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DavidNH
02-26-2006, 14:05
Hi,

I would like to know..is 9-10 pounds a reasonable weight for all clothing, exclusive of hiking boots, worn and carried for a north bound at hike starting March 21? Thats what it seems to come to.

If it helps I could give details in another post..all the items with weights. I know from reading it can get wintery in the south in late march early april. So I have fleece hat and gloves and polartech 200 pull over jacket included for insualation. Also have two waterproff sil nylon stuff sacks my clothing will be going into.

what do you guys have as total clothes weight? Not the super ultralighters but the "regular" folks?

thoughts, advice?

David

Ridge
02-26-2006, 14:12
Sounds heavy to me. I just carry the bare necessities, whatever the weight.

TwoForty
02-26-2006, 18:45
If you post what you have with weights, users can give you better suggestions.

DavidNH
02-26-2006, 21:05
clothing list as it stands now for Northbound AT trhuhike with 3-21 start:





ounces

Clothes for AT


1 REI XL quick dry shorts

8.2

1 pair xl short sleeve tech wick shirt

5.4

1 pair xl ems system III rain pants

12.2

1 xl frog toggs rain jacket

9.6

1 pair xl ems Bergelene long underwear botom

9

1 Lg pair xl ems Bergelene long underwear top

8

bathing suit (use in place of underwear)

3.6

1 pair gaitors

6

pack towel

4

fleece hat and gloves

3.4

lg tall ll bean 200 weight pull over fleece coat

20.6

1 pair XL size CROCS

13.2

1 pair ll bean full zip 100 weight fleece jacket

20.5

two pairs Hiking socks


sea to summitstuff sack (to keep critical



clothes dry)

1.2

3 pairs smart wool hiking socks approx wt

10.2

1 pair bergelene reg underwear

2.2

fleece Bacaclava

2.8

ll bean polartech 100 wegith fleece full zip jacket

23

ll bean down vest

14.8


Total............................................. ...............177.9 oz or 11 lbs

The above is everything I could take..including what would be warn at any particular time. so question is..what do I leave out yet still say relatively comfortable in possible snows in smokies and with nights and early mornings dipping to teens or less in Georgia?

IThinking I would either go with 200 weight fleece, or 100 and down vest or could I get away with just the 100 wt full zip fleece and frogg togg jacket fleece hat gloves and long undewear top?


there's gotta be 4 pounds of weight savings in here somewhere..just having trouble finding it. what makes it tough is knowing one day it could be in the 60's and next 20's and snowy.

David

DavidNH
02-26-2006, 21:05
sorry..looks like I lost the formatting..hope its readable.

hikerjohnd
02-26-2006, 21:09
2 pair shorts, 2 t-shirts, 2 pair socks, rain gear, 1 fleece top, 1 fleece bottom, hat/gloves - that's all you need and some folks will tell you that is too much.

astrogirl
02-26-2006, 21:29
I would ditch all but the warmest fleece pullover/jacket/coat, and most people wind up sending rain pants home. I have used them apres-hiking, but I never wear them in the rain. I usually debate taking them and then leave them at home, but they are nice if I don't want to be tied to my bag for hanging around camp and cooking.

Also, those REI shorts sound heavy to me and if you add the bathing suit, WAY too much for shorts. I would look for shorts with some kind of integral mesh underwear if you can't go without. I don't wear them myself, but I also don't have male accoutrements. :)

I really don't know about the vest. That depends on you. I am usually hot when I hike. Just today I hiked 2 miles on my local mountain at sunset in 25' weather with winter weight running tights, varitherm turtleneck (this is a medium base layer thing), fleece gloves, nylon baseball hat and wool scarf for my neck, ears and face. I was plenty warm and had to take off the gloves, in fact.

When I stop, I do get cold quickly and I throw on a fleece and/or my rain jacket. In camp, I get out the down sleeping quilt if it's really cold and cook from there. So, a down vest would be a waste for me, but I can't say for you.

Three pair of socks do it for me. Two pairs for hiking wear and one for sleeping that never get worn for hiking.

