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Rightfoot
10-25-2018, 16:44
I just saw reference on Instagram that, "our time with the shelter might be limited". I read into that there is at least a rumor floating around that the shelter might be scheduled for removal/teardown. Does anyone have the real information? Many good memories from waking up to the views from the lower level and tenting in the grassy area.

JG13
10-25-2018, 17:44
Dang...hope not. Was gonna stay there in 2 years during an Erwin to Damascus section.

DownYonder
10-25-2018, 18:19
Any idea who owns the shelter. For some reason, I had it in my mind that it is on private land but that may be wrong.

RangerZ
10-25-2018, 20:26
Keep the shelter, tear down the privy.

FrogLevel
10-25-2018, 22:07
I've not heard anything concrete about it going away. I wouldn't be against it if they built something like the Mountaineer Falls Shelter in its place. I hear nothing but complaints about the drafts of the barn but a new shelter with multiple floors and a cool seating area overlooking the valley might be just as good.

There is a lot of traffic there but its pretty limited to the grassy area and I've not personally noticed any egregious behavior other than the occasional party over the years. I do think they need to install a few black snakes as the mice situation is like nowhere I've ever seen.

saltysack
10-26-2018, 08:36
I canít imagine why theyíd tear it down unless itís structurally unsound. Iíve spent two of my coldest nights there several years apart. I hope my big arse hanging my hammock upstairs didnít do it in!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

ldsailor
10-26-2018, 12:39
I'm not very fond of that place. I stayed there a year ago. The loft was full, so I laid out my sleeping bag on the lower platform. A fog bank rolled in that night and all my gear got soaked (it never rained). If I ever go back there, I'll spend the night in a tent for sure.

importman77
10-26-2018, 19:54
I'd hate to see it go. I spent the night there on two occasions. Once I hung upstairs and the other time was in November and I stayed on the platform outside. It was cold as he11. I still remember the wind would come rushing up from the valley throughout the night and it honestly sounded like a freight train. Kinda scared me the first time till I figured out what it was. All that being said, I have fond memories from those two nights and I'd like it to be left alone. To me it's possibly the most iconic shelter on the trail.

Slo-go'en
10-26-2018, 20:30
Since the barn was designed to dry tobacco leaves, it wasn't made to be very wind proof. Fog and mist does blow through it. In rotten weather, you are better in a tent.

If the structure is starting to disintegrate and looking like a stiff wind could knock it over, then that would be reason to abandon it. A restoration would be a major undertaking. It would make more sense to build a new building.

BTW, if you follow the gravel road below the shelter out, you end up a long, long way from where you really want to be.

MuddyWaters
10-27-2018, 04:03
AT .
The trail where "hikers" complain about quality of buildings they sleep in.

What a bunch of crap.

Tear them all down
Reduce whiny baby hikers

Amazing how other trails are great without them . Wouldnt consider the ridiculous concept

mountain squid
10-27-2018, 10:50
I just saw reference on Instagram hmmmm ... very interesting ... I'd like to know who posted what on Instagram.

The Barn is leaning and in need of repair or possible destruction. No decisions have been made at this point, but it might come down. If it is removed the camping area will likely remain with some tent platforms or some other camping possibilities. At any rate the view will remain the same.

See you on the trail,
mt squid

johnacraft
10-27-2018, 13:10
hmmmm ... very interesting ... I'd like to know who posted what on Instagram.
This post from August may be what he's referring to: "Sad to hear to old barn is coming down . . . trail maintainers said itís leaning too much and Bob Peoples (of the Kincora hostel) and group is going to take it down and replace it with a large three wall. :-( "

https://www.instagram.com/p/BmtuDMbFS8V/?tagged=overmountainshelter

Christoph
10-27-2018, 17:02
I hope not. That's one of the trail icons. A must see (and stay at) for me.

