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tschertz
06-13-2018, 23:01
Well what can I say, Iím pretty darn new to the whole backpack camping. So far my trips have been along the lines of 2 nighters in the UP of Michigan on very budget gear (borrowed pack, Walmart tent, etc)


I leave for RMNP in less than a month for 5 nights backcountry and I am in a pickle.

Backpack: I purchased a mountaintop 70+10L and Iím afraid itís going to fail me. Things I enjoy about it: straps on the top for a pad and straps on the bottom for your tent. The inside seems extremely narrow for 70L pack.
I canít spend 300 on a new pack but saw the Kelty Coyote 80 for $200...however, really no outside straps- where would one fit a large tent and sleeping pad?


Tent: my 2p Walmart tent works fine but again, itís too heavy and the stuff sack is huge. Iím in need of something lighter without breaking the bank, perhaps $150ish? Any ideas?


Not concerned with my GSI cookware or my platypus water filter, but very concerned with the above 2.

Any suggestions would be fantastic!


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CalebJ
06-14-2018, 00:09
Is the tent just for you?

OCDave
06-14-2018, 00:47
For 5 days, use what you have. Learn what you like and don't like about your gear. Spend $150 now and you're likely going to make another $150 mistake.


My first 5 day trip was with a rented Eureka Timberline tent and Low grade external frame pack loaded to well beyond 50 lbs. Mistake or learning opportunity? It just depends upon your perspective.

HooKooDooKu
06-14-2018, 00:50
General thought based on experience... A 70L-80L is too much pack unless you're needing space for 10 days of supplies. So if you already have a 70L pack, don't waste your time buying yet another pack.

If you need a tent for one person, I love my BA Copper Spur UL2. But it's a very expensive tent. But for about $120 or less, you can get a Kelty Salida 2. It's the same size as the Copper Spur except for only 1 door and 1 vestibule. The Copper Spur weights less than 3lbs while the Salida is near 5lbs... but costs so much less.

If you need a tent for two persons, I would recommend the Kelty Gunnison 2 or Kelty Gunnison 3 at Sierra Trading Post because they are only about $120. They are both relatively heavy, but they are not so bad when you consider you're talking about 1 tent for 2 people. 2 people can confortably fit in the Gunnison 2, and the Gunnison 3 would give tons of space for 2 and all their gear.

Skip the Platypus Filter and use the Sawyer Squeeze or Mini instead. The mini is only $20, so I usually buy a new one at the beginning of the year on principle (even though they should last for years if taken care of).

Odd Man Out
06-14-2018, 00:52
Congratulations - You are on the right path. The biggest mistake people make is to think they are not making mistakes.

For a compact affordable tent (assuming this is for one person) you could consider the Six Moon Designs Skyscape Scout

https://www.backcountrygear.com/skyscape-scout-six-moon-designs-tent.html

Do you trek with trekking poles? If not, you would need to get two tent poles to set this up, sold separately. I used to have the slightly lighter version of this tent (Trekker) until I moved "up" to a Tarptent Notch. I like the Notch a bit better, but since you were on a tight budget, I suggest the Scout. It is a very good quality tent for not much money. Understand that one-person tents can be very tight on space inside if you are used to a 2 person tent. You have to decide where you priorities lie.

As for the pack, you could consider a new strategy that does not involve strapping things to your pack. I was on a 4 day trip across Pictured Rocks NL (in MI's UP - is that one you did?) with a friend who had his old external frame pack from the 1970's. I had an Elemental Horizons Kalais. As a lightweight backpacker, I had very little gear to pack: Besides my sleeping gear, food bag, and clothes bag, there wasn't much to pack. The tent went in a pouch on the back of the pack. I was packed in about 2 minutes and then sat around camp for an hour while my friend strapped everything to the outside of his pack. Then it was so heavy, I had to help him put it on. Then when we took a break, he had to unstrap everything so he could get to his snack food in the pack.

The REI Flash is on sale in your price range. I have not used it, but it is a very popular lightweight pack. It is somewhat smaller than the ones you suggested, but having a smaller pack can help you trim your gear kit. Remember the lightest and cheapest gear is the gear that is not in your pack.

https://www.rei.com/product/893906/rei-co-op-flash-65-pack

MuddyWaters
06-14-2018, 04:09
It all depends on how much you intend to hike
Versus how much you intend to camp

Heavy gear is perfectly acceptable for 5 to 7 miles a day
This would be the normal type of hiking that Scouts would do, or people that hype short distances in to places and camp for a couple of days

When you want to hike 20 miles a day, you need less weight. A lot less.