I don't even wear rainwear when I hike because I just sweat into it, even in 40' rain. My system involves never sweating in one set of long underwear and my fleece. I can't tell what you would actually wind up hiking in, but I'm betting on the shorts and T-shirt. In spring AT weather (and I do not backpack in the summer at all really -- only spring and fall. I day-hike in winter and summer), I wear running tights and a coolmax l/s top. I pretty much always wear a nylon and mesh baseball hat. In the morning, I often start out with my fleece hat, rain jacket and gloves and in about 10 minutes, they all get stuffed back in the pack!

You probably don't need a fleece hat AND a balaclava. But as they say, YMMV!

Alligator
02-26-2006, 22:37
Your heaviest items appear as the two 100 wt & one 200 wt fleeces, plus the down vest, 21, 23, 20, and 15 oz respectively. That's 79 oz. You could cut that down to about 31oz with a synthetic (PL1 or polarguard) jacket, vest and a microfleece pullover at 7 oz. These would nearly match or match the warmth of those four pieces.

That's nearly 3 pounds right there.

That's a heavy down vest IMO.

Kerosene
02-26-2006, 22:41
Clothing weight is always a challenge when you're hiking in the Spring/Fall "shoulder" seasons, when I do most of my section hiking because I hate bugs and humidity.

Basically, recognize that you're going to walk in one set of clothes, and sleep/camp in another. Don't mix the two.

Remember that your body will acclimate to cooler temperatures in just a few days. While 50F feels cold to you now, you'll be out in a T-shirt and shorts hiking up mountains and feeling warm. Believe me. Your extra clothes are mostly needed for camp, or to protect you from the wind. If you get a big snow day with really cold temperatures, then stay in camp until it warms up.

Most of the time you should be hiking in wicking T-shirt and shorts (my men's medium weigh 5.5 ounces and can be used as swim trunks when the opportunity arises, since they're nylon and will dry quickly). My feet sweat a lot, so I bring 4 pair of liner socks with 2 pair of Smartwools, plus another set of Smartwools for camp (or my hands when I'm walking instead of gloves). Sometimes I'll use the extra pair on the day before I head into town when I know I can wash and dry everything.

Your rain pants are just too darn heavy. A lot of thru-hikers ditch the rainpants in the first month or two. Either do the same now, get lighter rain pants, or think about getting DWR-treated wind pants. As astrogirl mentions, you can walk in tights/long underpants under your shorts if it's really cold.

Get a pair of breathable gaitors that weigh less than 3 ounces, or go without. There aren't too many places where you really need them, unless they are used to keep pebbles from getting into your boots, in which case a pair of shortie gators work just fine.

Ditch either the hat or the balaclava. At least the balaclava can be used as a hat if you want.

I've found that long underwear, a lightweight long-sleeve T-shirt (Coolmax Alta), a 100-weight microfleece jacket, and my Frogg Toggs jacket keep me reasonably warm (okay, not toasty but not frozen) down to 25F. My microfleece only weighs 9.5 oz (medium), so look at some other brands! I'm not a proponent of vests. If you really think you'll be cold, then get one of the superlight (9 oz) down jackets out there. You won't be walking in a vest.

DavidNH
02-26-2006, 23:20
thanks for the suggestions. Very helpful.

based on your feedback..I shaved weight down to seven pounds.

here is new list:

Clothes for AT


1 REI XL quick dry shorts

8.2

1 pair xl short sleeve tech wick shirt

5.4

1 pair xl ems system III rain pants

12.2

1 xl frog toggs rain jacket

9.6

1 pair xl ems Bergelene long underwear botom

9

1 Lg pair xl ems Bergelene long underwear top

8

bathing suit (use in place of underwear)

3.6

pack towel

4

fleece hat and gloves

3.4

1 pair XL size CROCS

13.2

1 pair ll bean full zip 100 weight fleece jacket

23

sea to summitstuff sack

1.2

3 pairs smart wool hiking socks approx wt

10.2

1 pair bergelene reg underwear

2.2

totals now about 113.2 oz


the three pairs of socks..one will be reserved for in camp only.