Rightfoot
10-27-2018, 18:57
The comment I referenced was simply a single line in IG that referred that our time with shelter might be limited. To be clear, neither I nor the comment I mentioned speak to a removal plan. Mountain Squid... the IG comment was made by a gentleman who goes by Markthompson1942.

importman77
10-28-2018, 07:05
Anyone have any idea when this might happen, (if it does indeed get torn down)? I would really like to get back there one more time if it's gonna be gone. I just realized it's the only shelter I've actually slept in. Don't care much for shelters as a whole.

lucky luke
10-28-2018, 07:59
AT .
The trail where "hikers" complain about quality of buildings they sleep in.

What a bunch of crap.

Tear them all down
Reduce whiny baby hikers

Amazing how other trails are great without them . Wouldnt consider the ridiculous concept

thank you so much, muddy waters!

just my thought when i read this. i for my part was happy to sleep in the "shelter" in 1998. there were 2 barking dogs, more mice running around than nails in the wood, it was drafty and loud, the wind blew the fog inside having ripped apart the plastic foil taped over the big opening in the wall.

what a ****ty place (compared to a hotel), i absolutely agree.

still 100 times better than sleeping outside in driving wind and fog and rain with temps little below freezing. i was thankful for it being there at that time, and i think of it as a not so good nite on the trail. but i was then, and i am now, grateful that it was there. so whats to complain....? if you like it better ouside than stay outside. if its better inside, then use it but donīt complain. be happy for it.

too bad its in a bad shape. "the barn" will be missed by many!

tunnelbear
10-28-2018, 08:53
I didn't investigate its structural integrity, but it seemed in pretty good shape a few weeks ago when I stayed there.

importman77
10-28-2018, 09:09
I didn't investigate its structural integrity, but it seemed in pretty good shape a few weeks ago when I stayed there.

It's been about 4-5 years since I was there and it seemed solid to me too. I'm no engineer but I didn't see anything structurally wrong with it. Yeah, the design allows the wind to blow straight through but that's not a defect.

importman77
10-28-2018, 09:27
Just thinking... Is there someone on here with the knowledge and wherewithal to start a petition or better yet a Go Fund Me to save this icon? I wouldn't know where to begin but I'd definitely sign a petition or donate to help this cause. Seems to me I remember a member on here who is a trail maintainer with The Tennessee Eastman Hiking Club. Anyone know who I'm talking about? Maybe he could shed some light on what's proposed and what we could possibly do to save "The Barn".

Lugnut
10-28-2018, 10:35
Mountain Squid

mountain squid
10-28-2018, 10:48
Seems to me I remember a member on here who is a trail maintainer with The Tennessee Eastman Hiking Club. Anyone know who I'm talking about?Yeah, that is me. I don't believe funds are an issue. Inspections have been made but a resolution has not yet been decided as I mentioned already. Yes, it is an icon and many, many, many hikers have stayed there. We had reports that over 100 were there over Labor Day weekend.

Thanks johnacraft and Rightfoot for providing the Instagram account. I was curious and now I know it was secondhand information being relayed.

See you on the trail,
mt squid

importman77
10-28-2018, 12:10
Thanks MS. Will you keep us updated as you find out more?

LazyLightning
10-28-2018, 15:13
I was sad when I stayed at Bob People's hostel and he was telling me it might come down, right after I stayed in it. I have a good story from my stay there, or actually on my way...

I thought the blue blazed trail was just for water so I took the trail that veered to the left and I'm thinking it's taking longer then I should. I heard the barn was in a field and I saw a big opening ahead so kept going, up hill, and come out into a huge field with absolutely nothing in it! …. I turn around and way in the distance in a much lower field I can just see the barn from high above it and I'm thinking "you gotta be kidding me". At this point it's in the 20s and snowing on me, freezing all day with snow showers, I just came from the highest shelter on the AT 7-8 miles back which I hiked up to in a rain storm then everything froze and started snowing overnight. It would be at least 45 minutes from my glance at it before I actually made it to the barn.

at least I got to see a couple deer running through a snowy field that I otherwise wouldn't have seen... there was snow blowing in through the cracks of the barn that night but I sure was glad it was there

johnacraft
10-28-2018, 16:43
Thanks johnacraft and Rightfoot for providing the Instagram account. I was curious and now I know it was secondhand information being relayed.

See you on the trail,
mt squid

Happy to help, and thank you for the update.

