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johnnyjohnson2043
05-13-2018, 16:15
I've been going through my gear for next year's thru-hike attempt and have whittled it all down to a base weight of about 16 lbs. Ultimately I'd love to be under 15 lbs if possible but I'm having a hard time thinking of ways to shave off those last few ounces. I know that I could easily just buy a new tent to save on weight but I love my Big Agnes Fly Creek UL1 and would rather not spend the money on something lighter right now. What are the craziest things you've done to cut down on pack weight? I'm willing to try anything. I might even think about cutting down my pack straps for an ounce or two. Thanks!

DuneElliot
05-13-2018, 16:40
An itemized gear list would help immensely if you want ideas to cut down on weight. You already have one of the lightest tents out there so you wouldn't be saving much even with a Duplex.

johnnyjohnson2043
05-13-2018, 17:19
An itemized gear list would help immensely if you want ideas to cut down on weight. You already have one of the lightest tents out there so you wouldn't be saving much even with a Duplex.

I'll get one written up as soon as I can but as I was looking at my gear I realized that there are some items such as toothpaste and soap that I shouldn't have included in my base weight. That helps a little at least...

johnnyjohnson2043
05-13-2018, 17:37
I hope I'm not missing anything but here is the list that I was able to put together...



Equipment (Base)

Specifics

Buy (Y/N)?

Weight (oz)



Backpack (big enough for a bear canister, where mandated)

GoLite Jam

N


26.2


Pack raincover

Etowah Gear

N


3.2


Tent suited to terrain, with guylines and repair sleeve

Big Agnes Fly Creek UL1

N


41.2


Sleeping bag suitable for wet weather and anticipated temperatures

REI Halo 40+

N


24.4


Sleeping pad

Therm-A-Rest Z Lite

N


9


Multifunction watch


N


2


Knife or multi-tool

Gerber

N


1.4


Map(s) and guidebook(s) or route description

AT Data Book

N


3.8








LED headlamp with extra batteries

Petzl Tikka

N


3.4


Water filter and backup treatment system

Katadyn Hiker Pro

N


12.4


Stove

Snow Peak Giga Power

Y*


3


Cookset, dishes, bowls, utensils, cups (measuring/drinking)

Snow Peak Titanium

N


4


Nylon cord (at least 60 feet)

Nylon Cord

N


2.2


Fire starter (for emergency survival fire)

Survival Spark Magnesium Survival Fire Starter with Compass and Whistle and Kindling

N


1.6


Clothing and Footwear






Long-sleeve shirt

Patagonia Long-sleeve shirt

N


9.8


Quick-drying shorts

Brooks Sherpa Shorts

N




Fleece jacket or vest, or insulated jacket or vest

The North Face Men's Denali 2 Jacket

N


22


Waterproof/breathable rain jacket suitable for the conditions

Mountain Hardwear Ghost Lite Jacket

N


3


Waterproof/breathable rain pants suitable for the conditions

REI Rain Paints

N


6


Bandana

Bandana

N


1.4


Winter hat

Beanie

N


3


Gloves or mittens

Mountain Hardwear Gloves

N


1.6


Sandals (for fording streams and relaxing in camp) or water shoes

Merrell Trail Gloves

N


16


Wicking, quick-drying underwear

ExOfficio Give-N-Go Boxer Briefs

Y


2.8


Wicking, quick-drying long underwear

Patagonia Capilene

N


12.4


Sanitation trowel

GSI Products

N


3


First-aid kit (see our First-Aid Checklist)


N


2.5


Quick-drying towel

Sea to Summit Tek-Towel

N


4.8


Camera or video cam and extra memory cards


N


4.3


Cell phone (don’t rely on service) w/charger

Samsung LG G5

N


8


Journal and pen


Y


2


Credit card; cash for layover days and camping fees


N


1


Stuff sack, dry bag or rodent-resistant food sack

20 L Sea-to-Summit Ultra-Sil Nano

Y


1.3


Misc.






Wicking, quick-drying T-shirt

GoLite...



2.6


Carabiner

Black Diamond...



1


Comb

Ace...