There's not any mistakes, as long as gear isn't poor quality that's going to fail on you. It's just gear intended for different purposes.

Without describing your intended amounts of hiking no one can really comment on the suitability of your gear. Five nights in the backcountry doesn't tell anything. That might be two miles from a trailhead.

red5
06-14-2018, 05:24
Buy once cry once.

I bought a lot of gear and ended up replacing quite a lot of it over the next year or two. I went for smaller lighter less volume items. I wish I would have just sprung for the more expensive options at first.

So yeah, $200 on a quilt, $300 on a tent, $100 on a pad, $200 on a backpack (and all the other smaller stuff) can add up quick, very quick. But if this turns out to be a life long passion then it'll be worth it.

Malto
06-14-2018, 05:53
Without seeing a complete gear list we can't say a 70L pack is too large. Based on the Walmart tent I suspect you have a lot of bulky gear. Post a complete gear list and you will likely get some very actionable ways of making this work. I would not go out and invest in a lot of shiny new gear unless you know you are going to be doing this for a while.

Cheyou
06-14-2018, 06:15
Get a cheep blue 9’ x 9’ blue tarp. Post Gear list
Thom

egilbe
06-14-2018, 06:57
As I keep telling my GF, one cannot have enough packs. Mine Rin from a 25 litter LL Bean technical day pack to a $550 Cuban fiber, external framed, Seek Outside Unaweep. I buy my packs on sale, when I see a good deal, or last year's models on clearance. Most of my packs I paid $100 or less. I have a couple six moon design packs, an REI Flash 45, a Deuter 45+10 I still haven't used.

You want to spend the money on your big 3 since that's where most of your weight will be. Tent, or tarp, sleep system, pack you purchase last so you can make sure all your gear fits in it.

My two person 20* quilt and two person air mattress was almost $1000, but it gets used quite often. Well worth the money.

T.S.Kobzol
06-14-2018, 08:07
I wouldn't call them mistakes. We've all been there. Use it, evaluate it for the type of trip you are on and then buy more gear if your current gear does not work for the type of trip you want to be on next.

Repeat + Repeat + Repeat = Experience

CalebJ
06-14-2018, 09:01
If you wanted to keep it simple, you can grab a much smaller tent just for yourself very inexpensively. One example is a Eureka Solitaire. Brand new, you can buy them for less than $90. Total packed weight is comfortably under 3 pounds. That would save you a good bit of space and weight, and worst case you can sell it afterwards without losing a significant amount of money.

colorado_rob
06-14-2018, 09:01
I agree with HooKooDooKu's comment below, keep the backpack, replace the tent, plenty of inexpensive options. What are you using for a sleeping pad and bag? Hugely important.

Where are you going in RMNP for 5 days? Just curious. The place can be quite harsh weather-wise for someone with very little experience. Not meaning to scare you, but Why RMNP? Gorgeous, but crowded and heavily restricted, etc.

Slo-go'en
06-14-2018, 09:44
One other complication, a bear canister is required in the park. I didn't see on the web site if you can rent/borrow one from the park, you might have to buy one. Now the question is will it fit into your pack along with all the other bulky items you have?

The primary weather event will be afternoon thunderstorms. Bugs aren't a big issue, so this is one area where a tarp is a good choice and you probably only need it to hide under to wait out those afternoon storms.

If your up at 9-10,000 feet, it gets real hard to breath. If you have a heavy pack, it gets even harder.

tschertz
06-14-2018, 09:57
Without seeing a complete gear list we can't say a 70L pack is too large. Based on the Walmart tent I suspect you have a lot of bulky gear. Post a complete gear list and you will likely get some very actionable ways of making this work. I would not go out and invest in a lot of shiny new gear unless you know you are going to be doing this for a while.

Thanks everyone for all the feedback! RMNP was a cheap camping trip overall for flights, figured we would give it a shot. My buddy has been to both RMNP and glacier national, rmnp was much cheaper and Iím no die hard camper so Iím fine with it.
We are staying at Moraine the first night to get acclimated, then hiking anywhere between 3.5-10 miles each day which include lower granite falls, north inlet junction, pine mountain, and summer land park.