Do I remember correctly that there was some substantial foundation work done on the downhill wall a few years back?

And I'll add my request that, if you have time and think of it, I'm sure many of us would appreciate updates or point us to a place where we might find them (like the TEHCC web site). I've never stayed in the barn itself, but I do enjoy camping there, and like many will want to make one last visit to pay our respects.

43909

James GAME2009
10-28-2018, 23:12
Absolutely my favorite shelter on the AT and a place where years after my hike I first introduced a friend to the AT. I'd be sad to see it go.

illabelle
10-29-2018, 08:50
Some shelters aren't worth saving. This one is. But if the decision is to take it down, I hope they will reuse the barn materials for the new shelter. Not just for the sake of recycling, but as an alternate way to preserve the barn.

importman77
10-29-2018, 09:35
Some shelters aren't worth saving. This one is. But if the decision is to take it down, I hope they will reuse the barn materials for the new shelter. Not just for the sake of recycling, but as an alternate way to preserve the barn.

Totally agree with this.

mountain squid
10-29-2018, 18:55
Do I remember correctly that there was some substantial foundation work done on the downhill wall a few years back?
And I'll add my request that, if you have time and think of it, I'm sure many of us would appreciate updates We did some work on the retaining wall by the sleeping platforms. If I remember we added some logs.

I'll try to keep everyone updated as I learn things.

See you on the trail,
mt squid

importman77
10-29-2018, 21:32
Sounds good. Thanks MS.

bayview
10-30-2018, 18:33
It is a historic structure that needs to be saved. We get a crap load of whining when people talk about putting a pipeline through a zone that helps thousands get less expensive power yet a little draft and inconvenience and we want to tear it down.

Historic Icons need to be preserved for posterity

Quik
10-31-2018, 18:21
It is a historic structure that needs to be saved. We get a crap load of whining when people talk about putting a pipeline through a zone that helps thousands get less expensive power yet a little draft and inconvenience and we want to tear it down.

Historic Icons need to be preserved for posterity

Please share with me what is historic about this barn, someone mentioned it was a tobacco barn, that doesn't make it historic? If it is deemed unsafe and it is too expensive to bring it up to a safe place for hikers then it needs to come down.

bayview
10-31-2018, 18:45
It was an old farmstead used before the trail was even established. It is part of the mountain lifestyle. It should be preserved as it is part of history in the Appalachians. We preserve historical homes and barns in many places Look at GSMNP.

FrogLevel
10-31-2018, 19:35
Please share with me what is historic about this barn, someone mentioned it was a tobacco barn, that doesn't make it historic? If it is deemed unsafe and it is too expensive to bring it up to a safe place for hikers then it needs to come down.

Its probably the most famous shelter on the AT. Tens of thousands of people have stayed there and had great memories of it for over 30 years. Many groups from all over the country and the world plan trips every year to meet at the barn as part of their yearly hiking trip with friends and family. Lots of people around here grew up going there as kids and have some of our first memories of hiking and camping at Roan Mountain and the barn.

That makes it historic.

MuddyWaters
10-31-2018, 20:47
Please share with me what is historic about this barn, someone mentioned it was a tobacco barn, that doesn't make it historic? If it is deemed unsafe and it is too expensive to bring it up to a safe place for hikers then it needs to come down.
Or, just tell lazy building loving AT people to sleep in a tent like real hikers. Eliminate it as an AT shelter all together. It can stay as historic bldg.

No shelter is needed or needs replacement.
Shelters need to be done away with
Create more concentrated tent camping areas like new Hawk mtn instead.

It will reduce party crowd, #s, and spread people out more

Dogwood
11-01-2018, 04:15
An AT icon. View. Drafty. Cold. Appreciated on a few rainy or snowy days. Gorgeous scene arriving in the snow! Historic? I don't know if it merits enough widespread historical significance not to be torn down. Meese could be out in force even during the day. One of the AT's worse in terms of emboldened rampaging meese. This alone made me usually move on. It obviously could be a party spot. Beer cans galore. Shelter maintainers like Mountain Squid must have had their hands full.