0.2


Wicking, quick-drying underwear

ExOfficio Give-N-Go Boxer Briefs

Y


2.8


Wicking, quick-drying long underwear

Patagonia Capilene

N


12.4








Total Weight




261.7

johnnyjohnson2043
05-13-2018, 17:39
Ignore the "Buy" section...I forgot to delete that when I posted.

johnnyjohnson2043
05-13-2018, 17:48
And I also realized that there are a couple of duplicates...ignore those.

johnnyjohnson2043
05-13-2018, 17:52
In fact, here's a cleaner one



Equipment (Base)
Specifics
Weight (oz)


Backpack (big enough for a bear canister, where mandated)
GoLite Jam
26.2


Pack raincover
Etowah Gear
3.2


Tent suited to terrain, with guylines and repair sleeve
Big Agnes Fly Creek UL1
41.2


Sleeping bag suitable for wet weather and anticipated temperatures
REI Halo 40+
24.4


Sleeping pad
Therm-A-Rest Z Lite
9


Multifunction watch

2


Knife or multi-tool
Gerber
1.4


Map(s) and guidebook(s) or route description
AT Data Book
3.8


LED headlamp with extra batteries
Petzl Tikka
3.4


Water filter and backup treatment system
Katadyn Hiker Pro
12.4


Stove
Snow Peak Giga Power
3


Cookset, dishes, bowls, utensils, cups (measuring/drinking)
Snow Peak Titanium
4


Nylon cord (at least 60 feet)
Nylon Cord
2.2


Fire starter (for emergency survival fire)
Survival Spark Magnesium Survival Fire Starter with Compass and Whistle and Kindling
1.6


Credit card; cash for layover days and camping fees

1


Carabiner
Black Diamond...
1


Comb
Ace...
0.2


Camera or video cam and extra memory cards

4.3


Cell phone (don’t rely on service) w/charger
Samsung LG G5
8


Journal and pen

2


Quick-drying towel
Sea to Summit Tek-Towel
4.8


Sanitation trowel
GSI Products
3


First-aid kit (see our First-Aid Checklist)

2.5


Long-sleeve shirt
Patagonia Long-sleeve shirt
9.8


Quick-drying shorts
Brooks Sherpa Shorts



Fleece jacket or vest, or insulated jacket or vest
The North Face Men's Denali 2 Jacket
22


Waterproof/breathable rain jacket suitable for the conditions
Mountain Hardwear Ghost Lite Jacket
3


Waterproof/breathable rain pants suitable for the conditions
REI Rain Paints
6


Bandana
Bandana
1.4


Winter hat
Beanie
3


Gloves or mittens
Mountain Hardwear Gloves
1.6


Sandals (for fording streams and relaxing in camp) or water shoes
Merrell Trail Gloves
16


Wicking, quick-drying underwear
ExOfficio Give-N-Go Boxer Briefs
2.8


Wicking, quick-drying long underwear
Patagonia Capilene
12.4


Wicking, quick-drying T-shirt
GoLite...
2.6


Total

245.2

Sarcasm the elf
05-13-2018, 18:26
Suggestions/Low hang fruit I see on the list:

- Consider Ditching the Merrill Trail Gloves, not everyone carries camp shoes and itís an easy 16oz saved.
- Consider a Deuce of SpadesĒ backpacker trowel instead, it weighs 0.6oz.
- Does your phone take good enough photos to make the separate camera unnecessary?
- A sawyer squeeze filter is considerably lighter than the Hiker Pro you have, though the Hiker pro is nice to have at smaller watee sources due to itís hose and pump.
- While the Denali jacket is perfectly fine, a UL down jacket like the Mountain Hardware Ghost Whisperer can weigh as little as 7oz. This is an expensive item, but if you happen to see one on clearance (mine was around $115), consider snagging it.

- Personal preference, but I prefer using a dish sponge over a backpacker towel, itís cheaper and hardly weighs anything.

