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lobster
02-28-2006, 12:51
Let the tally begin!

mdionne
02-28-2006, 13:09
Let the tally begin!

is lobster's ego needing some inflation?:rolleyes:

i think i saw this thread last year too

Blue Jay
02-28-2006, 13:10
Let the tally begin!

I can't figure out why you love others dropping off the trail soooo much. You have started thread after thread about this. Does it make you feel better because that is what you did?

Gray Blazer
02-28-2006, 13:15
I wish whiteblaze was more about the trail itself and hiking and less about who thru-hiked it or didn't. One day I'm just going to up and thru-hike the whole thing and not tell anybody. Whoops, I just did.:rolleyes:

irritable_badger
02-28-2006, 13:18
I can't figure out why you love others dropping off the trail soooo much. You have started thread after thread about this. Does it make you feel better because that is what you did?
Christ. Isn't that a bit harsh? I think it's a very valid question. If most of the people who started were finishers then the AT wouldn't be that big of an accomplishment. The drop-outs are just as important as those who finish.

irritable_badger
02-28-2006, 13:19
I wish whiteblaze was more about the trail itself and hiking and less about who thru-hiked it or didn't. One day I'm just going to up and thru-hike the whole thing and not tell anybody. Whoops, I just did.:rolleyes:
I almost wish I hadn't told anyone what I was doing. Just left and came back six months later as a Thru-Hiker.

Topcat
02-28-2006, 13:55
<TABLE cellSpacing=2 cellPadding=3 width=500><TBODY><TR><TD bgColor=silver colSpan=2>Journals From Hikers Who Got off The Trail
</TD></TR><TR><TD colSpan=2><TABLE><TBODY><TR><TD>Every year many hikers start out their hike with the intentions of completing a thru-hike. At some point many of these hikers are faced with the decision of leaving the trail. Some hikers leave because of injuries while others realize a thru-hike is not for them. Getting off of the trail is a very difficult decision. Read some of these inspiring journal by hikers who made this difficult decision and remember it is not the destination it is the journey. </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>This is from Trail Journals at the top of the people who got off the trail section of their journals. I think it says it all. If you are going to look down at someone as a failure for getting off the trail and get some pleasure from it, i hope i dont meet you on a hike.

Spirit Walker
02-28-2006, 15:49
Christ. Isn't that a bit harsh? I think it's a very valid question. If most of the people who started were finishers then the AT wouldn't be that big of an accomplishment. The drop-outs are just as important as those who finish.
Not harsh at all. He really does seem to be obsessed with this subject.

Jack Tarlin
02-28-2006, 18:00
Hey Lobster, with all due respect, how many miles do YOU have on the Trail?

I realize you get your rocks off on this trolling thing you do here, and you enjoy getting a rise out of folks, but in all truth, smarmy posts or threads like this one, especially be someone who's never been out there, is a real candyass thing to do.

It's possible to be a troll without being a moosecock, and you should try it sometime.

lobster
02-28-2006, 18:41
The molehill is growing!

kyhipo
02-28-2006, 19:06
I have met several hikers who had injuries and family probs drop out and come back to the trail again either by section hiking or thru hiking.ky

Lugnut
02-28-2006, 19:08
Wow! I've never known of Jack calling someone a moosecock (justified in this case). This could become serious. I'm running out for a 6 pack and a pizza to enjoy while the molehill grows. :banana

Squeaky 2
02-28-2006, 19:15
if i was going to be insulted i would want to be called a moosecock

AbeHikes
02-28-2006, 19:19
Those of us who actually are moosecocks are insulted by the association.

:D

Indeed.

Skidsteer
02-28-2006, 19:26
Those of us who actually are moosecocks are insulted by the association.

:D

Indeed.

And Lobstercocks might actually be flattered.

Double :D :D

Jack Tarlin
02-28-2006, 19:31
Hey, sorry about the language and all that....I'm usually pretty good about that when on on-line, but lately there's been a lot of nonsense here: Betting on people's chances and posting odds; speculating on who's gonna quit the Trail, and when; keeping tabs on who's already quit, etc.

Pewrsonally, I think this is chickens*** of the first order.

It's tacky and ugly if it comes from folks who've already hiked, as they should know better and be a bit more respectful of the new folks, and more helpful, too---and when this horseflop comes from folks who've NEVER thru-hiked, and who in all likelihood, never will, it's pitiful. Anyone who posts s*** like this who hasn't walked the walk needs to shut off the computer, move outta their mom's basement, drop the donuts, and start hiking.

You wanna make fun of someone who's out there hiking in February, or you wanna talk about who's quit or is likely to? First off, get your ass out there yourself, or tell us how many Trail miles YOU'VE got. Otherwise, as far as I';m concerned, you're full of s***, and so are your posts on the subject.

MOWGLI
02-28-2006, 20:01
Lobster is a troll.

BW2006
02-28-2006, 20:04
I agree with Jack. This site has been so helpful for the planning of my hike but I feel bad seeing people tearing up others like Minnesotasmith who are out there giving it their best. Maybe you feel some deserve it but all it shows me is that your own self esteem is lacking. It's mean to talk trash about people behind their backs.