Dogwood
11-01-2018, 04:26
It was an old farmstead used before the trail was even established. It is part of the mountain lifestyle. It should be preserved as it is part of history in the Appalachians. We preserve historical homes and barns in many places Look at GSMNP.
Many more were torn down or not preserved than preserved. It takes resources to preserve structures. Seems every time on WB donating one's resources or considering one's behavior to contribute to conservation and such endeavors is mentioned the post count is ridiculously low and the thread quickly fizzles.

FrogLevel
11-01-2018, 09:41
Or, just tell lazy building loving AT people to sleep in a tent like real hikers. Eliminate it as an AT shelter all together. It can stay as historic bldg.

No shelter is needed or needs replacement.
Shelters need to be done away with
Create more concentrated tent camping areas like new Hawk mtn instead.
It will reduce party crowd, #s, and spread people out more


I love how bitter old men now consider people hiking 2000 miles lazy. I say get rid of shoes too. Lazy people want shoes now? What babies!

Its unfortunate how so many people go through life so upset at what others think and feel the need to ruin their experience because the are the true superior hiker. Pathetic.

MuddyWaters
11-01-2018, 10:37
I love how bitter old men now consider people hiking 2000 miles lazy. I say get rid of shoes too. Lazy people want shoes now? What babies!

Its unfortunate how so many people go through life so upset at what others think and feel the need to ruin their experience because the are the true superior hiker. Pathetic.
Whats pathetic , is judgemental people that ignore facts.

No other long trail sans LT, that AT was copied from, has copious shelters. Or privys even.

In spite of this, they also dont have AT degree of problems.

JMT manages AT scale of hikers per day with minimal impact. No trash, partiers, overflowing privys . CT does too nowdays.

Shelters create problems with high use. Its a demonstrated fact. Shelters are only moderately clean because caring people volunteer to clean them up regularly and pack out garbage that wont burn.

Bottom line.....they attract wrong type of people. People with limited concern for environment they are in. Give people a building and they behave like they are in town. Leaving trash, discarding gear, and attracting people truly unprepared to be self sufficient. Evidence is overwhelming.....that does not occur when they arent there.

Bitter? Ha. No. Such ignorance.
I actually care that our limited resources be appreciated and respected and protected by people that use them.

If that results in inconvenience, so be it. Its not about you.

Quik
11-01-2018, 11:03
Some shelters aren't worth saving. This one is. But if the decision is to take it down, I hope they will reuse the barn materials for the new shelter. Not just for the sake of recycling, but as an alternate way to preserve the barn.

If it is removed and rebuilt then I agree with using some of the old boards and beams


It was an old farmstead used before the trail was even established. It is part of the mountain lifestyle. It should be preserved as it is part of history in the Appalachians. We preserve historical homes and barns in many places Look at GSMNP.

Old doesn't make it historical. I am currently renovating a house built in 1922, that doesn't mean it's a historical house. Bayview if you want to go through proper channels and donate your own $$$ and time to renovate the barn by all means do it.


What other LONG trails in the U.S. besides the AT and LT have shelters? PCT none that I remember, CDT none that I remember and there is no need for them.

Rightfoot
11-01-2018, 11:31
I'm sorry I posted this in the first place. I was only asking a simple question and never intended it to become a debate on the value of shelters on the trail.

Quik
11-01-2018, 12:04
I'm sorry I posted this in the first place. I was only asking a simple question and never intended it to become a debate on the value of shelters on the trail.

Rightfoot- don't be sorry, this is White Blaze you never know which way a thread will go, it can lead to a good discussion or it can go off the deep end. No matter what the topic is a lot of posts are based on personal feelings and emotions rather than facts. It's the internet, everyone has an opinion and everyone thinks they are right.

I stated above the PCT and CDT had no shelters that I remembered, maybe I don't remember because I didn't stay in any if any are/were there. I do remember staying in one and only one shelter on the AT during my 2010 thru, never again will I do this. I do remember seeing the Overmountain shelter from the trail, I had no interest in going down to it.

importman77
11-01-2018, 12:05
I'm sorry I posted this in the first place. I was only asking a simple question and never intended it to become a debate on the value of shelters on the trail.
Rightfoot, I for one am glad you asked the question. I had no idea this was even being thought of. Now at the very least I can get myself in gear and go stay there one more time in case it does actually get torn down.

ldsailor
11-01-2018, 12:11
Whats pathetic , is judgemental people that ignore facts.