My gear list thus far:

Pack: mountaintop 70+10L from amazon. Seems very narrow but pockets and straps everywhere. Decent review for a low quality pack.

Tent: Walmart Ozark Trail 2p tent. Bulky in terms of stuff sack...think of your normal Walmart tent bag. Probably 5.5-6.25 pounds. I enjoy the 2P tents-roomy

Cookware: GSI Pinnacle Dualist. Compact and fairly lightweight - happy with this.

Sleep pad: Amazon OutdoorsManLab self inflating with pillow. 2.2 lbs but it doesnít compress small- like the size of an NFL football 13x6.5x6.5

Water filter: I have the Sawyer squeeze but it froze so I should purchase a new one. Didnít like the hassle of the squeeze - want he platypus 2L for ease of use



Food will go in bear canister.

Extras will be camp shoes, cheap trekking poles, water bottle, headband light, clothes bag, small medical kit, few toiletries, etc..





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Feral Bill
06-14-2018, 10:47
You will have a heavy pack. Do not let that stop you. Enjoy your trip and consider it a learning experience. If you have not used the tent in serious rain try it under a lawn sprinkler.

tschertz
06-14-2018, 11:02
Forgot to add my sleeping bag is a Rovor Buhl. Just over 2 pounds and compresses decently (less than a foot Lon with 7 diameter)

Fits in the bottom of the pack just fine.

Think my real concern is the tent, pack, and sleeping mat but will wait for all your advice!


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LittleRock
06-14-2018, 11:29
For 5 days, use what you have. Learn what you like and don't like about your gear. Spend $150 now and you're likely going to make another $150 mistake.
This says it perfectly. The best way to figure out what gear you need to replace is to spend more time with the gear you have. If the only issue is it's heavy or uncomfortable, it's not going to kill you.

When I started doing serious backpacking 10 years ago, my pack weighed close to 50 lbs for a 5-day trip. It was uncomfortable but it worked and didn't ruin the experience for me. Over time I've replaced nearly all of it, one piece at a time. Never had to break the bank and buy a bunch of stuff at once. Now my pack is more like 30 lbs. starting out on a 5-day trip.

Berserker
06-14-2018, 12:09
Food will go in bear canister.
Just a piece of advice. Since you stated you don't have a lot of experience, you'll want to mess around with the canister a bit if you have access to it before you go on your trip. Packing a bear can is a bit of an art form, and there's certain food choices that make it easier to get more days of food into a canister.

HooKooDooKu
06-14-2018, 12:35
Just a piece of advice. Since you stated you don't have a lot of experience, you'll want to mess around with the canister a bit if you have access to it before you go on your trip. Packing a bear can is a bit of an art form, and there's certain food choices that make it easier to get more days of food into a canister.
Agree... when I was planning for a JMT thru hike and had decided on the Bearikade Expedition, I spent the $375 to be able to have the bear canister in hand well before the trip rather than the option of renting one for much less. Glad I did because it was the cause of me realizing my REI Flash was NOT going to handle that size canister and had to buy a larger pack.

tschertz
06-14-2018, 13:12
Again, thanks for all the info. I most likely will be keeping my pack but need to look for a smaller footprint tent and sleeping pad.

Both of those items are just too bulky in their stuff sack.

Any ideas for a sleeping pad that can compress down fairly well (which isnít the size of a nfl football) and a decent cost? Donít need a 4 season pad, just something thatís decently comfy and is small when compressed.


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CalebJ
06-14-2018, 13:22
Any of the newer non self inflating pods pack down shockingly well. Exped Synmat, Thermarest NeoAir, etc.

Burrhead
06-14-2018, 13:41
Upgrade if you want to and can afford it. If you decide to stick with the wal mart tent I would recommend seam sealing it. My opinion is to just go and have fun. Your going to be with someone that has some experience so they hopefully can keep you out of trouble. Most of us started with cheap, heavy gear and survived. The biggest mistake I am seeing is picking up backpacking as a hobby. You can plan on spending obscene amounts of money on gear and clothes. Driving through the night to the middle of nowhere. walking until every muscle is sore. Being harassed by bugs, mice, possums, raccoons, skunks, snakes and bears. And spending long hours being too hot...too cold...too wet or too dry. You will also get to watch your productivity at home and work plummet as you spend countless hours reading and replying to backpacking forums. Welcome to the family!

