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Tipi Walter
02-15-2006, 22:23
I would like to discuss gear some of us have used and grown up with, old Kelty packs, the first orange Thermarests with the metal valves, old North Face A-frame tents with the snow tunnel doors(and their external frame Back Magic packs), the canvas Boy Scout Yucca packs, the old Nike Ascent and Approach trail shoes, Sundog packs, etc.
It is very hard to find this gear for sale nowadays but for some of us just remembering is enough.

jasonklass
02-15-2006, 22:30
It is very hard to find this gear for sale nowadays but for some of us just remembering is enough.
Go to the return counter at REI!

Weldman
02-15-2006, 23:43
I have a better place for old gear like that, Military surplus stores! I have seen a that type of tent 2 yrs ago at a surplus store

Mike

jasonklass
02-15-2006, 23:47
Yeah-that's right. I've seen some vintage gear there that was never even used! It was like they were frozen in time.

Kerosene
02-16-2006, 01:10
My first boots were dark green very high top hunting boots. I remember that they froze overnight during my March 1975 hike on the Connecticut AT.

I think I finally tossed the old 1.5 pound Optimus 8R white gas stove that I relied on for all my hikes from 1974 through 1986.

I forgot when I bought my first Therma-Rest, but it was heaven compared to Ensolite (remember that?) and other closed cell pads.

As a Boy Scout I had one of the canvas packs with an external frame, but I bought one of the first nylon external frame packs on the market in 1972 from Sears and used that until I graduated from high school in '75. I replaced it with a Kelty Tioga that I used through '86, after which it sat in the corner of my garage. When I decided to get back out in '99, I found that the aluminum frame had corroded from all the salt from the cars.

I purchased a nylon 2-man tent (Walrus Comet?) -- light at "only" 5.5 pounds. The coating of the fly came off after I stored it for several years -- rolled! -- atop a closet.

Here's a picture of me (http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=65&c=665&userid=3) near the end of my first long distance hike in April 1973. Note the massive poly-fill sleeping bag, the Sears pack that more than once hauled 50+ pounds, the jeans jacket and pants, the hunting boots. It's a good thing it didn't get too wet that trip!

LostInSpace
02-16-2006, 02:13
My first boots, when I was a Scout, were Army surplus. My first serious hiking boots were Vasque that lasted from 1973 to mid 80’s. I wore them until they literally fell apart.

My first tent was an Army surplus mountain tent – A-frame with the round doors and vents on each end. Sometimes I used an Army surplus jungle hammock. I don’t know what happened to them. About 1973 I bought a North Face VE-24 tent, which I had until three weeks ago. TNF replaced it with a new 2006 VE-25 under the warranty that the VE-24 came with. Although the TNF warranty has changed, I had the original hang tags that the tent had an “unconditional” warranty, which TNF honored. (I have bought lighter tents in the meantime.)

My first pack, as a Scout, was an Army surplus ammo pack of some sort … rucksack … no frame. I think I ditched it last year when I cleaned out my basement. I still have my Kelty Tioga that I bought in the ‘70s. The packbag and frame are still in good condition, but the foam in the hipbelt has turned to stone! A replacement belt is about $45 … hardly worth it.

My first down jacket was a Frostline kit, but my sister did most of the sewing. I still have it for grunge work.

The down vest from Wilderness Experience is still serviceable.

The Gerry down bag, -10 degree, is still serviceable, but that sucker is heavy!

The waffle-weave long underware from Sears was turned into truck polishing rags some time ago.

The Ensolite sleeping pad got melted or torn somewhere along the line. I replaced it with a covered eggcrate foam pad that was hardly any better. Fortunately, whomever I lent it to never returned it!

I still have my Svea 123 white gas stove (works like a champ) and a small Ensolite pad to insulate it from the ground in cold weather.

The Bull Dog Brand aluminum nesting pots are actually lighter than the GSI ones I bought. The Svea 123 fits inside the smallest Bull Dog pot.

I still have three Gerry squeeze tubes for condiments, etc. I never have used them.

The candle lantern is still floating around somewhere.

In retrospect, I actually carried a lot fewer items when I was younger … no camp shoes, no bear bag, no extra batteries, no hiking poles, no sunglasses, smaller first aid kit, etc., etc.

gsingjane
02-16-2006, 07:08
On the extended canoe and hiking trips we took in Girl Scouts, we used what we called "umbrella" tents - they were these green canvas monsters with a central pole where you pushed up and, yes, the top popped out like an umbrella. They were square and you had to stake them and yes, of course, we trenched around them. They slept 4. Does anybody else remember these? It would have been late '60's/early '70's?

Jane in CT

Hikes in Rain
02-16-2006, 07:18
I still use the old Boy Scout cook kit I got for Christmas back in the mid-60's. Still have the original bold and wing-nut for the frying pan, although the plastic green cup (the one that made everything taste like polystyrine, you!) was traded in the early 70's for a Sierra cup, also still in use. Have an early 70's vintage no-brand-name cannister "grasshopper" stove that functions nicely, and got me through my first section hike after melting down my Whisperlite.

Ratbert
02-16-2006, 08:41
My first pack (early 70s) was a great external frame made by a company called "Alpenlite." Their motto was, "Let your hips shoulder the load." It had a curved frame that attached to the hipbelt right at your hips, as opposed to the back and it really did transfer weight better than the Keltys I had previously borrowed and used. It also allowed the pack to stand up by itself, which was awesome!

My tent was a Jansport Trail Wedge that I obtained from a friend by trading him a 10-speed bicycle.

I had several products from a company called Snow Lion, which were very sturdy and lasted me for many years ... a down vest, 20 degree down bag, and an awesome 60/40 mountain parka (remember those?). Most of my better gear came from Cumberland Transit on West End in Nashville ... still there and still selling great gear.

Stove was a Gerry canister stove that packed up "like a damn tin yo-yo" according to The Complete Walker, which I faithfully read cover-to-cover.

Blue jeans, cotton waffle-weave long underwear, Raichle mountaineering boots (that had to weigh 5 pounds apiece!) rag wool sweaters, caps and socks, ensolite pad rolled up and strapped to the top of your pack. Back then you weighed your pack to boast about how much you could carry! Gawd, we had fun!

Teatime
02-16-2006, 08:44
Sears Hillary-I Backpack, Green
Original Coleman Peak 1 Stove.
Some off brand tent with big, fat, plastic stakes.

Tin Man
02-16-2006, 09:05
On the extended canoe and hiking trips we took in Girl Scouts, we used what we called "umbrella" tents - they were these green canvas monsters with a central pole where you pushed up and, yes, the top popped out like an umbrella. They were square and you had to stake them and yes, of course, we trenched around them. They slept 4. Does anybody else remember these? It would have been late '60's/early '70's?

Jane in CT

Hi neighbor, I remember when our scout master bought the umbrella tents in the late '60's, although ours were 2 man. They were canvas, heavy, and worked well for about a year. Fortunately, he drove them to the site where we hiked into to camp. I think the forests have recovered from all those nasty trenching habits we used.

Kerosene
02-16-2006, 09:17
Wow, it's really cool to see names of vendors who no longer lead the industry: Gerry, Alpenlite, Frostline, Snow Lion, etc.

I forgot that my first down bag was a combination duck down/feather mummy crafted in orange and blue nylon from Sears purchased in the early 70's. I have no idea what it was rated to.

My future wife-to-be made me a pair of down booties with covers for my 19th birthday that I still have somewhere but don't use for backpacking. I bought myself a nice Eddie Bauer down sweater in the mid-70's that I still use occasionally.

Much of my discretionary spending in high school was for backpacking gear. My bible was The Appalachian Hiker by Ed Garvey, which I bought just after his first thru-hike in 1971 I think. I knew everything in those pages, and I still have the book. I also devoured the first edition of Colin Fletcher's, The Complete Walker.

Hikes in Rain, I actually still a 8-oz plastic green cups from a circa 1950's aluminum camping cookset as one of my containers since it's so light, although it no longer tastes like plastic!

Of course, this entire thread reminds me of how much old stuff I have in my gear closet that I never use. Anyone interested in some old gear?

peter_pan
02-16-2006, 09:57
Seems like every year or so I do an ultra light presentation or a hammock presentation for a Boy Scout troop and leave a foot locker of slightly used gear behind as donations/prizes for the scouts in attendance...great way to trade miles for smiles when I can't be out hiking on some week night....try it... it is a great way to recycle and lots of fun.

Pan

peter_pan
02-16-2006, 10:02
A PS...

How many of you still have the leather 50 mile patch and Historical trails patch, or the National Jamboree patch from the BSA 50 anniversary in 1960?...These patches once sewed on packs that I carried and the merit badges, hiking, camping, pioneering etc are a box of my prize posessions.... boy those packs were heavy then... nice photo Kerosene.

Pan

Cookerhiker
02-16-2006, 10:16
My first AT backpack was 35 miles in Vermont, 1977. One piece of equipment still in use today: my Boy Scout small saucepan which I curently use for cooking oatmeal and boiling tea/hot chocolate water. It fits inside my aluminum billy pot which I bought in 1979 and still use. Oh, I also use my Scout eating utensils.

I upgraded my external frame Kelty pack in 1980 and used it through my 110 mile section hike March 2004 in GA & NC. Afterwards, I finally threw in the towel and bought an internal frame pack.

First stove was a small butane saucer-like setup with a rubber fuel tube connected to a cannister the size of a shaving cream can. Worked well and fast and was lightweight but the cannisters were a pain and also suspect in cold weather. Upgraded to a Svea which I used for about 15 years followed by a Coleman Peak 1. Each successive stove has been heavier; I guess I'm doing something wrong!:-?

Used my A-frame tent until 1991 when I acquired my Sierra Designs Clip Flashlight. Incidentally, its maiden night was in Death Valley (March, '91) when a desert sandstorm blew in and snapped the pole in half. Campmoor gave me a replacement which I've used since.

troglobil
02-16-2006, 10:28
Kelty external frame... still have it, actually my wife uses it
Svea 123...still have it
ensolite pad.... have parts of it, pad my cave pack with it
sierra cup....lost it
snow lion bag....still have it and use it
60/40 parka finally got rid of it 5 years ago
and believe it or not... a chamois shirt from 1978 that is ratty as hell, but i still wear it around the bonfire when car camping. it has been threatened to be thrown in the fire.

Gray Blazer
02-16-2006, 10:29
Jansport used to be an industry leader in backpacks. There is a thread on this site where a girl (I forgot her name) is selling her Mom's old Jansport. It's funny that jansport only makes kids backpacks for school books now. My sister and her family hiked from Gainesville FL (Go Gators) to Portland , Oregon (Remember the Walkin' Warriner's) in the late 70's. Nike sponsered them and they used state of the art Jansport Backpacks. In honor of her I use a similar backpack that I bought from Winton at Neels Gap off his wall of old school backpacks.
You can view it in my photo gallery on this site. the name on the top says it belonged to Mitch Wynn. Has anybody heard of him? Was he an old school thru hiker?

RockyTrail
02-16-2006, 10:45
I still have my BSA Yucca and Camper ext frame packs from 1970 era. I used the Camper pack on a trip in 2000, and my son the artist used the Yucca to paint a "still life" of the Yucca pack with some related BSA gear recently for an art class assignment.

Back then I used:
Bag: A Kmart cotton rectangular bag (pheasants and bird dogs!)
Sleep Pad: What's a sleep pad?
Boots: High-top broughams (type used for construction work)
Clothes: Jeans & T-shirts, all cotton
Tent: ARmy surplus "pup" tent, no floor, barely waterproofed, black plastic groundcloth
Pack: Yucca or Camper ext frame
Mess: Std BSA issue mess kit (blackened from wood fire cooking, always cooked on fires)

I still have the packs and mess kit. The only thing I still use is the little aluminum pot and the green cup that came with the mess kit. They make good "second pot& cup" for heating water and measuring exact portions while I drink from a more modern cup and cook in a Ti pot on a Pepsi/Guiness stove. (btw, the cup doesn't smell like plastic:D not anymore anyway)
In case anybody's wondering about this stuff, I plan to keep on keeping it just for old times sake.

Cookerhiker
02-16-2006, 10:45
Jansport used to be an industry leader in backpacks. There is a thread on this site where a girl (I forgot her name) is selling her Mom's old Jansport. It's funny that jansport only makes kids backpacks for school books now. My sister and her family hiked from Gainesville FL (Go Gators) to Portland , Oregon (Remember the Walkin' Warriner's) in the late 70's. Nike sponsered them and they used state of the art Jansport Backpacks. In honor of her I use a similar backpack that I bought from Winton at Neels Gap off his wall of old school backpacks.
You can view it in my photo gallery on this site. the name on the top says it belonged to Mitch Wynn. Has anybody heard of him? Was he an old school thru hiker?

Are you sure that Jansport only makes kids' backpacks? I have a Jansport day pack (acquired about 4 years ago) and it's more than adequate for day hikes and trips.

RockyTrail
02-16-2006, 10:54
A PS...

How many of you still have the leather 50 mile patch and Historical trails patch, or the National Jamboree patch from the BSA 50 anniversary in 1960?...These patches once sewed on packs that I carried and the merit badges, hiking, camping, pioneering etc are a box of my prize posessions.... boy those packs were heavy then... nice photo Kerosene.

Pan

I have the 50 miler earned (as an adult) three years ago on a Philmont trip. The modern ones are cloth, about 3"x5", red background, yellow markings. One of the few patches handed out to adults as well as scouts. I too have a box of old prize posessions like you mentioned...

The Solemates
02-16-2006, 10:55
the first orange Thermarests with the metal valves,

got one, still...

Kerosene
02-16-2006, 11:07
...and leave a foot locker of slightly used gear behind as donations/prizes for the scouts in attendance...Great idea, Pan. I always thought that I'd do something for the BSA once I got older, but the son I envisioned turned out to be a daughter, so my time has gone elsewhere. I'll look up my local troop and see if I can help. It would be great if you had an outline or slides that you use that I could build from.

Gray Blazer
02-16-2006, 11:18
Are you sure that Jansport only makes kids' backpacks? I have a Jansport day pack (acquired about 4 years ago) and it's more than adequate for day hikes and trips.

No, I'm not sure. That's what I heard from an outfitter.:datz :datz :datz

Tipi Walter
02-16-2006, 11:25
I guess I'm a geezor cuz I fondly remember many of the items mentioned so I guess I should retitle this My Geezor Gear and be done with it. When Kerosene mentioned ensolite pads it brought back a good memory. I was living out of my pack around Boone NC through the 1980s and in 1981 I met a wandering hobo who looked at my gear and my floppy old ensolite pad. He held up his little orange thermarest and said, "Buy One!" I did go buy one and 12 thermys later I have become a prisoner to these finicky but comfortable little animals.

When LostInSpace brought up the Svea 123 I couldn't help but remember it was my stove of choice for many years. I went through between 4 to 6 of these handsome brass home warmers and heartbreakers. I had one explode in the mountains of North Carolina where the flame shot out toward my face so I rushed it to the local backpacking shop but it was pronounced Dead on Arrival.

gsingjane brought up the green canvas tent and I am amazed the description seemed to fit an exact same tent I had as a boy. I remember how heavy it was and the big spiders that would jump out when pulled from storage. It had a strong canvas smell and had these little flap windows that would roll up(or down)and secure. Hikes In Rain brought up a memory of the old GI cook kit that was oval with a locking swing arm joining the pot and plate cover together.

One thing about this thread which is comforting, I can turn to these idyllic memories and then just as quickly turn away and look fondly at my new gear as I plan the next trip. But I think it is good to sit back often and to remember all of our backpacking trips, where we were, how beautiful or sometimes how awful it was, how we felt in the rain or the snow or the heat or the high wind or pumping nylon up a mean mountain, and to remember the gear that helped take us there. Amen.

Gray Blazer
02-16-2006, 11:26
Yeah, I got my 50 miler patches somwhere. My troop,456 from Clearwater, FL, used to take canoe trips every year from the day after Christmas to New Years so my patches are for canoeing not backpacking.

RockyTrail
02-16-2006, 12:42
gsingjane brought up the green canvas tent and I am amazed the description seemed to fit an exact same tent I had as a boy. I remember how heavy it was and the big spiders that would jump out when pulled from storage. It had a strong canvas smell and had these little flap windows that would roll up(or down)and secure. Hikes In Rain brought up a memory of the old GI cook kit that was oval with a locking swing arm joining the pot and plate cover together.

.

You wont believe this, but my dad still has my Grandads cook kit from World War 1! The pieces are stamped "1917 US Army". He hauled it all over France. A bit heavy for backpacking but they sure made'm tough then, maybe that's why the Kaiser lost?