No other long trail sans LT, that AT was copied from, has copious shelters. Or privys even.

In spite of this, they also dont have AT degree of problems.

JMT manages AT scale of hikers per day with minimal impact. No trash, partiers, overflowing privys . CT does too nowdays.

Shelters create problems with high use. Its a demonstrated fact. Shelters are only moderately clean because caring people volunteer to clean them up regularly and pack out garbage that wont burn.

Bottom line.....they attract wrong type of people. People with limited concern for environment they are in. Give people a building and they behave like they are in town. Leaving trash, discarding gear, and attracting people truly unprepared to be self sufficient. Evidence is overwhelming.....that does not occur when they arent there.

Bitter? Ha. No. Such ignorance.
I actually care that our limited resources be appreciated and respected and protected by people that use them.

If that results in inconvenience, so be it. Its not about you.

The Ouachita National Recreation Trail has shelters all along the trail.

The JMT, unlike the AT, does not cross a single road (source - socialhiker.net). That makes it difficult for partiers to take advantage of the trail as most partiers are locals who hike in with their party supplies. Furthermore the JMT comes "close to civilization at only a few points" (source - socialhiker.net), which makes it even more difficult for partiers/locals to access the trail. And recently I read a lament by another hiker in a forum about the toilet paper that blows freely around the JMT. I can honestly say in almost 1,900 miles of the AT that I have never seen toilet paper blowing around on the trail; although I'm sure others might have.

It is my understanding that shelters and campsite around shelters on the AT are meant to focus impact on the trail in a concentrated area so as to not impact the trail willy nilly. Those who camp outside the recommended or in some states "legal" campsites call those campsites "stealth" for a reason.

So why not just campsites and no shelters? Other than it started at the beginning of the Appalachian Trail way back when (I saw an early shelter in the AT museum) and seems to be a tradition now, I have no idea why shelters are still used and new ones built. Maybe that's a good topic for another thread. I do know that any shelter where I have camped is usually full during peak hiking season, and it's rare to see a shelter with no one in it at night. Whether there is a shelter available for my use is not an issue. I carry a tent. Still, I have used shelters, especially when I couldn't find a place to pitch a tent at an approved campsite or when I get in late to a shelter area. The night I spent at the barn, I had both circumstances occur - no tent space and it was right after the sun set.

MW, instead of railing against shelters here where no one can do anything about it, why not turn your focus on the ATC and various clubs that build and support the shelters. They can do something about it. This is a thread about the potential demise of a landmark of which a lot of hikers have fond memories.

MuddyWaters
11-01-2018, 12:21
.

MW, instead of railing against shelters here where no one can do anything about it, why not turn your focus on the ATC and various clubs that build and support the shelters. They can do something about it. This is a thread about the potential demise of a landmark of which a lot of hikers have fond memories.
Shelters are not meant to focus impact.
They do, but thats not why they were built. They were created far before the impact was an issue.

There is no reason a historical building must torn down because you arent allowed to sleep in it anymore. Why people equate this is dumb. Theres several historic structures along trail that you cant enter or sleep in.

Closing the barn as a shelter doesnt mean tearing it down
EXCEPT to people who demand it be replaced with another that they can sleep in. Read post 5 this thread. These people.....are the ones that will get it torn down. Not people that say we dont need to have another shelter there. Im arguing to save it from those people. Its a fine campsite, with historic structure, and privy with a view.

Looking down from the hump and seeing a typical shelter in that spot would be disgraceful

Rain Man
11-01-2018, 12:43
I'm sorry I posted this in the first place. I was only asking a simple question and never intended it to become a debate on the value of shelters on the trail.

Yep. WhiteBlaze. Where keyboard critics can whine about shelters they are not forced to stay in, at, or near. Heck, they aren't even forced to hike on the trail at all, as there are so many other trails more to their liking.

