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neo
02-17-2006, 18:01
i just dont understand why people sleep on he ground in tents or in shelters
hammocking is more comfortable and more versitle,i dont get it,i dont make since,it sucks sleeping on the ground,i guess each to their own,sleeping on the ground just sucks:cool: neo


http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=7105&c=577

neo
02-17-2006, 18:02
most people are afraid of change even if for the better:cool: neo

Fiddler
02-17-2006, 18:19
I roll around at night and fall out of bed a lot. When I'm on the ground I ain't got far to fall.

BW2006
02-17-2006, 18:25
Why??? My pelvis hurts when I sleep in a hammock for extended time plus I like to do yoga and stretches while in my tent and that's not easy to do in a hammock. I can also sit in my tent on a cold wet day with my sleeping bag around me and cook in the vestibule of my hubba.

Jack Tarlin
02-17-2006, 18:26
A few quick replies off the top of my head, Neo, 10 reasons while I'll keep my tent:

1. Many folks (maybe MOST folks) don't want to hammock for six months.
While they may be comfortable in a hammock on a short-term basis, most
folks don't wanna do it for the whole trip. Many folks sleep poorly in
them.

2. One can do things in tent or a tarp that one cannot do in a hammock:
Prepare a cold meal; change one's clothes, do gear repairs, do first aid/
personal stuff, etc. In a hammock, you can essentially lie down. Period.

3. There are wonderful places on the Trail that are treeless.....balds,
mountain tops, open fields, grassy areas, sandy beaches. If you're
a hammock hiker, you won't be staying in any of these places.

4. You'll sleep colder in a hammock, especially in the early and late days
of your trip.

5. You can't get your pack or most of your belongings in a hammock, meaning
you leave them out, where they can get wet, bothered by animals, etc.

6. Hammocks are no good if you're oversized or heavy. Most hammocks for
"Big and Tall" guys either cost around $200.00 bucks, or weigh at least
three and a half pounds. Big guys can find tents or tarps that weigh
and cost less.

7. In really horrible weather, or if injured, you can kill a whole morning,
or even a day, in your tent or tarp if you have to. If you try to spend
16 hours, awake, in a hammock, you'll go out of your mind.

8. Hammocks aren't much use if you come up with a player to be named
later that you might want to spend the evening with. Unless you're a
Bulgarian contortionist, engaging in romantic intimacy in a hammock
is generally not worth the trouble.

9. Some bears are known to be partial to "pinata" parties, if you catch my
drift.

10. Snakes, including poisonous ones, can all climb trees.

On that last note, Neo, sleep well! :)

general
02-17-2006, 18:27
hammocks really suck if you are a stomach sleeper. i just don't want to wake up in the morning feeling like i have been bent in half backwards.

general
02-17-2006, 18:28
i also like to sleep with my wife. to the best of my knowledge that would be impossible in a hammock.

Kerosene
02-17-2006, 18:35
Maybe neo is just more enlightened and living on a higher plane (pun intended).

TwoForty
02-17-2006, 18:36
I sleep on the ground to give neo something to talk about.

BW2006
02-17-2006, 18:39
My husband and I tried to sleep in a hammock together on one trip. I ended up sleeping on the ground underneath it. It was way more comfy!

neo
02-17-2006, 18:42
A few quick replies off the top of my head, Neo, 10 reasons while I'll keep my tent:

1. Many folks (maybe MOST folks) don't want to hammock for six months.
While they may be comfortable in a hammock on a short-term basis, most
folks don't wanna do it for the whole trip. Many folks sleep poorly in
them.

a.hammocks are more comfortable.

2. One can do things in tent or a tarp that one cannot do in a hammock:
Prepare a cold meal; change one's clothes, do gear repairs, do first aid/
personal stuff, etc. In a hammock, you can essentially lie down. Period.

b.thats easy,i can do all that i use an oversized tarp.

3. There are wonderful places on the Trail that are treeless.....balds,
mountain tops, open fields, grassy areas, sandy beaches. If you're
a hammock hiker, you won't be staying in any of these places.

c.i have hung in my hammock over bluff edges,how is that for a few.

4. You'll sleep colder in a hammock, especially in the early and late days
of your trip.

d.thats what pad or under quilts are for.

5. You can't get your pack or most of your belongings in a hammock, meaning
you leave them out, where they can get wet, bothered by animals, etc.

e.thats what my guy lines are for.

6. Hammocks are no good if you're oversized or heavy. Most hammocks for
"Big and Tall" guys either cost around $200.00 bucks, or weigh at least
three and a half pounds. Big guys can find tents or tarps that weigh
and cost less.

f.they make them for up to 350 lbs,if ya are more than that,ya probley dont hike.

7. In really horrible weather, or if injured, you can kill a whole morning,
or even a day, in your tent or tarp if you have to. If you try to spend
16 hours, awake, in a hammock, you'll go out of your mind.

g.wrong

8. Hammocks aren't much use if you come up with a player to be named
later that you might want to spend the evening with. Unless you're a
Bulgarian contortionist, engaging in romantic intimacy in a hammock
is generally not worth the trouble.

h.who needs company.

9. Some bears are known to be partial to "pinata" parties, if you catch my
drift.

i. i never see bears stealth camping away from sloppy campers.

10. Snakes, including poisonous ones, can all climb trees.

j.i like snakes.

On that last note, Neo, sleep well! :)


the question is still the same,why sleep on the ground:cool: neo

BW2006
02-17-2006, 18:43
I'm not on the ground! I am on my nice comfy therm a rest surrounded by bug netting!

neo
02-17-2006, 18:44
Maybe neo is just more enlightened and living on a higher plane (pun intended).

nice way to say it lol:cool: neo

Jack Tarlin
02-17-2006, 18:45
Geez, Neo, silly me.....I kinda thought I'd just given ten different answers to your question.

Sorry you missed it.

general
02-17-2006, 18:46
hammocks are too heavy.

neo
02-17-2006, 18:48
Geez, Neo, silly me.....I kinda thought I'd just given ten different answers to your question.

Sorry you missed it.

this is one thing we agree on,we love our jetboils:cool: neo
http://www.climbinggear.com/products/listing/item77.asp

neo
02-17-2006, 18:49
hammocks are too heavy.

mine wieghs 1 lb 10 oz

Pacific Tortuga
02-17-2006, 18:51
To each their own ,hammocks leave my back in extreme pain and that offsets any advantages of them for me. They have never felt comfortable for longer than my tropical buzz has lasted. :-? I'm sure my ballast has nothing to do with a hammocks comfort.

neo
02-17-2006, 18:54
hammocks are too heavy.

i bet my hammock and oversized tarp wiegh less than your tent:cool: neo

general
02-17-2006, 18:55
mine wieghs 1 lb 10 oz

my sil shelter is big enough for a threesome and weighs 15oz.

neo
02-17-2006, 18:55
To each their own ,hammocks leave my back in extreme pain and that offsets any advantages of them for me. They have never felt comfortable for longer than my tropical buzz has lasted. :-? I'm sure my ballast has nothing to do with a hammocks comfort.


thats why i sleep in a hammock,my back feels better,my wife back feels better in her hammock also:cool: neo

Jack Tarlin
02-17-2006, 18:56
Hey, Neo, I've prepared many a dinner on a rainy night with my JetBoil safely and happily sitting on the ground in the vestibule of my tent, or on the ground outside my tent, but within my reach, where I lie warm, dry, and happy, til my dinner's ready.

How many hot meals have you prepared in your hammock, Neo? Unless you wanna turn yourself into a flaming burrito, cooking while lying recumbent in a hammock is generally considered a questionable practice, no?

All right, that's eleven reasons. Need more? :)

Fiddler
02-17-2006, 18:57
I said it before, I'll say it again. I ain't no monkey. I ain't gonna swing from no tree.

MOWGLI
02-17-2006, 18:58
Hammocks are alright. Youngblood loaned me one of his last year for a 3 day hike. It was fun. It was different. But I'll stick with a tent - thank you very much.

Jack Tarlin
02-17-2006, 19:00
For a three-day trip, depending where you're going, I think they're fine.

On a 173 day trip, no.

BW2006
02-17-2006, 19:03
To each his own!!! Hike your own hike and leave everyone elses alone!

Vi+
02-17-2006, 19:10
Neo,

You wonder why people choose not to sleep in a hammock.

I sleep on my back. My hips and heels make great contact with the bottom of the hammock but my knees are not well supported. My knees arenít great even without hiking, so by morning Iím feeling some real pain. This canít be a good sign, starting off hiking.

I like the idea of hammocks; I have one permanently set up at my house and take another with me car camping, but they both tension out almost flat. I also have two backpacking hammocks.

They just donít work well for me.

stupe
02-17-2006, 19:11
I like a hammock because my back feels great after sleeping in it ( I can't figure out why sleeping in a U shape is easier on my back) , it's easier to find a spot to pitch it ( rocks, slopes, etc, are no problem ), and I don't get crawling bug and tick bites.
I just can't get used to hanging there like a pinata. I feel safer on the ground, as silly as that seems.

Almost There
02-17-2006, 19:14
One of my favorites was watching Orangebug set up his hammock using a questionable tree....and a few minutes later snap as it all came down with him inside!!!Funny...yeah, but I'll keep my tent, I like to sit up and eat when it's cold and wet and be in my sleeping bag.

neo
02-17-2006, 19:17
Hey, Neo, I've prepared many a dinner on a rainy night with my JetBoil safely and happily sitting on the ground in the vestibule of my tent, or on the ground outside my tent, but within my reach, where I lie warm, dry, and happy, til my dinner's ready.

How many hot meals have you prepared in your hammock, Neo? Unless you wanna turn yourself into a flaming burrito, cooking while lying recumbent in a hammock is generally considered a questionable practice, no?

All right, that's eleven reasons. Need more? :)

since i stealth camp i rarely cook and eat and sleep in the same area:cool: neo

neo
02-17-2006, 19:18
I like a hammock because my back feels great after sleeping in it ( I can't figure out why sleeping in a U shape is easier on my back) , it's easier to find a spot to pitch it ( rocks, slopes, etc, are no problem ), and I don't get crawling bug and tick bites.
I just can't get used to hanging there like a pinata. I feel safer on the ground, as silly as that seems.

way ta go rob,cool:cool: neo

neo
02-17-2006, 19:20
To each his own!!! Hike your own hike and leave everyone elses alone!

just asking the question why,nothing wrong with asking a question lol:cool: neo

Catsgoing
02-17-2006, 19:35
Why did you use to sleep in a tent Neo? Most have invested hard earned money in our tent gear. And have homes to up keep. It isn't that cheap to switch over.... Plus in some areas there isn't strong trees to hold BIG BUTT WOMEN LIKE ME :) In South Florida we have skinny Pine Trees that are so spread out you can't use a hammock. So far I haven't seen anyone hammock hanging down south here...

Your pretty much a newbie hanger. I remember when you hated hamock hanging......

To each there own..... For now it is me and my tent and that $85 dollare REI inflated mat... That was a waste of money.....

SWEET DREAMS NEO

Crazy Larry #1
02-17-2006, 19:43
alright here's a question for ya neo........why don't everyone just sleep in thier fifth wheel camper??????,,,,,,,,,i just don't understand why no one has thought of this but me.............on my next hike i think i'll throw mine on my back after i haul it to the trail head with my Ford pick 'em truck.....

Toolshed
02-17-2006, 20:12
i just dont understand why people sleep on he ground in tents or in shelters
hammocking is more comfortable and more versitle,i dont get it,i dont make since,it sucks sleeping on the ground,i guess each to their own,sleeping on the ground just sucks:cool: neo


http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=7105&c=577
CAST...................SWOOOOOOOOOOSHHHHHHHHHHHHH. ... ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ............... SPLASH
What a TROLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL if I ever saw one.....

RITBlake
02-17-2006, 20:37
i guess each to their own,sleeping on the ground just sucks:cool: neo


Hey Neo, if you're such a firm believer in 'to each his own' why do you care why people sleep on the ground? seriously, kind of weird..

You love hammocking...great! why are you so hell bent on converting and discussing people who don't? Some people don't want to hammock, some do. Why not leave it at that?

I'm actually a hammocker. And honestly, I really don't care what anyone else carries. Why are you so threatened by people who haven't switched?

Ridge
02-17-2006, 21:01
I agree with what Jack said in post #5.


The question should be "Why does one sleep strung up between two trees in a body bag"?

swift
02-17-2006, 21:01
I have 2 HH ultralites. I've put in least 50 nights' worth of my time on the AT sleeping in them and almost every time I've slept better in them than in a tent, to the point of over-sleeping a few times. It's the best sleep I've had on the trail. Having said that I had what could have been a near-death experience this year in my HH. If the temps had been 10 degrees lower I woulda been in deep poop. Here is the journal entry for the worst night I've ever had on the AT.

http://www.trailjournals.com/entry.cfm?id=109418

Essentially in certain conditions of high winds and a very heavy downpour water can hit the tarp of the hammock fast enough to create a puddle regardless how steep you pitch it, or how taut. Once that happens the depression of water, because of the way a hammock tarp is tensioned will build up water under force of gravity until something breaks. In my case it was the plastic ring that attaches the tarp to the main line to the tree. Instant 3 gallons of cold water that collected on the tarp while I dozed dumped on me. I dont think I'd hike with the HH again unless its dead of summer.

neo
02-17-2006, 22:38
Hey Neo, if you're such a firm believer in 'to each his own' why do you care why people sleep on the ground? seriously, kind of weird..