Still room of improvement I know..but its a start. Also..doesn't help that being tall and big I take xl size on just about everything. I understand the guys at the mountain crossings hostel can help me getting rid of stuff I only think I need but don't really need..resulting in weight savings. I really hesitate right now to go without rain pants for instance.

also..if 12 oz rain pants is too heavy..what would work? I do have also the frog togg rain pants that came with the jacket..they are a good 5 oz lighter..but don't have the long side zips or any pockets.

David

PS...I hope you folks don't get sick of me..I am determined to be around and keep posting and asking all week.. cause there is just no way I am gonna start off at Springer with a 50 pound pack..just can't let that happen..it's death! I would prefer not to be over 40.. if I could be in high 30's I'd be psyched! yet in process of not taking too much I still need to have enough..and i dont know how much is enough..may not know till I get on the trail..but seems like you more exprienced folks know better than I do!!

Alligator
02-26-2006, 23:42
If that's what you intend to carry, I would switch the 100 wt to the 200 wt. It's lighter and warmer.

Maxwell_Allen
02-27-2006, 00:12
Hmm, drop the packtowel-4oz, very few places you'll need it. i hiked with rainpants without zips and just a back pocket (campmor redledge) save another 5oz, bating suit for underwear, and reg. underwear. pick one, or try none. i just used running shorts with a liner save 3.6+oz. there goes another 12.6, cut off a few tags and your under 100oz! I also hiked with a thin windbreaker, not totaly waterproof, foolish in the early months but it only weighed 2.7oz. If you're hesitant on anything, bring it then send it home, its easier than either buying a new one or getting it mailed to you. better safe than sorry.
Happy trails,
4-Cheese

Tinker
02-27-2006, 00:46
is my full clothing weight, including worn clothing, excluding boots and wide brimmed hat.
I'm leaving March 7th. (But I'm only doing the Georgia section).

If I were doing the whole thing this year, I'd still pack the same. My insulation layers are:

A TNF Nuptse Jacket at 1#9-3/4 oz.

A Campmor fleece vest (300 wt. I think) 11 oz.

Other than two light polypro tops and bottoms, that's all I think I'll need, even if it snows and hits the single digits.

I also am carrying a Precip jacket and Red Ledge full zip rain pants.

One pair of zip off pants will do it for hiking duties (even on a thru, I could wear my rain pants while I washed clothing).

The fleece vest will help on the morning take off, before working up some heat, and I have a light polypro balaclava and a Lowe Alpine Cloudwalker hat for sleeping and around camp.

MacGyver2005
02-27-2006, 09:00
I would personally ditch the bathing suit and underwear, as I truly think that you would be more comfortable without them. That's just my opinion, though, and if you really want them go for it. I also agree with Alligator to switch the fleeces. If you are willing to spend a few more bucks you can lighten up your raingear too: http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/drop_stoppers_rain_gear.html Doing all of this would save you another pound.

Regards,
-MacGyver
GA-->ME

peter_pan
02-27-2006, 09:21
I'd switch the fleece to a montbell thermowrap, size xl is 10.5 oz....saves 12.5oz and get one of the new pack towels or use a bandana save 2+ more oz for almost a pound saved.....Ps... the thermowrap will be much warmer....IMHO.

Pan

kyhipo
02-27-2006, 09:37
take them all and send home or bounce them as you go!through the yrs especially in late march early april the weather is unpredictable for sure.ky

Peaks
02-27-2006, 10:18
Hiking in early spring/ late fall, bring along extra layers. Hard to predict just how cold it might get.

That being said, I'd consider using Frogg Toggs as my only long pants. When it's cold, I'd wear them over long bottoms, and my shorts. Don't really need full length zippers and pockers in the long pants.

By the way, clothing with zippers gets heavy. That's one reason why I don't use convertable pants, and my usual fleece top has buttons instead of a zipper.