Odd Man Out
06-14-2018, 15:44
For a sleeping pad, consider a Klymit Static V. I have a regular static V for summer use. For three seasons, I would recommend the insulated one. It's inflateable, so it rolls up very small in the pack. Very comfy yet affordable for a name brand pad.

Time Zone
06-14-2018, 16:10
For a sleeping pad, consider a Klymit Static V. I have a regular static V for summer use. For three seasons, I would recommend the insulated one. It's inflateable, so it rolls up very small in the pack. Very comfy yet affordable for a name brand pad.

As inflatable pads go, it has its merits. It packs small and is nowhere near as noisy as the bag o' chips Neoairs. Great price too. However, in my experience, they were not 72" long, they were 68-70 inches long. If you're tall, that's a factor to consider.

Slo-go'en
06-14-2018, 16:15
I browsed ebay for tents to see what is commonly available. It seems you get what you pay for. Lots of Ozark Outdoors. One possible solution would be a bug bivy and tarp. That combination can be found for not a lot of money, is reasonably light and compact. Most of the tents under $100 were still 3-4 pounds and bulky. Best deals are shipped from China, but you probably don't have enough time to wait for shipping, which can be 3-4 weeks.

CalebJ
06-14-2018, 16:22
That's one of the reasons I mentioned the Solitaire. Years ago I used a Gossamer for quite a while. It held up well and kept me dry. It's a shame they dropped the aluminum poles when they introduced the near identical Solitaire.

Also the cheap (alibaba, etc) stuff from China is junk. Quick knock offs of intellectual property without actually matching the original fabric specs or finishing quality.

nsherry61
06-14-2018, 16:31
You've got a bunch of equipment. You don't know if it will do what you want of it to or not. You are uncertain about its reliability.

Go use what you have. Learn what works and doesn't work, and why. Then go spend more money to address the key concerns you learn about on this trip.

Make sure you have a needle and thread, some safety pins and duct tape and maybe even some Tenacious tape. Then, you should be able to fix most problems that are likely to arise at least well enough to get by.

If you are in high wind or high rainfall, I would be concerned about an Ozark Trail tent. The rest of your stuff may be heavier and bulkier than fancier gear, but it's not going to outright fail in a catastrophic way.

I would not put your pad on the high priority spending list, as again, it may be heavy and bulky, but it wont kill you. If there is a chance of high winds and heavy weather, a failed shelter can become catastrophic.

Odd Man Out
06-14-2018, 18:45
As inflatable pads go, it has its merits. It packs small and is nowhere near as noisy as the bag o' chips Neoairs. Great price too. However, in my experience, they were not 72" long, they were 68-70 inches long. If you're tall, that's a factor to consider.

I'm 5' 11.25" and haven't noticed a problem with the length. Maybe I should measure mine. But for me, I like the fact that a normal Static v is wider than a normal pad. I can't sleep on a 20" wide pad.

Ethesis
06-14-2018, 18:51
Lanshan tents are also available from domestic sources and have a good reputation. Look them up on YouTube.

Time Zone
06-14-2018, 19:24
I'm 5' 11.25" and haven't noticed a problem with the length. Maybe I should measure mine. But for me, I like the fact that a normal Static v is wider than a normal pad. I can't sleep on a 20" wide pad.

Nor can I. The Static V is a nice width for ground-dwellers who find 20" lacking. My arms can stay on it, if I'm on my back or stomach. It's still a bit narrow for me if thrown in a hammock.

But I did find the length of my uninsulated Static V (from costco) to be 68-70", depending on whether it was measured at the midpoint of the short end or along the edge. That, coupled with my height (73") and occasional stomach-sleeping where my toes are pointed away from my head (not at the ground) - I'd need more than 73" anyway, so all things considered, I do best with the large sizes (25x77).

If I was OK with my feet hanging off, I'd probably not go just a tad short (like 23x70), I'd go to a truly small pad (e.g., 20x48) and just try to sleep on my side.