MuddyWaters
11-01-2018, 12:52
Yep. WhiteBlaze. Where keyboard critics can whine about shelters they are not forced to stay in, at, or near. Heck, they aren't even forced to hike on the trail at all, as there are so many other trails more to their liking.
...and people that dont understand that their actions impact others experience, and believe if you dont agree with their views you should be quiet or go away.

Discussion and conflicting viewpoints are necessary and healthy. People that quelch them....are not.

Lnj
11-01-2018, 15:34
Don't be sorry Rightfoot. It's just the way it goes here. If you had posted a thread that simply said "It's beautiful day today". In 24 hours it's as likely as not that there would be some terribly snarky responses, and more than a few deeply analytical replies and a full on debate about the true definition of the word beautiful and if today in fact qualifies as such and if it is even truly considered a "day" by scientific definition and so on and so forth. It is the circus that is Whiteblaze. And somewhere amidst it all, there will be some helpful and very kind-hearted responses mingled in with all the gruff and pretentiousness. It's all very entertaining to the readers at large. Don't take personal offense to the responses received. They are just fingers on keyboards flying to empty the mind of the body attached. Has nothing at all to do with you, and very little to do with what you post. :banana

Captain Blue
11-01-2018, 15:55
The JMT, unlike the AT, does not cross a single road ..

Not true. The JMT crosses Highway 120 twice.

The Overmountain shelter is indeed scenic, iconic and well loved. But I doubt there's anything historic about it. Heck, the available space isn't used effectively. The upstairs is dark and only has one window. Half of the downstairs is a dirt floor. The other half has sleeping platforms that are often hogged by people using them as tent platforms.

soilman
11-01-2018, 17:47
Bottom line.....they attract wrong type of people. People with limited concern for environment they are in. Give people a building and they behave like they are in town. Leaving trash, discarding gear, and attracting people truly unprepared to be self sufficient. Evidence is overwhelming.....that does not occur when they arent there.

Pretty strong and broad assumption. On my last thru hike I stayed in shelters 44% of my nights on the trail. I camped 33%, and stayed in hotels, hostels, or houses 23%. On my first AT hike in 1976 I spent 59 out of 100 nights on the trail in a shelter. The first thing I do when I get to a shelter is sweep it out. I don't like packing a wet tent and on a rainy night a shelter is pretty inviting to me. But I guess I must be unprepared.

FrogLevel
11-01-2018, 19:08
Whats pathetic , is judgemental people that ignore facts.

No other long trail sans LT, that AT was copied from, has copious shelters. Or privys even.

In spite of this, they also dont have AT degree of problems.

JMT manages AT scale of hikers per day with minimal impact. No trash, partiers, overflowing privys . CT does too nowdays.

Shelters create problems with high use. Its a demonstrated fact. Shelters are only moderately clean because caring people volunteer to clean them up regularly and pack out garbage that wont burn.

Bottom line.....they attract wrong type of people. People with limited concern for environment they are in. Give people a building and they behave like they are in town. Leaving trash, discarding gear, and attracting people truly unprepared to be self sufficient. Evidence is overwhelming.....that does not occur when they arent there.

Bitter? Ha. No. Such ignorance.
I actually care that our limited resources be appreciated and respected and protected by people that use them.

If that results in inconvenience, so be it. Its not about you.
That's great that those trails don't have shelters. Great for them.

The "Facts" are that the AT has shelters- its always had shelters. Its part of the whole experience that makes it unique. Yeah, lets just get rid of the shelters, the blazes and, heck, lets get rid of the trail while were at it.

"Bitter? Ha. No. Such ignorance."

Yeah, you are bitter. You hate that others use the trail in a way that's different than you do. You want people to not sleep in shelters. That's a bad attitude to have.

How DARE people enjoy the things I dislike! We shouldn't be allowing them to have those things!

Or if you're really concerned about nature you should limit yourself to wilderness areas.

There's always the "old school" crowd that has to be different and just trash on everyone else because they are enlightened.

FrogLevel
11-01-2018, 19:11
...and people that dont understand that their actions impact others experience, and believe if you dont agree with their views you should be quiet or go away.