Trail Yeti
02-27-2006, 12:07
If it was me I would ditch the 3rd pair of socks ( I only carry two, one to hike, one to sleep/camp). I do bring capilene underwear to sleep in, but there is no need for two pairs...if you're feeling adventuresome, try a kilt...FREEDOM!!!:banana
I don't carry rain pants, I wear tall gaiters. If its cold there is only a gap of a few inches between the bottom of my kilt and my gaiter tops (and I could always wear my capilene bottoms too).

carolinahiker
02-27-2006, 12:18
Hmmmm a question ive been told they have meeting were thru hikers can get their gear gone over before hand by folks who have thru hiked or experts??? im not goin to till 2007 so i have time is this true. email me at carolinahiker@aol.com. thanks

The Solemates
02-27-2006, 17:52
for late march start, all you need is:

Convertible pants w/ built in liner
rain pants

T-shirt
long underwear top
fleece (200 pile)..obviously there are other lightweight alternatives
rain jacket

hat
gloves

bandana

2 pairs socks

trail runners

Peaks
02-27-2006, 18:56
for late march start, all you need is:

Convertible pants w/ built in liner
rain pants

T-shirt
long underwear top
fleece (200 pile)..obviously there are other lightweight alternatives
rain jacket

hat
gloves

bandana

2 pairs socks

trail runners


Maybe you, but not me. I'd certainly want more than what's on your list. Easier to ship something home after a couple of weeks than freeze my butt off.

DavidNH
02-27-2006, 18:56
OK.. following all the wonderful advice:
I take away my pack towel
change pants to frog toggs pants (but I just barely get them on with out takeing boots off)
lose the bathing suit (I will have that sent in summer for swimming!)

results in this:

Clothes for AT



1 REI XL quick dry shorts

8.2


1 pair xl short sleeve tech wick shirt

5.4


1 pr xl size Frogg toggs pants

6.4


1 xl frog toggs rain jacket

9.6


1 pair xl ems Bergelene long underwear botom

9


1 Lg pair xl ems Bergelene long underwear top

8


fleece hat and gloves

3.4


1 pair XL size CROCS

13.2


1 pair ll bean 200 weight pull over fleece

20


sea to summitstuff sack

1.2


3 pairs smart wool hiking socks approx wt

10.2


1 pair bergelene reg underwear

2.2
















96.8

6.05 lbs


Perhaps add on 8 oz to have a short sleeve town/camp shirt kept in waterproof zip lock?

Anyway... You guys have just lightened me by almost 5 pounds!!!!!!!

One question.. I know from experience that my 200 weight fleece is too warm to hike in unless it is like 15F or less. But what if I have only a short sleeve techwick t shirt and perhaps frogg togg jacket going over a 5000 foot bald and its wintery? will I still be warm enough?


Also..the long underwear top and bottom listed above is medium weight. Could light weight be adequate?

seems like a constant struggle between too much and not enough!!

David

DavidNH
02-27-2006, 19:07
If it was me I would ditch the 3rd pair of socks ( I only carry two, one to hike, one to sleep/camp). I do bring capilene underwear to sleep in, but there is no need for two pairs...if you're feeling adventuresome, try a kilt...FREEDOM!!!:banana
I don't carry rain pants, I wear tall gaiters. If its cold there is only a gap of a few inches between the bottom of my kilt and my gaiter tops (and I could always wear my capilene bottoms too).


Imgaine the looks a guy would get walking into town wearing just a kilt and nothin underneath? I wonder if that has ever been done!!! I am not sure I would want those looks.

Doctari
02-27-2006, 20:59
Imgaine the looks a guy would get walking into town wearing just a kilt and nothin underneath? I wonder if that has ever been done!!! I am not sure I would want those looks.

Been done. You get used to the looks. My usual response is: "It takes a real man to wear a kilt, , , , Oh, I see you are not wearing one, so sorry!" :eek:

Doctari.

Bob Baker
02-27-2006, 21:50
Maybe think about some lighter footwear than the crocs, theyre near a lb. I know there are other posts debating crocs but I cant find any right now. Otherwise it looks golden.

DavidNH
02-27-2006, 22:00
Maybe think about some lighter footwear than the crocs, theyre near a lb. I know there are other posts debating crocs but I cant find any right now. Otherwise it looks golden.

