not be more right!

BuckeyeBill
04-10-2018, 07:39
Glad you found what you needed. Just goes to show that you have to get what works for you.

DuneElliot
04-10-2018, 15:28
Follow up - thank you everyone who gave me advice. After thinking about it I went to a different shop, one that is a little more focused on actual hiking, and tried on everything they had. Turns out I really don't like anything with a "trampoline" back, ie. Osprey Eja, Aura, Lumina, Zpacks, etc. I ended up with a HMG Windrider and it's snug and super comfortable. It is exactly the opposite of what I thought I would want, so to everyone who said you need to find what works for you and not rely on other peoples opinion - you could not be more right!

Exactly...and I am the complete opposite...I hate anything that doesn't have the air mesh like the Exos and the Arc Haul. I hated the ULA Circuit for that reason...or one of the reasons...but so many people love it

Ahmeyer
04-10-2018, 21:58
Exactly...and I am the complete opposite...I hate anything that doesn't have the air mesh like the Exos and the Arc Haul. I hated the ULA Circuit for that reason...or one of the reasons...but so many people love it

Isn't it funny how that works. I was 100% sure I wanted air mesh or some kind of ventilation, and now it turns out like a snug fit against my back. Who knew! Proof that we should all figure out what we like personally and not listen to fit advice from others. Where I think advice from others is advantageous is less personal gear, stoves and what not!

DuneElliot
04-11-2018, 14:44
I think advice from others is still important even when it comes to things like backpacks because there are products out the the general public may not know about and isn't in stores...but in the end fit is personal.

MuddyWaters
04-11-2018, 20:41
Never say you don't want back ventilation till you hike AT in june on a 95 degree day

Entire pack will be wet from back sweat wicking. There will be salt in the fabric. Rodents love salt . Gnaw gnaw gnaw

Bansko
04-14-2018, 14:01
My 10 year old ULA Circuit has taken me thousands of miles and suffered much abuse, but it's still hauling.

MtDoraDave
04-20-2018, 19:38
On fit:
I bought my newest pack at an outfitter 100 miles away because there wasn't a reputable one closer. An Osprey Volt 75. I brought my old pack and made sure everything fit inside the new pack. (This was intended to be my winter pack) Then they adjusted it to me. I couldn't stand it adjusted that way. I guess I've put enough miles in to know what I like and what I don't. I had to loosen the shoulder straps and lower them so that it didn't ride on my neck where the two straps come together - also, I prefer the pack NOT to ride tight to my back for the purpose of ventilation. If I was part of an assault team, I'd be worried about the pack swinging around making noise or rubbing me raw - but I'm just walking up and down mountain trails. I have taken it on a few trips since then, and it is totally comfortable to me. Most of the weight rides on my hips and the straps keep it from falling off my back.

Next year, I'd like to go with a lighter pack for my warmer weather pack, and have been pretty set on a ULA Circuit.
Curious if others have had the same experience as Wayne and recommend the S straps instead of the standard J(?) straps they usually recommend for men.

DuneElliot
04-20-2018, 22:35
On fit:
I bought my newest pack at an outfitter 100 miles away because there wasn't a reputable one closer. An Osprey Volt 75. I brought my old pack and made sure everything fit inside the new pack. (This was intended to be my winter pack) Then they adjusted it to me. I couldn't stand it adjusted that way. I guess I've put enough miles in to know what I like and what I don't. I had to loosen the shoulder straps and lower them so that it didn't ride on my neck where the two straps come together - also, I prefer the pack NOT to ride tight to my back for the purpose of ventilation. If I was part of an assault team, I'd be worried about the pack swinging around making noise or rubbing me raw - but I'm just walking up and down mountain trails. I have taken it on a few trips since then, and it is totally comfortable to me. Most of the weight rides on my hips and the straps keep it from falling off my back.

Next year, I'd like to go with a lighter pack for my warmer weather pack, and have been pretty set on a ULA Circuit.
Curious if others have had the same experience as Wayne and recommend the S straps instead of the standard J(?) straps they usually recommend for men.

If you like your pack to ride away from your back you probably won't like the Circuit much. After initially buying an Arc Haul I tried a Circuit...and hated it. I couldn't get it comfortable and I hated how close it was to my body. I went back to my beloved Arc Haul.