Discussion and conflicting viewpoints are necessary and healthy. People that quelch them....are not.

But your viewpoint is to remove the shelters entirely. No question. You want to keep as many people off the trail as possible to preserve it in the way YOU want it.

bayview
11-01-2018, 20:23
If we look back to the original intent of the trail and research it, shelters were a part of it but to even a bigger extent. Brenton McKaye actually wanted them set up as a community but of course no one inteneded it to be used for a thru hike.

Shelters also help reduce impact to only certain areas promoting LNT.

As per the barn, historic does not mean that some important happened there, but I am a historian and a teacher and things that arenít done anymore, built anymore, and or seen are considered historic. The ďSee Rock CityĒ barns are historic and need to be preserved as they are slowly disappearing and once gone can never be replaced.

Some people sound like they have never hiked or seen shelters in the south. They are different from other places. We do have a few places that are close to road access and that is why they become party shelters. Those should be relocated but not Overmountain and that location is historic as that is where volunteers traveled to cross the mountain to fight at Kings Mt. It is probably one of the most picturesque sights in the area and that is because of the shelter.

Save it and if you donít like it, walk past it.

importman77
11-01-2018, 20:29
Save it and if you donít like it, walk past it.

Well said. I totally agree.

Dogwood
11-01-2018, 20:36
Bob Peoples is involved...nuff said. He'll be aware and sensitive to know how to proceed.

Even if it is torn down barn timbers and cladding are recycled extensively. Even if it is torn down perhaps the remnants can be integrated into a new structure? There's a lot of it too. That would help us reminisce hey?

Rightfoot(talking to his grandson: "See these red boards Jimmy?
Grandson: "Yes, grandpa Rightfoot. What's so special about them?"
Rightfoot: "Well....." ;)

Dogwood
11-01-2018, 20:41
Umm, without giving it much thought one can hike from shelter to shelter on the 133 mile Northville Lake Placid Trail and on the 192 mile Quachita Trail.

MuddyWaters
11-01-2018, 20:43
But your viewpoint is to remove the shelters entirely. No question. You want to keep as many people off the trail as possible to preserve it in the way YOU want it.

Not really.

Id like to see people that dont respect it, trash it, not encouraged to use it, or have anything that attracts and facillitates their bad conduct.

The side effect of fewer people if those stay home, is a bonus that everyone benefits from. It postpones or mitigates inevitable restrictions.

But, i also have a right to opinion about trail, what it should be, now and in future. Do not try to imply I shouldnt. You may disagree, thats OK. We have a large part of our society today that are protected crybabies that cant stand if anyone disagrees with them. A pitiful product of the last 20 yrs.

But you could tear all shelters down and id be ok with it. I wouldnt miss them. Id also be ok with being required to carry bear cannister. 2 lb wont kill me either. I appreciate a shelter in rain as much as next person. But I dont need a shelter in rain.

Dogwood
11-02-2018, 02:03
Rightfoot- don't be sorry, this is White Blaze you never know which way a thread will go, it can lead to a good discussion or it can go off the deep end. No matter what the topic is a lot of posts are based on personal feelings and emotions rather than facts. It's the internet, everyone has an opinion and everyone thinks they are right....

It's not just the internet either. 24/7 political, news, and social talk entertainment operate the same, even weather based news - feelings rather than fact based. Reality TV can be very far from truly representing reality and more feelings based. It pays too. Feelings based discussions feed into everyone having a different opinion which everyone assume their right in having. It feeds into dissension, the more dramatic the better, a prerequisite for tuning in - "being connected." This is necessary for a 24/7 always "connected" desiring culture. In turn this leads to someone or some group always debating, being offended about something. Turn on the computer, TV, radio, etc you'll be bombarded with people voicing being offended. That's why hiking can be a vehicle for sobering up from this.

johnacraft
11-02-2018, 10:24
We did some work on the retaining wall by the sleeping platforms. If I remember we added some logs.

Thanks.