You love hammocking...great! why are you so hell bent on converting and discussing people who don't? Some people don't want to hammock, some do. Why not leave it at that?

I'm actually a hammocker. And honestly, I really don't care what anyone else carries. Why are you so threatened by people who haven't switched?

not trying convert nobody :cool: neo

domnokmis
02-17-2006, 23:19
not trying convert nobody :cool: neoThat's good, because you're not. I had been thinking about getting a hammock, but after reading Baltimore Jack's post, I realize that would be about the dumbest thing I could do.

mbroadhe
02-18-2006, 00:14
I have slept in a hammock (crazy creek crib) and have slept quite comfortably. Although, the Crazy Crib is heavy for my needs. So, this past year, I needed rain gear. So, while coming up with ways to ditch weight, the Crib went and a poncho was bought because I needed some rain gear. It also serves as my shelter. I was nowhere near interested in spending $100 - 300 on a "lightweight" hammock. I could probably say that everything in my pack including my pack probably cost me less than what you paid for a hammock or close to it. I also found I enjoy sleeping on the ground in the open. For some reason, I feel more connected to nature this way. These are a few of my personal reasons. So, until my body can't take it anymore (which will hopefully be a very long time), I'll be found on the ground laying in the dirt.
Oh, and lay up on the poor guy, he was just asking a simple question. Maybe you should start a "Why do people sleep in a hammock" thread to even the playing field, Neo.

gsmnpmtguyot
02-18-2006, 00:24
I will agree with the General; I am a stomach/side sleeper and in a hammock doing so bends the body into positions it is not meant to be put into. I considered a hammock and tried sleeping on my back at home and out in the woods; always end up on my stomach/side so I could get some sleep. No vast tent/sleeping pad conspiracy, just people sleep differently. Get a good nights sleep no matter how you do it.

C_Brice
02-18-2006, 01:14
" not trying convert nobody :cool: neo "

Who are you trying to kid with this comment neo.

You all have to remember, neo is the guy that posted, "use a hammock" as an answer to a post of mine concerning winter camping with my 2 young daughters. Hope you didn't pay too much for that wine you keep drinking neo, you'll be broke in no time.

On top of that, a lot of my camping is done from a canoe. Ever try to set up a hammock on a sand bar neo? Even if I did like hammocks I would need two differrent sleep systems. A hammock for in the trees and a tent/tarp for on the sand bars. I'll save my $$ and stick to a shelter that I can set up ANYWHERE.

But thanks for your concern,
Chris

hammock engineer
02-18-2006, 02:07
I love my hammock. Sleep great all night. I toss and turn on the ground, no matter what the pad I use.

I lay really flat in my HH, don't think my back would servive a thru without.

Rifleman
02-18-2006, 03:56
Jack,
Neo may be a newbie hanger but I am not. I have been hanging for several years now and am still learning more each trip.

[A few quick replies off the top of my head, Neo, 10 reasons while I'll keep my tent:]

[1. Many folks (maybe MOST folks) don't want to hammock for six months.
While they may be comfortable in a hammock on a short-term basis, most
folks don't wanna do it for the whole trip. Many folks sleep poorly in
them.]

Carrying a hammock doesn't necessarily mean you have to sleep in it every night for six months. Even tent/shelter campers sometimes sleep in hostels/motels.

[2. One can do things in tent or a tarp that one cannot do in a hammock:
Prepare a cold meal; change one's clothes, do gear repairs, do first aid/
personal stuff, etc. In a hammock, you can essentially lie down. Period.]

Granted, there is a steep learning curve with how to properly use a hammock. If pitched properly you can sit up in a hammock & do all the things you mentioned (i.e. prepare a cold meal, change one's clothes, etc.).

[3. There are wonderful places on the Trail that are treeless.....balds,
mountain tops, open fields, grassy areas, sandy beaches. If you're
a hammock hiker, you won't be staying in any of these places.]

Often there are trees growing on the places you mentioned. Yes sometimes on the edges of those places but they are there. Also, hammocks can be pitched as bivys. You lose the 'in-the-air' comfort yet still retain the protection from the elements.

[4. You'll sleep colder in a hammock, especially in the early and late days
of your trip.]

Just as with tenters, sleeping warm in a hammock is in large part about the insulation under you. Its not hard to have effective insulation that favorably compares (weight-wise) with sleeping in a tent.

[5. You can't get your pack or most of your belongings in a hammock, meaning
you leave them out, where they can get wet, bothered by animals, etc.]

Whether you get your pack and belongings into the hammock with you depends a lot upon the size of your pack and how many belongings you carry with you.

[6. Hammocks are no good if you're oversized or heavy. Most hammocks for
"Big and Tall" guys either cost around $200.00 bucks, or weigh at least
three and a half pounds. Big guys can find tents or tarps that weigh
and cost less.]

You're right. Big guys can find tarps at one of the 'Big Boxes' that weigh a couple of pounds & cost $20. However, there are hammocks on the market that will hold 400 lbs and someone who is 6' 6" and weigh a couple of pounds. I own one. Its called an Eagles Nest Outfitters double. It cost me approximately $60 with the slap straps.

[7. In really horrible weather, or if injured, you can kill a whole morning,
or even a day, in your tent or tarp if you have to. If you try to spend
16 hours, awake, in a hammock, you'll go out of your mind.]

If an individual is claustrophobic, any small space, tent or hammock, is going to drive them bonkers.

[8. Hammocks aren't much use if you come up with a player to be named
later that you might want to spend the evening with. Unless you're a
Bulgarian contortionist, engaging in romantic intimacy in a hammock
is generally not worth the trouble.]

I've learned that if I'm looking for a romantic partner on the trail it probably isn't going to happen. However, I've been known to carry my ENO double for that purpose. If you don't have a double then simply drop the hammock on the ground & use it as a tarp/ground cloth for a sexual liason.

[9. Some bears are known to be partial to "pinata" parties, if you catch my
drift.]

Balls. I've never heard of that. Of course if you sleep with your food you have to accept that Bruin might come calling!

[10. Snakes, including poisonous ones, can all climb trees.]

I've never heard of snakes attacking sleeping humans. I've never heard of snakes shimmying down hammock guy ropes either. I have heard of snakes sometimes crawling into tents and slithering under quilts to benefit from the body heat of unsuspecting tenters! :rolleyes:

The bottom line is that you're right Jack. Hammocks are not for everyone
(and probably shouldn't be).
Cordially,
R.

Smile
02-18-2006, 07:44
It is very healing to sleep on the ground, close to Mother Earth.

Often, injured animals will lay on the ground with the injured area facing down to earth for healing.

I always feel more rested after sleeping on terra firma.

Lone Wolf
02-18-2006, 07:48
Hammocks are for the back yard. After mowing the lawn get in it a drink a cold beer.

Frolicking Dinosaurs
02-18-2006, 07:59
My take on deciding to hammock, tent, tarp or shelter - people need to try all the alternatives and use what works for them. As Rifleman noted, hammocking isn't for everyone. No alternative is right for everyone.

The male dino will not use a tarp - he feels too exposed. He wants a private place to change clothing, scratch where it itches, ect. He also wants to be able to reach out and touch the female dino during the night :D and that isn't possible in a hammock. He isn't a fan of shelters because "I was in the Air Force long enough to discover I didn't like sleeping with rodents or snorers"

I tried several hammocks at trail days last year both in the vendor area and in in the tent city hoping to avoid having to carry heavy-duty padding to be able to sleep on the ground due to orthopedic issues / lots of metal replacement parts. I couldn't get into or out of any hammock without considerable assistance. I also was not comfortable laying in any of the hammocks for more than about 10 minutes - they made my injured leg and hip throb. I have to change my position often when sleeping to avoid pain, have some serious padding & insulation, and have enough padded / insulated space to position the leg comfortably - a rectangular (not mummy) Big Agnes insulated air core is the only thing I've found that is somewhat lightweight (24 oz / 680 gms) and big / thick enough to keep the leg and hip reasonably happy. Tenting with two rather than tarping keeps the ambient temps up enough to make it possible for me to carry less insulation for above me. Having the bed warmer (aka the male dino) in my sleeping bag also cuts down the amount of insulation needed and makes me a happy camper.

Tin Man
02-18-2006, 08:12
Laying straight on the ground allows me to stretch out my throat contributing to the quality of my snoring which helps keep away unwanted critters and hammock hangers. :p

shades of blue
02-18-2006, 09:24
I've hammocked in a speer hammock from GA to the Smokys and from VA 42 North to Maine. My hammock gave me a ton of more options (solo) than I had ever experienced in a tent. I was comfortable most of the time. Yes, I had to worry about keeping warm....but I slept better, had more choices on where to stay for the night and loved sleeping with a tarp over me instead of a stuffy tent. My tarp also dried a lot faster than my tent ever would, which made for less weight after rains.

I will use my tent (sierra designs cliplight flashlight) while hiking with my soon to be wife this summer after a week in Colorado. She wants to sleep right beside me (have no idea about that, being we'll just be married. My back may hurt a little more....but I guess there may be other advantages......

My hammock/tent is just another piece of gear, to be used appropriately at the right time. Jack seemed to think hammocks were evil incarnate...(or only for liberal democrats...;) but he may just be pissed at Neo forcing the issue constantly. Of his top 10 list...the only issue for me was keeping warm. It is a big deal, and you need the proper gear and experience to do it...however...isn't it that way with ALL things hiking...proper gear and experience rules in the backcountry.

My speer is open on top...so I could change clothes, cook with my stove beside my hammock (not too close...) do first aid on my feet as I sat in my hammock like a swinging chair, eat snacks...but I almost always hung my food. With my 8X10 huge silnylon tarp I could bivy on the ground on any bald I chose because I had a pad for warmth also.
As for being claustaphobic...I am and loved my speer although some people don't like the sides curling next to you.....but I was open to the air, and felt much more comfortable than I ever felt in a tent. I could go on and on....

Is hammocking for everyone? Of course not, it's all good....but the person who said they wouldn't use a hammock now because of Jack....I would experience it for yourself.....I and MANY others love their hammocks...talk to youngblood....he can set you up with a hammock forum that Ed Speer runs....
I'm not saying Jack or anyone else's choice of a tent is wrong...it's not...but hammocks are a lot more versatile than they let on.

Peace

neo
02-18-2006, 09:33
I've hammocked in a speer hammock from GA to the Smokys and from VA 42 North to Maine. My hammock gave me a ton of more options (solo) than I had ever experienced in a tent. I was comfortable most of the time. Yes, I had to worry about keeping warm....but I slept better, had more choices on where to stay for the night and loved sleeping with a tarp over me instead of a stuffy tent. My tarp also dried a lot faster than my tent ever would, which made for less weight after rains.

I will use my tent (sierra designs cliplight flashlight) while hiking with my soon to be wife this summer after a week in Colorado. She wants to sleep right beside me (have no idea about that, being we'll just be married. My back may hurt a little more....but I guess there may be other advantages......

My hammock/tent is just another piece of gear, to be used appropriately at the right time. Jack seemed to think hammocks were evil incarnate...(or only for liberal democrats...;) but he may just be pissed at Neo forcing the issue constantly. Of his top 10 list...the only issue for me was keeping warm. It is a big deal, and you need the proper gear and experience to do it...however...isn't it that way with ALL things hiking...proper gear and experience rules in the backcountry.

My speer is open on top...so I could change clothes, cook with my stove beside my hammock (not too close...) do first aid on my feet as I sat in my hammock like a swinging chair, eat snacks...but I almost always hung my food. With my 8X10 huge silnylon tarp I could bivy on the ground on any bald I chose because I had a pad for warmth also.
As for being claustaphobic...I am and loved my speer although some people don't like the sides curling next to you.....but I was open to the air, and felt much more comfortable than I ever felt in a tent. I could go on and on....

Is hammocking for everyone? Of course not, it's all good....but the person who said they wouldn't use a hammock now because of Jack....I would experience it for yourself.....I and MANY others love their hammocks...talk to youngblood....he can set you up with a hammock forum that Ed Speer runs....
I'm not saying Jack or anyone else's choice of a tent is wrong...it's not...but hammocks are a lot more versatile than they let on.

Peace

i wish you and your future wife the very best,happy hammocking and trails to ya always :cool: neo

peter_pan
02-18-2006, 10:24
I've hammocked in a speer hammock from GA to the Smokys and from VA 42 North to Maine. My hammock gave me a ton of more options (solo) than I had ever experienced in a tent. I was comfortable most of the time. Yes, I had to worry about keeping warm....but I slept better, had more choices on where to stay for the night and loved sleeping with a tarp over me instead of a stuffy tent. My tarp also dried a lot faster than my tent ever would, which made for less weight after rains.

I will use my tent (sierra designs cliplight flashlight) while hiking with my soon to be wife this summer after a week in Colorado. She wants to sleep right beside me (have no idea about that, being we'll just be married. My back may hurt a little more....but I guess there may be other advantages......

My hammock/tent is just another piece of gear, to be used appropriately at the right time. Jack seemed to think hammocks were evil incarnate...(or only for liberal democrats...;) but he may just be pissed at Neo forcing the issue constantly. Of his top 10 list...the only issue for me was keeping warm. It is a big deal, and you need the proper gear and experience to do it...however...isn't it that way with ALL things hiking...proper gear and experience rules in the backcountry.