Feral Bill
06-14-2018, 20:45
Consider this: https://www.rei.com/product/829820/therm-a-rest-prolite-sleeping-pad It's just enough to get a good nights sleep without weighing a ton. I have used an older model for thirty+ years.

HooKooDooKu
06-14-2018, 22:05
... is nowhere near as noisy as the bag o' chips Neoairs. ...
Noisy Neoairs depend upon style (the 1st models terrible from what I understand) and how much it is inflated.
I've got the second generation (mummy shaped) and while it can have a crinkle noise if under-inflated, it didn't make a sound on my most recent camping trip this past weekend.

Berserker
06-15-2018, 12:32
Agree... when I was planning for a JMT thru hike and had decided on the Bearikade Expedition, I spent the $375 to be able to have the bear canister in hand well before the trip rather than the option of renting one for much less. Glad I did because it was the cause of me realizing my REI Flash was NOT going to handle that size canister and had to buy a larger pack.
Good point. When I wrote my previous post I was referring to the packing of food in the canister being an art form, but making sure the canister fits in the pack is the other crucial step in using a canister.

poolskaterx
06-17-2018, 22:48
The six moon design tent is pretty sweet for the price and will get you through just fine; bonus... if ya dont like it you can easily resell for a small loss as it is a ďrealĒ backpacking tent. As far as sleeping pad id go with a therma rest foam pad like a z rest and tie it to the bottom of your pack, cheap, quick, and fail proof.
I started with an 80l pack at over 50lbs years ago; i have had so much fun over the years improving my kit. Enjoy your hike.

Siestita
06-18-2018, 00:04
"Water filter: I have the Sawyer squeeze but it froze so I should purchase a new one. Didnít like the hassle of the squeeze - want he platypus 2L for ease of use."

If by chance you've not yet replaced your frozen filter, consider possibly instead using chemical treatment for your upcoming trip, perhaps either Aqua Mira drops or MSR Aqua Tabs. I've been pleased using both of those products. Either of them would be lighter than a filter, and not initially more costly. I especially like the tiny Aquatabs. Enough MSR Aquatabs to purify water for several weeks, along with a good "container" to keep them handy and dry (a snack sized zip lock bag inside a sandwich sized zip lock), altogether weighs only a small fraction of an ounce.

If you later find yourself backpacking extensively, perhaps doing so for several months each year, you may then find that purchasing a filter to be more economical. But, paying for Aqua Tabs instead of a filter for your five day trip to Colorado probably wouldn't break the bank.

tschertz
06-18-2018, 09:10
Thanks everyone for all the info.

Although I should use my pack I have, that Osprey Aether AG looks too comfy compared to my Mountaintop :) the pack I went with on amazon, the hip pads are like rear hip pads, donít even go around my hip as they should...but it was $85 so beggars canít be choosers.

Still researching all the tents a bit, going to be by an REI this weekend so I will take another look. I know mine holds up just fine under a downpour, but would be nice to shave some pounds and have something nicer quality.

I will be buying a new pad, just because mine is absolutely huge and would rather save off 1.5 pounds - going with a Klymit static V2... should be much more comfy than I currently have.

Although treatment tabs would be the better investment, I like the idea of just filtering. Only reason I want the Platypus is I donít have to sit there and squeeze nonstop...should be able to filter all my water fairly quickly when we stop by a stream.





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HooKooDooKu
06-18-2018, 09:32
Only reason I want the Platypus is I donít have to sit there and squeeze nonstop...should be able to filter all my water fairly quickly when we stop by a stream.
You can use the Sawyer in a gravity feed mode just as well.
My system is a Sawyer filter, an Evernew Water Carry, and a Platypus Hozer...
The Evernew Water Carry is basically Evernew's version of a Platypus bladder. The key difference is that Platypus decided to design their bladders using a custom thread pitch. Sawyer used the "standard" thread pitch you find on most water bottles, and the Evernew Water Carry uses the same thread pitch. The platypus hozer is my clean water bag, with the bite valve removed, I simply slide the hose over the nipple of the Sawyer (if you get the Sawyer Squeeze, it comes with a hose addapter that makes this extreamly easy... but I find I can usually slide hoses over the Sawyer nipple without it). The final change for me was to replace the thick stiff hose that came with the Platypus Hozer with the soft hose used with many pump filters... lighter weight and easier to pack when finished. We I say final, actually, use a hole punch to make a hole in the margins of the Evernew Water Carry to stick some string thru so I could hang the badder.
Here's a picture (https://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/files/1/1/8/7/1/sawyer.jpg) of my system getting tested in the kitchen (the Evernew is hanging from the knob of an open cabinet). I seem to recall that with the smaller Sawyer mini, I can filter 2L of water in gravity mode with a 3' hose without any priming of the system in 4 minutes.