I can't think of camp foot ware that are lighter than crocks other than flip flops. But flip flops aren't good for too much except at camp. Crocs can be used to get watea..ford streams etc.
David

astrogirl
02-27-2006, 22:14
Maybe think about some lighter footwear than the crocs, theyre near a lb. I know there are other posts debating crocs but I cant find any right now. Otherwise it looks golden.

I don't carry camp shoes, but everyone I saw last year on my 120 mile section had crocs. OK, not *everyone*, but damn near.

If I still wore boots instead of trail runners, I'd carry them.

I've tried flip-flops, and they suck as camp shoes. Think about hiking down a rocky trail to a privy or water source in whatever you're bringing for camp shoes. If it doesnt work, you either need more shoe or no camp shoes at all.

I'd say either the crocs or nothing.

DavidNH
02-27-2006, 22:46
I don't carry camp shoes, but everyone I saw last year on my 120 mile section had crocs. OK, not *everyone*, but damn near.

If I still wore boots instead of trail runners, I'd carry them.

I've tried flip-flops, and they suck as camp shoes. Think about hiking down a rocky trail to a privy or water source in whatever you're bringing for camp shoes. If it doesnt work, you either need more shoe or no camp shoes at all.

I'd say either the crocs or nothing.

I tend to agree with you Astrogirl. An alternative would be Ativa sandles but I have a pair and taking crocs instead saves me a whole half pound right there!

Peaks
02-28-2006, 09:51
David,

Ultimately, the choice of clothing is what works for you, not what works for others. I'd urge you to be prepared for cold weather. The southern Appalachians are more rugged and colder than most of us New Englanders expect. Carry it for the first month. By that time,you should be past the worst of the cold weather, and will know better what works best for you.

mingo
02-28-2006, 10:43
I tend to agree with you Astrogirl. An alternative would be Ativa sandles but I have a pair and taking crocs instead saves me a whole half pound right there!

yes but do you know how to tie them to your pack?

dougmeredith
02-28-2006, 10:45
Been done. You get used to the looks. My usual response is: "It takes a real man to wear a kilt, , , , Oh, I see you are not wearing one, so sorry!"

Yeah, that respose would really threaten my man hood. If it wasn't being delivered by a guy in a SKIRT. :)

Doug

Trail Yeti
02-28-2006, 10:55
The looks don't bother me, the comments don't bother me.....hiking in a kilt is the best. however, I wear them all the time, not just hiking....I've worn my sportkilt to class a few times. I have red hair and a big red beard....I look better in a kilt than I do without one!!!1

The Solemates
02-28-2006, 11:09
Maybe you, but not me. I'd certainly want more than what's on your list. Easier to ship something home after a couple of weeks than freeze my butt off.

will certainly agree with you there. its all a matter of personal choices. i am quite fine with the above, coupled with a 20 degree sleeping bag. BUT, i think the main problem (well, not really a problem, just thinking in a rut) first-time hikers have is that they try to carry enough clothes to be comfortable in camp in the cold. this is usually not the case. Take enough clothes to hike in comfortably and to sleep in comfortably. once you stop hiking and get into camp, they only chores you have to do is get water, go to the privy, erect your tent, etc. that gives you just enough time to cool down from hiking. then out on an extra layer, put on a hat, and climb into your sleeping bag to cook, etc. Using your sleeping bag as "clothing" is the lightest alternative there is. and this is what most thru-hikers do. most dont sit around camp for hours in the cold.

DavidNH
02-28-2006, 18:22
hmm..get into my sleeping bag and cook soulmates? wouldnt that just invite every mice and/or bear for miles to my sleeping quarters?

I am invisioning cooking in a shelter..chatting with folks for a half hour or so, eating, then going into bag. I guess if its really cold..I could just eat, clean up and not chat.

David

The Solemates
02-28-2006, 18:42
hmm..get into my sleeping bag and cook soulmates? wouldnt that just invite every mice and/or bear for miles to my sleeping quarters?

David

people (including you) are going to cook in shelters. right next to where you sleep. dont drop stuff, hang your food, and mice shouldnt bother you. bears are not a problem on the AT.

or you could just tent it if you have a problem with the mice.