My speer is open on top...so I could change clothes, cook with my stove beside my hammock (not too close...) do first aid on my feet as I sat in my hammock like a swinging chair, eat snacks...but I almost always hung my food. With my 8X10 huge silnylon tarp I could bivy on the ground on any bald I chose because I had a pad for warmth also.
As for being claustaphobic...I am and loved my speer although some people don't like the sides curling next to you.....but I was open to the air, and felt much more comfortable than I ever felt in a tent. I could go on and on....

Is hammocking for everyone? Of course not, it's all good....but the person who said they wouldn't use a hammock now because of Jack....I would experience it for yourself.....I and MANY others love their hammocks...talk to youngblood....he can set you up with a hammock forum that Ed Speer runs....
I'm not saying Jack or anyone else's choice of a tent is wrong...it's not...but hammocks are a lot more versatile than they let on.

Peace

Like the Rifleman and Shades of Blue I've hammocked for years....I think they are comfortable for me, but recognize that for stomac sleepers that may not be the case.

There are easy ways to negate the natives that Jack stated in post Number 5...virtually any thing done in a tent can be done in a hammock, including cooking and spending an extra day riding out a storm. I have comfortably used hammocks for 2 month trips, and personnaly would do so again.

As to warmth, when prepared with an adequate insulation plan and system there is no reason to be cold from single digits up. There is also no reason to pay a severe penalty in volume or weight for a warm system. (There are hundreds of satisfied, warm JRB under quilt users). There are many other answer to warmth, some that allow one to easily go to ground, if desired, such as the SPE and a pad combo.

I believe hammocking is less impact because it free us from the overused congested tent sites and allows a bivouc without any ground prep.

All that said... HYOH... Carry what you like... camp safe... Also enjoy the debate and "take each other with a grain of salt".

Pan

PS. If you are over 30, looking for more comfort or lighter weight options, If you tend to toss and turn all night fell free to PM me....

Tin Man
02-18-2006, 10:39
I believe hammocking is less impact because it free us from the overused congested tent sites and allows a bivouc without any ground prep.

Actually, I wonder if this is true. I tent camped at the state campground on Greylock and I specifically recall the ranger dude telling me not to tie anything to the trees. Doesn't the hammock line rub against and therefore damage the bark to some degree? If the hammock swings in the wind or when you are getting in and out (or when Jack's bear is doing the piŮata thing), doesn't this cause some damage to the tree? Maybe some trees are like posters, more sensitive than others?

Deb
02-18-2006, 10:56
I'm skeptical of the claims that hammocks are more environmentally friendly than tents. It's walking around your tent or hammock site that causes the most impact due to frequency and concentration of your weight.
If I have to move a rock or twigs to pitch my tent, I put them back in the morning.

Unless you're levitating, once you get out of your hammock you have the same impact as anyone.

neo
02-18-2006, 11:22
I'm skeptical of the claims that hammocks are more environmentally friendly than tents. It's walking around your tent or hammock site that causes the most impact due to frequency and concentration of your weight.
If I have to move a rock or twigs to pitch my tent, I put them back in the morning.

Unless you're levitating, once you get out of your hammock you have the same impact as anyone.

wrong,most tent sites are over used,i camp out of site off the trail were
no one has ever camped before or will again:cool: neo

Toolshed
02-18-2006, 11:31
Imagine pulling to a camping area for the night and Neo is there along with some Born again Bible thumpers????? I'm wondering who's going to work harder to earn a convert ?!?!?

Tin Man
02-18-2006, 11:35
I will take Neo over any other fanatic.

Rain Man
02-18-2006, 11:38
not trying convert nobody :cool: neo

Well, just a hint, Neo-- you need to change both the tone and the words you use (or the words you leave out).

"Absolutes" are almost always wrong in the first place, and just cry out for argument in the second. You need to use a healthy dose of "qualifiers."

"Generalizations" are the same. You need to start saying "for me" once in a while instead of imposing your individual personal preferences onto everyone. You speak as if everyone has to like your personal preference of ice cream flavor, or else they're not quite up to your level.

Finally, if you intend humor, then use a lot of smileys and/or go to the humor forum. Otherwise, it's not funny.

So, you do seem to be trolling, whether you intend to or not. Plus, your threads praising other trolls doesn't help.

If you mean to troll, you're doing okay. If you don't mean to troll, then listen to what a bunch of WhiteBlazers are telling you and modify the tone and tenor of your posts. In other words, don't insult people who don't genuflect to your hammock god.

Now, when are we taking the wives hiking?!!!! :)

Rain:sunMan

.

Mags
02-18-2006, 11:39
Kinda hard to pitch a hammock above treeline. A few of those stretches here in Colorado. ;)

neo
02-18-2006, 11:40
Imagine pulling to a camping area for the night and Neo is there along with some Born again Bible thumpers????? I'm wondering who's going to work harder to earn a convert ?!?!?

ya will not see me in camp,i avoid crowds:cool: neo

neo
02-18-2006, 11:43
Well, just a hint, Neo-- you need to change both the tone and the words you use (or the words you leave out).

"Absolutes" are almost always wrong in the first place, and just cry out for argument in the second. You need to use a healthy dose of "qualifiers."

"Generalizations" are the same. You need to start saying "for me" once in a while instead of imposing your individual personal preferences onto everyone. You speak as if everyone has to like your personal preference of ice cream flavor, or else they're not quite up to your level.

Finally, if you intend humor, then use a lot of smileys and/or go to the humor forum. Otherwise, it's not funny.

So, you do seem to be trolling, whether you intend to or not. Plus, your threads praising other trolls doesn't help.

If you mean to troll, you're doing okay. If you don't mean to troll, then listen to what a bunch of WhiteBlazers are telling you and modify the tone and tenor of your posts. In other words, don't insult people who don't genuflect to your hammock god.

Now, when are we taking the wives hiking?!!!! :)

my wife is a hammock hanger to:cool: neo
Rain:sunMan

.
yeah that sounds cool rain man we and our wifes need to get togethr soon
stay cool rain man:cool: neo

neo
02-18-2006, 11:45
I will take Neo over any other fanatic.

thanks tin man,are there really fantics on the trail lol?:cool: neo

Turbo Joe
02-18-2006, 11:47
i have to say that i am a rough sleeper at times so unless the weather is really bad i don't stay in a crowded shelter ther have been nights where i have literally rolled over other hikers. i dont prefer hammocks because i like good firm support on my back. one night a watauga lake shelter i fell asleep on the ground and have a great nights sleep then woke up to find i was sleeping on jagged rocks. and i still to this day have no clue of why i thought that was comfortable

Tin Man
02-18-2006, 11:49
Neo, I am a fanatic about my fires, but since the regs usually allow them only at shelters, I guess I won't be running into the cool hammock fanatic dude.

neo
02-18-2006, 11:50
i have to say that i am a rough sleeper at times so unless the weather is really bad i don't stay in a crowded shelter ther have been nights where i have literally rolled over other hikers. i dont prefer hammocks because i like good firm support on my back. one night a watauga lake shelter i fell asleep on the ground and have a great nights sleep then woke up to find i was sleeping on jagged rocks. and i still to this day have no clue of why i thought that was comfortable


i toss and turn in bed at home,no need to in a hammock because i am perfectly comfortable:cool: neo

Tin Man
02-18-2006, 11:56
i toss and turn in bed at home,no need to in a hammock because i am perfectly comfortable:cool: neo

I am devastated! I was sure you hammocked 365 days/year.

Turbo Joe
02-18-2006, 12:08
i do have to say on the shelter behalf when its a miserable day some people will do anthing to squueze into a shelter. i got the last spot one night and my buddy asked if there was any room and the only thing we could come up with was a an uneven support beam with a 5 inch drop to the next level and he was happy to have it

the goat
02-18-2006, 14:19
i could hammock for a few days, but, as jack pointed out, there are way too many disadvantages to using one on a thru. $hit, half of my camp sites would have been eliminated if i used a hammock.

Ridge
02-18-2006, 14:34
I've heard several say they can cook in a hammock. I have cooked many a meal in my tent vestibule in rain/snow, but I can't imagine cooking while in a hammock. Someone please explain how this is done.

Rifleman
02-18-2006, 16:53
I've heard several say they can cook in a hammock. I have cooked many a meal in my tent vestibule in rain/snow, but I can't imagine cooking while in a hammock. Someone please explain how this is done.
This was my response to Baltimore Jack's ten reasons (in regards to things you can do in a tent v. cannot do in a hammock):

QUOTE:
[2. One can do things in tent or a tarp that one cannot do in a hammock:
Prepare a cold meal; change one's clothes, do gear repairs, do first aid/
personal stuff, etc. In a hammock, you can essentially lie down. Period.]

Granted, there is a steep learning curve with how to properly use a hammock. If pitched properly you can sit up in a hammock & do all the things you mentioned (i.e. prepare a cold meal, change one's clothes, etc.). :-?

Addendum: Hammocks are merely tarps & ground cloths raised into the air. Many folks use the hammock as a 'second floor' to the system & have a second ground cover (tyvek, etc.) which they use approprately. With a large enough coverage tarp (9x9, 10x10, or 8x10) the first or ground floor can be used for many chores in all by the worst weather. In the worst weather if the tarp/hammock system is pitched low enough, say 2-4 feet off the ground, the tarp could give just as much weather coverage as a Henry Shires tarptent or a Ron Moak's Sixmoondesigns tarp tent & still allow you to hang in the hammock off the ground. Such a lower than normal pitch could allow the industrious hammock camper to even add a 'bath-tub' like floor which would attach by velcro to the tarp itself. Such a floor could allow the hammock camper to let die hard tenters sleep on the first floor (for a nominal fee of course!). :-?
R.

Jack Tarlin
02-18-2006, 17:05
I think Rifleman's posts here were excellent. (And by the way, I was kidding about the bear "pinata party" thing!)

Ultimately, one's choice of shelter is a matter of personal preference. I've nothing against hammocks, but for any number of reasons, I'd prefer not to use one for six months at a time.

neo
02-18-2006, 17:18
I am devastated! I was sure you hammocked 365 days/year.
no but i wish i was hammocking 365 a year lol:cool: neo

Dances with Mice
02-18-2006, 18:17
I've heard several say they can cook in a hammock. I have cooked many a meal in my tent vestibule in rain/snow, but I can't imagine cooking while in a hammock. Someone please explain how this is done.I thought someone else would have answered this by now. I'm not an old pro at hammocks, I did my first week-long hike with a HH last spring, the Georgia loop. I didn't cook "in" my hammock, meaning I didn't bring my stove into the hammock with me, but I cooked and ate all my hot meals while on my hammock, under an over-sized tarp.

Like this: http://www.hennessyhammock.com/use-as-a-chair.htm Food prep is even mentioned in the first and last paragraphs.

My 'cooking' is waiting for water to boil. But if I had needed to prepare something more elaborate, it wouldn't have been a problem.

Panzer1
02-18-2006, 18:31
I enjoy the times I have spent in my tent. I like having that space around me and having all my "things" in there with me. It's like my little "fort". I don't think I would like hiking with a hammock. I wouldn't mind taking an hour nap in one though. But for those who like to hammock, I say enjoy yourselves, that's what it's all about.

Panzer

Lumberjack
02-18-2006, 18:34
Ive soloed a lot with hammocks but they arent for everyone and dont work well for more then one.

Tin Man
02-18-2006, 22:48
Panzer and Lumberjack have summed it up quite well - to each his own. Hike your own hike and sleep where you want.

Tinker
02-19-2006, 00:13
Neo, I'm a hammock hanger much of the year, myself. I usually hike solo, and have a wife at home, so I don't need room for another. So, here we're on the same page, but there sometimes is a very thin line between an enthusiast and a fanatic. Right now, I'm looking for a viable way to use my existing hammocks and sleeping bags so I can do the Ga. section of the AT without sleeping on the ground, but I'll do it if blowing snow is a real possibility.

With some of the responses I've read by others on the forum, I hope nobody figures out just how easy it is to take out a hammock camper with a Bic lighter. Oops!:rolleyes:

Rifleman
02-19-2006, 02:43
With some of the responses I've read by others on the forum, I hope nobody figures out just how easy it is to take out a hammock camper with a Bic lighter. Oops!:rolleyes:
Tinker,
All of the materials, to my knowledge, that are used for hammocks, tents, or tarps are extremely flammable. That's why its damn important to be careful with fire in or around any modern (old-time canvas you could get away with) shelter. :eek:
R.

River Runner
02-19-2006, 03:46
I love my hammock. I get a much more comfortable night's sleep than sleeping on a thin pad in a tent (and I consider a 1-1 1/2 " thermarest thin). I'm a stomach and side sleeper. It's very easy to sleep on my side in my Hennessy, and I actually find I can even sleep comfortably on my back which I can't do on a mattress.

I can change clothes in my hammock if necessary. I can sit up if necessary, but frankly when I am out in God's country, I am more interested in being outside than staying inside whether in a tent or a hammock, so being comfortable spending daytime hours in a shelter isn't a high priority. If I want, I can set my tarp up higher and use the hammock as a comfy lounge chair if it comes to that.

Most of the area I camp are bear country, so I wouldn't eat in my hammock or in a tent either. But if need be, I could eat comfortably under the tarp.

Condensation makes me really cold in a tent, and there is considerably less (usually none) when I hammock, so I stay warmer even if there is a breeze. Now that might not be the case if a huge blowing storm hits, but I've seen a lot of tents damaged by those too.