Venchka
04-20-2018, 23:52
If you like your pack to ride away from your back you probably won't like the Circuit much. After initially buying an Arc Haul I tried a Circuit...and hated it. I couldn't get it comfortable and I hated how close it was to my body. I went back to my beloved Arc Haul.
I guess some of us just dont know any better.
I have used 4 packs over the decades. All road on my back. I didnt know any different. I didnt die.
Since I started hiking in a Helly Hansen wicking base layer and a polyester ventilated fishing shirt I finish the day virtually dry. Im dry in an hour or less.
As for the S straps, personal preference. My 1994 Dana Design pack came with S straps. The Catalyst didnt. I didnt object to the Catalyst shoulder straps, but would get the S straps in the future. There are a few tweaks I would like for the Catalyst. Perhaps ULA can make that happen. YMMV
Wayne

Shrewd
04-21-2018, 09:50
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180421/8bb4b40afe8ad2ebd434b4db47a270a7.jpg

Im 63 with fairly broad shoulders. The guy over at ULA recommended I go with the S straps. Im not sure how necessary they were but I was comfortable with them. Id often alternate between using the sternum strap and forgoing it.


https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180421/db75b0940f88ab61c8233d1980f631cf.jpg

DuneElliot
04-21-2018, 14:34
I guess some of us just don’t know any better.
I have used 4 packs over the decades. All road on my back. I didn’t know any different. I didn’t die.
Since I started hiking in a Helly Hansen wicking base layer and a polyester ventilated fishing shirt I finish the day virtually dry. I’m dry in an hour or less.
As for the S straps, personal preference. My 1994 Dana Design pack came with S straps. The Catalyst didn’t. I didn’t object to the Catalyst shoulder straps, but would get the S straps in the future. There are a few tweaks I would like for the Catalyst. Perhaps ULA can make that happen. YMMV
Wayne

The author of the post I was referring to said he preferred the pack to ride away from his back...hence my comment.

Venchka
04-21-2018, 15:02
And a valid comment it is.
The internet has taught me that were all different. Especially when it comes to any piece of gear that comes in contact with our person. Clothes, shoes, packs, sleeping gear. We all have different solutions. Thank goodness the choices are almost endless.
Cheers!
Wayne

Runner2017
04-21-2018, 16:06
Based on PCT Class 2017 Gear Survey https://www.halfwayanywhere.com/trails/pacific-crest-trail/pct-gear-guide-2017/

Thru-hikers showed unusually high dissatisfaction with Zpacks gear in the survey. You may want to read the survey before pulling the trigger.

Sent from my ASUS_Z01HD using Tapatalk

Shrewd
04-21-2018, 19:23
I noticed the same thing amongst AT hikers last year; several people complained about them, or at least werent impressed, though often enough it was small stuff like straps getting twisted in buckles.

Still, its worth mentioning

DuneElliot
04-21-2018, 20:18
Based on PCT Class 2017 Gear Survey https://www.halfwayanywhere.com/trails/pacific-crest-trail/pct-gear-guide-2017/

Thru-hikers showed unusually high dissatisfaction with Zpacks gear in the survey. You may want to read the survey before pulling the trigger.

Sent from my ASUS_Z01HD using Tapatalk

From reading the article it only reads high dissatisfaction with ZPacks sleeping bags...and I'm curious as to why. I also think people seem to expect as much longevity and durability from ultra-light gear because it is more expensive and thus should be getting the same results but lighter. I have had zero problems with any of my much loved ZPacks gear (pack and Duplex) but I am also gentle with it

Runner2017
04-21-2018, 20:38
According to the above mentioned PCT thru-hike gear survey, Zpacks sleeping bag is among the "most disliked gear".

In addition, "For the second year in a row, there were a lot of hikers ANGRY WITH ZPACKS over the the quality their gear" under "GEAR OBSERVATIONS".

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cmoulder
04-22-2018, 08:36
According to the above mentioned PCT thru-hike gear survey, Zpacks sleeping bag is among the "most disliked gear".

In addition, "For the second year in a row, there were a lot of hikers ANGRY WITH ZPACKS over the the quality their gear" under "GEAR OBSERVATIONS".