I know what you mean about "that strong canvas smell". That one phrase brought back some memories of the old umbrella tents... The only thing fabric smell stronger than that is the olive drab army canvas smell as found on tents and jeeps.

BW2006
02-16-2006, 13:36
I still have my orange Camptrails pack that was my brothers boy scout pack. Used it myself until about 6 years ago. Served me well!

Also still have and use my original orange Thermarest. We have two of them and have replaced both valves with the plastic ones but these things sure take a beating. We use them on cold weather camping trips all the time. It seems like you can't destroy them. Had a small pin hole in one from an ash but a bit of seam sealer fixed it up and five years later it's still going strong. I do take a 3/4 light Thermarest now.

The Solemates
02-16-2006, 14:26
You wont believe this, but my dad still has my Grandads cook kit from World War 1!

i still have my dad's scout cook-kit from the 60s. i still use the plate some.

otterman
02-16-2006, 14:31
I started with a bright orange external frame backpack of unknown maufacturer. Then upgraded to a Jansport external frame around 1980. Orange Holofil sleeping bag. Heavyweight Vasque boots. Eureka Timberline tent. All of which I still have in usable condition. Those boots weighed a ton!

Gray Blazer
02-16-2006, 14:51
I started with a bright orange external frame backpack of unknown maufacturer. Then upgraded to a Jansport external frame around 1980. Orange Holofil sleeping bag. Heavyweight Vasque boots. Eureka Timberline tent. All of which I still have in usable condition. Those boots weighed a ton!

I had a eureka timberline tent. Now that was a nice tent.:jump

Mags
02-16-2006, 14:59
I remember the gear I used for Boy Scouts. Though it was only 20 years ago, it is funny how much gear has changed!

Lesse:

*I used a cotton canvas "Yucca" pack.
*Had a "mess kit" that looked similar to a WW2 GI military set!
http://pages.tias.com/11742/PictPage/1922364738.html
* K-mart "Texas Steer" work boots
* Sears tough skins jeans
* Waffle weave long underwear, cotton of course!
* Canvas A-frame tents
* Naturally, we all cooked on a camp fire!

otterman
02-16-2006, 15:03
I had a eureka timberline tent. Now that was a nice tent.:jump

I spent a night on Mt. Mitchell. Heavy rain and and 40 mph winds. Didn'e leak and didn't budge. I bet it could still do it today, but I carry lighter shelters now.

Mags
02-16-2006, 15:04
You wont believe this, but my dad still has my Grandads cook kit from World War 1! The pieces are stamped "1917 US Army". He hauled it all over France. A bit heavy for backpacking but they sure made'm tough then, maybe that's why the Kaiser lost?


That's so cool! Much to the sadness of my dad and myself, my grandfather gave away much of his WW2 gear to goodwill without telling us. :(
(Including his "Eisenhower" jacket with the patches !!!!)

Footslogger
02-16-2006, 15:20
got one, still...
======================
I do too. Fondly remember having that valve stick to my lip one winter trip

'Slogger

Footslogger
02-16-2006, 15:23
How about the old WWII vintage "canvass shelter halfs". That's all our boy scout troop had. We picked a tent mate and then divvied up the canvas halves, poles and stakes. Stuffed them into our canvass ruck sacks, along with our food for the weekend (typically wrapped in aluminum foil) and headed out on the trail.

Ahhh ...the good old days. Did I mention that we all wore those orange leather work boots from Kmart ??

'Slogger

Frolicking Dinosaurs
02-16-2006, 15:28
We still have our old external frame Kelty packs from about 1970, but we don't use them anymore. I still use a mid-1960's aluminum 5 cup pot from my first Coleman backpack cookset. Laugh all you want - it is light, works well and can cook darn near anything. Several hikers have borrowed it on the trail because thier dinky saucepans where too small to hold their dinner.

max patch
02-16-2006, 15:36
I had a Eureaka Timberline until last year when I gave it away to someone.

My 25 year old orange thermarest with the metal valve was going strong until last spring when all of a sudden the valve froze into place and can't be budged. Havent gotten around to replacing it yet; used it this this year just for the insulation value.

My 30 year old svea 123 stove still works great and is my stove of choice, although on weekend trips I sometimes use my zzip ztove. Loaned my svea to more than one thruhiker in 88 when their whisperlight failed (they had clogging problems back then).

DebW
02-16-2006, 16:02
Anyone remember the Justrite headlamp? Took 4 D batteries in a case you could hide inside your coat in cold weather. Mine still works. I also had a SVEA 123 stove, Snowlion double-A frame tent, ensolite pad, 60/40 parka (loved it), and Trailwise frame pack. I still wear my Snowlion polarguard booties for winter camping. Have a polarguard vest made from a Frostline kit. My two orange Therma-rests failed in unpatchable ways and Cascade Designs replaced them for free a couple years ago. Too bad the new ones weighed 3/4 lb more.

TN_Hiker
02-16-2006, 16:11
I still have a Eureka 4 man Timberline that I use w/ the Scouts when they are "base" camping. It weighs about 10 lbs but man talk about having some room. My orange CampTrails external frame pack is stuck in the gear closet somewhere. What about the World Camp (I think) big aluminum canteens w/ the flannel outside? Those things leaked like crazy.

Two Speed
02-16-2006, 16:17
Gave my old Clip Flashlight to a friend recently; the old baby blue one. Still a good shelter after all these years. A mere 4 lbs.

Still have a Coleman Peak 1 Multi-Fuel. Oddly enough it's baby blue, too. Well, were it isn't sooted up, scratched or rusted. Haven't fired that thing up in the last couple of years and I'm beginning to think I never will. Some of the corrosion on the tank looks serious. If I had to do it over again I'd get a SVEA 123 instead of the Coleman. I've got more in parts in that Coleman than I spent for it new.

Coleman Solo cookset. One large pot, one lid/fry pan, one bowl, one cup. Still use the pot at home once in a while. Stuff sack is in REALLY sad shape, though. If I remember corectly I've seen this set in the Campmor catalog recently.

I've got the frame for a Yucca pack. The pack bag disappeared many moons ago.

LostInSpace
02-16-2006, 16:24
How about the old WWII vintage "canvass shelter halfs". ...

Yes, I had one of those, too, at one time. I remember the three-section tent poles, and the fat wooden tent pegs that were hell to get into rocky ground!

Footslogger
02-16-2006, 16:32
Yes, I had one of those, too, at one time. I remember the three-section tent poles, and the fat wooden tent pegs that were hell to get into rocky ground!
============================================
Remember doing the "Wilderness Survival" merit badge and setting up the shelter half as a lean-to ?? Mine caved in during the night. It was cold and rainy so I just grabbed some sticks and propped it up enough to keep it off me and my sleeping bag (an old 4 - 5 lb rectangular Coleman, as I recall)

...and we thought we had it made in the shade back then !!

'Slogger

Klezmorim
02-16-2006, 16:45
Ah, you're bringing out the "Old Faht" in me, too!

I started backpacking in '71. Bought a cheap K-Mart orange external frame pack that sqeaked with every step because the anodized orange aluminum frame was not welded, oh no!, it was held together with nylon fasteners. Oy. I used a red folding Sterno stove that quickly fell out of favor on winter trips in Upstate New York. I also had one of those olive-drab synth-fill rectangular bankies that had a looong zipper that allowed you to turn it into a sleeping bag. Heavy and bulky. Kinda like Kerosene's.

I quickly upgraded to...

Eastern Mountain Sports Ext. Frame Pack.............. Still use, although I am gradually taking off all the patches as the thread mom used to sew 'em on rots away.

North Face Tuolumne Tent (Sloping A-frame with snow tunnel).. Can't use, because the poly coating had turned to cottage cheese by the time I opened her up last year, after a 20-year coma [the tent's, not mine!])

Orange Thermarests (replaced metal valves with plastic after-market replacement as soon as they became available. Gawd, those metal valves jammed every time!!).......................................Stil l used until last November when I bought us two of those nifty new Exped synth-fill blow-up pads. Get one!

Green cup swiped from sis' Girl Scout messkit in '71...Still use, perfect for hot bevvies and "adult drinks" (my small Penny alc. stove fits inside perfectly!)

Holubar (remember them? defunct.) down booties (sis sewed 'em from a kit)........ Still use.

0-degree goose down bag made by "Jones Tent & Awning" in Canada (defunct)......Still use, eh.

All-leather Red Wing hiking boots ('74).......Ditched in 2003

Svea 123R..............Still use for winter trips or at home during power outages.

I have a camping/hiking junk box full of stuff I bought in the 70's and 80's and will probably never use, but can't bring myself to throw out: instep crampons, electronic mosquito repellent, magnesium fire starter, K-bar knife, solar battery recharger....

Thanks for the trip down memory lane! I'll go quietly back to my room now....

TJ aka Teej
02-16-2006, 16:59
Whoa - flashbacks!
70s gear -I wore hunting boots, replaced by bright yellow Nikes, followed by Army surplus 'Jungle Boots'. Couldn't afford the fancy waffle stompers with the red laces. Big Swiss Amry knife - with a spoon and fork! Wine skin, metal canteen, tupperware, and tin boxes for food. Used a Band-aid tin for a first aid kit. Used my Dad's LLBean canvas external at first, then a red white and blue flag patterned nylon external - not a Kelty, 'American' something? Sears sleeping bag, red plaid lining, and a little awning you could rig for over your face. Cook set was one pot with the handle melted off and a P-38 can opener. Cut off jeans, my H.S. track suit and shorts, chamois shirts, nylon windbreaker. When it got cold I wore hand-me-down hunting gear. All that stuff is probably in the celler still.

Skidsteer
02-16-2006, 19:28
I have a Svea 123 that my eighty-five year old Father-in-law gave me. It's old; no telling how old. He had stored it with fuel still in it and the varnish smell was overpowering. I dumped out what I could, filled it with fresh fuel, and it fired up first try! Great little stove!

When he passes on I'm gonna put that stove in my pack, head out to a high place, cook my supper on it, and toast the memory of a man who had a profound impact on my life. I get misty-eyed just thinking about it. All that emotion in one piece of old backpackin' gear!

Skidsteer
02-16-2006, 19:32
Sears sleeping bag, red plaid lining, and a little awning you could rig for over your face.

We used to have the same sleeping bags! I had forgotten all about them; thanks for the memory jog!

gsingjane
02-16-2006, 20:14
Wow, talk about memories... especially the smell of canvas tents. EEEEK! Watch out!!! Don't touch the side of it when it's raining!!!

And a quick message to Kerosene: if you want to hook up with a Boy Scout troop, well, more power to you. But if you have a daughter, you might have heard about a little program they have for girls, too ... if she's interested and if you're interested, it can be a really cool combination. Several guys help out with outdoors stuff with their daughters' troops and it's a great way to spend true quality time with your daughter. (Think about my name ... I'm a lifer, LOL). Feel free to PM me if you want some suggestions or ideas about how to get started with Girl Scouts.

Jane in CT

lbbrown
02-16-2006, 20:27
I have a Svea 123 that my eighty-five year old Father-in-law gave me. It's old; no telling how old. He had stored it with fuel still in it and the varnish smell was overpowering. I dumped out what I could, filled it with fresh fuel, and it fired up first try! Great little stove!


When he passes on I'm gonna put that stove in my pack, head out to a high place, cook my supper on it, and toast the memory of a man who had a profound impact on my life. I get misty-eyed just thinking about it. All that emotion in one piece of old backpackin' gear!
Don't wait til he's gone! Do it NOW! Take him with you and if he can't hike, just go to the park or in the backyard. Toast him while he is still with you. How else will he know how he has helped you? I speak from experience.

Skidsteer
02-16-2006, 20:38
Don't wait til he's gone! Do it NOW! Take him with you and if he can't hike, just go to the park or in the backyard. Toast him while he is still with you. How else will he know how he has helped you? I speak from experience.

Thanks lbbrown. I've had several "heart to hearts' with my Father-in-law telling him how much he has influenced me. He knows, I know-;) . But your post gave me an idea. I'll let him in on my "post-dad plan". It'll bring a big smile to his face, I know!

Tipi Walter
02-16-2006, 20:59
DebW's post reminded me of my bittersweet LOVE/HATE relationship with the strange Thermarest. At least 2 of them over the years "delaminated", pulled apart inside, though they still held air, and I ended up trying to sleep on a 10 inch high orange air bladder which can't and doesn't work.

Klezmorin, you say you had the old North Face Tuolumne? I've been looking for that tent for several years now as it was my first real backpacking tent and one that I had a special connection to. I lived in that little blue and brown 3 poled A-frame for 7 years in Watauga County, NC and so I think I am overly attached to it. Mine was purchased in 1978 and eaten by a dog in 1992, sob . . .

Cookerhiker
02-16-2006, 21:02
Whoa - flashbacks!
... Sears sleeping bag, red plaid lining, and a little awning you could rig for over your face. ......

Exactly what I had for my first sleeping bag with the Scouts in 1959.

Weldman
02-17-2006, 01:21
Like most of you I have a old Svea stove too, that I still use for lite packing. 2 yrs ago at a antique swap meet I pick up a Optimus 8R for $5.00. They did not know what they had - looked brand new and fired right up. these stoves may be heavy but are great in the snow and higher elevations. I use old Military SS canteen cups( Brass handle 1950's) for my cook pot on these stoves - quick and easy

Mike

TN_Hiker
02-17-2006, 10:04
Kerosene,
The Boy Scouts have a fairly new program called Venturing (sort of like the old Explorer Posts) that is co-ed for youth 14-20 that concentrate on high adventure activities. My girls Venturing Crew is hitting the AT this Spring for 7 days, whitewater canoeing in June, scuba diving in July, and going to ski the slopes this weekend w/ them. Check with your council for more info.

weary
02-17-2006, 11:18
I would like to discuss gear some of us have used and grown up with, old Kelty packs, the first orange Thermarests with the metal valves, old North Face A-frame tents with the snow tunnel doors(and their external frame Back Magic packs), the canvas Boy Scout Yucca packs, the old Nike Ascent and Approach trail shoes, Sundog packs, etc.
It is very hard to find this gear for sale nowadays but for some of us just remembering is enough.
I see someone has been sneaking through my house and inventorying all my latest stuff.

Sly
02-17-2006, 11:59
Late 60's early 70's- Camp Trails external frame, North Face A frame tent, Army surplus down bag, Optimus 8 stove, Blue Jeans and Army surplus jacket, Bread and Dinty Moore Beef Stew.

littlelaurel59
02-17-2006, 13:00
On my first backpacking trip, at the ripe age of 10, I took a Coleman rectangular bag with a red flannel lining. Carried it in a canvas pack with no hip belt. We camped under plastic tarps. In the middle of the night, a storm arose, the plastic collected a BIG puddle of water, and the twine at the corner gave way. Splash!!! When I got up the next morning, my underwear was pink. Extreme humiliation for a 10 year old boy. Amazing I ever went again.

From the 70's I have a Camp Trails external frame pack that could hold a ton. The lower pocket has a patched tear from a bear that shimmied up a bear pole in the smokies (my pack was 2 down from the one with the bacon. That one was shredded).

I still have an REI rectangular bag, still in great condition, but heavy (4.5 pounds for a 35* bag).

Raichle boots- sturdy, stiff, and heavy.

Last year, I took the old Coleman 2 burner camp stove and Coleman lantern from my parents' garage. Still had fuel in them. Hadn't been used in 30 years! Started right up.

Back then, we bragged about how heavy our packs were. Now, I brag about how light.

swede
02-23-2006, 00:25
Being Army brats, we kids had a lot of cool green stuff. My favorite piece of gear was an evacuation bag that was used by the Mash style helicopters with external cots to lash the wounded. It was large enough to put a fully clothed soldier in and had a wolf fur collar,and built in underpad for insulation.So large it had it's own duffle bag. When my dad brought it home, it was unused and had a plastic bag in it that I later learned was a body bag! Medics would use the body bag as a liner to keep the sleeping bag cleaner. I still have the bag, and have some fine memories of it in college as a 'double' bag on camping trips. :rolleyes:

Just Jeff
02-23-2006, 01:16
You did the dirty in a body bag? Twisted.