Hey - if you like tents cool. That leaves more good trees for me to hang my hammock. :)

Singe03
02-19-2006, 04:01
I'm a pretty strong HH convert and used one on much of the AT but there are definately issues with them and I'm 50/50 on whether I'd carry one on another thru attempt. Probabily start with a tent and finish with a tent and carry the HH during July and August.

I loved the HH during the hot summer months, took the rainfly off and slept far better than I would have in a shelter or tent. I could lay there on top of my bag wearing only a pair of shorts, enjoying the breeze and silently snicker at the people who were sweating in their tent or trying to get comfortable while getting eaten alive by the bug storm in the shelter. Too hot to sleep in bag, too many biting bugs to sleep outside of bag <snicker>.

I hated being so limited on what I could take inside with me or what I could do in the hammock. Writing in my journal was near impossible, rolling over to sleep on my side was always an adventure in shuffling stuff around as everything tends to slide to the center unless you hang it from the ridge line. Trying to figure out how to cook in the rain is a pain in the rump, keeping the rest of my gear dry in the rain sucked.

I missed the tent alot when i used the HH then missed the HH when I sent it home and got my tent back. In short, there is no ideal solution, each has its strengths and weaknesses for me. The HH is more comfortable, the tent provides more comforts.

bfitz
02-19-2006, 05:15
I catch crap from people all the time for lugging around my 7 plus lb. (or whatever it weighs) two-person tent. When people ask me why I say it's optimism. I think this quote from (another one of) Jack's list(s) says it all...

Unless you're a Bulgarian contortionist, engaging in romantic intimacy in a hammock is generally not worth the trouble.
In addition to the fact that you can't have guests over, all the other ways a tent resembles a "home" weigh in their favor with me also. Plus, I have that thermarest thingy....Has anyone ever made a tent with an inflatable floor? "Moonbounce" style!

Tin Man
02-19-2006, 08:25
The cooking question from a tent versus a hammock seems to me to be an invitation for unwanted guests. Bear country is one thing, but I tent so I am not intruding on the mouse shelter and I don't particularly want them intruding on my shelter. Even if you just cook from your shelter in the morning before breaking camp, doesn't the smell linger on your shelter for the next time you pitch it? I always crawl out and enjoy the cold or rain right away - why wait? Besides, I usually need to get up to use the privy (or a nearby tree) when I wake up.

Lumberjack
02-19-2006, 09:05
the only thing I wont cook under my hammock tarp is burritos.... :P

peter_pan
02-19-2006, 09:41
Tinker,
All of the materials, to my knowledge, that are used for hammocks, tents, or tarps are extremely flammable. That's why its damn important to be careful with fire in or around any modern (old-time canvas you could get away with) shelter. :eek:
R.


Rifleman et al,

FWIW... I've attended several pre 1840 rendeveaus (sp) over the years... almost every year the is at least one camp that goes up in flames out of 1000-3000 camps.... all of which are "old time canvas"... must add that there is ususally a high volume of alcohol involved. Any fire is a risk in my book.. at any time... just the degree of risk is at issue.

Pan

Rifleman
02-19-2006, 12:45
Rifleman et al,

FWIW... I've attended several pre 1840 rendeveaus (sp) over the years... almost every year the is at least one camp that goes up in flames out of 1000-3000 camps.... all of which are "old time canvas"... must add that there is ususally a high volume of alcohol involved. Any fire is a risk in my book.. at any time... just the degree of risk is at issue.

Pan
Pyromanics! There is help for you. Until then, keep fire away from all tent, tarp, & hammock materials (especially mine!). Yep. Apply enough heat & anything is going up like a rocket. :eek:
R.

Tipi Walter
02-19-2006, 12:57
Actually I'm a tipi lover but that's another story. Hammocks are great if you're escaping and evading capture from a foreign army. Stealth campers could all learn a lesson from Neo and bone up on their hammock skills. But I entirely agree with Jack Tarlin and I would add this: How many hammocks have you seen on a Denali or Mt Everest climb? I was caught in a blizzard at 5000 feet for five days in the Slickrock Wilderness, the wind was gale force and white powder blew everywhere and so my humble 28 sq ft tent became a safe refuge from Miss Nature's twirling dance. Even in that I was daft by day 5, mumbling jibberish to the wind and having a long talk with a big bird that kept flying over.

I think it is great that the hammock option is out there, I mean, there's so many trees at so many non-tent sites begging for a hammock that I can see how free it must feel to set up at such places. But I'm a "nester" by nature and by choice and if I mentioned the weight of the tent I am currently carrying I'd be kicked off Whiteblaze.