Sent from my ASUS_Z01HD using Tapatalk

Totally unsubstantiated, not researched and subjective observation on my part, but they're probably using an Arc Blast and expecting the ruggedness and durability they'd get from a Circuit that weighs about twice as much. Ain't. Gunna. Happen. :o

That said, based upon a recent, one-off (hopefully!) anecdotal experience from a close friend of mine, it appears Zpacks might be going downhill. He received an Arc Haul that was extremely pooly assembled with bad stitching (seams ready to come apart right out of the box!), stitching on shoulder strap daisy chains that came apart immediately with NO load on them, and some very ugly do-over stitching to try to cover up some really bad sewing. My friend sent me photos of the carnage, although I'm not going to post them here. Yet.

Zpacks offered to exchange, but my friend was so exasperated from trying to address everything only by e-mail that he just returned it for a refund. While I understand that their policy is to conduct communications by e-mail both for efficiency and to create a record of correspondence, it wouldn't hurt to pick up the phone and talk to people sometimes, especially those with serious, legitimate complaints about workmanship/QC.

I hope Zpacks can 'right the ship' before it takes on more water. I've been a huge Zpacks fan for a few years (since getting into UL in 2013), but that loyalty is contingent upon them holding up their end of the bargain.

nsherry61
04-22-2018, 08:56
Based on PCT Class 2017 Gear Survey https://www.halfwayanywhere.com/trails/pacific-crest-trail/pct-gear-guide-2017/
. . .
Something pretty important to note when reading that survey is that much of the gear that had the most dissatisfaction was also the most popular gear, meaning that they had the most users and the most complaints. So having a large number of complaints was not necessarily because they had more problems than the alternatives, but because there were many times more people using that gear and thus even with 1/2 as many complaints per unit used, they would have more complaints overall.

It's been a while since I read the surveys, so detail may be sketchy, but as I recall, here are some key examples:
Z-rest pads are the most used and most complained about. Not because they are a problem, but because so darn many people are using them and they are not the best choice for everyone, even if they are the best choice for many.
Z-packs 20 degree bag wasn't warm enough, but then, many other 20 degree bags weren't warm enough either, but with fewer people using them, fewer people complained about them.

The real truth behind most of the dissatisfaction numbers wasn't flaws in gear, but that the most popular choices were not necessarily the best choice for many. So, just because everyone claims z-rest pads and 20 degree bags are best, and they may well be best for many if not most people, they are absolutely NOT the best for everyone.

Remember, read you survey numbers with a critical and thoughtful eye.

P.S. As an added note, the gear that is most touted (often for good reasons) is likely to get the most complaints because people that don't really know what they are doing are more likely to buy and use the most touted gear even when it is not best of them and their particular needs. The use of ultralight frameless packs is a good example of this where the loads people are carrying, on average, were the same regardless of whether or not they were carrying an ultralight frameless pack or a more traditional option.

Runner2017
04-22-2018, 09:39
Something pretty important to note when reading that survey is that much of the gear that had the most dissatisfaction was also the most popular gear, meaning that they had the most users and the most complaints. So having a large number of complaints was not necessarily because they had more problems than the alternatives, but because there were many times more people using that gear and thus even with 1/2 as many complaints per unit used, they would have more complaints overall.

It's been a while since I read the surveys, so detail may be sketchy, but as I recall, here are some key examples:
Z-rest pads are the most used and most complained about. Not because they are a problem, but because so darn many people are using them and they are not the best choice for everyone, even if they are the best choice for many.
Z-packs 20 degree bag wasn't warm enough, but then, many other 20 degree bags weren't warm enough either, but with fewer people using them, fewer people complained about them.

The real truth behind most of the dissatisfaction numbers wasn't flaws in gear, but that the most popular choices were not necessarily the best choice for many. So, just because everyone claims z-rest pads and 20 degree bags are best, and they may well be best for many if not most people, they are absolutely NOT the best for everyone.

Remember, read you survey numbers with a critical and thoughtful eye.

P.S. As an added note, the gear that is most touted (often for good reasons) is likely to get the most complaints because people that don't really know what they are doing are more likely to buy and use the most touted gear even when it is not best of them and their particular needs. The use of ultralight frameless packs is a good example of this where the loads people are carrying, on average, were the same regardless of whether or not they were carrying an ultralight frameless pack or a more traditional option."the most dissatisfaction was also the most popular gear, meaning that they had the most users and the most complaints."

Really? The larger the user base, the higher percentage of customer dissatisfaction? This totally defies the math of statistics analysis tho.