SGTdirtman
02-23-2006, 01:25
Ha, funny... I just pulled out a tent I got from my dad that was made in the 70's and set it up in the yard to see if it was still functional. and the vintage bright orange JCpenny tent is still in perfect condition... I'm considering taking it camping this year and hanging a disco ball in it :banana

Teatime
02-23-2006, 04:49
I have a picture of me when I was about 11 years old, standing on the Hawksbill Mtn. overlook, wearing blue jeans, a blue denim shirt with Sierra Cup hanging from my belt. Also, got on my gold wire rim glasses. That was one of my first backpacking trips. Far out, man!

borntired
02-24-2006, 00:33
My first long bp trip was Philmont with the scouts in 1966. I carried next to nothing, it seemed at the time:
Yucca pack and frame
Scout sleeping bag about 4 or 5 pounds
Scout poncho doubled as ground sheet
Two prs shorts, two T shirts, one sweatshirt, extra socks
Army messkit
Flashlight
Towel and soap in a plastic thing.
Even so, that weighed 29 pounds. We weighed our packs before we started walking. When I carried the canvas tent, it was another 6 pounds. Also probably about 6 pounds when it was my turn to carry pots (which were huge) and dehydrated food. We would mix up powdered milk in a plastic bag at night. It was always a bit of a shock to see all the bits of bugs and dead leaves floating in it the next day. We drank it anyway. We didn't walk too far. About 52-55 miles in 12 days, I think it was. I still have a map with our route marked on it.

swede
02-24-2006, 01:40
HaHa, green rubber bag long gone by that time, if all the Goths at the local high school hear of the idea, might start a fad!:D

sierraDoug
05-05-2006, 02:28
As a Scout we only backpacked once. A little later, I read "The Complete Walker" and replaced my orange World Famous brand/Everest model external pack with a Trailwise one, in 1978. Also got a Trailwise mummy down bag and Pivetta leather boots, all purchased at The Ski Hut in Berkeley, CA where they made the Trailwise brand gear. Bought a Svea stove, too and was fitted out just like the Man (Colin Fletcher, that is).

Dumped the heavy boots first (mid '80's).

Only replaced the Svea a couple years ago with a Whisperlite, now to be replaced with a homemade alcohol stove.

New bag last fall: WM Ultralite.
New pack on its way: ULA Catalyst.

Gonna have to keep the pack, though I got rid of the Svea and will soon get rid of the old bag. I think. :-?

MedicineMan
05-05-2006, 05:05
that brought back a flood of memories...seemed like i lived in that jacket for many years and to think that if i saw in on the shelf today i'd look at the cotton component and say no! one of my favorite pieces of gear lore is the Jansport D2....good pack eh Lone Wolf?

aufgahoban
05-05-2006, 09:31
Jansport used to be an industry leader in backpacks. There is a thread on this site where a girl (I forgot her name) is selling her Mom's old Jansport. It's funny that jansport only makes kids backpacks for school books now. My sister and her family hiked from Gainesville FL (Go Gators) to Portland , Oregon (Remember the Walkin' Warriner's) in the late 70's. Nike sponsered them and they used state of the art Jansport Backpacks. In honor of her I use a similar backpack that I bought from Winton at Neels Gap off his wall of old school backpacks.
You can view it in my photo gallery on this site. the name on the top says it belonged to Mitch Wynn. Has anybody heard of him? Was he an old school thru hiker?


Acadamy sells Jansport packs, the good old external type. You might also want to check the Jansport website. Anyway, last weekend we did a short backpacking trip and my daughter borrowed her fathers pack so she could go. It's a fairly new Jansport. She loved it. Now she wants one. She said it was very comfortable, and she had quite a bit of weight. (she carried all the community items for the trip, plus her own stuff) She's done quite a bit of backpacking in Colorado and elsewhere with different types of packs. I was surprised she was so impressed with the $100 Jansport, but my wallet was happy!

stoikurt
05-05-2006, 11:13
In the late 60's, my first hike was with an old canvas yucca pack with my new troop when I was about 12. We went 26 miles through the Ocala National Forest over sugar sand roads. I was young and excited and didn't notice how difficult it was.

A little later, I had a no name bright orange pack from JM Fields dept. store. It had the nylon washers between the joints, an Army down bag my dad bought 2 of at a yard sale for $5.00 each. I spent my hard earned money on an Optimus Stove (the one that did not have the fold down front for the fuel tank to slide forward). I still have it and it still works but needs new gaskets. At a Scout Expo in Palm Beach in the early 70's I won my pride and joy, a new BSA nylon pack and aluminum frame. I think it was called Blue Horizons, but I could be wrong.

In the early 70's, when I was around 16, my troop went to North Carolina and we did the AT loop from Rock Gap to Standing Indian Mountain and down to Standing Indian Campground. The whole troop went but may of the boys weren't in shape and shouldn't have done the hike. One leader, a big Florida Highway Patrolman, carried a full size Coleman Stove in his pack to cook for the group. Six of us were ahead of the group and arrived at the shelter (I think it was Carter Gap). The rest of the group never arrived. If I hadn’t carried my own food and stove the six of us would have went hungry that trip. We did the hike as intended and met the rest of the group at Standing Indian Campground later the next day.

Well, I’m, still involved in Scouting and sharing my new found wisdom about light and ultra-light backpacking with my troop. Sorry for rambling.

Stoikurt

Tin Man
05-05-2006, 11:26
Stoikurt,

Brings back memories. My first pack was also the Yucca pack and it is very appropriately named. For my first hike when I was 11, my mother stuffed it full of canned food like spaghetti-o's and franks-n'beans - yumm. It was so heavy and uncomfortable, I fell behind and even (god forbid) started snivelling (oh, how I hate that!). Within a year, I bought the real boy scout official backpack with frame and moved smartly to the front of the line while hiking with the troup. When I was 14, I hiked 50 miles at Philmont and loved every minute of it.

Frolicking Dinosaurs
05-05-2006, 16:35
Check out this photo (http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b47/lowcarbscoop/1960.jpg) and thank God for ultralight gear.

Kerosene
05-05-2006, 17:33
My first pack was also a BSA Yucca, but fortunately I "upgraded" to a nylon Sears pack before my first long-distance backpacking trip. One of my buddies used his Yucca for the first 2 section hikes we did together in high school, until a strap fell off which he replaced with a hank of thick rope and a towel just before we took off on 130-mile section hike. Needless to say, he was in agony with 40+ pounds in that pack.

ex-tennesseean
08-30-2006, 23:01
Today, in one Denver thrift store, I found down vests from Gerry and Frostline. It tugged at my nostalgic bone, but I didn't buy either. They seemed so small, even the "L" size. Maybe folks were smaller back then? I know I was. There's a slow but steady stream of this almost-antique gear trickling out of the back of people's closets. Do you think I should start an eBay store for classic camp gear?

Once I found some 1978 issues of Backpacker magazine. In the tent survey issue, several dozen models were extensively reviewed. There were all kind of complex straight-poled and flat-faceted designs, but the only thing resembling a modern tent was the Jan Sport Trail Dome. I had it in the bright yellow-green.

Time passes, and things change. Twenty years ago, I felt so modern with my dome tent and Thermarest pad. If you'd have told me I'd someday be proud of my pup tent (MSR Trekker Tarp/tent) and my air matress (Big Agnes air core), I'd have thought your were crazy. If you'd have added that I'd own an RV, (16' Scamp), I'd have known you were crazy. But it's true, so maybe I'm crazy instead.

mrc237
08-31-2006, 09:25
Still have what we called (way back) a ''ski pack" that has a frame sort of ''T" shaped at the time it was considered the ''coolest'' of packs also have an old BSA mess kit with original ''wingnut'' Coleman stove, one of their firsts (need someone that knows how to repair it) Like the idea of an E-bay store. I enjoy showing my titainium gear to old scouters now and then.

atraildreamer
09-10-2006, 00:52
Mallory flashlight...lost it. Optimus 8R Hunter Packstove...stil have it.

Tinker
09-10-2006, 01:03
Strangely enough, I just had an old friend I hadn't seen in years return a Cannondale tent to me which I had originally purchased in 1984 and sold to him three or four years later. Its design is probably based on the Stephenson idea of an inner and outer tent sewn together. Unfortunately, the inner tent is breathable, so moisture passes through the "ceiling" and condenses on the underside of the fly, just as Jack Stephenson said it would if his tents had porus liners. Anyway, It's a bomber tent, an A-frame with a flexible poly tube replacing the pole section at the apex of the tent. The vestibule alone is big enough to sleep two small people. If I remember correctly, weight is right around 8lbs. Just for memory's sake, I think I'll take a photo of it and post it on my Webshots site.

In case it's new news to anyone here, Cannondale originally opened as a backpack, bike pack, tent, and sleeping bag manufacturer in Connecticut in the 1970s. Their bikes didn't hit the market until 1985, if I remember correctly.

hopefulhiker
09-10-2006, 08:22
I remember liking the old brass SVEA stove from the 70's and hating the old Boy Scout one pole , no floor,canvas 2 person tent from the 60's.

neo
09-10-2006, 09:22
I would like to discuss gear some of us have used and grown up with, old Kelty packs, the first orange Thermarests with the metal valves, old North Face A-frame tents with the snow tunnel doors(and their external frame Back Magic packs), the canvas Boy Scout Yucca packs, the old Nike Ascent and Approach trail shoes, Sundog packs, etc.
It is very hard to find this gear for sale nowadays but for some of us just remembering is enough.

:D yep gear sure has changed,progress is wonderful
but i would love to find a boy scout canvas d ring yucca pack
i miss that old pack,it would be an antique now:cool: neo

StarLyte
09-10-2006, 09:52
:D yep gear sure has changed,progress is wonderful
but i would love to find a boy scout canvas d ring yucca pack
i miss that old pack,it would be an antique now:cool: neo

Neo just go to a large flea market - I see this stuff all the time. I'm always tempted to buy some of these things just to add to my AT wall.

totally Boagus
09-10-2006, 11:30
I still wear for time to time my old Vasque hiker II's that I got at Appalachian outfitters in Oakton Va. in 1974. At that time you could order them in mixed sizes and I have a 10 for the right and a 10.5 for the left..... best fitting shoes/boots I've ever had.
Also from that time period I have a camp 7 down vest and a class 5 rain shell.

Northstarr
07-01-2007, 15:32
Still have and use my original Mallory flashlight. MSR type R stove. as well as 2 sleeping bags from Holubar - 'the Ptarmigan dual configuration'. Which included a polargaurd outer lightweight, with a 'slimline' down bag inner. I still have my original Royal light tent from Holubar - with the Egyptian cloth shell (although I did replace the factory floor at one time - but that usually only get used now for a spare tent for car camping. I also owned a Holubar 3 man "Chateau" but like a fool loaned it to a "friend" who packed it wet and I had to dispose of the tent in the late 80's, but still use the poles and rainfly. My first pack was a bright orange no name frame pack - that made many trips with the scouts, that I eagerly replaced in an around 1972 with an Eddie Bauer pack with a Jansport S frame. ( they actually did a crossover ) and made many miles and trips with that. It's downfall came after a bear attack on the Kekakabic trail in northern MN. After which I upgraded (78 or so) to an internal X frame made by Synergy Works. I still have the Synergy works pack but now have to add to the hip belt a bit to fit! I also bought a Duluth Pack in the 70's that still gets a trip or so every year in to the BWCA. That huge old portage pack will probably outlive me. I wore out my Sigg billy pot - sad to see Sigg got out of the cooking pots and fuel bottles. And still have my original thermarest with the metal valve. My youngest son uses that and my "old" bones sleep on a newer larger model.

JimM
07-01-2007, 20:05
Hi neighbor, I remember when our scout master bought the umbrella tents in the late '60's, although ours were 2 man. They were canvas, heavy, and worked well for about a year. Fortunately, he drove them to the site where we hiked into to camp. I think the forests have recovered from all those nasty trenching habits we used.
Our scout troop used military surplus pyramid tents and canvas Baker tents in the 60's. 3 of us did a 50 mile hike back then, camping under the stars...sure glad it didn't rain.
Jim

shelterbuilder
07-01-2007, 20:38
I had a no name bright orange pack from JM Fields dept. store. It had the nylon washers between the joints, an Army down bag my dad bought 2 of at a yard sale for $5.00 each. I spent my hard earned money on an Optimus Stove (the one that did not have the fold down front for the fuel tank to slide forward).

Stoikurt

My no-name pack was blue, not orange, but still had the nylon washers between the joints, and a nylon-web hip strap instead of a padded hip belt!:eek: I started out with an Army surplus WOOL liner sleeping bag, which was quickly replaced after my first cold-weather trip in college!!:D I still have - and still use - my Optimus 99 aluminum-body stove: it's a work-horse, and the roar of the burner is somehow a soothing intrusion of technology into the calm of the woods.

Programbo
07-01-2007, 22:12
I`m sorry I missed most of this thread as it is right up my alley...While i`m sure I am forgetting some things here is as best I can recall the equipment list from my 1977 thru:

Kelty Tioga Pack ...Size large..Green with an extra outside pocket swen on the flap
Camp 7 down bag
nylon stuff sack for sleeping bag
rain cover for pack
Ensolite foam pad 1/2" thick 6 feet long
plastic ground sheet..5' x 7'
2 man 5'x7' "pup" tent (With stakes,ropes,etc)
SVEA 123 stove
1 Qt SIGG aluminum fuel bottle
1.5 quart Mirro water bottles (rectangular with built in stoppers on top)
1.5 gallon collapsable water container (For times the shelter was far from a water source)
2 aluminum cooking pots (Medium and Large sizes)
plastic plate divided into 3 sections
plastic bowl
Knife,fork and spoon set
strike anywhere matches in waterproof container
Maps
Guide books
paperback book
notebook
pens
Kodak 120 camera
extra film
long burning hurricane candles
small flashlight
Heavy duty mountaineering boots
2-3 pairs of thick wool socks
2-3 pairs of light weight nylon/cotton inner socks
moccasins for in camp/town use
2 pairs of jeans
2 flannel shirts
underwear
rain poncho
insect repellant
toilet kit (soap,tooth paste,brush,etc)
wash cloth
towel
small mirror
100' nylon cord
sheath knife
first aid kit
sewing kit
*food and all related containers for 4 -7 days

Doctari
07-02-2007, 11:44
Going back to the late 50s:

I still remember when my dad brought home the new tent, all canvas, weighed a ton (I know cause I carried it out to the trash 30 years later) had 3 HUGE windows, covered by flaps that were about ¼ inch larger, when brand new. After the first rainstorm, the flaps were 2 to 3 inches smaller than the openings. I remember waking to floating in 4 inches of water on my air mattress during one rainstorm, good times. I think a 7' (steel) pole in the center, 4 (steel) poles for the corners & 2 to hole up the porch roof. About 500 feet of rope for supports (yes, it was likely less than 50', but it seemed like more). The tent would sleep 4.

My first backpack was also canvas, sleeping bag was cotton & kapok & I think the temp rating (if there even was one) was about 70. Campfires were how we cooked, I think the cook pot(s) may have been aluminum, am sure they weren’t cast iron. We slept on what we called “air mattresses” they were not designed for camping, but for laying on in a pool & even had a built in pillow, luxury!
My “Hiking boots” were kids sized work boots. I never hiked in long pants, but I did hike in jean cutoffs, white cotton tee shirt, cotton socks.
Walking stick was something we found at the start of every trip, & was just a stick.
I don’t remember what food we ate, by the time we hit camp I would have eaten rocks.

I was in 3rd grade I think when Nylon was introduced to civilian use, I really it wasn’t any lighter than canvas, just somewhat more waterproof & durable. My memory says that the first civilian nylon was the same size thread as the canvas, sort of a “hey it worked on canvas, why change” mentality. Within a few years it became lighter as nylon improved & the manufacturers became more comfortable with it. Imagine doing time travel & showing them a piece of Sylnylon.

AKKKKKK! I’m older than Nylon! Egad!

Dakota Dan
10-31-2007, 21:52
Wow, this site has really brought back some old memories. If it wasn't for military surplus and Boy Scout stuff I'd probably would never have made it out of GA in 76. I had a heavy surplus down bag, don't even know the temp rating, a surplus pad, a scout flashlight and canteen. Surplus Boots, wool socks, surplus Arctic hat with dog ears with fur, had some kind of long black liners and every sort of army cloths imaginable, mostly wool of course. Started off with a folding Sterno stove to cook on, lasted about 2 weeks before resorting to just a campfire using those wonderful surplus hexamine tablets to start a fire. Had a surplus "mess kit" at the beginning, had a cast iron skillet for a very short while and ended up with just an alum. pot, mess cup, and a large spoon. Slept under a tarp. Pack was a Kelty external, I kept this the longest after the trip, however it got sold at a yard sale years ago. Mail drops were not used like today. But Trail Names hadn't really started either. Parents and relatives helped keep us supplied a lot. One of my buddies was from Vermont and his dad and granddad was probably more responsible for our survival than anybody. I wasn't the person in the know when it came to the AT back then, didn't know about the ATC, my hiking friends did all that stuff, I just kind of followed and basically didn't want to be the one who chickens out first.
Here I am 30 yrs later searching the web (and WB) for a Star Trek Transporter or at least an easier way to hike the AT again with a demanding nephew.

coss
11-01-2007, 21:00
I grew up in NH, and spent each Thursday of the summer day hiking with the local community center. I've been up some of the NH peaks on the AT 25 times.