Roland
02-19-2006, 13:14
~~~Even in that I was daft by day 5, mumbling jibberish to the wind and having a long talk with a big bird that kept flying over.~~~
Thanks for the good laugh, Tipi. That really hit my funny bone, for some reason. Probably because I've had a similar experience.

sparky2000
02-19-2006, 14:23
Tarps are more snake friendly and i wouldn't want to be called un-snakely.

Singe03
02-19-2006, 15:12
Hammocks are great if you're escaping and evading capture from a foreign army

I have never been in the military so obviously never in an E&E situation but l think the absolute last thing I want to be in would be a HH or Clark Hammock in that situation. Too hard to get out of quickly and you'd either have to sleep with your rifle in it (and snag it getting out most likely) or seperate yourself from it (bad). Also, at least on the HH, the velco makes a pretty good amount of noise. I'd think you'd be better off just wearing a poncho so you could quietly get up and move on.

Hammocks are awesome, I always think of taking it first when I consider going out, but they are situational in my mind.

Dances with Mice
02-19-2006, 17:51
How many hammocks have you seen on a Denali or Mt Everest climb?Yeah, I've also noticed that the number of people using hammocks seems to drop above the tree line.

neo
02-19-2006, 17:53
Yeah, I've also noticed that the number of people using hammocks seems to drop above the tree line.

thats why ya carry carabiners and rope:cool: neo

Topcat
02-19-2006, 18:37
In addition to the fact that you can't have guests over, all the other ways a tent resembles a "home" weigh in their favor with me also. Plus, I have that thermarest thingy....Has anyone ever made a tent with an inflatable floor? "Moonbounce" style![/quote]

I saw a tent that used air to set up in rib bladders instead tent poles. how far away could an inflatable floor be?

digger51
02-19-2006, 20:02
I tried a hammock once, but the tv and dvd player kept falling out so its still a tent for me.

Panzer1
02-19-2006, 21:01
FWIW... I've attended several pre 1840 rendeveaus (sp) over the years...

I always wanted to go to one of those things. Are there any in PA/NJ area?

Panzer

weary
02-19-2006, 21:35
i just dont understand why people sleep on he ground in tents or in shelters
hammocking is more comfortable and more versitle,i dont get it,i dont make since,it sucks sleeping on the ground,i guess each to their own,sleeping on the ground just sucks:cool: neo


http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=7105&c=577
Well most of us think that once we leave civilization, the ground is the only option we have. Neo and perhaps others think hammocks are superior. Maybe. But you know us conservative, traditionalists. We're not easily persuaded by these new fangled things. Why I suspect the first hammock was not dreamed up until several millinennia ago. Certainly not enough time to compensate for a million years of evolving on ground sleeping.

Weary.

MOWGLI
02-19-2006, 21:44
Compared to shelters or floors, the ground is actually quite soft. And you don't rock back & forth when you sleep on the ground.

Tabasco
02-19-2006, 21:54
I do it just to piss you off Neo.....

River Runner
02-20-2006, 02:06
.

I hated being so limited on what I could take inside with me or what I could do in the hammock. Writing in my journal was near impossible, rolling over to sleep on my side was always an adventure in shuffling stuff around as everything tends to slide to the center unless you hang it from the ridge line. Trying to figure out how to cook in the rain is a pain in the rump, keeping the rest of my gear dry in the rain sucked.

I'll grant that writing in a journal could be difficult. I've found taking my clothing stuff sack into the hammock and storing it at thigh or knee level gives me a place to put things I don't want to hang on the ridge, plus can provide extra insulation in cooler temps (might be hot in summer though). A caribiner can be clipped to either end of the HH on the inside to allow gear to be clipped up out of the way, so that might be better in the summer. Cooking in the rain is a pain in the rump in a tent too unless you want to risk catching the tent on fire. To keep my pack and gear I don't take into the hammock with me from getting wet, I just carry a large trash bag, slide the pack into it, tie the top, and lay it under the hammock. Works great.

Just Jeff
02-20-2006, 02:35
All you people saying hammocks are awesome are dead wrong. Hammocks suck, there's no way to stay warm in them, and there's no way to make them cool. Stay away from my trees.

neo
02-20-2006, 10:21
All you people saying hammocks are awesome are dead wrong. Hammocks suck, there's no way to stay warm in them, and there's no way to make them cool. Stay away from my trees.

who are you kidding,you hammock hanging fool lol:cool: neo

hopefulhiker
02-20-2006, 12:12
Last year I saw this hiker with a hammock pitched on the side of a mountain. He had his sleeping bag rolled up on the ground. He kicked it by accident and it rolled a couple hundred yards straight down the side into a brook.. So much for the advantage of not having to have level ground...

neo
02-20-2006, 12:15
Last year I saw this hiker with a hammock pitched on the side of a mountain. He had his sleeping bag rolled up on the ground. He kicked it by accident and it rolled a couple hundred yards straight down the side into a brook.. So much for the advantage of not having to have level ground...

uh oh:cool: neo

MOWGLI
02-20-2006, 12:20
uh oh:cool: neo

Where were you when that hapened Neo, and why haven't we learned about this sooner? :banana

neo
02-20-2006, 12:21
Where were you when that hapened Neo, and why haven't we learned about this sooner? :banana

that was not me jeffery:cool: neo

shades of blue
02-20-2006, 12:24
I saw "wing it" throw her pot down a hill when she was throwing her grey water out. I had no idea something that small could travel that far for so long. Everyone at that camp was busting a gut.

neo
02-20-2006, 12:26
Where were you when that hapened Neo, and why haven't we learned about this sooner? :banana

besides that my ed speer sleep quilt is packed tightly in a jacksrbetter silnylon compression sack it would stay pretty dry:cool: neo


http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=6063&c=577

icemanat95
02-20-2006, 12:32
I have never been in the military so obviously never in an E&E situation but l think the absolute last thing I want to be in would be a HH or Clark Hammock in that situation. Too hard to get out of quickly and you'd either have to sleep with your rifle in it (and snag it getting out most likely) or seperate yourself from it (bad). Also, at least on the HH, the velco makes a pretty good amount of noise. I'd think you'd be better off just wearing a poncho so you could quietly get up and move on.

Hammocks are awesome, I always think of taking it first when I consider going out, but they are situational in my mind.

As I understand it from some folks who were there, the SAS and other British military forces prefer hammocks for tactical sleeping in the rainforests and jungles of southeast asia. It's easier to keep the marauding ants and bugs off during the night. Set up properly, getting in and out of their hammocks is quick and simple and they are able to keep weapons ready to hand. In the US military we tended to do our tactical bivouacs on the ground under a quick poncho shelter and wrapped in our poncho liners. A few stories I've read of US soldiers cross training with SAS in SEA had funny tales of the US soldiers learning quickly to immitate their British hosts in the hammocks after finding themselves being made meals by the local insects.

Hammocks are one of many options available to the lightweight hiker. I'll stick with my little tent One of the advantages of being a side-sleeper is that you can usually find a position that puts the rocks and roots in an empty space behind your knees or in front of your stomach.

Just Jeff
02-20-2006, 12:34
Last year I saw this hiker with a hammock pitched on the side of a mountain. He had his sleeping bag rolled up on the ground. He kicked it by accident and it rolled a couple hundred yards straight down the side into a brook.. So much for the advantage of not having to have level ground...

Yep. One person makes a bad decision about where to put his sleeping bag and that negates all the advantages of his shelter.

I once saw a guy sleep in the rain and his tarp didn't give him enough protection. So much for saving weight by carrying a tarp instead of a log cabin. And for staying warm in a sleeping bag since it didn't work so well when it was wet.

:)

neo
02-20-2006, 12:36
As I understand it from some folks who were there, the SAS and other British military forces prefer hammocks for tactical sleeping in the rainforests and jungles of southeast asia. It's easier to keep the marauding ants and bugs off during the night. Set up properly, getting in and out of their hammocks is quick and simple and they are able to keep weapons ready to hand. In the US military we tended to do our tactical bivouacs on the ground under a quick poncho shelter and wrapped in our poncho liners. A few stories I've read of US soldiers cross training with SAS in SEA had funny tales of the US soldiers learning quickly to immitate their British hosts in the hammocks after finding themselves being made meals by the local insects.

Hammocks are one of many options available to the lightweight hiker. I'll stick with my little tent One of the advantages of being a side-sleeper is that you can usually find a position that puts the rocks and roots in an empty space behind your knees or in front of your stomach.

great point of view:cool: neo

stag3
02-22-2006, 06:39
Sound like there is a lot of personal preferece for tents or hammocks. If you are going above the tree line then don't carry a hammock!!! And if you do, learn to use it as a bivy.On the At, I took some blue blaze trails and for two days did not see a place flat enough for a tent--oh thank God for my hammock. There is nothing worse than being in a tent on a hill and constantly ending up in a corner.My tarp is great for keeping dry and never leaked. As for cooking near a tent, this IMHO is a bad idea. Other than a big fire or attracting four legged things, why would you do this.Hammocks are the only way to travel.

Lone Wolf
02-22-2006, 08:29
That's your opinion. I've been backpacking 20 years with a tent only and cook in the vestibule a lot. Never had a problem with "attracting four legged things". Tents are the only way to travel.:)

LIhikers
02-22-2006, 08:57
I've never really considered a hammock since 99% of my hiking is with my wife. There may be hammocks for two, I don't know, but it's not uncommom for us to bring our 80 pound shephard dog along if we're out for less than a week. I'm sure the dog wouldn't take to a hammock.

Green Bean
02-22-2006, 09:41
I dont I have Never tryed hammocking but it seems like the sleeping bag and the pad are doing me alright! ~GB

atmuttley
02-22-2006, 11:02
Mine is a quite simple reason... after I had back surgery and had titanium rods put in my back it does not bend like it used to, Like its supposed to. therefore I need to lay as flat as I can. I like the ground also because its softer than the shelters. But best of all I get to sleep with my georgeous wife.

neo
02-22-2006, 11:05
Mine is a quite simple reason... after I had back surgery and had titanium rods put in my back it does not bend like it used to, Like its supposed to. therefore I need to lay as flat as I can. I like the ground also because its softer than the shelters. But best of all I get to sleep with my georgeous wife.

sound good to me;) enjoy your georgeous wife:cool: neo

kyhipo
02-22-2006, 11:50
well i like to spread out a bit and I am not a hammok expert but dont you kinda sleep slumped in a position?they look cool but can you roll around ect ect ?I get cramps at night and need to strecht out a bit move around:-? ky

Tin Man
02-22-2006, 13:08
There are many advantages to sharing a tent with my brother. For example, I can roll over and whisper:

"Bartender, thanks for the night cap. Pass me the Advil."

"Bartender, wake up, I think I hear a bear. Go check it out."

"Bartender, it is time to get up. Go make the coffee."

SGTdirtman
02-22-2006, 16:29
I'd try bringing a hammock on a hike but pretty sure I'd miss having a shelter to put my pack in with me, or move around freely... eat my dinner in... etc etc. plus if someone elses shelter gets gets damaged its no big deal to share for a night to help someone out.

I try to pack as light as possible but dont see the weight saving advantage of packing a hammock over a small tent worth it. I just like the idea of having my own little sanctuary on the trail. Im not even fond of those solo bivies, more than a few times I've set up my tent early on crappy days and had a few people come in and play some cards or sit back and talk in a nice dry warm place. My tent is small but 3-4 people can sit in it. I love it, I try to pack very light but my tent is the one thing I dunno if id want to try and get rid of for the sake of a couple pounds.

all just a matter of opinion

general
02-22-2006, 18:33
if you add all the crap you would have to use to make the hammock comfortable in winter, there are no weight savings.

Lone Wolf
02-22-2006, 20:08
Hammocks and Leki poles are gimmicks.

Tin Man
02-22-2006, 20:13
When I am not putting weight on my Leki poles, they can shoot poison darts at anyone who tells me they are a gimmick.

Just Jeff
02-22-2006, 20:15
You know what's funny about the hammock crowd? They have an antithesis. The anti-hammock crowd. There are no anti-quilt crowds...just people who don't use them. There are no anti-trail runner crowds...just people who prefer boots. The people who don't use hammocks REALLY like to talk about it.

I think I'm gonna start my own mafia...just gotta find the right piece of gear to be against.

saimyoji
02-22-2006, 21:04
Tents/tarp-tents come mucho inexpensivo. Where can I pick up a cheap hammock, the likes of which you speak?

neo
02-22-2006, 21:14
Tents/tarp-tents come mucho inexpensivo. Where can I pick up a cheap hammock, the likes of which you speak?

here ya go:cool: neo

http://www.hennessyhammock.com/catalogue-hammocks.htm



http://www.hennessyhammock.com/clearance.htm

Just Jeff
02-22-2006, 21:28
Neo, I think siamyoji was talking about cheap hammocks. Check Campmor or REI for Amazonas, Moskito, Byer Traveller Hammock, etc. They're pretty cheap. Or search the WB archives for Neo's posts on "Budget Hammock Gear" or "More Budget Hammock Gear".

saimyoji
02-22-2006, 21:29
here ya go:cool: neo

http://www.hennessyhammock.com/catalogue-hammocks.htm



http://www.hennessyhammock.com/clearance.htm


OK, those clearance prices are pretty cheap. Looks like something to check out. Thanks neo:cool: ;)

neo
02-22-2006, 22:15
Neo, I think siamyoji was talking about cheap hammocks. Check Campmor or REI for Amazonas, Moskito, Byer Traveller Hammock, etc. They're pretty cheap. Or search the WB archives for Neo's posts on "Budget Hammock Gear" or "More Budget Hammock Gear".

ok:cool: neo

neo
02-22-2006, 22:17
You know what's funny about the hammock crowd? They have an antithesis. The anti-hammock crowd. There are no anti-quilt crowds...just people who don't use them. There are no anti-trail runner crowds...just people who prefer boots. The people who don't use hammocks REALLY like to talk about it.

I think I'm gonna start my own mafia...just gotta find the right piece of gear to be against.

just like i am neo,agent smith is anti neo lol:cool: neo

happy hammocking to ya jeff:cool: neo

SteveJ
02-22-2006, 22:23
OK - I'll jump in here!

I become a ground-pounder (errr, I mean I sleep on the ground) for only a few reasons. It takes a very good reason for me to pound the ground rather than restfully snooze while gently rocking between two trees!

The primary reason I'd go to ground is that my youngest wants to go hiking with me :banana

When he comes along, we usually sleep under my BD Betamid. I've talked him into hammocking a couple of times, but he'd rather just be with me! I figure I better take advantage of that now before he becomes a teenager.....

Last weekend, we went hiking! And we slept on the ground (well, he slept, I mostly tossed and turned!).

http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=10050&catid=newimages&cutoffdate=1 (http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=10050&catid=newimages&cutoffdate=1)

http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=10052&catid=newimages&cutoffdate=1

It's all good! :sun