Out of curiosity, have there been any discussions about installing a moldering privy when the current one is retired? Given how much use this site sees, it seems like an ideal candidate.

ldsailor
11-02-2018, 10:52
[QUOTE=Captain Blue;2227170]Not true. The JMT crosses Highway 120 twice./QUOTE]

I read three different sources that said the JMT does not cross a highway; although I only cited one in my post.

MuddyWaters
11-02-2018, 12:03
Jmt crosses hwy 2x at tuolumne.

Then goes 190 mi or so without crossing a rd

Many take shortcut at tuolumne, and dont cross hwy, but that not the jmt at that point.

But almost touches road and civilization at reds meadow. Your 100 yds from a bus into mammoth.

Several miles from rd and campground at Lake Edison.

Tennessee Viking
11-02-2018, 17:14
Built in the 1970s. Converted into a AT shelter in the 1990s.

Furlough
11-03-2018, 06:32
To add to the info from Tennessee Viking's post:
Info courtsey of the TEHCC
Shelter: Overmountain

Description Arguably the most unique shelter on the entire Appalachian Trail with a great view looking down into Roaring Creek Valley. A classic wooden two-story barn built in the 1970s to meet the needs of a local farm, it was later converted to a shelter and renovated in the 1990s. The barn comfortably accommodates up to 30 people and is the only TEHCC shelter with a privy.

Maintenance History
May 2012: Replaced 15 loft floor boards with old barn boards. Refastened picnic table legs with screws. After six years, the privy was again repaired and relocated over a new 5'x4'x4' pit. The old pit was covered with a row of 8" logs, then dirt from the new pit, and finally the old toilet lid was placed on top.
2010: Replaced 2x10 framing and bottom two feet of siding on uphill side with treated lumber, installed guttering on uphill side, painted roof on uphill side and painted entire exterior using grant funds from North Carolina Appalachian Trail License Plate.
2006: Replaced tops of ground level sleeping platforms with painted plywood using grant funds from North Carolina Appalachian Trail License Plate.
Mar 2006: Relocated privy. The platform was enlarged and placed over a 5'x4'x4' hole lined with rough sawn pine boards. Old hole with soil and logs.
2002: The "Older American" crew installed braces at each bottom end of the barn on the side where the sleeping areas are located. It should be more stable during wind events now.
1996: Framed the ground level and put in gravel to eliminate the dust. Covered the upstairs wall cracks to prevent entry of wind and rain. Built two sleeping platforms on the ground level. Built a bench upstairs. Painted the outside and installed a picnic table.
1995: TEHCC and Fred Lashley installed new roof.
1993: Reinforced structure in loft area. Dug ditch on back side, lined with plastic and filled with large rock for drainage. Enclosed stairwell and opening in loft with safety rails, cut door opening on ground level and installed bench upstairs.

scope
04-11-2019, 13:17
Anyone have a current status on the shelter? Any word on future plans?

FrogLevel
04-15-2019, 15:53
Anyone have a current status on the shelter? Any word on future plans?
I was up there about a month ago and it was still in good shape. I can't imagine its going anywhere for a long time.

mountain squid
04-15-2019, 16:43
Thanks.

Out of curiosity, have there been any discussions about installing a moldering privy when the current one is retired? Given how much use this site sees, it seems like an ideal candidate.I believe elevation is a problem for the moldering privies. We typically just move this one every several years.


Anyone have a current status on the shelter? Any word on future plans?I missed our last Partnership meeting due to being down at Springer, but I don't think there was a resolution yet. I'll try to remember to get confirmation this week during trail maintenance.

See you on the trail,
mt squid

Ethesis
04-15-2019, 20:02
I was up there about a month ago and it was still in good shape. I can't imagine its going anywhere for a long time.


Still there as of last week. The privy lets you see the entire valley and everyone who is in line.

The wind can be amazing. Use a ground cloth or foot print.

Marta
04-16-2019, 01:05
As a sleeping space, it's not great. I slept in it once; ever after I've tented nearby.

But it's the only shelter on the AT I can think of that enhances the space it sits on.

Astro
04-16-2019, 14:41
But it's the only shelter on the AT I can think of that enhances the space it sits on.

Good point. :)