Burrhead
05-13-2018, 19:35
I don't know when you plan on leaving or what direction you are going in but the 40 degree sleeping bag is going to be rough until about the middle of May on a NOBO hike.

fiddlehead
05-13-2018, 20:19
My pack weight is around 12 lbs.
Some things that you carry that I don't: Headlamp (I only carry a small PhotonII light and it's all I've needed for the last few thru's)
Thermo-rest: I only use a lightweight foam pad (those blow-up mattresses are heavy)
Knife; I used to only carry a razor blade but now have one of those smallest swiss army knives with the little scissors on them
Your cookit says you have a bowl? For what?
journal pen? (you have a phone, get an app that let's you make notes)
video camera? (again you have a phone)
water filter. I just carry tablets and rarely use them
trowel: I use a rock and/or stick
sandals or camp shoes (I don't spend a lot of time in camp and don't remember any fords until Maine anyway).
dishes, bowls, utensils, cups : what is this? Get a styrofoam coffee cup and the lightest weight spoon you can find. cooking pot is my dish/bowl
quick drying towel: ???

If you make it all the way, chances are you'll probably get rid of at least half of that stuff anyway.

Lone Wolf
05-13-2018, 21:25
I've been going through my gear for next year's thru-hike attempt and have whittled it all down to a base weight of about 16 lbs. Ultimately I'd love to be under 15 lbs if possible but I'm having a hard time thinking of ways to shave off those last few ounces. I know that I could easily just buy a new tent to save on weight but I love my Big Agnes Fly Creek UL1 and would rather not spend the money on something lighter right now. What are the craziest things you've done to cut down on pack weight? I'm willing to try anything. I might even think about cutting down my pack straps for an ounce or two. Thanks!

folks try to slackpack all the way. most don't make it. it ain't about pack weight for success. your mental strength is what's gonna get you there

chknfngrs
05-13-2018, 21:30
Sawyer squeeze is 3 oz

Venchka
05-13-2018, 21:49
I'll get one written up as soon as I can but as I was looking at my gear I realized that there are some items such as toothpaste and soap that I shouldn't have included in my base weight. That helps a little at least...
Toothpaste and soap arenít going to carry themselves.
Skin out. Everything. Food and the containers holding the food. Same for water. Youíre going to start with more food than you need and eventually not carry as much as you need.
Your all up on the trail weight has to be carried up the approach trail and eventually to main. What list you put things in wonít get you to Maine any easier.
Hereís a Stone Age tip that is still true today:
ďDonít carry more clothes than you can wear all at once to sleep in on the coldest night you anticipate.Ē Colin Fletcher.
Good luck!
Wayne

cmoulder
05-14-2018, 08:37
Whether or not somebody wants to play the gram-counting game matters not to me, but the "pesky ounces" in the title suggests the OP does.

So, as a certified gram weenie, those numbers don't look kosher to me — nothing weighs exactly 6 oz.

Get a good scale (accurate to at least 1 g), use an app like Geargrams or Lighterpack, and come up with a complete list, not this rough draft that's missing a lot of stuff.

Then get out and do some actual 2- or 3-night 'shakedown cruises' with this kit to become familar with it.

chknfngrs
05-14-2018, 09:53
B o o m ! !



whether or not somebody wants to play the gram-counting game matters not to me, but the "pesky ounces" in the title suggests the op does.

So, as a certified gram weenie, those numbers don't look kosher to me — nothing weighs exactly 6 oz.

Get a good scale (accurate to at least 1 g), use an app like geargrams or lighterpack, and come up with a complete list, not this rough draft that's missing a lot of stuff.

Then get out and do some actual 2- or 3-night 'shakedown cruises' with this kit to become familar with it.

cmoulder
05-14-2018, 10:35
Reality check.

Gambit McCrae
05-14-2018, 11:11
Ditch the filter and get a sawyer, easy oz to lose there. This pack weight I am assuming is for a march 1st start(may have already been mentioned), so look forward to dropping some serious lbs when sending winter stuff home

bamboo bob
05-14-2018, 15:59
You can easily get a much lighter tent from Lightheart or Tarptent also a Sawyer is much lighter than any pump. Don't get sucked into a MIni , get a regular size, the Mini takes a longtime to fill a bottle.

Kaptainkriz
05-14-2018, 17:28
What he said...

Whether or not somebody wants to play the gram-counting game matters not to me, but the "pesky ounces" in the title suggests the OP does.

So, as a certified gram weenie, those numbers don't look kosher to me — nothing weighs exactly 6 oz.

Get a good scale (accurate to at least 1 g), use an app like Geargrams or Lighterpack, and come up with a complete list, not this rough draft that's missing a lot of stuff.