Just Jeff
02-22-2006, 22:32
Maybe I should be anti-alcohol stoves. Sure they have advantages, but they don't fit my hiking style so every time someone brings it up, I'll list the reasons I don't use one.

Haha...long as everyone's happy on the trail, I don't care. I guess any time someone finds new gear that's better than the old stuff, there will be luddites who don't like to change for the better. (J/K - before anyone accuses me of being a zealot.) I just think it's interesting that every time there's a hammock thread, there's a post saying, "I don't use hammocks." (To be fair, on most tent or tarp threads there's a post about hammocks, too!)

But I'm with you - I don't know why people would knock hammocks without ever trying them.

bfitz
02-22-2006, 22:57
You know what's funny about the hammock crowd? They have an antithesis. The anti-hammock crowd. There are no anti-quilt crowds...just people who don't use them. There are no anti-trail runner crowds...just people who prefer boots. The people who don't use hammocks REALLY like to talk about it.

I think I'm gonna start my own mafia...just gotta find the right piece of gear to be against.
Talk to lone wolf about leki poles.

astrogirl
02-22-2006, 23:54
hammocks really suck if you are a stomach sleeper. i just don't want to wake up in the morning feeling like i have been bent in half backwards.

Exactly.

That's why I don't do hammocks.

Catsgoing
02-23-2006, 00:25
Hush a bye baby, on the tree top,
When the wind blows the cradle will rock;
When the bow breaks, the cradle will fall,
And down will come baby, cradle and all.
This post Neo should be in Humor!
Sweet Dreams Hikers

Catsgoing
02-23-2006, 00:28
Hush a bye baby, on the tree top,



Hush a bye baby, on the tree top,
When the wind blows the cradle will rock;
When the bow breaks, the cradle will fall,
And down will come baby, cradle and all.
This post Neo should be in Humor!
Sweet Dreams Hikers

neo
02-24-2006, 00:12
Hush a bye baby, on the tree top,





Hush a bye baby, on the tree top,
When the wind blows the cradle will rock;
When the bow breaks, the cradle will fall,
And down will come baby, cradle and all.


This post Neo should be in Humor!
Sweet Dreams Hikers

i am laughing lol,sweet dreams to ya to:cool: neo

Sly
02-24-2006, 00:19
The people who don't use hammocks REALLY like to talk about it.

LOL... Pretty funny considering the title of this thread. On the contrary, it appears to me it's the neo-hammockers trying to convert tenters and tarpers.

mbroadhe
02-24-2006, 00:29
LOL... Pretty funny considering the title of this thread. On the contrary, it appears to me it's the neo-hammockers trying to convert tenters and tarpers.
It's also the Hammock Nazis who answer questions like "where can I camp in such and such an area?", obviously looking for a legality answer, with "anywhere in my hammock." :D

SGTdirtman
02-24-2006, 00:44
Is the hiking community splitting into two different races? the "ground people" and the "tree dwellers" ?

sounds like a bad sci-fi movie...

mbroadhe
02-24-2006, 00:50
Solid! We'll call it, Lord of the Trail : R.E.M. of the King. I think it will sell.

Just Jeff
02-24-2006, 01:04
It's also the Hammock Nazis who answer questions like "where can I camp in such and such an area?", obviously looking for a legality answer, with "anywhere in my hammock." :D

Truth hurts? Haha...j/k.


LOL... Pretty funny considering the title of this thread.

Haha...that's true. Happens on all kinds of threads, though. Not that it bothers me; it's just funny.

Belgarion
02-24-2006, 01:22
when the weather gets warm, hammocking is the only way to go. It doesn't cause any damage to the ground and is incredibly comfortable. Ultra light, I only bring a fleece blanket for any chill.

Hana_Hanger
02-24-2006, 02:51
Why do some people sleep on the ground?

Well because they forgot their Winnabegos!

Nah I like Tarps, Tents and Hammocks. For me a good nights sleep is only in a hammock. Yet in a tent I sleep great on a 5" futon... :P
Each to their own....and each have their place and purpose. That is why we have so many choices :)

neo
02-24-2006, 09:40
Why do some people sleep on the ground?

Well because they forgot their Winnabegos!

Nah I like Tarps, Tents and Hammocks. For me a good nights sleep is only in a hammock. Yet in a tent I sleep great on a 5" futon... :P
Each to their own....and each have their place and purpose. That is why we have so many choices :)

winnabegos are to heavy to carry anyway lol:cool: neo

neo
02-24-2006, 09:45
when the weather gets warm, hammocking is the only way to go. It doesn't cause any damage to the ground and is incredibly comfortable. Ultra light, I only bring a fleece blanket for any chill.

i started out only using my hammock in warmer with also,only using a poncho liner,then a year and a half ago i made a decisision to go all the way
4 season hammock hanging,i even carry my hammock and jetboil on day hikes i love it so much:cool: neo

http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=10089&catid=newimages


http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=10086&catid=newimages

http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=10085&catid=member&imageuser=3462



http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=10041&catid=member&imageuser=3462

kyhipo
02-24-2006, 09:49
Exactly.

That's why I don't do hammocks.yeah i sleep sleep on my stomach 75 pecernt of the time on a long hike so thats my concerns also :eek: being bent besides i cramp and need to move around.ky

C_Brice
02-24-2006, 22:46
Quote:
The people who don't use hammocks REALLY like to talk about it.

LOL... Pretty funny considering the title of this thread. On the contrary, it appears to me it's the neo-hammockers trying to convert tenters and tarpers.

Was thinkin the same thing Sly, rofl. I haven't seen any post lately titled, " Why do people sleep in trees?".

Jeff must of been having a bad day when he posted that (or he isn't the sharpest stick in the wood pile, haven't decided yet).

Enjoy,
Chris

betic4lyf
02-24-2006, 23:51
i don't hammock because the cost to much >$0, and i have a creeping suspicion that all my lactic acid would drain to my hips, and that it would be hard to sleep on my side and back, which i invariably doo.also i cant fight with bears as easilly with a hammock

neo
02-24-2006, 23:57
tommorrow me and my wife and my oldest son will be hammock hanging:cool: neo

mbroadhe
02-25-2006, 00:08
tommorrow me and my wife and my oldest son will be hammock hanging:cool: neo
Well, have fun.

Just Jeff
02-25-2006, 01:23
Jeff must of been having a bad day when he posted that (or he isn't the sharpest stick in the wood pile, haven't decided yet).

Guess I didn't put enough smileys in there. Here are a few so everyone knows I was just playing. :-? :) And I'll even add one for neo :cool:

And as to sharp sticks, I didn't realize that's what people look for in a wood pile. I usually just look for something that'll burn well. Dry. :D

oldfivetango
02-25-2006, 10:24
Greetings All,
Looks like I will never make the trail because of my back
problems but I still go on overnighters here locally.
Why all the controversy about tent vs hammock?You gotta go with what you feel comfortable with.Some people cant sleep in a hammock-I cant sleep without one-but then again I have been sleeping in a
chair since Feb 16,2005.
If you pitch your tarp on a separate line above your hammock and use a piece of tyvek or tarpstuff for a "floor" you would have all the advantages of a tent,a tarp,and ,yes,even a hammock.You could sleep in the hammock or just fold it over for a "chair" while you cook and then ditch it and just sleep on the ground.It all weighs about what a tent does btw.
So the only critical issue I can fathom is privacy.Just how much privacy do you guys have changing clothes in a shelter?Or a tarp for that matter?
Here's my privacy suggestion.Take your tarp that you use over your hammock and stake it loosely to the ground on all four corners.Now put your walking stick under it in the middle and erect it-"voila",you now have a TeePee.
Now you can change clothes,bathe off,or do whatever.Just dont knock the pole down.If your tarp is small and you are tall then you can
put some lines out of the corner grommets and make it taller-but then people might see your lower legs and feet-but you still maintain considerable privacy for hygiene issues etc.
Too bad I wont ever make it to the hills with you guys.
Oldfivetango

weary
02-25-2006, 10:56
Why do some people sleep on the ground?
Because it's there!

neo
02-25-2006, 12:03
tonite it will be 24 degrees,it will be the record low for my wife hammock hanging:cool: neo

Just Jeff
02-25-2006, 12:50
Because it's there!

Haha...ok, Mallory. That's the best answer yet!

freefall
02-25-2006, 19:00
i just dont understand why people sleep on he ground in tents or in shelters
hammocking is more comfortable and more versitle,i dont get it,i dont make since,it sucks sleeping on the ground,i guess each to their own,sleeping on the ground just sucks:cool: neo


http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=7105&c=577

Hey Neo, did you used to sell Amway or something?:)

Besides, with all the ground dwellers, we get choice pick on the trees!:banana

C_Brice
02-26-2006, 02:13
Just for you Jeff,

Retyped to read:

"CHRIS must of been having a bad day when he posted that (or he isn't the sharpest stick in the wood pile, haven't decided yet)."

Enjoy,
Chris

Scots Guards
02-26-2006, 10:09
Because I prefer sleeping on the ground, Duhh!! I've tried the hammock thing and I just prefer solid under me. Must be the infantryman in me. My wife and daughter prefer their hammocks. More power to them. Same to you Neo. It's really a matter of personal preferance and comfort.

Rifleman
03-01-2006, 02:02
Because I prefer sleeping on the ground, Duhh!! I've tried the hammock thing and I just prefer solid under me. Must be the infantryman in me. My wife and daughter prefer their hammocks. More power to them. Same to you Neo. It's really a matter of personal preferance and comfort.

I can understand that. Everybody goes with what they know. This might interest you.

http://www.sixmoondesigns.com/shop/shopexd.asp?id=45

or this:

http://www.uscav.com/Productinfo.aspx?productID=5485&TabID=1

or if you're on a budget:

http://texsport.net/acatalog/Willowbend_Two-Person_Trail__Tent.html
:-?
R.

SGTdirtman
03-01-2006, 02:31
I dont mean to sound mean... but who why how would you pay $110 dollars for a oversized poncho

I'm baffled... sure its lightweight, BUT ITS JUST A BIG TARP WITH A HOOD ON IT!

Patrick
03-04-2006, 03:37
Yowza, this is quite a thread. My first reaction is to agree with Jeff. Don't sleep in hammocks. They're terrible and you don't even want to try them.

I don't get anyone bashing neo for hyping hammocks either. Can you blame the cheetah for chasing the antelope? No, it's just what he does. "Should I use a plastic or titanium spork?" "hammocks rule, give up the ground :cool: neo". God bless him.

Something I don't think has been said is that because you hammock, doesn't mean you have to lay in your hammock the whole time you're in camp. That tarp over it is nice and high with plenty of protected square feet.

And your hammock is also a chair. People talk about cooking in tents and how you can't in a hammock. No, I can't cook in my Hennessy, but I can cook under my tarp and then sit back in my nice swinging chair and eat my dinner and drink my coffee. That's luxury, man.

Who said cold weather hammocking is heavier than tenting? I'll take the Pepsi challenge on that one and my stuff is synthetic. Compare someone with JRB down and a Speer and remember that your sleeping pad isn't weightless.

As far as price goes, a Hennessy ULB costs under $200. Not cheap, but not a crazy price for a tent either. Too much? Check out Risk's page. What does his hammock cost, $7?

I'd agree that if you're an absolute stomach sleeper, you probably won't be comfortable. But side sleepers do great. Here's something else. When I'm in a bed, I'm a 100% side sleeper. In the hammock, though, I'm probably 50/50. For whatever reason, I have no trouble sleeping on my back in one.

Anyway, that's my story. I'm fine with hanging my hammock way away from everyone and relaxing. All you other guys should stick with your tents.

neo
03-04-2006, 05:24
Yowza, this is quite a thread. My first reaction is to agree with Jeff. Don't sleep in hammocks. They're terrible and you don't even want to try them.

I don't get anyone bashing neo for hyping hammocks either. Can you blame the cheetah for chasing the antelope? No, it's just what he does. "Should I use a plastic or titanium spork?" "hammocks rule, give up the ground :cool: neo". God bless him.

Something I don't think has been said is that because you hammock, doesn't mean you have to lay in your hammock the whole time you're in camp. That tarp over it is nice and high with plenty of protected square feet.

And your hammock is also a chair. People talk about cooking in tents and how you can't in a hammock. No, I can't cook in my Hennessy, but I can cook under my tarp and then sit back in my nice swinging chair and eat my dinner and drink my coffee. That's luxury, man.

Who said cold weather hammocking is heavier than tenting? I'll take the Pepsi challenge on that one and my stuff is synthetic. Compare someone with JRB down and a Speer and remember that your sleeping pad isn't weightless.

As far as price goes, a Hennessy ULB costs under $200. Not cheap, but not a crazy price for a tent either. Too much? Check out Risk's page. What does his hammock cost, $7?

I'd agree that if you're an absolute stomach sleeper, you probably won't be comfortable. But side sleepers do great. Here's something else. When I'm in a bed, I'm a 100% side sleeper. In the hammock, though, I'm probably 50/50. For whatever reason, I have no trouble sleeping on my back in one.

Anyway, that's my story. I'm fine with hanging my hammock way away from everyone and relaxing. All you other guys should stick with your tents.

remember the old saying"rock and roll is here to stay",so are hammocks:cool: neo

Heater
03-04-2006, 07:50
remember the old saying"rock and roll is here to stay",so are hammocks:cool: neo

Rock and roll. Isn't that what happens when the hammock strings break and you fall?

Haha! Rock and roll:cool:

:D

neo
03-04-2006, 08:28
the answer is,that they have not saw the light,and started hammock hanging yet:cool: neo

http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=9723&c=577


http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=8017&c=577



http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=7889&c=577



http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=7869&c=577


http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=7105&c=577

general
03-04-2006, 09:30
Yowza, this is quite a thread. My first reaction is to agree with Jeff. Don't sleep in hammocks. They're terrible and you don't even want to try them.

I don't get anyone bashing neo for hyping hammocks either. Can you blame the cheetah for chasing the antelope? No, it's just what he does. "Should I use a plastic or titanium spork?" "hammocks rule, give up the ground :cool: neo". God bless him.

Something I don't think has been said is that because you hammock, doesn't mean you have to lay in your hammock the whole time you're in camp. That tarp over it is nice and high with plenty of protected square feet.

And your hammock is also a chair. People talk about cooking in tents and how you can't in a hammock. No, I can't cook in my Hennessy, but I can cook under my tarp and then sit back in my nice swinging chair and eat my dinner and drink my coffee. That's luxury, man.

Who said cold weather hammocking is heavier than tenting? I'll take the Pepsi challenge on that one and my stuff is synthetic. Compare someone with JRB down and a Speer and remember that your sleeping pad isn't weightless.

As far as price goes, a Hennessy ULB costs under $200. Not cheap, but not a crazy price for a tent either. Too much? Check out Risk's page. What does his hammock cost, $7?

I'd agree that if you're an absolute stomach sleeper, you probably won't be comfortable. But side sleepers do great. Here's something else. When I'm in a bed, I'm a 100% side sleeper. In the hammock, though, I'm probably 50/50. For whatever reason, I have no trouble sleeping on my back in one.

Anyway, that's my story. I'm fine with hanging my hammock way away from everyone and relaxing. All you other guys should stick with your tents.

pepsi challenge: information of the ground dweller

winter weight
shelter 13 oz
0 sleeping bag 2lb 8 oz
big agnes air core pad 1lb 13 oz

total 5lb 2oz