In the summer of '73, another 14 year old and I went on our first backpacking trip. Our parents actually let us do this, just the two of us. Today, they would get arrested for child neglect. Because I had read The Complete Walker about a dozen times, I was clearly prepared. We didn't bring enough food, ran out of water, got wet, and had a fine time. Wildcat is pretty steep when you are dehydrated and hungry.

I had what was considered to be very light gear for the day:
EMS external frame pack (last used 5 years ago).
EMS 5 degree down bag, 2 lb 10 oz (still use it).
Gerry Southface A frame tent, 5 lb 10 oz, (sometimes used for car camping, and I copied its rainfly for my silnylon tarp).
Open cell foam pad (still used inside for kids' sleepovers).
Gerry mini stove (last used for a nostalgia fling on an overnight with my sons about three years ago, fuel is out of production, and I figure I have about two days of use on the remaining cans before it's a museum piece).
Packboard poncho, bright orange, very heavy, worse when wet.
Leather hiking boots, took days to dry.
Cotton tee shirts, wool shirt, wool sweater, wool hat.

The base weight was about 27-30 lbs, as I recall. The last time I used some of this gear, I ran into an ultralighter and he opened my eyes to a 30 year update. My base weight is now about 6 lbs for summer trips. I no longer run out of food or water, but I still get wet and have a fine time.

Coss

Auntie Mame
11-01-2007, 21:11
We bought a Thomas Black double Egyptian cotton and down sleeping bag when we got married, it had a thin inner bag and a thick outer one, could be used as a single also. Very state of the art at the time, saved a long time for that.(!) Came from Moor and Mountain in Concord, MA, a haven for the New England trail-stricken of the time. Had the Svea, and a Trailwise orange frame pack, mail ordered from Ski Hut. Then there was the flashy red Gerry pack that had four horizontal zip compartments and an ex frame. Had a carpenter's chalk blue Gerry pup tent that went on many many trips, considered ultra light in 1970's. Had a run on making Frostline items, two down vests and a 60/40 jacket as was mentioned above. You could spot this crew coming from 10 miles off.

StarLyte
11-01-2007, 21:33
I see a "vintage" Ruck somewhere in our future here :D

I would LOVE to see all this old gear, especially being raised in a military family where everything was green, heavy, dark, but note SENSIBLE.

I know the thread is titled: Gear from the 70's and 80's, but this is taking me back a little.

My first pack was a hand-made one. I remember it well. I didn't want to wear it, but once I put it on...that was 41 years ago. Two years ago I found some footage of myself walking on the A.T. when I was a kid...I didn't know who it was at first ;)

I donated some old things to the A.T. Museum too.

Great thread.

rafe
11-01-2007, 21:53
No longer functional: Svea stove, ca '75. Fabiano Trionic leather boots, ca. '89. Still functional: Down bag with about 2.5 lbs of down in it, purchased new for $65 in '71. Whereabouts unknown: Eureka Timberline (2 person) tent, my first decent, modern double-walled tent, ca. '78.

From the late '80s, still in use or at least useable: OR Seattle Sombrero, Thermarest, Whisperlite, Camp Trails Adjustable II (external frame) pack, a couple more down bags. Headlamp with incandescent bulb and remote power unit (4 AA batteries.) Candle lantern. Mag-Lites. 35mm SLR camera. Eureka Gossamer solo tent.

take-a-knee
11-01-2007, 23:58
I still have and use my SVEA 123 and my Kelty frame pack. I had a North Face tent called the Tuolumnee that had a fabric tunnel opening instead of a zipper, I used it all over McKinley Nat. Park and sold it when I left AK. I had a zero degree Snow Lion sleeping bag and a Campmor biker down bag that I used inside it. I spent a few comfortable nights in that set up at about minus 25 or so in the open.

Jim Adams
11-02-2007, 00:23
hey, anybody out there have a Peak 1 external frame pack with the flexable nylon frame for sale?
Been looking for one for about a year now.

geek

skskinner
11-02-2007, 00:54
When I was in California in the 60's, I started by climbing Whitney with no tent, a Marine Corps 782 gear pack, ammo belt, canteens and sleeping bag was two wool blankets. Spent a cold night at that last camp before summit.
Later I bought a Sears Hillary, bright yellow frame pack that I dyed green in the sink, and two nalgene bottles, the cheap ones with the blue caps to fit in my side pockets, a $2.00 bright orange plastic tube tent, a blue foam mat, a $20.00 sleeping bag and a blue stuffsack and huge steel tent pegs. Also a p13 (???) sea ration can opener. I hiked all over the San Jasinto's with that state of the art gear.
I still have the P13, the water bottles and they don't leak, much, and the stuffstack has seen more miles than any one pack since. A friend of mine uses the pack every so often.
These are good memories, all.
Steve

rafe
11-02-2007, 00:58
I had to throw away my old (1990) Nalgene just recently. I left some lemonade mix in it for a bit too long and it got moldy. Tried and tried but could not get the moldy spots off. BTW, those old Nalgenes were actually 2 oz. lighter than the shiny new lexan ones.

Marta
11-02-2007, 07:05
I know what you mean about "that strong canvas smell".

I think the smell comes from the waterproofing treatment, more than from the fabric. There are some "waxers" (waterproof canvas jackets, mostly make in the UK or Ireland, very expensive, very popular with the horsey set) that smell just like an old tent.

Marta
11-02-2007, 07:23
... early 70's... Bread and Dinty Moore Beef Stew.

Remember Space Food Sticks? Like oversized Tootsie Rolls.


...We camped under plastic tarps.

This was my shelter of choice, after an unfortunate experience with a nylon poncho/shelter.

shelterbuilder
11-02-2007, 08:14
No longer functional: Svea stove, ca '75....

How do you kill a Svea stove??? Those things are almost indestructable!:eek:

rafe
11-02-2007, 08:16
How do you kill a Svea stove??? Those things are almost indestructable!:eek:

Right, that's why you see so many on the trail nowadays. :rolleyes:

shelterbuilder
11-02-2007, 08:23
Right, that's why you see so many on the trail nowadays. :rolleyes:

You don't see many on the trail these days because the alcy stove people have better marketing!!;)

I've had one Svea stolen out of my van, but I still have one that I use as a back-up stove for spur-of-the-moment trips, car camping, etc. Unless you blow out a tank seam, they're a pretty tough little unit.

Footslogger
11-02-2007, 09:21
hey, anybody out there have a Peak 1 external frame pack with the flexable nylon frame for sale?
Been looking for one for about a year now.

geek
========================================

I actually do have one of them in the storage room. Have owned it since the early-mid 80's but it never got much use. Hadn't thought about selling it before. Have always kept it with the thought of loaning out to someone who showed up on our doorstep and wanted to do some hiking with us out here in Wyoming.

You want me to dig it out and get a few pics ??

'Slogger

Litsuka
11-02-2007, 09:34
I know for the most part this is a nostlagia thread but some of the military stores still have this equipment or equipment i used in the infantry. I am going to be hiking next year and I dont have a lot of money to invest in lightweight modern gear, so i was thinking of using the stuff from the mil surplus stores, mostly gear such as on this thread, my question is would you do it? It should hold up ok? or is it worth plopping a thousand on new gear even though this older stuff is still good.

Fiddleback
11-02-2007, 10:11
A PS...

How many of you still have the leather 50 mile patch and Historical trails patch, or the National Jamboree patch from the BSA 50 anniversary in 1960?...These patches once sewed on packs that I carried and the merit badges, hiking, camping, pioneering etc are a box of my prize posessions.... boy those packs were heavy then... nice photo Kerosene.

Pan

As I grew into geezer-hood I realized that the true definition of "collectors' items" are 'things that you once owned but that your Mother threw away.':rolleyes: Other than my Eagle medal and the Order of Arrow 'dangler' that affixed to the flap-pocket button, all my Scout stuff is gone. That includes the Order of the Arrow lodge patch which I've seen going for $200. But what I really miss is my BSA Handbook from the early 60's...I even had a dream about it a couple nights ago (I'd consider therapy but, really, it's too late:o).

Of the 'things we grew up with' in Tipi Walter's post at the top of the thread; ... old Kelty packs,...Thermarests,...A-frame tents, the canvas Boy Scout Yucca packs,...Nike Ascent and Approach trail shoes, Sundog packs, etc...only the Yucca pack was around when I was backpacking with the Scouts. I still have mine and it was last used in ~84.

I have a fair amount of stuff bought in '82. I Last used the sleeping bag in '01 and about two years ago I used the Thermarest.

FB
p.s. I only missed three monthly troop outings in my 5+years; one of them was the 50-miler...my family was vacationing at my grandparents while my buddies earned their patch...:mad:

Kerosene
11-02-2007, 10:49
In the summer of '73, another 14 year old and I went on our first backpacking trip. Our parents actually let us do this, just the two of us. Today, they would get arrested for child neglect. Because I had read The Complete Walker about a dozen times, I was clearly prepared. We didn't bring enough food, ran out of water, got wet, and had a fine time. Wildcat is pretty steep when you are dehydrated and hungry.

I had what was considered to be very light gear for the day:
EMS external frame pack (last used 5 years ago).
EMS 5 degree down bag, 2 lb 10 oz (still use it).
Gerry Southface A frame tent, 5 lb 10 oz, (sometimes used for car camping, and I copied its rainfly for my silnylon tarp).
Open cell foam pad (still used inside for kids' sleepovers).
Gerry mini stove (last used for a nostalgia fling on an overnight with my sons about three years ago, fuel is out of production, and I figure I have about two days of use on the remaining cans before it's a museum piece).
Packboard poncho, bright orange, very heavy, worse when wet.
Leather hiking boots, took days to dry.
Cotton tee shirts, wool shirt, wool sweater, wool hat.
Wow, this description closely fits my initial backpacking experience: three 15-year old boy scouts hiking the 50-odd miles from Delaware Water Gap to Unionville during spring break 1973 wearing cotton shirts, jeans, Yucca packs, huge camp sleeping bags, open cell pads, no tent, Optimus 8R stove, ponchos, big clunky high-top work boots. It's a good thing that it didn't rain until the next-to-last day.

weary
11-02-2007, 14:41
My gear from the 70s is gradudally wearing out or has been lost. I still use the sleeping bag I bought about 1973. It originally weighed two pounds, but over the years it has lost a quarter pound (of down, I imagine.) But it is the only bag I usually use between April and November.

I still use one of the original self inflating sleep pads, ca unknown, but weight heavy. On the trail in 1993 I broke down and bought an ultra light version. I saved a pound but was less comfortable.

My old Kelty bounced off a truck and was run over by an inconsiderate motorist. The bottom has since worn out of the 1985 Lowe Expedition that replaced it, so this year I bought an LL Bean replacement.

I'm sure my 1970s Svea is still around here somewhere. But I can't seem to find it. I put it away too well after a trip long ago. I replaced it with a Whisperlight in 1990, but as I've pointed out too many times I switched to one of the original Zip Stoves. The aluminum softened during my '93 hike and the "C cell" power was a bit heavy so after I got home, I bought a second Zip that uses double As and has a better switch arrangement.

Weary

4eyedbuzzard
11-02-2007, 15:39
I still have an old (circa 1968)Camp Trails Horizon pack sitting in the garage - ugly orange and the urethane coating is delaminating but it was a good pack in its day, pretty lightweight as well. I also have and still use a Kelty radial super tioga from the early 90's. Still a great (and comfortable)pack for extended hikes, especially if you're hauling in supplies for backwoods camping/fishing and not just laying down trail miles. I also have an old Svea123 and an Optimus 8R, both in working condition. I've gone to using a Zip stove most of the time like some others here, mine is an older one which I modified by getting rid of the damper and adding a potentiometer with built in stop position so that I have a variable speed fan - much better than the original arrangement. Also have an old North Face down bag from the late 80's that I still use. 20° rated, weighs approx. 3 lbs, still fluffs up good, and I just can't justify replacing it - yet. I'll be tempted to buy a lighter warm weather bag if I get the chance to thru-hike in 2009. Also still have an old nylon covered open-cell foam sleeping pad from the 70's that still gets used for tent camping and as a floor cushion.

Tipi Walter
11-02-2007, 15:54
Wow, this thread has sprung back up to life! I was eating a pizza in a nearby restaurant recently and on the wall was an original boy scout Yucca pack hanging for no one to notice except me. Golden brown canvas and a frame. The one I used back in the late 50s did not have a frame, it hung on my neck and shoulders like a rock but I loved the thing and I remember those many D rings around the outside. Naturally for lashing on a bedroll.:)

My mom got me a Sears flannel sleeping bag back in 57-58 and it had very soft red flannel inside with deer jumping back and forth. It had a heavy cotton shell and had a peculiar "awning" drawstring headpiece that could be configured into an overhang. Too weird for me. But this bag was heavy, at the time I estimated it to be around 9 pounds. Massive and heavy. I loved it.

dessertrat
11-02-2007, 17:17
Are you sure that Jansport only makes kids' backpacks? I have a Jansport day pack (acquired about 4 years ago) and it's more than adequate for day hikes and trips.

I think I recall seeing a couple of big Jansport external frames for sale at one of the online stores, maybe campmor. They looked like serious expedition packs. This was quite recently.

RockDoc
11-02-2007, 22:16
Long ago I trashed out all the gear from the 1970's... Nothing remains.

Kelty pack died in a car crash; was rear-ended with the pack in trunk. I splinted the broken tubes up with wood and rawhide, which didn't last long. A Camp Trails pack met a similar fate; fell on ice winter hiking in Glacier NP and bent the frame. Later found out that they guarantee the frames!

Over the years, tried many tents, tarps, hammocks, you name it.

Ditto on stoves. Svea 123, the graduated to the MSR multifuel. Recently ditched it for a SnowPeak Giga.

Weaned on the Boy Scout heavy single wall tent. Spent many a heavy rain lying in pools of water, then had to pack it all up.

Earned the 50 mile patch in about 1970-72. We did the "Four State Hike" in a few days, traveling from the DC area. Yes, those four states. Now numerous thru-hikers do it in a single (long) day.

Ah, hiking memories!

4eyedbuzzard
11-07-2007, 08:41
hey, anybody out there have a Peak 1 external frame pack with the flexable nylon frame for sale?
Been looking for one for about a year now.

geek


Saw this one while surfing on ebay - auction ends at @ 17:00PST today!

I PM'ed you as well.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=320177167959&ssPageName=ADME:B:DBS:US:1123

Frolicking Dinosaurs
11-07-2007, 09:22
We still have our old external frame Kelty packs from about 1970, but we don't use them anymore.Was out in Tipi Walter's TJ's photos and found a pic of the pack (http://209.200.85.146/trailjournals/photos/5046/tj5046%5F112806%5F111316%5F196961.jpg)

ed bell
11-07-2007, 20:00
One of my backpacking buddies organizes a "retro retreat" every once in a while. Friends are encouraged to dig deep in the closet for the old stuff. Lots of fun, especially in winter. Lots of 70's winter gear that still holds up today. Most of my old stuff isn't that old, but starting with my beloved frame pack I can manage a few things. Don't forget your roots.:sun

Dakota Dan
11-07-2007, 20:42
I just got a brochure from Diamond Brand Outfitters up near Hendersonville,NC. I remember going to a "Gear Swap" & "Yard Sale" for customers/public at their store one year. I saw lots of outdoor vintage gear/junk at cheap prices. I'm not sure they still do that though, can't recall seeing it in their recent newsletters.

rickb
11-07-2007, 20:56
Nothin' better than listening to a bunch of weenies talking about their state-of-the-art stoves right before taking out the Svea, dousing it with way too much fuel to insure the prime, lighting the whole thing on fire in a place you probably shouldn't.

Then, when people finally catch their breath, cranking it up to drown out the comments that follow.

Crap gear has it place.

ed bell
11-07-2007, 21:40
Crap gear has it place.Aw, c'mon rick. Crap is a strong word.:) I love my old ****.:cool:

take-a-knee
11-07-2007, 21:56
Nothin' better than listening to a bunch of weenies talking about their state-of-the-art stoves right before taking out the Svea, dousing it with way too much fuel to insure the prime, lighting the whole thing on fire in a place you probably shouldn't.

Then, when people finally catch their breath, cranking it up to drown out the comments that follow.