Sent from my ASUS_Z01HD using Tapatalk

nsherry61
04-22-2018, 12:24
. . . Really? The larger the user base, the higher percentage of customer dissatisfaction? This totally defies the math of statistics analysis tho. . .
NO. I must have been confusing it what I was saying. I am claiming that, even with a much smaller percentage of dissatisfaction, a larger user base can still show the highest number of people dissatisfied, NOT the highest percentage or "rate".

If that is not clear, I am claiming that if I am selling a super-hiker-widget with a 50% failure rate, and I sell 100 of them, I have 50 dissatisfied customers. If, on the other hand, you are selling an alternative super-hiker-widget with a 10% failure rate, and sell 1,000 of them, you will have twice as many dissatisfied customers as I do even though your widget is 5X more reliable than mine.

So, which widgit should you then buy, the one with the fewest dissatisfied customers or the one with the most dissatisfied customers AND the lowest failure rate?

This particular issue of false perception is rampant in those hiker surveys and touched upon, but not highlighted by the authors. So, reader beware, and don't jump to conclusions to quickly from those numbers.

Runner2017
04-22-2018, 13:42
NO. I must have been confusing it what I was saying. I am claiming that, even with a much smaller percentage of dissatisfaction, a larger user base can still show the highest number of people dissatisfied, NOT the highest percentage or "rate".

But the PCT Class 2017 Gear Survey shows percentage of satisfaction in each gear category.



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BuckeyeBill
04-22-2018, 15:42
Gear, like politics and religion should not be talked about and then only talk about gear if you are asked.

cmoulder
04-23-2018, 06:19
Always reminds me of Mark Twain's "Three Kinds of Lies"... Lies, Damned Lies and Statistics.

And the fact that people who have problems are FAR more vocal than satisfied customers, which is why, for example, we rarely see a post where someone complains that a sleeping bag is too warm while too cold is a monotonously recurring theme.

Venchka
04-23-2018, 11:24
Always reminds me of Mark Twain's "Three Kinds of Lies"... Lies, Damned Lies and Statistics.

And the fact that people who have problems are FAR more vocal than satisfied customers, which is why, for example, we rarely see a post where someone complains that a sleeping bag is too warm while too cold is a monotonously recurring theme.
Operator error is also difficult to gauge.
Wayne

MuddyWaters
04-23-2018, 21:05
Always reminds me of Mark Twain's "Three Kinds of Lies"... Lies, Damned Lies and Statistics.

And the fact that people who have problems are FAR more vocal than satisfied customers, which is why, for example, we rarely see a post where someone complains that a sleeping bag is too warm while too cold is a monotonously recurring theme.
There is also a bias for people to be ...lets say....not objective .....when it comes to rating their personal choices. There's a heavy bias towards people rating their own gear choices satisfactory. Or cars, etc.

If you randomly gave an item to them to evaluate objectively, a lot more problems and dissatisfaction would be reported compared to evaluating items they personally chose for themselves after researching, etc. Especially $$$ items.

cmoulder
04-24-2018, 00:04
Yep, I'd agree with bias favoring personal choices, becoming incrementally stronger as the $$$ commitment increases.

Not in all cases but probably most, maybe 80-90% or higher.

Hey, we're talking statistics, so my wild-assed guess is a good as anyone's, right? :)

Another Kevin
04-28-2018, 10:23
AAnd the fact that people who have problems are FAR more vocal than satisfied customers, which is why, for example, we rarely see a post where someone complains that a sleeping bag is too warm while too cold is a monotonously recurring theme.

I'm sure we could get Coach Lou to complain that his Puma is too warm - he loves rubbing our noses in it. :)

Elaikases
04-28-2018, 11:09
On the bags, the actual numbers jumped out:



SLEEPING BAG
PRICE
TEMP
WEIGHT
FILL
FILL WEIGHT
SATISFACTION


Enlightened Equipment Revelation 20 (https://enlightenedequipment.com/revelation-850dt-20-navy-charcoal/)
$285
20F / -7C
20.2 oz / 572 g
850-fill duck down
13.63 oz / 386 g
80%


Western Mountaineering UltraLitehttps://i1.wp.com/www.avantlink.com/tpv/10060/0/147666/183186/PCT_SURVEY_2017_GEAR/cl/image.png?resize=0%2C0 (https://goo.gl/2GDsRT)
$500
20F / -7C
29 oz / 822 g
850-fill goose down
16 oz / 453.6 g
86%