summer weight
shelter 11oz
bug net 9oz
30 sleeping bag 2lb (a little less, but not much)
big agnes air core pad 1lb 13oz

total 5lb 1oz

now break those scales out and see if you can beat that. the big agnes is for total comfort on the ground. substitute that for a full length thermarest and loose 1lb off of total weight. substitute the big agnes for a full length ridge rest and loose about 1lb 8oz off of total weight.

possible total for summer weight only (because i like the added warmth of the air core pad in winter and wouldn't substitute) 3lb 9oz, for shelter, bag, and sleeping pad.

neo
03-04-2006, 09:40
pepsi challenge: information of the ground dweller

winter weight
shelter 13 oz
0 sleeping bag 2lb 8 oz
big agnes air core pad 1lb 13 oz

total 5lb 2oz

summer weight
shelter 11oz
bug net 9oz
30 sleeping bag 2lb (a little less, but not much)
big agnes air core pad 1lb 13oz

total 5lb 1oz

now break those scales out and see if you can beat that. the big agnes is for total comfort on the ground. substitute that for a full length thermarest and loose 1lb off of total weight. substitute the big agnes for a full length ridge rest and loose about 1lb 8oz off of total weight.

possible total for summer weight only (because i like the added warmth of the air core pad in winter and wouldn't substitute) 3lb 9oz, for shelter, bag, and sleeping pad.


not worried about a few oz.i just feel better hanging than i did when i wuz a ground deweller thats all:cool: neo

neo
03-04-2006, 09:48
pepsi challenge: information of the ground dweller

winter weight
shelter 13 oz
0 sleeping bag 2lb 8 oz
big agnes air core pad 1lb 13 oz

total 5lb 2oz

summer weight
shelter 11oz
bug net 9oz
30 sleeping bag 2lb (a little less, but not much)
big agnes air core pad 1lb 13oz

total 5lb 1oz

now break those scales out and see if you can beat that. the big agnes is for total comfort on the ground. substitute that for a full length thermarest and loose 1lb off of total weight. substitute the big agnes for a full length ridge rest and loose about 1lb 8oz off of total weight.

possible total for summer weight only (because i like the added warmth of the air core pad in winter and wouldn't substitute) 3lb 9oz, for shelter, bag, and sleeping pad.

my hennessey hammock wieghs 1 lb 10 oz
my sleep pad 10 0z
30 degree sleep quilt 1 lb 9 0z
for real cold weather i add my 45 degree down bag 1 lb 8 oz
this is my single digit set up

total 5 lbs 4 oz if i swap out standard tarp for my 9x9 tarp that makes 6 lbs 4 oz thats for raging
storms and near zero temps:cool: neo

kyhipo
03-04-2006, 11:26
my hennessey hammock wieghs 1 lb 10 oz
my sleep pad 10 0z
30 degree sleep quilt 1 lb 9 0z
for real cold weather i add my 45 degree down bag 1 lb 8 oz
this is my single digit set up

total 5 lbs 4 oz if i swap out standard tarp for my 9x9 tarp that makes 6 lbs 4 oz thats for raging
storms and near zero temps:cool: neostill to heavy for my blood,but heck if thats your diggs stick with your guns:-? ky

neo
03-04-2006, 11:34
still to heavy for my blood,but heck if thats your diggs stick with your guns:-? ky

good advice thanks:cool: neo

kyhipo
03-04-2006, 11:54
bottom line is some people like tents,tarps,hammoks,whatever your prefrence but people who sleep on the ground have their reasons,I like to be able to move around,I like being able to open my tent screen and cook or other things,But this thread is about ground dwellers :D quit stealing our turf.ky ofcourse you know iam kidden.U want to hang go for it

neo
03-04-2006, 11:59
bottom line is some people like tents,tarps,hammoks,whatever your prefrence but people who sleep on the ground have their reasons,I like to be able to move around,I like being able to open my tent screen and cook or other things,But this thread is about ground dwellers :D quit stealing our turf.ky ofcourse you know iam kidden.U want to hang go for it

i started this thread lol,anit stealin nuthin lol:cool: neo

kyhipo
03-04-2006, 12:11
i started this thread lol,anit stealin nuthin lol:cool: neowell ground dwellers rule:banana :banana just foolin with ya ,ky :eek:

Ridge
03-04-2006, 12:50
I'd like to check out some hammocks. I do think in the tropics they would be good, I don't want to attempt a winter hike in one, but for hot and wet forested areas they sound like they might be the ticket.

Just Jeff
03-04-2006, 13:21
pepsi challenge: information of the ground dweller

winter weight
shelter 13 oz
0 sleeping bag 2lb 8 oz
big agnes air core pad 1lb 13 oz

total 5lb 2oz

summer weight
shelter 11oz
bug net 9oz
30 sleeping bag 2lb (a little less, but not much)
big agnes air core pad 1lb 13oz

total 5lb 1oz


I was so hot with this setup at -10F wind chill that I had to open the PeaPod down to my waist to vent. I have no idea how low it could go but I was starting to overheat when I vented.

08 - Homemade Speer-type
04 - Webbing supports
36 - PeaPod w/ 2 oz overstuff
33 - Exped Downmat 7 w/ inflation sack
21 - JRB Nest top quilt
15 - MacCat Standard with cord and tensioners

Total 117 oz = 7.3 lbs

Here are some others posted here before that show hammocks compare favorably if you look at comparable features like bug protection and the comfort of a hammock over a 1/8" torso-length CCF pad.

TEMPERATURE: 40F

19 - Speer 8.0 (w/ bugnet)
29 - Speer PeaPod
13 - Speer 8x10 Tarp
04 - 4 stakes w/ cord
65 oz total - 4 lbs 1 oz - 1843 g

11 - Homemade Speer (w/o bugnet)
29 - PeaPod
07 - MacCat Micro
04 - 4 stakes w/ cord
51 oz total - 3 lbs 3 oz - 1446 g

TEMPERATURE: 37F

11 - Homemade Speer (w/o bugnet)
03.5 - Speer SPE
10 - Equinox CCF Pad 20"x72"x3/8"
16 - Speer Top Blanket
09 - JRB 8x8
02 - 2 stakes w/ cord
51.5 oz - 3 lbs 3.5 oz - 1460 g

TEMPERATURE: 30F

20 - HH UL BP Asym
20 - JRB Nest Underquilt
20 - JRB No Sniveler Top Quilt
02 - JRB Connectors
09 - JRB 8x8 Tarp
02 - 2 stakes w/ cord
73 oz - 4 lbs 9 oz - 2070 g

11 - Speer (w/o bugnet)
29 - PeaPod
16 - Top Blanket
09 - JRB 8x8 Tarp
02 - 2 stakes w/ cord
67 oz - 4 lbs 3 oz - 1900 g

http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?t=10229&highlight=hammock+weights

and

http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?t=10426&page=4&highlight=hammock+weights

neo
03-04-2006, 17:11
I was so hot with this setup at -10F wind chill that I had to open the PeaPod down to my waist to vent. I have no idea how low it could go but I was starting to overheat when I vented.

08 - Homemade Speer-type
04 - Webbing supports
36 - PeaPod w/ 2 oz overstuff
33 - Exped Downmat 7 w/ inflation sack
21 - JRB Nest top quilt
15 - MacCat Standard with cord and tensioners

Total 117 oz = 7.3 lbs

Here are some others posted here before that show hammocks compare favorably if you look at comparable features like bug protection and the comfort of a hammock over a 1/8" torso-length CCF pad.

TEMPERATURE: 40F

19 - Speer 8.0 (w/ bugnet)
29 - Speer PeaPod
13 - Speer 8x10 Tarp
04 - 4 stakes w/ cord
65 oz total - 4 lbs 1 oz - 1843 g

11 - Homemade Speer (w/o bugnet)
29 - PeaPod
07 - MacCat Micro
04 - 4 stakes w/ cord
51 oz total - 3 lbs 3 oz - 1446 g

TEMPERATURE: 37F

11 - Homemade Speer (w/o bugnet)
03.5 - Speer SPE
10 - Equinox CCF Pad 20"x72"x3/8"
16 - Speer Top Blanket
09 - JRB 8x8
02 - 2 stakes w/ cord
51.5 oz - 3 lbs 3.5 oz - 1460 g

TEMPERATURE: 30F

20 - HH UL BP Asym
20 - JRB Nest Underquilt
20 - JRB No Sniveler Top Quilt
02 - JRB Connectors
09 - JRB 8x8 Tarp
02 - 2 stakes w/ cord
73 oz - 4 lbs 9 oz - 2070 g

11 - Speer (w/o bugnet)
29 - PeaPod
16 - Top Blanket
09 - JRB 8x8 Tarp
02 - 2 stakes w/ cord
67 oz - 4 lbs 3 oz - 1900 g

http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?t=10229&highlight=hammock+weights

and

http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?t=10426&page=4&highlight=hammock+weights

sounds to like your good to go anytime,anyplace any temp.we know its not about wieght its about comfort and freedom and style,excellent jeff:cool: neo

hammock engineer
03-04-2006, 17:17
I agree neo. It isn't for the weight that I hang. More for the comfort and freedom to set up anywhere I like. I would rather carry a 20 lbs pack and be comfortable and happy than a 12 lbs pack and not be happy.

Just Jeff
03-04-2006, 18:22
It isn't for the weight that I hang. More for the comfort and freedom to set up anywhere I like. I would rather carry a 20 lbs pack and be comfortable and happy than a 12 lbs pack and not be happy.

Yep - agree completely. I could probably save a bit of weight by leaving the hammock, but it's not worth it.

As far as a winter rig, sleeping on the snow partially eliminates some of the advantages - no rocks and roots on the snow, you can dig out a level area, etc. But even so it's still not as comfortable as hanging!

neo
03-04-2006, 18:35
I agree neo. It isn't for the weight that I hang. More for the comfort and freedom to set up anywhere I like. I would rather carry a 20 lbs pack and be comfortable and happy than a 12 lbs pack and not be happy.

hammock hanging is not really heavy anyway,its great:cool: neo

SGTdirtman
03-05-2006, 00:13
Just to cause problems...

I dont see how a hammock has more "freedom" I can put my bivy shelter anywhere theres ground, Hammocks need to be hung from something....

My shelter and sleeping bag weigh the same if not less than your whole hammock ordeal and smaller than all the crap you gotta carry for cold weather....

I have a floor and walls, I can sit in my shelter if its raining, I can eat my dinner in my shelter, I can play solitare in my shelter. You can pretty much just lay in a hammock....

I can sprawl out and lay in any position my little heart desires in my shelter, A hammock your kinda stuck sleeping on your back or side....

In a pinch 2 people can sleep in my shelter for emergencies or just late night fun, you just lay alone crying yourself to sleep in a hammock....

So enjoy your hammock gilligan... I'll be sleeping peacefully in my tent

Beachwalker
03-05-2006, 09:19
I've been reading about these hammocks for over a year now, and you know why I won't buy one... because they are cold, and because I can't bring my pack inside with me, open it up, get stuff out, cook, change, etc. To make myself sleep warm, I have to bring an underpad... more weight. Yeah, the tarp allows you a "dry" spot under the hammock for changing, etc, but in mild wind the dry spot is all wet, as is the ground underneath it.

On the other hand, My Tarptent Virga is lighter than any hammock that will fit me (I'm 6'3", which rules out all the smaller hammocks), and my pack.If its raining I can change inside the tent, I don't get sidesplatter, and I can cook in the vestibule. Oh, and even with my Prolite 3 its a lighter combination at colder temperatures than a Hammock will ever be.

Until you hammock guys come up with a credible and light way to keep my ass warm while I am swinging from the trees, I am sticking to my TarpTent. I've seen HH's ideas for keeping you warm, and while interesting, its too heavy. Work out the kinks, then call me!

Cheers

-- Mike

Jaybird
03-05-2006, 10:07
i just dont understand why people sleep on he ground in tents or in shelters.......yada, yada, yada....i guess each to their own
7[/URL]





NEO:


i SECOND the..." each to his own"...we're all as different as our taste in boots, shoes or backpacks....enjoy the hammock...i LOVE my tent!:D

general
03-05-2006, 13:02
my shelter is also good for two plus gear and dogs.

Dust
03-05-2006, 14:22
I've tried both a Hennessey and a Spear, and have gone back to sleeping on the ground. To stay warm in a hammock you need a pad, but the pad always squirms around and you end up with your legs halfway out of the hammock or thrown to the ground.

I salute hammocks.

Just Jeff
03-05-2006, 14:36
To stay warm in a hammock you need a pad, but the pad always squirms around and you end up with your legs halfway out of the hammock or thrown to the ground.

I used to not like my Jeep because I'd get all wet when it rained. Then I realized that, if I used it correctly, I could stay dry...so I put the top up and what do you know...it worked!

You don't need a pad to stay warm in a hammock. But if you do use a pad, there are ways to fix the problems you described. But if you want to judge hammocks without going through the effort of finding out how to use it correctly, that's up to you. :D

But hammocks aren't for everyone - find whatever works for you and stick with it.

saimyoji
03-05-2006, 14:42
Gotta say that as annoying as it is to see a 'hammocks rule' post every other thread, that you gotta do what you gotta do...if you're comfy in a hammock, good for you. Some people aren't comfy anywhere (even in their own homes).
I like my A-frame. Sets up in minutes and gives me what I need.

neo
03-05-2006, 14:43
Gotta say that as annoying as it is to see a 'hammocks rule' post every other thread, that you gotta do what you gotta do...if you're comfy in a hammock, good for you. Some people aren't comfy anywhere (even in their own homes).
I like my A-frame. Sets up in minutes and gives me what I need.

hammock hanging is the only way to fly lol:cool: neo

mbroadhe
03-05-2006, 17:25
hammock hanging is the only way to fly lol:cool: neo
I prefer an airplane. :rolleyes: (for flying)

kybishop
03-05-2006, 17:47
Why sleep in a hammock?

kybishop
03-05-2006, 17:47
Why sleep with a pillow?

kybishop
03-05-2006, 17:48
Why do some people sleep at night?

kybishop
03-05-2006, 17:48
Why sleep with pj's or underwear?

kybishop
03-05-2006, 17:49
Because everybody is different.

Heater
03-05-2006, 18:48
You don't need a pad to stay warm in a hammock. But if you do use a pad, there are ways to fix the problems you described. But if you want to judge hammocks without going through the effort of finding out how to use it correctly, that's up to you. :D

But hammocks aren't for everyone - find whatever works for you and stick with it.

It's seems like just a big hassle... at the end of the day.... when you can just pitch the tent, roll out the pad and bag, and crash.

max patch
03-05-2006, 18:58
After all the crap that neo has posted the last month or so (I love hillary, I love longshanks, ruth ginsberg rules, blah, blah, blah) I'm convinced that if neo says hammocks are cool that they must really suck.

kybishop
03-05-2006, 19:16
Why do some people drool when they sleep?

Just Jeff
03-05-2006, 19:27
Why do some people act six when they're 37?

mbroadhe
03-05-2006, 19:59
Why do some people act like drug pushers when they're hammock campers?

napster
03-05-2006, 21:08
I've tried both a Hennessey and a Spear, and have gone back to sleeping on the ground. To stay warm in a hammock you need a pad, but the pad always squirms around and you end up with your legs halfway out of the hammock or thrown to the ground.

I salute hammocks.

I second that one finger, I payed odles for a winter season system and still froze, I aint tried no Spear so I can't give the one finger salute.

Just Jeff
03-05-2006, 22:01
Why do some people act like drug pushers when they're hammock campers?

More like evangelists. Maybe I'll get us a TV deal and y'all can send money. :D

Rainman
03-06-2006, 00:14
They will tell you you can't sleep alone in a strange place,
They will tell you you can't sleep with somebody else,
O, but sooner or later you sleep in your own space,
either way it's OK, you wake up with yourself.

Tree swingers just aren't grounded people :cool: LOL

saimyoji
03-06-2006, 00:30
They will tell you you can't sleep alone in a strange place,
They will tell you you can't sleep with somebody else,
O, but sooner or later you sleep in your own space,
either way it's OK, you wake up with yourself.

Tree swingers just aren't grounded people :cool: LOL

Actually the lyrics to the entire song are appropriate.

http://www.sing365.com/music/lyric.nsf/My-Life-lyrics-Billy-Joel/C351330977A537C448256870001D54FB

mbroadhe
03-06-2006, 00:51
How about this one instead?
http://www.lyricsondemand.com/b/billyjoellyrics/captainjacklyrics.html

neo
03-06-2006, 10:32
i still dont understand why people sleep on the ground:cool: neo

neo
03-06-2006, 10:37
i still dont understand why people sleep on the ground:cool: neo

my whole family are hammock hangers:cool: neo


me
http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=9720&c=577

http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=7889&c=577
my wife
http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=8019&c=577

http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=9725&catid=member&imageuser=3462
my son hank

http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=6654&c=577

my son logan

http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=6420&c=577

mbroadhe
03-07-2006, 00:28
Who cares?

mbroadhe
03-07-2006, 00:30