Crap gear has it place.

I concurr with your first two paragraphs but I take issue with calling a SVEA 123 "crap gear".

Tipi Walter
11-07-2007, 22:13
Nothin' better than listening to a bunch of weenies talking about their state-of-the-art stoves right before taking out the Svea, dousing it with way too much fuel to insure the prime, lighting the whole thing on fire in a place you probably shouldn't.

Then, when people finally catch their breath, cranking it up to drown out the comments that follow.

Crap gear has it place.

Aw, fond memories. I remember many trips in 1983-83-85 when 5 or 6 of us with our separate Sveas would light up to cook at usual intervals thereby causing what looked like spontaneous combustion of the entire forest, each backpacker momentarily caught in a high yellow bursting flame. Then, some unfortunate friend ran out of fuel midway thru cooking and like an idiot gingerly refilled the hot stove and, yup, re-primed it and relit it. A large gaseous explosion followed, singeing hair and eyebrows, chest hairs and nasal passages. Calm followed and the cooking continued.

ed bell
11-07-2007, 22:36
Aw, fond memories. I remember many trips in 1983-83-85 when 5 or 6 of us with our separate Sveas would light up to cook at usual intervals thereby causing what looked like spontaneous combustion of the entire forest, each backpacker momentarily caught in a high yellow bursting flame. Then, some unfortunate friend ran out of fuel midway thru cooking and like an idiot gingerly refilled the hot stove and, yup, re-primed it and relit it. A large gaseous explosion followed, singeing hair and eyebrows, chest hairs and nasal passages. Calm followed and the cooking continued.See, this is my beef with handmade, lightweight stoves, no excitement.:D

Tipi Walter
11-07-2007, 23:08
See, this is my beef with handmade, lightweight stoves, no excitement.:D

Yeah, in the old days they made gear ratings based on the Pucker Factor, the Svea 123 having a high PF rating. Any piece of backpacking gear that was likely to fail or cause certain injury was given a high PF rating and people in the know back then went out to purchase such gear in the hopes that it might explode or as a corollary that it might actually work, intermittently. Boy Scout products all had high PF ratings with the early scout poncho rated "Sure To Fail" by the Pucker Institute.

People new to backpacking and currently backpacking can now only purchase gear Certain To Bore, as endorsed by the ratings system of the Yawn Institute. Hence your beef with the handmade, lightweight stoves.

ed bell
11-07-2007, 23:16
The kids these days, they just don't know what they are missing.:D

rickb
11-07-2007, 23:29
See, this is my beef with handmade, lightweight stoves, no excitement.:D

You must have figured out that alcohol flames can be invisible early on, huh?

Tipi Walter
11-07-2007, 23:29
The kids these days, they just don't know what they are missing.:D

Yes, and your retro-retreats must be a grabfest delight filled with bandages, emergency dust-offs, skin grafts and sucking chest wounds. That's just cooking supper with the Svea stove. Then there's the deep puncture wounds of the clevis pins stuck into thumbs, the snapped ankles atop 10 pound mud-encrusted lugged leather boots and the burned off lips sipping hot tea from a Sierra Cup.:)

rickb
11-07-2007, 23:35
Will candles ever make a come back? Not only more natural to read by, but they added a lot of color to the shelter floors.

rickb
11-07-2007, 23:38
Just wondering how you play mumblty peg with a Leatherman Micra. The more I think about the more I miss some of my **** gear.

Tipi Walter
11-07-2007, 23:53
The old candle lanterns could cause premature balding and deep slicing wounds from the knife when trying to pry out the rock hard old candle wax from the lantern's housing. There was a coiled spring beneath the candle that would clog with hot wax and then dry . . . hard . . . difficult to remove . . . difficult to breath . . . hair thinning . . .

Frolicking Dinosaurs
11-07-2007, 23:58
Yes, and your retro-retreats must be a grabfest delight filled with bandages, emergency dust-offs, skin grafts and sucking chest wounds. That's just cooking supper with the Svea stove. Then there's the deep puncture wounds of the clevis pins stuck into thumbs, the snapped ankles atop 10 pound mud-encrusted lugged leather boots and the burned off lips sipping hot tea from a Sierra Cup.:)Darn you, Walter, you've gone and made the Dino miss the good ol' days. Seriously, I still use some of my old gear, but I gave up the Svea long ago (I like have bangs, eyebrows and eyelashes....)

Tipi Walter
11-08-2007, 00:02
Darn you, Walter, you've gone and made the Dino miss the good ol' days. Seriously, I still use some of my old gear, but I gave up the Svea long ago (I like have bangs, eyebrows and eyelashes....)

The candle lantern took my hair off on the top and the Svea blew away the rest.

ed bell
11-08-2007, 00:12
Let's be honest, though. What is more beautiful than seeing the candle lantern induced glow inside the the tent upon returning from "the call of nature". :sun

Dakota Dan
11-08-2007, 00:12
The oldest piece of wearable gear I have is a Moonstone Thermal 2-layer shirt from the late 70's. It has wear showing where pack straps rubbed it. I have a new one, but I seem to always wear this one instead. It is very warm and really draws moisture off me. A-1 stuff.

Flush2wice
11-08-2007, 00:37
Still have my Woolrich 60/40 jacket. It doesn't fit too well any more.
Vasque Cascades anyone?

budforester
11-08-2007, 00:37
I was deeply saddened by the death of my Svea 123. The young whippersnappers around didn't understand what kind of stove I was trying to repair, much less where to inquire for parts. Years later,I found Svea sources online. I don't regret moving on to alcohol stoves; they're fun to tinker with, but some cold, lonely suppertimes I still get melancholy and miss my Svea.

Tipi Walter
11-08-2007, 00:40
Let's be honest, though. What is more beautiful than seeing the candle lantern induced glow inside the the tent upon returning from "the call of nature". :sun

I agree, and this is not something the newbies and youngsters have to miss, either. All my tent memories are great, even the night puking from my tent door in Grayson Highlands, but my fondest memories go back to following a one mile trail at night up to my tipi in a swirling snowstorm and stepping thru the snow into my lodge still warm from a woodstove and lit by lantern light. Hiking at night in a blizzard is remarkable,(and being on a known trail helps).

take-a-knee
11-08-2007, 00:40
I'll never quit using my SVEA, I don't know of a lighter stove that you can actually cook with, you can't cook with a whisperlite or a simmerlite, you can heat water but you can't simmer.

budforester
11-08-2007, 00:49
I'll never quit using my SVEA, I don't know of a lighter stove that you can actually cook with, you can't cook with a whisperlite or a simmerlite, you can heat water but you can't simmer.
I'm feeling melancholy again. Maybe Santa would....

Tipi Walter
11-08-2007, 00:53
I'll never quit using my SVEA, I don't know of a lighter stove that you can actually cook with, you can't cook with a whisperlite or a simmerlite, you can heat water but you can't simmer.

I have to agree with this. I can't remember how many times I'd get to camp and cook up a pot of lentils or brown rice with my Svea and the thing actually SIMMERED. All day. Purred like a little gas kitten. In those days of abject poverty, most of the food I carried was hard beans and raw rice, cheap but long-cooking items. A bag of lentils and a bag of rice . . . lasted for weeks.

But alas, the poor Svea. The little nail-like prongs would get lost in the dirt and then replaced by bent . . . nails, and they too would get lost. The on/off key would get tangled up in the housing, hard to remove. Priming would invariably waste gas and filling was never easy, especially midway thru a meal. The brass outer sleeve got bent easily and became harder to slide and turn on or off.

But it's a dang good stove and if I had to use one today I'd take it out and make it work and be a better man for it.

EWS
11-08-2007, 02:17
Svea 123's are still available here (http://www.packstoves.com/optimus%20pages/optimus%20svea%20stove.htm) if your looking to keep the building scar material Walter. I for one would like to hear you account of trying out the glory days again, as the memories were damn entertaining. Nova's will cook though if you're looking.

Tipi Walter
11-08-2007, 09:12
Svea 123's are still available here (http://www.packstoves.com/optimus%20pages/optimus%20svea%20stove.htm) if your looking to keep the building scar material Walter. I for one would like to hear you account of trying out the glory days again, as the memories were damn entertaining. Nova's will cook though if you're looking.

Thanks for the Svea link and pictures. The old stuff is hard to find nowadays(new) except for the Svea stove, an enduring brass bundle of memories. It's pretty enough to be hung on a wall, I should get some to give to young aspiring backpackers just starting out. It'll test their resolve and motivation to continue hiking and camping, while having it in their packs could also bring a certain fascination and wonder, possibly keeping them out longer on pristine trails. The stove is a paradox that I think escapes(mercifully)the backpacking youngsters today.

shelterbuilder
11-08-2007, 11:12
The old candle lanterns could cause premature balding and deep slicing wounds from the knife when trying to pry out the rock hard old candle wax from the lantern's housing. There was a coiled spring beneath the candle that would clog with hot wax and then dry . . . hard . . . difficult to remove . . . difficult to breath . . . hair thinning . . .

Personally, I could NEVER get my spring-loaded candle lantern to work right...so, I bought an oil light from Early Winters. I still use the thing from time to time. Fill it with oil, and it burns for hours. Any other old geezers like me remember???

Klezmorim
11-08-2007, 11:46
Yeah, yeah, yeah, I also still love my SVEA123 (purchased in '72). Alky stoves are nice, but in the winter, give me that old-time Swedish engineering.

But here are a few clinkers from the 80s that I wish I'd never puchased:

Solar-powered battery charger. What made me seriously think I could recharge a set of 4-AA batteries on a daily basis (walking in deep woods, no less) so that I could use my EverReady flashlight lantern for several hours each night?

AA-powered Electronic Mosquito Repellant. Gee, too bad my soloar-powered charger couldn't keep up with my lighting needs, much less my bug-chasing desires. Oh, and this clunker made a high-pitched squeal that succeeded only in repelling me! Got DEET?

Hi-Tec Pacific Crest Trail Boots. These canvas clunkers must've been designed by "Dr. Leaky." If wet, cold and blistered feet is your idea of fun, "these boots are made for (your) walkin'"!

Don't EVEN get me started on the topic of freeze-dried backpacking food from the '70s and '80s!

Care to add to my "scat" list? Anyone? Anyone?

Tipi Walter
11-08-2007, 12:03
How about the hand-held pump flashlight with plastic gears that threw off no real light and lasted 20 minutes tops before the gears shredded? "Doesn't need batteries!" Uh, okay.

Jim Adams
11-08-2007, 13:04
I was deeply saddened by the death of my Svea 123. The young whippersnappers around didn't understand what kind of stove I was trying to repair, much less where to inquire for parts. Years later,I found Svea sources online. I don't regret moving on to alcohol stoves; they're fun to tinker with, but some cold, lonely suppertimes I still get melancholy and miss my Svea.

What did you say...I CAN'T HEAR YOU!!!!:D

geek

Marta
11-08-2007, 13:41
Ya know how there was a hammock section at last year's Trail Days? What about a retro area? Wouldn't that be a sight? Sort of like a reenactment encampment.

Klezmorim
11-08-2007, 13:57
Ya know how there was a hammock section at last year's Trail Days? What about a retro area? Wouldn't that be a sight? Sort of like a reenactment encampment.

Ah yes, and we will eat Gorp and Trail Mix and Muesli as we sit around REAL campfires reminiscing about gals we knew with long, straight hair...

...And guys we knew with long, straight hair.

"Dude! You're hiking in Earth Shoes... cool!" (Note '70s spelling. "Kewl" is not cool.)

Heck, I might even bring my Boy Scout Mess Kit so I can fry up some FRESH eggs that I schlepped in a plastic Egg Holder. I'll bring salt & pepper in classic METAL 35mm film cans. (Yup, I still have a bunch!)

Hey, what's funny is that you can STILL buy a lot of that vintage sh...tuff at (ahem) Campmor.

Old hippies die hard, I guess (and hope!)

Marta
11-08-2007, 14:16
We've gotta dress like this:

http://www.trailjournals.com/photos.cfm?trailname=5051

shelterbuilder
11-08-2007, 14:17
GOD! I thought that I was the only person left alive who still had aluminum 35 mm film canisters!

Did you ever use the plastic ones as salt and pepper shakers???? (Way back when, some company made snap-on shaker lids.)

Klezmorim
11-08-2007, 15:27
GOD! I thought that I was the only person left alive who still had aluminum 35 mm film canisters!

Did you ever use the plastic ones as salt and pepper shakers???? (Way back when, some company made snap-on shaker lids.)

Nope. I just *knew* that those snap-on lids would snap OFF after a couple miles of jostling in my pack.

My hunch must've been correct because I found a set of them abandoned at Springer shelter a couple years ago.

"Gee, they looked like a neat idea in the store!"

Jim Adams
11-08-2007, 15:39
Nope. I just *knew* that those snap-on lids would snap OFF after a couple miles of jostling in my pack.

My hunch must've been correct because I found a set of them abandoned at Springer shelter a couple years ago.

"Gee, they looked like a neat idea in the store!"

They did work well and the lids didn't come off in your pack but a film cannister of salt or pepper would last you a month or more. If you only filled them part way...why carry something that big?:D

geek

Jim Adams
11-08-2007, 15:43
We've gotta dress like this:

http://www.trailjournals.com/photos.cfm?trailname=5051



No one else still dresses that way?

ah...

never mind.

How do I get to a selling used clothes site?:D

geek

shelterbuilder
11-08-2007, 15:50
They did work well and the lids didn't come off in your pack but a film cannister of salt or pepper would last you a month or more. If you only filled them part way...why carry something that big?:D

geek

Why did we carry a lot of the stuff that we carried back then? (Seemed like a good idea at the time....) Besides, I've always liked a lot of salt and pepper on my instant mashed potatoes and freeze-dried peas!:D

Klezmorim
11-08-2007, 16:03
...a film cannister of salt or pepper would last you a month or more. If you only filled them part way...why carry something that big?:D

After not so many years, I finally figured out 'Hey... I know how much salt I like to add to Recipe X. Let's just add that amount to the ingredients and leave the canisters at home!'

Ah, but before I got that smart, I not only carried full canisters of salt and pepper, but also oregano and garlic powder. *Then* I got real clever and bought one of those multi-chambered plastic doo-hickeys with 6! Different! Spices! http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=2212&memberId=12500226&storeId=226&catalogId=40000000226&langId=-1

Hey, it was the '70s, man!

shelterbuilder
11-08-2007, 16:17
... *Then* I got real clever and bought one of those multi-chambered plastic doo-hickeys with 6! Different! Spices! http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=2212&memberId=12500226&storeId=226&catalogId=40000000226&langId=-1Hey, it was the '70s, man!

Yeah, we have one of those multi-chamber doo-hickeys, too - it's up at the cabin now, and we still use it for cooking at "base camp". (What can I say - cooks like to putter in the kitchen!)

Tipi Walter
11-08-2007, 16:32
We've gotta dress like this:

http://www.trailjournals.com/photos.cfm?trailname=5051

Wow, great fotog showing typical backpackers carrying external packs and for the most part cotton clothing. It's all we thought we needed. The packs were all either Keltys, Camp Trails, Jansports or nebulous brands like Outdoor Products/Hillary/Academy. There was a backpacking revolution going on but only the climbing community and mountaineers had heated discussion of gear, we got what was available locally(no net)and made do.

Eric Ryback and Peter Jenkins popped up about this time with their Jansport(and other)packs and the studious amongst us took note: Let's get our gear and go!

shelterbuilder
11-08-2007, 21:09
Wow, great fotog showing typical backpackers carrying external packs and for the most part cotton clothing. It's all we thought we needed. The packs were all either Keltys, Camp Trails, Jansports or nebulous brands like Outdoor Products/Hillary/Academy. There was a backpacking revolution going on but only the climbing community and mountaineers had heated discussion of gear, we got what was available locally(no net)and made do.

Eric Ryback and Peter Jenkins popped up about this time with their Jansport(and other)packs and the studious amongst us took note: Let's get our gear and go!

I was a freshman in college in '73 - went on a weekend backpack trip with the college outing club and spent a BITTERLY COLD night (18*) on the Pinnacle in an old surplus Army mummy bag (the kind with the wool liner!). My friends were in no better shape with their junk bags. Half of us decided that if we were going to keep doing this sort of thing, we needed better equipment - the other half of the group, we never saw again!:D

Frolicking Dinosaurs
11-08-2007, 21:27
We've gotta dress like this:

http://www.trailjournals.com/photos.cfm?trailname=5051Sweet mother of pearl - I think I know some of those people from back in the day. :eek:

Footslogger
11-10-2007, 12:44
Just uploaded some pics of my old backpack (one of many) from the 80's. It's a Peak 1 from Coleman with the flexible frame. Dug it out of the gear locker the other day and was amazed at how well it had weathered. Also surprised at how light it was.

http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/files/1/5/0/IMG_2651-1.JPG
http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/files/1/5/0/IMG_2652-1.JPG
http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/files/1/5/0/IMG_2653-1.JPG
http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/files/1/5/0/IMG_2654-1.JPG

'Slogger

mudhead
11-10-2007, 13:42
I just wish I still could grow hair like that.