Then get out and do some actual 2- or 3-night 'shakedown cruises' with this kit to become familar with it.

BowGal
05-14-2018, 18:18
Hope I don’t sabotage the OP’s post, but I too plan to hike next year...and am looking for ways to reduce weight.
I always hear that ones tent can be replaced with the popular ultra-light tents and save weight. My tent setup (Marmot 2P UL) plus footprint and 4 tent pegs comes in at 3.5lbs. I’ve looked at other tents like TarpTent...and just can’t justify spending $500 to save maybe 1 lb. I’ve wanted to go the hammock route...but again, when you factor in top quilt, underquilt, pad, all the rope plus the hammock...it surely is over 3 lbs.
I think where I’m going to cut weight is clothing...but I’m planning a March 1 start date...and would rather have too much at the start than not enough. I can always send clothes home as I progress.

BowGal
05-14-2018, 18:19
Hope I donít sabotage the OPís post, but I too plan to hike next year...and am looking for ways to reduce weight.
I always hear that ones tent can be replaced with the popular ultra-light tents and save weight. My tent setup (Marmot 2P UL) plus footprint and 4 tent pegs comes in at 3.5lbs. Iíve looked at other tents like TarpTent...and just canít justify spending $500 to save maybe 1 lb. Iíve wanted to go the hammock route...but again, when you factor in top quilt, underquilt, pad, all the rope plus the hammock...it surely is over 3 lbs.
I think where Iím going to cut weight is clothing...but Iím planning a March 1 start date...and would rather have too much at the start than not enough. I can always send clothes home as I progress.

lonehiker
05-14-2018, 18:46
Easiest way to shave pesky ounces (pounds rather) is to carry less food. People new to LDH almost always carry too much food. You should go into your resupply out of food. The idea of carrying a day extra is silly. You will not die if you miss a meal or two. Next way to save pounds is to carry less water. On trails that generally have frequent water sources, like the AT, you can get away with carrying smaller amounts of water. People worry about an ounce or two when they can save over 2 pounds by carrying one less quart of water.

fiddlehead
05-14-2018, 20:11
That's good advice (above) and so true.

reppans
05-14-2018, 20:41
...I always hear that ones tent can be replaced with the popular ultra-light tents and save weight. My tent setup (Marmot 2P UL) plus footprint and 4 tent pegs comes in at 3.5lbs. Iíve looked at other tents like TarpTent...and just canít justify spending $500 to save maybe 1 lb...

How about if you could double that weight savings for half the price (~2lbs for $250)? And much less $$ if the old tent is worth something in the secondary market. I went from a BA Fly Creek UL2 (47oz) to a SMD Gatewood Cape/Serenity NetTent (27oz) and feel I have improved every shelter aspect except free-standing... ie, weight, pack space, vestibule, interior, bug/rain protection, and set-up/take-down ease/speed.

gracebowen
05-15-2018, 01:08
There's a tent for sale here that weighs about half of yours. I think it's $75

BowGal
05-15-2018, 06:18
How about if you could double that weight savings for half the price (~2lbs for $250)? And much less $$ if the old tent is worth something in the secondary market. I went from a BA Fly Creek UL2 (47oz) to a SMD Gatewood Cape/Serenity NetTent (27oz) and feel I have improved every shelter aspect except free-standing... ie, weight, pack space, vestibule, interior, bug/rain protection, and set-up/take-down ease/speed.

Thank you. I looked at this, and it’s interesting. My fear is wearing the cape when it’s raining, snagging it on a branch.

chknfngrs
05-15-2018, 06:52
I wouldn’t bother wearing the gatewood and dedicate it shelter. Frog tog for your raincoat

BowGal
05-15-2018, 07:22
I wouldn’t bother wearing the gatewood and dedicate it shelter. Frog tog for your raincoat

True...just as I posted my reply, I realized I would never use it as a poncho.
I’m back on SMD site...giving it another look.

Jayne
05-15-2018, 11:06
I’ve wanted to go the hammock route...but again, when you factor in top quilt, underquilt, pad, all the rope plus the hammock...it surely is over 3 lbs.