I still don't understand the importance of this thread. I also don't understand why were wasting bandwidth on such a stupid topic. I just wish it would go away. So, this is the last time I post in this thread..... over and out.

Sly
03-07-2006, 00:39
After all the crap that neo has posted the last month or so (I love hillary, I love longshanks, ruth ginsberg rules, blah, blah, blah) I'm convinced that if neo says hammocks are cool that they must really suck.

LOL... :D

Lone Wolf
03-07-2006, 07:54
i still dont understand why people sleep on the ground:cool: neo
Do you sleep in a hammock in your house? If not, why not? Don't be a hypocrite. Hammocking is a fad. MOST hikers don't do it.

Tin Man
03-07-2006, 12:27
Judging by Neo's posts here and in other forums, I think his goal is just to stir people up, not encourage them to hang from trees or become fans of Hillary. :D

neo
03-07-2006, 13:04
I still don't understand the importance of this thread. I also don't understand why were wasting bandwidth on such a stupid topic. I just wish it would go away. So, this is the last time I post in this thread..... over and out.

happy hiking to ya:D :cool: neo

neo
03-07-2006, 13:05
Judging by Neo's posts here and in other forums, I think his goal is just to stir people up, not encourage them to hang from trees or become fans of Hillary. :D

also a jeanine pirro fan:D ,she is a babe:cool: neo

Just Jeff
03-07-2006, 16:10
Neo, you have the worst taste in women. Notwithstanding your wife...I'm sure she's a babe and all...but the pics you post here are truly disturbing.

Dan Wilson
01-13-2007, 14:18
Check out ENO aka Eagles Nest Outfitters They make the best hammocks I have ever seen or used! www.eaglesnestoutfit.com (http://www.eaglesnestoutfit.com) if you go with this make sure to pick up the Slap Straps Also as they are bomb!

Socrates
01-13-2007, 14:39
hammocks really suck if you are a stomach sleeper. i just don't want to wake up in the morning feeling like i have been bent in half backwards.

Same here, I couldn't sleep on my back if you paid me.

oldfivetango
01-13-2007, 15:25
All you people saying hammocks are awesome are dead wrong. Hammocks suck, there's no way to stay warm in them, and there's no way to make them cool. Stay away from my trees.

So far,the coldest I have done in my HH Expedition is about 20
degrees F.You can be JUST AS WARM in a hammock as a tent
because the hammock IS a tent IF you lower that puppy enough
that you get ground interface.However,you can keep your head
slightly raised(ala your home recliner etc) or in warmer temps you
can suspend the hammock.Let's see you guys suspend your tents!
Granted,the tent has alot more room but I would use my HH Expedition
completely on the ground under the tarp before I would become
a tarp only camper.Speaking of tarps and Swift's unfortunate experience
with his hammock-I suspend my oversize tarp from a separate line,thereby
eliminating the stress on the plastic ring and preventing the scenario
that Swift so unfortuneately encountered.Also,when you break camp
you can take down and pack the hammock up and roll your bag and pack
the pack,all the while as a tarp enthusiast.And for all you tree huggers
out there,I do use a small piece of hose to keep the line from cutting
into the tree so far as the tarp is concerned.For the hammock itself
I use the HH supplied tree hugging wraps which has yet to leave a
mark on any tree yet.Oh,and I do use a small tarp under the HH to serve
as a bit of a floor and ground cloth as the situation dictates.Yep,you can
pull that tarp down low for privacy and do all sorts of stuff under it;including boiling water!That said,hammocks ARE NOT for everybody
but some of us consider them the shelter of choice.But if you are a tent
person and it's working for you-GREAT!:D
Cheers,
OFT

FanaticFringer
01-13-2007, 17:09
Same here, I couldn't sleep on my back if you paid me.

That's why I sleep on my side in my hammock.

rafe
01-13-2007, 17:46
Hammocking is a fad.

Indiana Dan was hammocking in 1990. Surely you recall. OTOH, he did absolutely nothing by-the-book.

dloome
01-13-2007, 17:55
There are only a couple reasons why I don't use a hammock, but they are big ones:

Versatility- You can pitch a tarp or tent anywhere. In environments like desert, tundra, open plains or alpine you'll have one heck of a time trying to set up your hammock. Yeah I know, some hammocks convert to really crappy bivys! No thanks.

Weight- The lightest tarp will always be much lighter than the lightest hammock.

Comfort- If you like to sleep in positions other than on your back, you're out of luck.

If you're only hiking in conditions like you'd find on the AT maybe a hammock would be alright. Otherwise it's just too limiting. Besides, what's wrong with sleeping on the ground?

nitewalker
01-13-2007, 18:36
ok this is my 1st confession on this subject.. neo you and all alike have taken another soul over to the darkside of hiking, hammock hangin!!! i as of 1/10/07 have in my possesion a brandy new ultralight backpacker A-SYM hammock and accompanied by a really nice black shirt with silver graphics of the product upon arrival... all these years i have read about the hammock thing but just didnt bother..i being a true gear head had the so called LAW OF AVERAGES catch up too me.. i had no more needs when it comes to any type of gear for hiking other than the HAMMOCK so the law won out...now i just need to get the thing out into the field and give it a whirl, just not sure when as of rite now.....as a 1st time user what will be my 2 or 3 bigest issue to worry about on 1st setup....thanks, nitewalker

oldfivetango
01-13-2007, 19:12
There are only a couple reasons why I don't use a hammock, but they are big ones:

Versatility- You can pitch a tarp or tent anywhere. In environments like desert, tundra, open plains or alpine you'll have one heck of a time trying to set up your hammock. Yeah I know, some hammocks convert to really crappy bivys! No thanks.

Weight- The lightest tarp will always be much lighter than the lightest hammock.

Comfort- If you like to sleep in positions other than on your back, you're out of luck.

If you're only hiking in conditions like you'd find on the AT maybe a hammock would be alright. Otherwise it's just too limiting. Besides, what's wrong with sleeping on the ground?

To answer your question-ain't nuthin wrong with sleeping on
the ground and if you can do it-more power to ya!However,
some of us have limitations like joint pain that means we have
to sleep reclined-as in a hammock.Were I to lay flat of the back
on the ground for any length of time a major back spasm would
likely ensue.So its hangin for this old boy but if you tenters like what
you got,stay with it.Us old folks like having other options and a hammock
gives us one.
OFT

FanaticFringer
01-13-2007, 19:28
ok this is my 1st confession on this subject.. neo you and all alike have taken another soul over to the darkside of hiking, hammock hangin!!! i as of 1/10/07 have in my possesion a brandy new ultralight backpacker A-SYM hammock and accompanied by a really nice black shirt with silver graphics of the product upon arrival... all these years i have read about the hammock thing but just didnt bother..i being a true gear head had the so called LAW OF AVERAGES catch up too me.. i had no more needs when it comes to any type of gear for hiking other than the HAMMOCK so the law won out...now i just need to get the thing out into the field and give it a whirl, just not sure when as of rite now.....as a 1st time user what will be my 2 or 3 bigest issue to worry about on 1st setup....thanks, nitewalker

Hello and welcome to the hanging crowd. Just realize that there is a learning curve with hammocks that's a little steeper than with tents.
Come on over to www.hammockforums.net to get it all figured out. Also check the hammock camping forum on this site.

FanaticFringer
01-13-2007, 19:33
There are only a couple reasons why I don't use a hammock, but they are big ones:

Versatility- You can pitch a tarp or tent anywhere. In environments like desert, tundra, open plains or alpine you'll have one heck of a time trying to set up your hammock. Yeah I know, some hammocks convert to really crappy bivys! No thanks.

Weight- The lightest tarp will always be much lighter than the lightest hammock.

Comfort- If you like to sleep in positions other than on your back, you're out of luck.

If you're only hiking in conditions like you'd find on the AT maybe a hammock would be alright. Otherwise it's just too limiting. Besides, what's wrong with sleeping on the ground?

www.tothewoods.net/HammockCamping.html

FanaticFringer
01-13-2007, 19:36
Do you sleep in a hammock in your house? If not, why not? Don't be a hypocrite. Hammocking is a fad. MOST hikers don't do it.

I guess hiking poles are a fad too.:rolleyes:

Vi+
01-13-2007, 23:00
why do people sleep on the ground?


Gravity.


Otherwise we'd sleep in the air, tethered to trees, sort of like in a hammock.

freefall
01-14-2007, 00:26
why do people sleep on the ground?


Gravity.


Otherwise we'd sleep in the air, tethered to trees, sort of like in a hammock.

Funny- I chuckled a good bit over this one.

But to dispell a couple of myths about hammocks I choose to continue.
Myth 1-Sleeping on your back- BUSTED!
In my HH Expedition A-Sym, I can sleep on my side comfortably and have even woke up in the morning on my stomach. The A-symetrical design allows for a practically flat sleeping area so you can sleep just about however you want. I will admit that trying to go to sleep on my stomach was a little difficult but I do believe that has a lot to do with tension, in my body not the hammock.
Sleeping on your side is great in a hammock once you get the knack of hanging it properly(doesn't take long). I am traditionally a stomach sleeper but now I sleep on my side mostly, even at home in a bed. In the hammock, I used my fleece as a pillow and used the rest of my clothes as a wedge. It gave me the feeling of sleeping on my stomach but without the spinal mal-alginment that usually accompanies sleeping on one's stomach.

Myth 2- treeless areas- BUSTED!
Using trekking poles, a hammock can be set up on the ground much like a tent. Now, if you hike exclusively above treeline- don't go with a hammock. But if you're like most of us and have excursions below and above treeline, the hammock is very versatile. When set up in treeless areas, the poles are not to keep you off the ground but to expand the hammock much like a tarp or a tent. Then say you are climbing up the side of a mountain, like the Cathedral Bells here in Colorado. You get tired and decide it would be best to stop for the day and finish in the morning. There are no trees but there is no flat groud either. The closest thing to flat has a slope of 30*. But there are some rock outcropings. Now, you could hook a couple of cams in the wall and tether yourself to the rock but I for one would not like ropes cutting into me while I tried to sleep under a tarp. On the other hand, you could hang your hammock from the rock outcroppings and sleep like a baby.
Myth 3- Hammock sleeping is cold!- BUSTED!
There are so many options out there to combat the cold in a hammock. Overquilts, underquilts, sleeping close to the ground, it's not even an arguement! I used a 20* sythnthetic down to 15* without any quilts and survived. I wore all my clothes but it worked. With the quilts available at such light weights, temps below 15* should be possible. Now, if you keep your house at 80* during the winter, there may not be much help for you. I personaly like a sleeping temp of around 55-60*.
So as you can see, there are many reasons to go to hanging. It may be a fad but it makes sense. I think someone once suggested that the internet was just a fad.....:-?

copythat
01-14-2007, 00:57
i just dont understand why people sleep on the ground in tents or in shelters
hammocking is more comfortable and more versitle ...



i'm afraid of heights.
:eek:

Dan Wilson
01-14-2007, 18:59
Trail hiker act like the idea of sleeping in a hammock it new and crazy! what most feel to realize (maybe because they spend to much time on the AT and not exploring other parts of the world) that all over the globe people sleep in hammocks always have and always will.......

Disney
01-15-2007, 13:44
Trail hiker act like the idea of sleeping in a hammock it new and crazy! what most feel to realize (maybe because they spend to much time on the AT and not exploring other parts of the world) that all over the globe people sleep in hammocks always have and always will.......


This guy's nothing but a salesman. Kind of annoying.

K0OPG
01-15-2007, 14:00
if i have a nightmare and fall out of bed...i don't have as far to fall as you.

no trees, still have my tent

rope breaks, still have my tent

tent pole breaks, patch with piece of aluminum and duct tape, can't do that with rope

lightning goes through tree into hammock...bad :mad:

lightning goes through tree, tthrough ground, then "maybe" into tent...less shocking of an idea...not as bad

i'll stick with my tent.;)

SteveJ
01-16-2007, 03:15
I always hammock. For me, a night in my HH leaves no pressure points, no sore shoulders or hips. I usually hike in the winter, and just can't lay on the ground for 12 hrs. If I'm on the ground, at 4:00 I'm hurting enough to just have to get up - only it's too cold! When hammocking, I go to sleep in my hammock, have 6 or 8 hours uninterrupted sleep, wake up refreshed, usually because I need a bio break, take that and then go back to sleep! I wake up without being sore and stiff from laying on the ground all night!

That being said, I lay on the ground last weekend...and thanks to my new Pacific Outdoors Equipment Insulmat, I was relatively comfortable! I hiked with my 11 year old. He wanted me to stay with him, and I also didn't want to carry both a hammock for me and a shelter for him (he's hammocked, but prefers sleeping on the ground - he'll see the light later!). We had a relatively tough weekend hike (~2,500 foot climb over 7 miles on Saturday - a tough hike for an 11 year old!), in bed by 7:30, and stayed in bed 'till 7:00 the next morning! Yeah, I woke up and rolled over every hour-and-a-half or so like I always do when I sleep on the ground, but I didn't have the aching hips / shoulders like I usually do when ground pounding! I'm happy w/ the SAC deal I got last month!

Steve

freefall
01-16-2007, 03:37
if i have a nightmare and fall out of bed...i don't have as far to fall as you.
At least with the Hennessey, you can not fall out unless you really, really work at it.


no trees, still have my tent See my post a couple or six up from here.


rope breaks, still have my tentI know how to tie a knot.


tent pole breaks, patch with piece of aluminum and duct tape, can't do that with ropeI still know how to tie a knot AND I wouldn't have to carry aluminum and EXTRA duct tape, just in case. They weigh something, a knot doesn't.


lightning goes through tree into hammock...bad :mad: Actually, probably not any more chance of this than in a tent. Lightning follows the quickest path to the ground. Kinda like a bird on a power line, hammock's not grounded.


lightning goes through tree, tthrough ground, then "maybe" into tent...less shocking of an idea...not as bad

i'll stick with my tent.;)Leaves more tree possiblities for us hangers.;)

hammock engineer
01-16-2007, 03:49
lightning goes through tree into hammock...bad :mad:

lightning goes through tree, tthrough ground, then "maybe" into tent...less shocking of an idea...not as bad



I started a thread a long time ago about hammocking in thunderstorms. I was thinking about this one night when I was sleeping in my hammock in a storm. The general consensous was that it does not matter if you are in your hammock, same place in a tent (obvously on the ground), or standing there. If a tree gets hit, it is going to explode and take out anything close. The lighting bolt could also ark through you just as easily on the ground as in a hammock.

With this in a hammock as in a tent, site selection is everything.

hammock engineer
01-16-2007, 03:51
Leaves more tree possiblities for us hangers.;)


I'm all for helping people with hammocks, but I'm with you on this one. If you do not want to use one, I am more than happy to use those trees for you.:cool:

highway
01-16-2007, 12:12
Trail hiker act like the idea of sleeping in a hammock it new and crazy! what most feel to realize (maybe because they spend to much time on the AT and not exploring other parts of the world) that all over the globe people sleep in hammocks always have and always will.......

Yep, but they saw it here, first. The Spanish picked up on the idea quickly when they saw it.