I saw a flexible pack similar to that at Wmart. How did it work back then? Functional?

Tipi Walter
11-10-2007, 14:50
I was a freshman in college in '73 - went on a weekend backpack trip with the college outing club and spent a BITTERLY COLD night (18*) on the Pinnacle in an old surplus Army mummy bag (the kind with the wool liner!). My friends were in no better shape with their junk bags. Half of us decided that if we were going to keep doing this sort of thing, we needed better equipment - the other half of the group, we never saw again!:D

"WE NEVER SAW THEM AGAIN" would be a great title for a backpacking book. Pretty much describes my life as a backpacker and my trips with fellow backpackers. But I've already picked a title for my backpacking book: 'PUMPING NYLON"

Hurley
11-10-2007, 15:08
I might not be that old, but back when I was in scouts are troop swore by using sterno stoves. Everytime I see a can of sterno now in the grocery store I have to laugh to myself. 15 kids in the woods all usng flammable goo is a sight to behold.

Lyle
11-10-2007, 16:01
Just uploaded some pics of my old backpack (one of many) from the 80's. It's a Peak 1 from Coleman with the flexible frame. Dug it out of the gear locker the other day and was amazed at how well it had weathered. Also surprised at how light it was.

http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/files/1/5/0/IMG_2651-1.JPG
http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/files/1/5/0/IMG_2652-1.JPG
http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/files/1/5/0/IMG_2653-1.JPG
http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/files/1/5/0/IMG_2654-1.JPG

'Slogger


One of the guys on the cross-country trip I was on back in 1980 got a sponsorship from Peak One. It amounted to them providing a pack like this (earlier model - one of the first) for him to use in exchange for advertising stories after the completion. After the trip was over, they did use his pictures and story but were always very careful to word the story that Phil had carried "a Peak One Pack the entire way". They failed to ever claim that it was the same pack throughout the trip. If I remember right, Phil went through four or five of those packs in the 4300 miles. He would contact them every so often and let them know that he needed a new one. Seems the buckle attacments would pull through the adjustment holes in the plasic frame, he could use a new hole for a while, but would eventually need a new frame. This was kinda a standing joke among the hikers.

Might work better today with the lighter loads everyone carries.

Footslogger
11-10-2007, 16:28
I saw a flexible pack similar to that at Wmart. How did it work back then? Functional?

===========================================

It worked amazingly well. In fact, I can't even remember why I decided to quit carrying it. Guess it was the whole "internal frame" trend.

Coleman made a short and regular torso version of this frame with a variety of bag styles and colors. My son carried one of the short torso Peak 1's for about 6 years in the scouts but when it came time for our Philmont trek he wanted something bigger and that would carry more weight.

'Slogger

amigo
11-11-2007, 22:40
Footslogger, I second everything you said about the nylon-frame Peak 1. I used mine from the mid-1980s until just a few years ago. I carried 25 pound loads on it, and I carried 50 pound loads (when I had to carry other people's gear.) Didn't matter, the thing is tough. Other than some dirt stains mine is in perfect condition. It's also light. I'd happily use it today if I hadn't gotten my base rig down to about 10 pounds.

Tinker
11-11-2007, 22:49
Last year, an old friend of mine that I hadn't seen in at least 10 years showed up where I was working at the time and gave me my old Cannondale Aroostook (sp?) tent that I sold him in the early 90's. I had offered to buy it back several times, but he declined. Since then, he's bought a new tent. The thing is still useable, but it's way heavy and sleeps three (I usually go solo and hammock). The last two church camping outings I loaned it out to some non-campers, so it's still earning its keep.

Fiddleback
11-12-2007, 11:14
"WE NEVER SAW THEM AGAIN" would be a great title for a backpacking book. Pretty much describes my life as a backpacker and my trips with fellow backpackers. But I've already picked a title for my backpacking book: 'PUMPING NYLON"

Both would be great titles. But I just became aware of an outdoor book title that, IMO, beats them all; "If You Didn't Bring Jerky, What Did I Just Eat?" :D

FB

slow
11-12-2007, 13:00
Just uploaded some pics of my old backpack (one of many) from the 80's. It's a Peak 1 from Coleman with the flexible frame. Dug it out of the gear locker the other day and was amazed at how well it had weathered. Also surprised at how light it was.

http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/files/1/5/0/IMG_2651-1.JPG
http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/files/1/5/0/IMG_2652-1.JPG
http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/files/1/5/0/IMG_2653-1.JPG
http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/files/1/5/0/IMG_2654-1.JPG

'Slogger
I still have a tan one.Great pack at the time and light.
My father shelled out 120 for that pack and still reminds me of it.:D

Pringles
11-12-2007, 13:29
Just uploaded some pics of my old backpack (one of many) from the 80's. It's a Peak 1 from Coleman with the flexible frame. Dug it out of the gear locker the other day and was amazed at how well it had weathered. Also surprised at how light it was.

http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/files/1/5/0/IMG_2651-1.JPG
http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/files/1/5/0/IMG_2652-1.JPG
http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/files/1/5/0/IMG_2653-1.JPG
http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/files/1/5/0/IMG_2654-1.JPG

'Slogger

I have one just like it (the Rambler). It was soooooo comfortable. I miss it.

I feel like I should pull it out, pack things in it, like my Svea 123 and my old wool shirt, and take the whole kit on a reunion hike.

Beth

V8
11-13-2007, 08:30
How about that 2-volume Rodale Press "Hiking the Appalachian Trail", nothing but trail journals, all 2,000 pages?

(Although I love the convenience of on-line trailjournals, I really wish people would print up their journals for people like me to buy. You just can't snuggle up to the laptop like you can a book at night before falling asleep. Nor can your mark up the good parts. (!) I know it's expensive to print, but a select few might be willing to pay the cost. Needn't be perfect writing, just a trail journal with the details - people, gear, weather, food, etc.)

3 1/2 lb. Snow Lion down sleeping bag, gorgeous luminous red, probably 0 or 10F bag, still kicking. Goes winter camping - a little much for backpacking.

Just read this thread through - wonderful!!

Tipi Walter
11-13-2007, 08:43
How about that 2-volume Rodale Press "Hiking the Appalachian Trail", nothing but trail journals, all 2,000 pages?

(Although I love the convenience of on-line trailjournals, I really wish people would print up their journals for people like me to buy. You just can't snuggle up to the laptop like you can a book at night before falling asleep. Nor can your mark up the good parts. (!) I know it's expensive to print, but a select few might be willing to pay the cost. Needn't be perfect writing, just a trail journal with the details - people, gear, weather, food, etc.)

3 1/2 lb. Snow Lion down sleeping bag, gorgeous luminous red, probably 0 or 10F bag, still kicking. Goes winter camping - a little much for backpacking.

Just read this thread through - wonderful!!

Although the book has been discussed in other posts, your're right, the two volume set is a very important part of the literature. How many times have I carried either Vol I or Vol II(never both!)on a backpacking trip and read laying in my tent with delight?

I still think of some of the hikers in those books, Elmer Onstott living on just sunflower seeds and raisins, the Green Beret guy who somehow lost his boots but ran into a group of Berets in the woods training, one of which gave him the boots off his feet. Or Dorothy Laker, a 3 time thru-hiker who carried a head of lettuce or cabbage for the "crunchiness" and who stashed her pack to hitch into town and coming back could not find where she put it.

Of course, there's Grandma Gatewood's multiple trail accounts along with an early Eric Ryback account he wrote of his AT experience. I need to google these Rodale Press books and see if they are still available.

rafe
11-13-2007, 09:32
How about that 2-volume Rodale Press "Hiking the Appalachian Trail", nothing but trail journals, all 2,000 pages?

Ayup. For those folks who attempted thru-hikes between its publish date and the arrival of the internet and the web (and web-based journals) it was a fantastic resource. But I have to say, after reading those two volumes, Bryson's book was a godsend. Some of those old geezers (Garvey, et. al) just took themselves way too seriously. Musta all thought of themselves as heirs to Thoreau... with the same priggishness and dryness in their writing styles.

Tipi Walter
11-27-2007, 21:17
I want everyone that has posted to this thread to know about a great website:

www.oregonphotos.com/Backpacking-Revolution1.html (http://www.oregonphotos.com/Backpacking-Revolution1.html)

We talk about the stuff and fondly remember vague brands and gear, but this website offers up some concrete facts and gives meaning to it all.

Dakota Dan
11-27-2007, 23:46
I want everyone that has posted to this thread to know about a great website:

www.oregonphotos.com/Backpacking-Revolution1.html (http://www.oregonphotos.com/Backpacking-Revolution1.html)

We talk about the stuff and fondly remember vague brands and gear, but this website offers up some concrete facts and gives meaning to it all.


I just skimmed over a few of the articles and I love reading this kind of stuff. I saved it for continued reading. thanks Tipi

Smile
11-28-2007, 00:12
I really enjoyed looking through some of the oldest books of hiker photos in Harpers Ferry, that was awesome. Some very cool haircuts too, and some interesting striped socks on a few guys with "farah faucet' hairdo's :)

ed bell
12-05-2007, 20:08
My guru turned me on to this cool site:http://www.pbase.com/mad_monte1/_retro_outdoor_gear&page=all Some really cool pictures of some vintage stuff.:cool:

Tipi Walter
12-05-2007, 23:09
My guru turned me on to this cool site:http://www.pbase.com/mad_monte1/_retro_outdoor_gear&page=all Some really cool pictures of some vintage stuff.:cool:

You outdid yourself this time, ed. There's several pic I'll have to study carefully, later, at my leisure.

Marta
12-10-2007, 11:23
When I was in the Smokies this weekend, the other people at the campsite had a Svea stove. They were big into cooking (they carried butter! fresh vegetables! a coffee press!) and were cooking away on it.

They had started off the trip with a Whisperlite as well...which had gone supernova on the first night out. I had been planning to rehab my MSR stove for multi-person, winter trips, but changed my mind.

Since my husband loves retro stuff in general, we've ordered him a Svea for Christmas. (We haven't decided yet whether he's going to give it to me, or whether I'm going to give it to him. That depends on what else we come up with to put under the tree.) I'm impressed that the things are still for sale, as are all the replacement parts. I hope the new ones are as sturdy and function as well as the vintage ones.

http://www.packstoves.com/optimus%20pages/optimus%20svea%20stove.htm

Oldgame
04-23-2008, 20:12
See picture. Second pack and pair of boots I used on my 1974 trek GA to ME. Everything weighted about 45 pounds. Today, I pack about 32 pounds, including a tent and 2 qts of treated water. In '74, I used a tarp (and you didn't need to treat water). I used unleaded gas in the optimus 8R stove; now I use an alcohol stove. Everyone wore jeans and flannel shirts. There's even a net t-shirt in the picture. The book was probably 2 pounds. My god, my back hurts just thinking about carrying all this stuff.

Oldgame
04-23-2008, 20:13
See picture. Second pack and pair of boots I used on my 1974 trek GA to ME. Everything weighted about 45 pounds. Today, I pack about 32 pounds, including a tent and 2 qts of treated water. In '74, I used a tarp (and you didn't need to treat water). I used unleaded gas in the optimus 8R stove; now I use an alcohol stove. Everyone wore jeans and flannel shirts. There's even a net t-shirt in the picture. The book was probably 2 pounds. My god, my back hurts just thinking about carrying all this stuff.

Klezmorim
04-23-2008, 21:03
See picture. Second pack and pair of boots I used on my 1974 trek GA to ME. Everything weighted about 45 pounds... Everyone wore jeans and flannel shirts. There's even a net t-shirt in the picture. The book was probably 2 pounds. My god, my back hurts just thinking about carrying all this stuff.

Hey!... HEY!!...HEY!!!! Give me back my stuff!!! Aw man, half that stuff in your picture looked like mine! I LITERALLY laughed out loud when I saw the full-size image. Then again, I guess everyone who "hauled pack" in the mid-70s carried the same junk.

I had completely forgotten about owning one of those %#^&*)!$*!@ net shirts. The *theory* made sense... 'trap pockets of air next to skin for insulation....' In actual use, though, the "net" became sweat-logged and started to saw into the flesh of my shoulders, with a li'l help from *my* 45-pound pack. I tossed that textile-based torture device after wearing it only on ONE weekender.

Good Grief, I even carried the same model of flashlight, though mine was blue. I bought two of 'em because the rocker switch went out on me both times - and that after sucking the juice out of a couple dozen batteries. Feh! Those things made a candle look good!

Solzhenitsyn, huh? I bet you even voted "Democrat" you first couple times at the poll. :D:D:D (The preceding was a humorous comment meant only to entertain and not to inflame or incite. I'm Klezmorim and I approve this joke.)

Lyle
04-23-2008, 21:20
Ok, just read through this entire thread. Used some things that weren't mentioned yet, but will list all that I can think of even if they have been mentioned.

One of the early Kelty Tioga Packs, blue (See FD post #107)

Sierra Cup

Sierra Sneakers - early light-weight boot, tan canvas uppers (10") with tan gum lug sole

Grasshopper propane stove - three legged, propane tank one of the legs - HEAVY!!!

http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/files/7/6/8/2/primus_grasshopper_stove.jpg

SVEA 123 with Sigg Nesting Cook Kit (incorporates wind screen/pot support/two pots/lid - designed to nest with the SVEA

Sierra Designs Starflight Tent - yellow, stretched pyramid - very popular

Jansport Synthetic Brass Bed - see post #165 for photo & description - mine was Hollofil top, Polarguard bottom - VERY colorful
http://www.oregonphotos.com/Resources/JanSport-colorful-bags-1978.jpg

Mallory, later DuraBeam flashlight - rectangular, easy to hold in mouth while cooking, small

Mica Candle lantern - rectangular, collapsible - Mica did not break as readily as glass

Spring loaded candle lantern

Gerry Food Tubes with the often breaking plastic clip holding it closed - pain to fill and clean

Vasque Hiker II's - Stiff, blister forming and HEAVY!!!

And last but not least, for winter hiking, Woolrich Wool Knickers with Wigwam Ragg Wool Knicker Socks - what a fashion statement, but very versatile - easy to ventilate when you got overheated.

This is all the old and for the most part popular stuff I can think of. Thanks for the trip down memory lane.

max patch
04-23-2008, 22:28
See picture. Second pack and pair of boots I used on my 1974 trek GA to ME. Everything weighted about 45 pounds. Today, I pack about 32 pounds, including a tent and 2 qts of treated water. In '74, I used a tarp (and you didn't need to treat water). I used unleaded gas in the optimus 8R stove; now I use an alcohol stove. Everyone wore jeans and flannel shirts. There's even a net t-shirt in the picture. The book was probably 2 pounds. My god, my back hurts just thinking about carrying all this stuff.

Kendall Mint Cake!!! Havent had one of those in 20 years.

And that flashlight was standard issue back in the day.

No dinner was complete without the Squeeze Parkway. Switched to olive oil after my thru.

Montego
04-23-2008, 23:25
Had an off-brand external frame pack. It had a built-in square wire loop used to hold the top (loading) open while you stuffed your things inside. The pack was made of the brightest orange coated nylon you could imagine, with a non-anodized aluminum frame fitted together with nylon spacers between the separate pieces (squeeked bad), held together with screws. I remember piercing my thumb more than once while trying to remove the wire rings holding the shoulder strap or waist belt pins in.

Tent was the typical canvas "A" frame pup tent with a three part metal ended wooden poles and "clothes line" type guy wires. Of course it came with long, square, notched, wooden pegs. Bug netting? What's that?

Sleeping bag was a Coleman canvas rectangular with full zip and red cotton lining. I don't think they even had a temp rating back then, but still do remember the deer print.

Sleeping bag pad.......naw :)

Used a Coleman(?) green combo one burner stove/catalytic heater that used Coleman stove fuel. Great little stove though heavy by todays standards. I haven't seen one of those combos is many, many years.

Cooking was with a 2 qt. aluminum pot w/lid, 8" steel frying pan, plastic mixing bowl, regular silver ware, can opener, pot holder, full kitchen utensils (slotted serving spoon, regular serving spoon, spatula, and knife) roll of paper towels, roll of aluminum foil, camp toater, coffee pot, and of course, the Sierra Cup.