A tent, sleeping pad, ground cloth, tent pegs, lines, and sleeping bag can easily be over 3 lbs too. Hammock set ups can't get as light as a tarp only set up but the quality of sleep is just so much better for me in hammock. I'm at right about 3.5 lbs for tarp, lines, pegs, hammock, stuff, top and bottom quilts, and a stuff sack. Total base weight is 13.9 lbs for my May section hike. I'm all for reducing weight but at a certain point is not worth the reduction in comfort to me.

JPritch
05-15-2018, 12:54
You could shave an entire POUND with a new tent....I'm just sayin'. Zpacks *cough*. And Sawyer Squeeze filter could get you a few ounces.

cmoulder
05-15-2018, 16:36
30deg top quilt 13.5oz (EE Enigma H.E. 7D 950fp), 30deg under quilt 11oz (EE Revolt), cuben hex tarp 7oz (Hammock Gear), Dutchware half wit hammock 10oz, suspension 3oz, total 45.5oz (2lb 13.5oz).

At the cutting edge, it's getting mighty competitive. ;)

QiWiz
05-18-2018, 12:45
So, ditch the sandals/water shoes, cook with Esbit rather than a canister stove, go with a lighter jacket than the Denali, switch to the Petzl eLite, use a squeeze filer or Aqua Mira for water treatment, and get a nice UL titanium trowel, and you can easily go down 2-3 pounds.

cmoulder
05-18-2018, 16:41
So, ditch the sandals/water shoes, cook with Esbit rather than a canister stove, go with a lighter jacket than the Denali, switch to the Petzl eLite, use a squeeze filer or Aqua Mira for water treatment, and get a nice UL titanium trowel, and you can easily go down 2-3 pounds.
+1

And with a complete list, there's bound to be lots more. :sun

shelb
05-19-2018, 00:12
Easiest way to shave pesky ounces (pounds rather) is to carry less food. People new to LDH almost always carry too much food. ............ Next way to save pounds is to carry less water.

So True! For the majority of the AT, no one needs to carry more than 4 days of food at anytime. Only carry one day of water. Look at your water sources to determine this... Make sure to "camel up" at water sources to make it easier to keep going.

KCNC
05-19-2018, 10:54
If you want camp shoes check out Xero - a pair of their sport sandals is about 11 ounces. Others have made excellent points on various items.

What do *you* weigh? If you're 150 then the difference between 15 and 16lbs means something. If you're 250 it means something else.

My philosophy is that your gear needs to be heavy enough to keep you safe and comfortable. That determination is completely personal.

shelb
05-19-2018, 23:28
Quick question... I am always confused by what is meant by "base-weight" versus other weights. Since I only hike in summer on the AT, I figure I should go by "skin-out weight" - and by that, I figure everything I need for five days (clothes on my body, shoes on my feet, poles in my hands, backpack with all my belongings and five days of food and ONE day of water - 2L - because I will find more water each day).

If I am just under 24# for this, am I doing well? ???? I have been there for the past two years, but I am thinking I could shave a pound off with a better tent, such s the one the OP has...

Deacon
05-20-2018, 20:36
Quick question... I am always confused by what is meant by "base-weight" versus other weights. Since I only hike in summer on the AT, I figure I should go by "skin-out weight" - and by that, I figure everything I need for five days (clothes on my body, shoes on my feet, poles in my hands, backpack with all my belongings and five days of food and ONE day of water - 2L - because I will find more water each day).

If I am just under 24# for this, am I doing well? ???? I have been there for the past two years, but I am thinking I could shave a pound off with a better tent, such s the one the OP has...

If youíre at 24 lbs. with five days of food, that is excellent. If you are counting the weight of your poles, I say you should not. Whatís important is the weight on your back.

Poles actually counter the burden on your back by giving yourself extra support.

For that matter why count the clothes worn. We donít give the weight of clothes a second thought normally.

The whole purpose is to examine the additional weight above no pack at all, as if you were out day hiking.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

Malto
05-20-2018, 21:22
I can't believe the new Jams weigh 26+ oz. We used to strip those down to under a pound. I went from a Jam to an MLD Burn eight years ago which is smaller but well under a pound. While the Burn may be too small for you, there are much lighter packs that will carry every bit as well as a Jam.