tschertz
06-18-2018, 10:06
You can use the Sawyer in a gravity feed mode just as well.
My system is a Sawyer filter, an Evernew Water Carry, and a Platypus Hozer...
The Evernew Water Carry is basically Evernew's version of a Platypus bladder. The key difference is that Platypus decided to design their bladders using a custom thread pitch. Sawyer used the "standard" thread pitch you find on most water bottles, and the Evernew Water Carry uses the same thread pitch. The platypus hozer is my clean water bag, with the bite valve removed, I simply slide the hose over the nipple of the Sawyer (if you get the Sawyer Squeeze, it comes with a hose addapter that makes this extreamly easy... but I find I can usually slide hoses over the Sawyer nipple without it). The final change for me was to replace the thick stiff hose that came with the Platypus Hozer with the soft hose used with many pump filters... lighter weight and easier to pack when finished. We I say final, actually, use a hole punch to make a hole in the margins of the Evernew Water Carry to stick some string thru so I could hang the badder.
Here's a picture (https://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/files/1/1/8/7/1/sawyer.jpg) of my system getting tested in the kitchen (the Evernew is hanging from the knob of an open cabinet). I seem to recall that with the smaller Sawyer mini, I can filter 2L of water in gravity mode with a 3' hose without any priming of the system in 4 minutes.

Thanks for this! I donít think I have the mini, but rather the regular sawyer squeeze. I know it did come with some hose and attachment but not sure what that is until I am done with work. Pretty sure itís the one you are mentioning.

I am just filtering water into 2 clean Nalgenes so this should be much cheaper than $100 on the platypus 2L gravity. How fast does it filter water in gravity? Thatís the one thing I disliked about my sawyer, squeezing took forever.


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Odd Man Out
06-18-2018, 10:17
The six moon design tent is pretty sweet for the price and will get you through just fine; bonus... if ya dont like it you can easily resell for a small loss as it is a “real” backpacking tent. As far as sleeping pad id go with a therma rest foam pad like a z rest and tie it to the bottom of your pack, cheap, quick, and fail proof.
I started with an 80l pack at over 50lbs years ago; i have had so much fun over the years improving my kit. Enjoy your hike.

That's exactly what I did. My biggest mistake was to think I had to get every gear purchase "perfect" the first time, so I spend a couple of years researching every possible option and considering every possible variable. While more information is better than less information, in the end I became paralyzed, not buying anything for fear I would get it wrong. I really turned the corner when I just broke down and got something respectable, knowing that it would be good enough to start and I could always sell it and trade up later. All the research and advice you get on-line can't compare to in the field experience.

Odd Man Out
06-18-2018, 10:28
I have used a Sawyer mini in gravity mode. I don't use a long tube either. It filter plenty fast. I attache a bladder with and adapter to collect clean water. Because it is a closed system the water flow stops when the receiving bag is full, so I just let it set while doing other stuff. When I come back, it's done. Also, air will not pass through this type of filter, so your flow rates are slow if you get an air bubble in it. I suck on the clean side like a straw while jiggling the bubbles out of the filter until I can feel it is flowing smoothly. I think low flow rates reported by some people are due to bubbles in the filter.

HooKooDooKu
06-19-2018, 10:29
Thanks for this! I donít think I have the mini, but rather the regular sawyer squeeze. I know it did come with some hose and attachment but not sure what that is until I am done with work. Pretty sure itís the one you are mentioning.
I am just filtering water into 2 clean Nalgenes so this should be much cheaper than $100 on the platypus 2L gravity. How fast does it filter water in gravity? Thatís the one thing I disliked about my sawyer, squeezing took forever.

Gravity mode will work with either the mini or the squeeze. Both have a "nipple" of one sort or another on the output that you can push a hose onto. Some versions of the squeeze come with a pair of hose adapters... you can use the adapter on the output side if you want a reliable hose connection, but I've found it to not be required as the hose only has to hold onto the nipple long enough to filter your water.