Clothes - why cotton, of course. Plaid or chamois long sleeved shirts (for bug protection), waffle long underware, blue jeans, white sport socks, rubberized poncho (Army surplus), and heavy, high top, leather hiking boots with lug soles.

Toiletries included a cotton wash cloth and bath towel, bar soap, deoderant, shampoo, metal camp mirror,

Ah, the candle lantern. Like others posters have said, I also had a folding candle lantern with mica lenses as well as a Ray-O-Vac 2 x D battery silver flashlight and was a jammin' with a transistor radio. Walking sticks were what ever we found along the way.

Oldgame
04-24-2008, 10:55
Glad you enjoyed the picture. I voted for Pat Paulson in 1972. He didn't win.

BJ Hiker
07-13-2010, 10:01
Jansport used to be an industry leader in backpacks. There is a thread on this site where a girl (I forgot her name) is selling her Mom's old Jansport. It's funny that jansport only makes kids backpacks for school books now. My sister and her family hiked from Gainesville FL (Go Gators) to Portland , Oregon (Remember the Walkin' Warriner's) in the late 70's. Nike sponsered them and they used state of the art Jansport Backpacks. In honor of her I use a similar backpack that I bought from Winton at Neels Gap off his wall of old school backpacks.
You can view it in my photo gallery on this site. the name on the top says it belonged to Mitch Wynn. Has anybody heard of him? Was he an old school thru hiker?

We just bought my son (17 Eagle Scout) a new Jansport External Frame pack. Its a great pack. They must be back in the backpacking business.

sbhikes
07-13-2010, 12:04
I had a candle lantern. I do not remember ever throwing it away.

I never really had any super cool backpacking gear in the 70s. I was pretty young then. My dad got a one-man tent way back then. Apparently it was a new idea. I still have the one-man tent. It's horribly claustrophobic and the condensation and sagging guarantee you'll be soaking wet by morning.

Mags
07-13-2010, 14:32
My guru turned me on to this cool site:http://www.pbase.com/mad_monte1/_retro_outdoor_gear&page=all Some really cool pictures of some vintage stuff.:cool:


Mad Monte is a cool guy. One of 'legendary' class of 1977 PCT hikers...

rickb
07-13-2010, 18:43
Did I miss anyone waxing poetic about their Frostline kits?

My mother made me not only one of their top of the line bags (still have it) but also a tent.

I am sure mothers still support their trail walking kids these days, but who else on this list can make such a claim.

Kerosene
07-13-2010, 18:52
Did I miss anyone waxing poetic about their Frostline kits?My girlfriend and eventual wife had her first, and last, experience with down garment construction sewing me a pair of Frostline down booties with "overboots" with a cordura/neoprene sole. I tossed the soles a few years later, but I wore the booties on cold winter nights up until a few years ago.

Wise Old Owl
07-13-2010, 19:08
As much as I like reading this thread about all the yesteryear stuff we all came to love, I have cleaned it all out except two pieces. An Andre Jamlet 2 person Tent and a Sweva Stove. Its currently Rick B's avatar just above. I couldn't fix the leaky original, it lasted some 25 years so I bought a new one and gave it to my dad a couple of years ago. Just so he could stop by the side of the road and make tea.

The new gear will bring new memories. Time will make backpacking enjoyable. Hammocks will eliminate West Verginnie ground floods & down pours and waking up on floating Big Agnes mats. So things will change and the landscape will still be here to be enjoyed by the young masters.

Deacon
07-13-2010, 19:13
Had an off-brand external frame pack. It had a built-in square wire loop used to hold the top (loading) open while you stuffed your things inside. The pack was made of the brightest orange coated nylon you could imagine, with a non-anodized aluminum frame fitted together with nylon spacers between the separate pieces (squeeked bad), held together with screws. I remember piercing my thumb more than once while trying to remove the wire rings holding the shoulder strap or waist belt pins in.

Tent was the typical canvas "A" frame pup tent with a three part metal ended wooden poles and "clothes line" type guy wires. Of course it came with long, square, notched, wooden pegs. Bug netting? What's that?

Sleeping bag was a Coleman canvas rectangular with full zip and red cotton lining. I don't think they even had a temp rating back then, but still do remember the deer print.

Sleeping bag pad.......naw :)

Used a Coleman(?) green combo one burner stove/catalytic heater that used Coleman stove fuel. Great little stove though heavy by todays standards. I haven't seen one of those combos is many, many years.

Cooking was with a 2 qt. aluminum pot w/lid, 8" steel frying pan, plastic mixing bowl, regular silver ware, can opener, pot holder, full kitchen utensils (slotted serving spoon, regular serving spoon, spatula, and knife) roll of paper towels, roll of aluminum foil, camp toater, coffee pot, and of course, the Sierra Cup.

Clothes - why cotton, of course. Plaid or chamois long sleeved shirts (for bug protection), waffle long underware, blue jeans, white sport socks, rubberized poncho (Army surplus), and heavy, high top, leather hiking boots with lug soles.

Toiletries included a cotton wash cloth and bath towel, bar soap, deoderant, shampoo, metal camp mirror,

Ah, the candle lantern. Like others posters have said, I also had a folding candle lantern with mica lenses as well as a Ray-O-Vac 2 x D battery silver flashlight and was a jammin' with a transistor radio. Walking sticks were what ever we found along the way.

What memories. That is exactly the way I remember my trip to the Region Seven Explorer scout canoe base in Wisconsin, back in 1962. Those were the best times of my life.

Klezmorim
07-13-2010, 19:16
Did I miss anyone waxing poetic about their Frostline kits?
...
... who else on this list can make such a claim.

Big smile, here. I bought 2 down-filled kits from Frostline's competitor, Holubar in the mid-70s; one for mittens, one for booties. My leetle seester stitched 'em up for credit in the sewing portion of her "Home Economics" class.(Do they even teach that anymore???)

I think Holubar's kits were unique in that the down came compressed in water-soluble plastic pouches. You just sewed the kit to a point, inserted the pouches and finished off the sewing. No down mess to deal with. Run the completed project through a gentle wash and the pouches dissolved. A tumble-dry got rid of the water and fluffed the down. Sweet!

The back of one of my mittens melted a bit on one of their first trips out when I get a little too close to the fire. A friend had given me a nice piece of rabbit fur, which my mother used to stitch over the "wound." Added a nice touch, I must say! The mittens finally bit The Big One when I repeated the "fire trick" sometime in the late 90s/early 00s. No amount of rabbit fur could resurrect them. RIP, Little Mittens (sniff). Your were only (about) 25 years old.

The booties? Still got 'em... 35 years and going!

Rick Hancock
07-13-2010, 19:30
Let's see, My first backpack was a Boy Scout Yucca Pack, no frame and the straps were attached with bolts/nuts/and fender washers. My cook set was an old army canteen with the bowl/cup that slid on the bottom of the canteen which slid into a od canvas holder and web belt. 2 person canvas tent you each carried your own half. A sears cotton flannel sleeping bag with an attached waterproof cover that was often shown erected over a cozy hiker that was supposed to keep the weather off! And for comfort a multi beamed air mattress.

In the late 70's thru hiked in 1980, I bought a Kelty D4 and a down bag from Best (you went into the store, picked what you wanted and it came down a conveyor belt) it was a great bag cost maybe $60 and I used it for years. I had a 3 piece nesting billies (Bull Dog Brand) cook set $9.10 from REI, a svea stove from LL Bean that cost less than $20, an ensolite pad that I used for way too many years, a 3piece metal knife/fork/spoon, Sierra cup, Vasque Cascade Boots, nylon knickers, down vest, I can't remember everything but there was a ton more. Oh yeah remember the Hank Roberts Mini Stove?

Weren't the good old days a hoot! We were so young.

Hikes in Rain
07-13-2010, 19:34
Did I miss anyone waxing poetic about their Frostline kits?

My mother made me not only one of their top of the line bags (still have it) but also a tent.

I am sure mothers still support their trail walking kids these days, but who else on this list can make such a claim.

Hadn't posted about that. Back in '74, right after my wife and I moved from Illinois to Alaska, she burned herself out making me a nice down parka from a Frostline kit. Hasn't sewed since. (Can't blame her!)

Still have it, used it on the southern half of the Smokies a couple of years back, when it kept me nice and toasty (not to mention making a great pillow).

Frostline kits. Man, flash from the past.

Cookerhiker
06-28-2011, 09:26
So last weekend, I tented at HighTop Hut in Shenandoah NP where I was the only weekender among 10 thruhikers, all of whom were young. I'm packing up after breakfast, putting away stuff in a matter-of-fact manner while one of the young guys is staring at me as I place the mug and small pan inside the large pan. "That's really cool - they fit together nice." Me: "I'm 63 years old, I've been backpacking since the 70s (>20 years before these guys were born), and I've updated all my gear over time except these - the same pots I used back then. The smaller one is from an old Boy Scout cookset." I think what impressed them the most was not only did the 2 pots nest, they each had little handles on the lids and large handles on the sides. They still work fine for me so why replace them?
116891169011691

weary
06-28-2011, 13:26
So last weekend, I tented at HighTop Hut in Shenandoah NP where I was the only weekender among 10 thruhikers, all of whom were young. I'm packing up after breakfast, putting away stuff in a matter-of-fact manner while one of the young guys is staring at me as I place the mug and small pan inside the large pan. "That's really cool - they fit together nice." Me: "I'm 63 years old, I've been backpacking since the 70s (>20 years before these guys were born), and I've updated all my gear over time except these - the same pots I used back then. The smaller one is from an old Boy Scout cookset." I think what impressed them the most was not only did the 2 pots nest, they each had little handles on the lids and large handles on the sides. They still work fine for me so why replace them?
116891169011691
All that is new is not better. I still carry a lot of old stuff. My zip Stove. Pots. 40-year-old Summer sleeping bag. (It gets lighter as the down slowly escapes. Started at 2#. Down to 1 3/4.)

ScottP
06-28-2011, 14:50
I ride a lime green made in the USA bicycle from the 1970s with mostly original Italian components (new bottom bracket, cranks, and front wheel). It's nice :)

Koinseb
06-28-2011, 14:54
I still use my original Trangia stove that I bought 28 years ago :-)

harryfred
06-28-2011, 21:09
Are you sure that Jansport only makes kids' backpacks? I have a Jansport day pack (acquired about 4 years ago) and it's more than adequate for day hikes and trips.
Jansport makes it all including internal and external frame packs and luggage. I want a external pack and I have my eye on a couple of theirs. I have two day packs of theirs and I love them. One I use as an "overnighter" My youngest was using it as a book bag his last two years of school.

EdP
10-27-2011, 10:36
Yup, I still have the old "A" frame North Face tent with the snow tunnel entrance, but have not used it since the mid `80's. Great floor space for a 2 man, head space - not so much. Still have a Kelty external frame pack too. One of my sons used it on a recent hike we took in Mt Rogers NRA. Still have a Svea 123R Climber stove too. I don't think a better stove was made until the Primus MFS. Still using a NF Chamois down bag I bought 40 years ago from the long defunct Skimeister shop in North Woodstock NH.

Odd Man Out
10-27-2011, 12:54
I still have my old Eureka Timberline tent from forever ago. Smells really bad right now and almost unusable. Weighs a ton. But you can still buy them new at the camping stores.

Don Newcomb
10-28-2011, 08:38
I misplaced my Holubar "Rocky Mountain Sweater" and regret the loss almost every day. It was a light down jacket with elastic cuffs and collar and metal snap buttons. It would stuff to the size of a softball. I still have my Woolrich hiking knickers and the long wool socks that go with them but the pants "shrunk" ( ;) ) and no longer fit me.

WingedMonkey
10-28-2011, 11:36
I would like to discuss gear some of us have used and grown up with, the canvas Boy Scout Yucca packs,

This is my Yucca Pack from Philmont 1970. Still have it in a cedar chest, to keep the Florida mildew off.

100 bonus points to anyone that can guess what that is hanging on the back of the pack. Above the stuff sack. (the stuff sack with the sleeping bag, air mattress and half of the tent)

I brought it all the way home as a gift/presentation to my Explorer Post Adviser.

WingedMonkey
10-28-2011, 11:39
This is my Yucca Pack from Philmont 1970. Still have it in a cedar chest, to keep the Florida mildew off.

100 bonus points to anyone that can guess what that is hanging on the back of the pack. Above the stuff sack. (the stuff sack with the sleeping bag, air mattress and half of the tent)

I brought it all the way home as a gift/presentation to my Explorer Post Adviser.


Opps, I forgot the pic

14236

hobby
10-28-2011, 12:04
has to be the US flag!

do I mone on to the bonus round?


Opps, I forgot the pic

14236

hobby
10-28-2011, 12:04
<move> i mean

WingedMonkey
10-28-2011, 12:09
has to be the US flag!

do I mone on to the bonus round?

Zero points.....we would have never been allowed to carry a flag draped on a pack in 1970.

:p

Tipi Walter
10-28-2011, 12:15
Yup, I still have the old "A" frame North Face tent with the snow tunnel entrance, but have not used it since the mid `80's. Great floor space for a 2 man, head space - not so much. Still have a Kelty external frame pack too. One of my sons used it on a recent hike we took in Mt Rogers NRA. Still have a Svea 123R Climber stove too. I don't think a better stove was made until the Primus MFS. Still using a NF Chamois down bag I bought 40 years ago from the long defunct Skimeister shop in North Woodstock NH.

If you ever want to get rid of your NF tent, let me know.


Opps, I forgot the pic

14236

I too started out with the Yucca---see below:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-kcjR43AJlWw/TIJy62ZxmKI/AAAAAAAAA6U/aN-Q2DJCQwM/s491/1963.jpg
Here I am as a young squirt with my frameless Yucca pack. Texas, 1963.

WingedMonkey
10-28-2011, 12:33
I too started out with the Yucca---see below:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-kcjR43AJlWw/TIJy62ZxmKI/AAAAAAAAA6U/aN-Q2DJCQwM/s491/1963.jpg
Here I am as a young squirt with my frameless Yucca pack. Texas, 1963.

I'm not sure if I still have my frameless one, it got loaned out so many time to kids in the family, I'll have to look now.

:sun

Tinker
10-28-2011, 12:50
If you ever want to get rid of your NF tent, let me know.



I too started out with the Yucca---see below:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-kcjR43AJlWw/TIJy62ZxmKI/AAAAAAAAA6U/aN-Q2DJCQwM/s491/1963.jpg
Here I am as a young squirt with my frameless Yucca pack. Texas, 1963.

Was Texas a state back then ? ;) :D

Oh, right. That's where JFK was shot. I still remember the day :(.

I didn't start hiking 'til the 70s. My first pack was a Browning frame pack, not too bad as cheap packs go back then.

I'm still trying to remember the name of my Cannondale tent. I thought it was the Aroostook, but it has one vestibule and tapers towards the foot end. It makes a great play tent or an overnight backyard tent for young visitors.

Papa D
10-28-2011, 15:03
I still have an orange thermarest with the steel valve - looks like I seam-sealed or put glue all around it to keep it from leaking, I thru hiked with a chouinard megamid which, to this day, I would recommend if you can find one - I had a single hiking pole (sort of a staff) and it was the perfect height for the Mega-Mid - you just staked it out, crawled under, pack and all, and put up the pole - you went on one side of the pole and the pack went on the other - if you selected the site right, you didn't even need the ground-sheet - I had one though - packs and stoves have become much better - do you remember the water bottles with the little plastic stopper? The top went over the stopper and then screwed on ..... this is sort of dating me.

Tipi Walter
10-28-2011, 15:24
I still have an orange thermarest with the steel valve - looks like I seam-sealed or put glue all around it to keep it from leaking, I thru hiked with a chouinard megamid which, to this day, I would recommend if you can find one - I had a single hiking pole (sort of a staff) and it was the perfect height for the Mega-Mid - you just staked it out, crawled under, pack and all, and put up the pole - you went on one side of the pole and the pack went on the other - if you selected the site right, you didn't even need the ground-sheet - I had one though - packs and stoves have become much better - do you remember the water bottles with the little plastic stopper? The top went over the stopper and then screwed on ..... this is sort of dating me.

I spent a winter in a Chouinard tipi tent, a pyramid. It was a miserable single poled tarp susceptible to lifting off the ground like an umbrella in a high wind. In fact, I usually had to hold down the leading edge during all night windstorms as the thing never bolted flush to the ground or was way too small when attempted.

http://www.trailspace.com/assets/8/1/0/67600/TRIP-123-576.jpg

Does anyone remember these old water bottles from the early 1980's? They were all I ever carried.