Zpacks 20 Sleeping Bag (http://www.zpacks.com/quilts/sleepingbag.shtml)
$415
20F / -7C
20 oz / 568 g
900-fill goose down
13.7 oz / 388 g
67%


Marmot Heliumhttps://i1.wp.com/www.avantlink.com/tpv/10248/0/147666/183186/PCT_SURVEY_2017_GEAR/cl/image.png?resize=0%2C0 (https://goo.gl/C8T2HU)
$400
15F / -9C
33 oz / 936 g
800-fill goose down
19.8 oz / 561 g
95%


REI Igneo 17https://i1.wp.com/www.avantlink.com/tpv/10248/0/147666/183186/PCT_SURVEY_2017_GEAR/cl/image.png?resize=0%2C0 (https://goo.gl/bhhAo1)
$300
17F / -8C
31 oz / 879 g
800-fill duck down
15.9 oz / 450 g
94%

Another Kevin
04-28-2018, 12:36
SLEEPING BAG
PRICE
TEMP
WEIGHT
FILL
FILL WEIGHT
SATISFACTION


Enlightened Equipment Revelation 20 (https://enlightenedequipment.com/revelation-850dt-20-navy-charcoal/)
$285
20F / -7C
20.2 oz / 572 g
850-fill duck down
13.63 oz / 386 g
80%


Western Mountaineering UltraLitehttps://i1.wp.com/www.avantlink.com/tpv/10060/0/147666/183186/PCT_SURVEY_2017_GEAR/cl/image.png?resize=0%2C0 (https://goo.gl/2GDsRT)
$500
20F / -7C
29 oz / 822 g
850-fill goose down
16 oz / 453.6 g
86%


Zpacks 20 Sleeping Bag (http://www.zpacks.com/quilts/sleepingbag.shtml)
$415
20F / -7C
20 oz / 568 g
900-fill goose down
13.7 oz / 388 g
67%


Marmot Heliumhttps://i1.wp.com/www.avantlink.com/tpv/10248/0/147666/183186/PCT_SURVEY_2017_GEAR/cl/image.png?resize=0%2C0 (https://goo.gl/C8T2HU)
$400
15F / -9C
33 oz / 936 g
800-fill goose down
19.8 oz / 561 g
95%


REI Igneo 17https://i1.wp.com/www.avantlink.com/tpv/10248/0/147666/183186/PCT_SURVEY_2017_GEAR/cl/image.png?resize=0%2C0 (https://goo.gl/bhhAo1)
$300
17F / -8C
31 oz / 879 g
800-fill duck down
15.9 oz / 450 g
94%





Heh. No wonder so many of us have kept our 'starter' bags - mine is an REI Radiant (older model, similar to the Igneo); my daughter has whatever EMS's equivalent was about ten years ago; PMags has a Kelty Cosmic. Sure, they're a few ounces heavier than the fancier bags, but these less expensive bags give fine service, and are less finicky.

Replacing my Radiant isn't high on my priority list. The cool kids don't use a cheap bag like these, but I've never been a cool kid.

cmoulder
04-30-2018, 07:05
I'm sure we could get Coach Lou to complain that his Puma is too warm - he loves rubbing our noses in it. :)

lol, well if anybody weren't warm in that bag (rated -25F) it would be time to go home. :)

I used to have one and used it in the Adirondacks once at -33F (official temp in Keene... I didn't have a thermometer that goes that low!)

Femadog
04-30-2018, 09:00
Just a few observations after just getting off the AT for 2 weeks. I loked at bunch of pack options and ended up getting an ULA Ohm. I got the S Straps and like them a lot. ULA was great at helping me get the right combination of pack and hip belt. I tried a variety of Osprey and while not bad, I preferred the ride of the ULA. Either were better than the old NF Snow Leopard I used when I did the Long Trail back in the early 80's.

I hear a lot of comments about the ULA being hot versus the Ospreys , not ventilating and absorbing sweat, blah, blah, blah. I have a lot of miles on mine and I don't ever feel like it doesn't have adequate ventilation. Other than than the hip belt, I only notice it contacting my back at a small spot near my shoulder blades and I adjust the pack so it just lightly touches as I walk for the most part. My maximum weight probably runs around 25 pounds with a week of food.

Just my experience. I wouldn't avoid the ULA just on the back ventilation concern. YMMV