Like I said above, a brand new mini could filter 2L of tap water with no priming of the system. Things usually get moving a little faster if you can get the hose to fill up and act as a suction (the greater the elevation difference between the filter and the clean bad, the stronger the suction).

I point out the issue of flow rate on a brand new device... because i'm learning that the filter can become clogged with mineral deposits over time if hard water is used.
When I hiked the JMT, I noticed how over the course of my hike, the filter started getting a little slower each day (water flowing over granite)... and a Sawyer Sqeeze I cleaned with hard water at home became almost completely clogged by mineral deposits after storage over the winter. It's recently been suggested to me that I would back-flush my Sawyer with warm distilled water and vinegar to help clean out mineral deposits.

john844
06-19-2018, 11:30
I am just filtering water into 2 clean Nalgenes so this should be much cheaper than $100 on the platypus 2L gravity. How fast does it filter water in gravity? Thatís the one thing I disliked about my sawyer, squeezing took forever.
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You could replace the Nalgenes with Smart Water Bottles to save some weight. They are cheap, light, widely available at grocery stores, and hold up well.

I have started using a Katadyn BeFree water filter that is amazingly fast. I can filter my water in half the time of sawyer squeeze. I still lightly squeeze my filter to speed it up, but it takes a minute or two to refill a couple 1 liter bottles. The squeezing pressure needed for these is minimal compared to sawyer and the opening to fill the dirty water bag is large.

trailmercury
06-19-2018, 11:48
[QUOTE=john844;2212490]You could replace the Nalgenes with Smart Water Bottles to save some weight. They are cheap, light, widely available at grocery stores, and hold up well.

Doesn't have to be a Smartwater bottle. Soda and Gatorade bottles are equivalent.

A sawyer squeeze is potentially more compatible with the opening of the re-used bottle as well.

a 32 oz Nalgene bottle empty weighs 6.2 oz
a 1 liter recycled soda/water weighs 1.2 oz
both weighed on my scale.

to replace the two Nalgenes with two Smartwater bottles would save 10 freaking ounces!!!

Time Zone
06-19-2018, 11:55
In the news lately have been "microplastics" from plastic water bottles. It's unclear if they pose any danger to human health (maybe they pass right through us harmlessly, IDK), but on the scale humans use plastic water bottles, it's said to be an increasing problem for the health of our oceans. So I wonder if re-using soda bottles is good/bad/indifferent, and do nalgene bottles (as sold today) have the same issues or not?

I'd like to do my part to limit pollution, but obviously adding 10 oz is not appealing, and if it does no better in terms of microplastics, there's obviously no point in it anyway, at least from that perspective.

Thoughts?

Feral Bill
06-19-2018, 13:38
[QUOTE=john844;2212490]You could replace the Nalgenes with Smart Water Bottles to save some weight. They are cheap, light, widely available at grocery stores, and hold up well.

Doesn't have to be a Smartwater bottle. Soda and Gatorade bottles are equivalent.

A sawyer squeeze is potentially more compatible with the opening of the re-used bottle as well.

a 32 oz Nalgene bottle empty weighs 6.2 oz
a 1 liter recycled soda/water weighs 1.2 oz
both weighed on my scale.

to replace the two Nalgenes with two Smartwater bottles would save 10 freaking ounces!!! I got this idea at a ruck. For those who prefer a wide mouth, 30 oz mayo jars weigh 1.8 oz. Big (Costco JIF) peanut butter jars (about 38oz capacity) weigh 2.5 The rims of the peanut butter jars need smoothing with ultra fine (1500 grit or such) sandpaper to seal well. It takes a minute or so.

middle to middle
07-13-2018, 23:15
Very good rendition !

Last Call
07-13-2018, 23:40
Lots of Grits and Oatmeal!

ZiggySours
07-14-2018, 11:16
ok this is what i would do
osprey 65l atmos ag pack it has a detachable brain you can take on and off as needed find last years model 160
rei garage big agnes 1 person tent 100 bucks
costco.com klymit sleeping pad and pillow combo 70 bucks
treking poles get the cascade 40 dollar carbon fiber cork handle jams off of amazon they are actually pretty baller after that upgrade as needed
msr windburner 150