Slo-go'en
10-28-2011, 15:59
Does anyone remember these old water bottles from the early 1980's? They were all I ever carried.

Ah yes, I used one for a very long time. It finally bit the bullet a few years ago. But I still have my Camp Trials (rembemer them?) 7 pound external frame pack, EMS "A" frame 2 person tent (still use it for car camping), SEVA 123 stove and nesting alum pots. With my Limer leather boots, I could go "retro" with out much effort (expect to carry it all).

Feral Bill
10-28-2011, 22:50
I could happily go retro with most everything beside my sleeping pad. Too old for cc foam now.

Don Newcomb
10-28-2011, 23:01
Does anyone remember these old water bottles from the early 1980's? They were all I ever carried. Remember? I still carry one. Made in France. I wish I could find some more.

Don Newcomb
10-28-2011, 23:06
I could happily go retro with most everything beside my sleeping pad. Too old for cc foam now. Your options were closed-cell foam, open-cell foam and air mattress. I remember one air mattress with individual clear inflatable tubes in a nylon slipcover. What did they call that? I do not look back fondly at my 3/4 length cc foam pads.

Feral Bill
10-29-2011, 01:01
Way back when, I had an air mattress that developed a slow leak, depositing me into late season snow every two hours for a couple of endless nights in Harriman SP. Until the Thermarest came along I swore off inflatables. I tried a closed cell foam pad on a retro gear weekend a couple of years ago and hated it. Natually, I still use my trusty SVEA on almost every trip.

4eyedbuzzard
10-29-2011, 01:14
Still have my old Camp Trails Horizon pack from the 70's. The urethane is delaminating from the packcloth, and the shoulder strap and hip belt padding is hard and cracking - but the frame and packcloth (other than the urethane) is still okay. I thought about cutting out one of the crossmembers and getting new straps etc for it to use as a "heavy hauler" for fishing trips. Wasn't that heavy a pack, maybe 4 lbs?

lemon b
10-29-2011, 10:44
Remember the LCE with a Butt Pack setup? The trick was keeping equipment dry. I used 6mil plastic rubber bands and twine.

WingedMonkey
10-30-2011, 15:36
This is my Yucca Pack from Philmont 1970. Still have it in a cedar chest, to keep the Florida mildew off.

100 bonus points to anyone that can guess what that is hanging on the back of the pack. Above the stuff sack. (the stuff sack with the sleeping bag, air mattress and half of the tent)

I brought it all the way home as a gift/presentation to my Explorer Post Adviser.

14267


OK, the photo is not all that clear (and it's 40 years old) so I will lower the score to 10 bonus points and give a clue.

In the fable of Sampson, he used one to kill a bunch of people.

:p

4eyedbuzzard
10-30-2011, 15:45
14267


OK, the photo is not all that clear (and it's 40 years old) so I will lower the score to 10 bonus points and give a clue.

In the fable of Sampson, he used one to kill a bunch of people.

:p
Wow. Cool find. And yeah, it would have been very hard to figure it out from the pic.

Papa D
10-30-2011, 17:14
we used to coat our boots in SNO SEAL - - I did this and wore gaiters - - when our feet got wet, we swore we needed to re-SNO-SEAL - or that we didn't get the stitching well enough - ha ha

Elder
10-30-2011, 17:39
Jawbone of an Ass (burro)?

WingedMonkey
10-30-2011, 18:19
Jawbone of an Ass (burro)?

And brought it all the way home to present at our annual award banquet.

:banana

RetroGear
11-03-2011, 02:11
Remember? I still carry one. Made in France. I wish I could find some more.

I still have, and still use, the ones I bought from Ski Hut in Berkeley in 1972. Superb water bottles ... but they weren't made in France.

1431114312

Tipi Walter
11-03-2011, 07:51
I still have, and still use, the ones I bought from Ski Hut in Berkeley in 1972. Superb water bottles ... but they weren't made in France.

1431114312

Oh yes, I remember this little decal on the bottom of the bottles. Thanks for the pics.

Don Newcomb
11-03-2011, 08:55
I still have, and still use, the ones I bought from Ski Hut in Berkeley in 1972. Superb water bottles ... but they weren't made in France. Hmmm. What was made in France? I remember those soldered fuel bottles with the brass caps. They always leaked. Those were made in France. We ditched them as soon as something better (which was just about anything) came along.

Pound Hound
11-14-2011, 18:34
My oldest gear story is about a candle lantern that I bought in 1968. The outfitter said it would be very useful. I carried it on about 4 trips and never used it. Never saw anyone else with one until my wife and I were at the Fontana Hilton in 2009 and "Grumpy" pulled one out of his pack. After he pulled a lot of other stuff out of his pack I asked him how heavy his pack was and he responded, "For 20 years in the army I carried a 90 pound pack. This is a lot lighter." So I questioned him about the candle lantern and he showed me how he used to to dry out his hiking boots. Very clever I thought but mine is still in the box labeled "Never take hiking but can't throw or give away".

Pound Hound and Garage Man

Mike2012
11-18-2011, 20:52
Camptrails external frame pack, peak 1 stove that did not behave in cold weather and whatever that foam sleeping pad was. I can't even find a picture of it on Google.

Tinker
11-18-2011, 20:58
At the REI store where I worked in the 1980s, we (privately) used to refer to the Peak 1 as the "Leak 1" stove, due to its many fittings which often would, well, leak. It didn't happen to folks who only used it once in a while, but it often happened with regular use and no maintenance.

The Whisperlite stove, otoh, was a great bargain for all of the employees of the store. They just had to wait 'til someone overprimed their nearly new stove and returned it due to the resulting fireball :). I got mine for $16.93 at an "attic sale" and still have it. I have never had a problem with it that a 10 minute cleaning wouldn't fix.

BradMT
11-19-2011, 10:32
I spent a winter in a Chouinard tipi tent, a pyramid. It was a miserable single poled tarp susceptible to lifting off the ground like an umbrella in a high wind. In fact, I usually had to hold down the leading edge during all night windstorms as the thing never bolted flush to the ground or was way too small when attempted.

http://www.trailspace.com/assets/8/1/0/67600/TRIP-123-576.jpg

Does anyone remember these old water bottles from the early 1980's? They were all I ever carried.

I carried that bottle all through the 70's and early 80's...

atrerunner
11-19-2011, 11:23
I still have (from 1972 throughhike): CampTrails packbag, Svea123, the hiking-pole aka broomstick that that saved my life, original Nalgene bottle made in West Germany, the spoon that i carried the whole way, and the REI down jacket that they wouldn't replace or repair after the baffling broke down, although it did help a lot in the early months, since i started on Feb. 03. I went through 2 of the aluminum CampTrails frames on the trip, and to their credit, they mailed me a new one each time.

BradMT
11-20-2011, 15:43
I've still got a pile of 1970's gear... still have my circa 1975 SVEA 123... it works great. Sigg Pots. 1979 North Face VE24, 1978 Early Winters Goretex Bivy Bag, 1977 REI ash-stocked ice axe... and on and on.

kayak karl
11-20-2011, 15:53
http://inlinethumb43.webshots.com/42858/2586353220104593866S600x600Q85.jpg

icewater

BradMT
11-21-2011, 09:52
On a 2.5 mos AT hike I was charged by a big Boar at that very shelter in July 1977...

atraildreamer
11-21-2011, 14:50
Yeah-that's right. I've seen some vintage gear there that was never even used! It was like they were frozen in time.

Hi Jason! Long time since I saw you post.

Don't overlook trash day! Cruise the neighborhood before the the DPW gets there and you'll be surprised at what you find. Especially around colleges when the kids are going home at semesters end in the summer. Besides outdoor equipment, there is a lot a good stuff they don't want anymore. One guy scored 5 (!) laptops at one stop. I "salvaged" 3 backpacks, a Kelty Tioga, a Coleman :(, and a no-name, all externals, and a Army winter sleeping bag (weighs about a ton), this way. D'ont be shy, just think of it as taking an active part in the recycling effort.

atraildreamer
11-21-2011, 15:25
Being Army brats, we kids had a lot of cool green stuff. My favorite piece of gear was an evacuation bag that was used by the Mash style helicopters with external cots to lash the wounded. It was large enough to put a fully clothed soldier in and had a wolf fur collar,and built in underpad for insulation.So large it had it's own duffle bag. When my dad brought it home, it was unused and had a plastic bag in it that I later learned was a body bag! Medics would use the body bag as a liner to keep the sleeping bag cleaner. I still have the bag, and have some fine memories of it in college as a 'double' bag on camping trips. :rolleyes:

The only way they'd get me to ride on the side of one of those helicopters is if I was unconcious, or extremely drunk!

moytoy
11-21-2011, 17:21
1443314434144351443614437
My pack from 1060-61 and the steel frame of my dad's pack.

sweeper
11-21-2011, 17:53
I used an Alpenlite for my section hikes in 72&73, an optumus 8r, ensolite pad, fly off my timberlite for a bivy, Kastlinger boots (5# from Austria), I think I had a 20deg North Face bag. Ate a lot of Minuit rice and canned tuna, my favorite desert was instant pudding, cut-off blue jeans, cotton ts, I did have a SD 60/40 for a jacket

Kerosene
11-21-2011, 19:18
Ah, yes -- I always lusted for a 60/40 jacket but couldn't afford one back then.
.
I relied on Sears' first nylon external frame pack, which was quite narrow and actually kept me from overloading beyond 45 pounds. As my dad worked for Sears, I also picked up a surprisingly heavy down/feather mummy that was orange and sky blue. I also relied on the venerable Optimus 8R white gas stove and slept on a closed cell pad. Eventually I bought a 5.5 pound Walrus tent. My early boots were dark green high-top workboots with an early Vibram sole; really difficult to put on when they're frozen!

max patch
11-21-2011, 21:03
I used a SVEA 123 and from Gorham north hiked off and on with a guy who had the Optimus 8R. Good stove! When we cooked supper it sounded like a plane was taking off.

My boots died at Hanover; I had my wife mail me a pair of used JC Penny work boots I used when doing yard work. Worked fine.

Used a piece of wood instead of "trekking" poles. Still use a piece of wood.

mirabela
11-21-2011, 22:51
Lots of familiar stuff in this discussion. I had one of those candle lanterns, a gift from my parents. I enjoyed having it when I was a GMC shelter caretaker. I did my first few years of backpacking with a Svea 123 stove. I had a Frostline kit backpack and fleece pants (thanks, Mom). I had a Wenzel tent that I got for five bucks at a garage sale, a four-sided single-wall pyramid with one pole in the middle. I did my winter hiking in Canadian wool cargo pants, a waxed anorak, dachstein mittens and a giant pair of Sorels.

I was really moving up in the world when I bought helly-hansen polypros (the blue kind with the white dotted lines), Sherpa snowshoes with neoprene decking, and a baggy pair of goretex trousers from Campmor.

Tinker
11-22-2011, 10:17
On a 2.5 mos AT hike I was charged by a big Boar at that very shelter in July 1977...

I'm assuming that you mean boar (as in hog).
Boar is also used when referring to a male bear (hey, I didn't invent the language!). :)

BradMT
11-22-2011, 21:51
I'm assuming that you mean boar (as in hog).
Boar is also used when referring to a male bear (hey, I didn't invent the language!). :)

Here in Montana bear country, I typically only refer to male Grizzly bears as "boars"... but yes, technically, black bear males are boars too.

Yes, the boar I refer to in the Smokies was a Russian Boar (pig)... likely went around 600+ lbs. Was about as big as they get.

Cookerhiker
05-13-2012, 15:09
My retro tent - set this up last week and re-waterproofed the fly. Used it in the 1970s and 80s, right up until I finally bought a Sierra Designs Clip Flashlight in '91. My hiking partner in those early years and I shared it quite well. I carried it and didn't complain about the weight!

The label is still on it: Morsan. How many WBers remember Morsan?

159321593315934

oldbear
05-13-2012, 15:38
My Sierra Designs Glacier tent : Twin A-frame , aluminum poles the diameter of your finger , orange , tunnel , zipped cookhole & chimney
A Sierra Designs Hex Tent ...looked like a teepee w/ three poles meeting at a central machined aluminum hub
My Svea 123 stove + Sigg cookkit...still the best stove I've ever owned
CampTrails frame packs that got upgraded to Kelty frame packs
Kelty's airplane style quick release metal buckle saved my life late one afternoon when I mistook a snow covered lake for meadow.....oops
I'm still thinking about trying to find a full length Kelty Serac eternal frame pack for next years thru hike
American made Vasque boots / Norwegian welts and brass screws ; great boots ...and resoleable
Fishnet underwear that you quickly discovered needed to be purchased w/ the solid cloth shoulders
or else your shoulders look like they get branded w/ a waffle iron
Peter Storm oiled wool sweaters that reeked of lanolin But always kept you warm
Laminated hickory ice axes
My Sierra Designs 60/40 parka
My trusty old Gerry Makalu parka which had double quilt construction
My TNF winter bag which had 11" of loft , double quilt construction , 3" tube spacing using overlapping V tubes and in a sign of the times had the official color of Acapulco Gold
A couple of EMS down bags

Frog
05-13-2012, 19:44
I still have my Jansport D 3 Pack I loved the way it packed and hated the hip belt. My first boots were Vasque that weighted about 2.3 lbs each and took nearly 10 years to break in. My first winter tent was a North Face V E 24 and was the best piece of gear that I used back then. It was a great tent. I do still have one of the old Thermarests with the metal valve and it still works for a summer trip. I also still have a coleman stove (white gas ) and it does still work although i want take it on a trip but will use every once in a while at the house for an extra outdoor burner.

RCGator
05-13-2012, 20:19
I had the same orange and blue Hillary bag, it replaced an Army feather mummy bag that weighed at least 10 pounds.

Cadenza
05-13-2012, 23:09
I still have my canvas Boy Scout pack from 1965.

And,....I still use my 1980 Svea 123 stove!

http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/ff143/61panhead/Camping/BoyScout_age10.jpg

Wise Old Owl
05-13-2012, 23:54
Wish I had the original to work with. This took 20 minutes.

Kerosene
05-14-2012, 07:16
I still have my canvas Boy Scout pack from 1965.

And,....I still use my 1980 Svea 123 stove!But did you save the car, which would now be worth a pretty penny?

Llama Legs
05-14-2012, 08:50
the big green bags are what we use to call "sleeping bags". They had the attached awning you could build over your head ;)

http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/files/2/7/1/2/5/climbing001_thumb.jpg (http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=44990)

Tipi Walter
05-14-2012, 10:16
1443314434144351443614437
My pack from 1060-61 and the steel frame of my dad's pack.

I remember my old Yucca and your pics bring back memories.


I still have my canvas Boy Scout pack from 1965.

And,....I still use my 1980 Svea 123 stove!

http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/ff143/61panhead/Camping/BoyScout_age10.jpg

I'll have to include my picture too!

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-kcjR43AJlWw/TIJy62ZxmKI/AAAAAAAAA6U/aN-Q2DJCQwM/s491/1963.jpg
Here I am in Texas in 1963 with my faithful Yucca. I always wore it frameless. I may of posted this one before.


the big green bags are what we use to call "sleeping bags". They had the attached awning you could build over your head ;)

http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/files/2/7/1/2/5/climbing001_thumb.jpg (http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=44990)
Your pic reminds me of an old bag I got in 1957 in heavy green canvas which rolled up exactly like yours.

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-GQxriGnysLs/TIJ7KnDrqPI/AAAAAAAAA7U/y2EUq7dJomM/s443/old%2520canvas%2520bag.jpg
This pic is all that is left of it as it rotted away years ago.

Connie
05-17-2012, 10:18
We could have a thread on how many of us had a Boy Scout Yucca Pack.

I carried mine frameless, as well. I saved up to purchase a Kelty Tioga frame pack, that broke. I never purchased a frame pack, again.

I carried a torso-length ensolite foam pad, a SVEA 123 stove, and a sleeping bag with a canvas extension you could pitch overhead. I had an Eddie Bauer Expedition vest, an Eddie Bauer Radar O'Reilly down filled hat, an REI "flood sale" British Ventile mountain jacket, Raichle Palu boots, Ragg socks and U.S. Army surplus wool pants with suspenders. I wore a lightweight wool shirt. I had a U.S. Navy wool watch cap.

I used a 6-mil 8' x 10' plastic tarp with grommets I put in myself.

I had a long ice axe I used as a walking stick and for self-belay on mountain snow fields and glaciers. I also carried a mountaineering rope for glaciers. I had glacier glasses to protect my eyes. I had Millar Mitts to protect my hands.

After that, I got into more lightweight gear.