My intent is to leave in two weeks on a long distance hike, how long I make it, who knows! I could be back in three days or 6 months but only I will know when it's time to come home and if I don't go the whole way I will be proud to have just made the attempt. It's not many people that have the guts to even try to do this!

Don't get me wrong, I love you guys and can't wait to meet you but sometimes you have to stop and think about why you are so happy to see other people fail!!! Barbie

Tinker
02-28-2006, 20:04
Go get 'em, Jack. Rejoicing in someone else's failure to achieve their dream is practically subhuman.

We've all failed -

And none of us enjoyed it when our failure is put in the spotlight for others to point and laugh.

Skidsteer
02-28-2006, 20:05
And Jack called him a moosecock, which I'm still giggling about. Genius, Jack! :)

DavidNH
02-28-2006, 20:36
Jack has a way with words and an uncanny ability to tell it like it is.

I can't think of anything to add.. Your post is dead on Jack!


David

Catsgoing
02-28-2006, 20:40
I don't see any problem with the question? It is a learning to hear why people dropped out early and didn't make The Thru Hike!

It seems to me it would help to know so maybe you could change something you where going to use or bring for your hike.

If you had to drop off the Trail it doesn't make you any less of a person. I think anyone who attempts the AT is a Winner..........

neo
02-28-2006, 20:43
most people have not started yet lol:cool: neo

freefall
02-28-2006, 20:58
I don't see any problem with the question? It is a learning to hear why people dropped out early and didn't make The Thru Hike!

It seems to me it would help to know so maybe you could change something you where going to use or bring for your hike.

If you had to drop off the Trail it doesn't make you any less of a person. I think anyone who attempts the AT is a Winner.......... The validity of the question lies with the askers motives for presenting said question. If it had been worded differently then perhaps it would be valid. Being as it is, I agree with Jack.

digger51
02-28-2006, 21:27
Come on Jack, tell us how you really feel. I concur with your sentiments. Lets support our fellow hikers.

Wolf - 23000
02-28-2006, 23:19
Let the tally begin!

Lobster,

Anyone can walk from Point A to B but it what happen inbetween that really matters. If someone walks 100 miles and finds their Katahdin in that, they had more a meanfully hike than someone who walked 2,000 miles as if it was a road march.

The number of miles that you've walked, it is just a number.

Wolf

Lugnut
02-28-2006, 23:21
I don't see any problem with the question? It is a learning to hear why people dropped out early and didn't make The Thru Hike!

It seems to me it would help to know so maybe you could change something you where going to use or bring for your hike.

If you had to drop off the Trail it doesn't make you any less of a person. I think anyone who attempts the AT is a Winner..........

You make a good point but it seems that Lobster only wants to know who he can look at as a loser/quiter while most of us would respect the person for at least trying, regardless of the outcome.

prozac
03-01-2006, 00:05
If Lobster ever sets foot on the trail his new name should be Moosecock.

Mountain Maiden
03-01-2006, 00:23
The written word is sometimes misunderstood but in this case, it does seem really mean spirited.

As the saying goes "It's not what you but how you say it."

lobster
03-01-2006, 12:15
Yes,

Now "Moosecock" is a great compliment!!

Folks sure read a lot into a question! Defensiveness seems to be a sure sign of an inferiority complex. Seek help!

As far as trail miles, between 2000 and 3000. I went to the Lone Wolf school of hiking so I don't have an exact figure. Climbed Katahdin 21 times if I remember correctly.

Has "Moosecock" ever been used as a trailname???

Lone Wolf
03-01-2006, 12:20
It's better than mousecock.

Heater
03-01-2006, 12:28
Anyone who posts s*** like this who hasn't walked the walk needs to shut off the computer

Geeze... Now Ive got you AND Doyle pissed at me? :rolleyes:

I think you need to reread my post, or perhaps you were not addressing me... I don't know... :-?

hauptman
03-01-2006, 13:36
:banana I do not get what all the fuss is about. It sounds like when my brother asked his girlfreind her dress size(..what is that suppose to mean...you think I am fat...I hate you, you ******* *******, ******* *** ****, etc.......). Sounds like lobster just wanted some statistics. Geez, I think people need to remember we are on white blaze not forums for the thin skinned and paranoid (sing along--if ya angry and ya know it, just zip it; second verse, same as the first!!!). Seriously though, lobster should just think before he writes his posts and the rest of can be more understanding of a stupidity leak. After all, how many times have the rest of us had to pry that big old foot out of mouth? I can not even keep track anymore!!! So let us all mumble a few curses to know one in particular and get back to more productive fun.

p.s., lobster should just wait and check ATC statistics as hikers start their journeys. Just check how many make it to neels gap, damascus, etc.... Gives you a good idea of the overall number without having to know each individuals personal info..

p.p.s., key points highlighted for the impatient reader!!!:banana

mdionne
03-01-2006, 14:09
threads started by lobster:

12/6/2004 - "how many hikers actually completed their thru hike this year?"

1/10/2005 - "Which 2005ers have quit already"

4/6/2005 - "how is the weather effecting the drop out rate this year?"

what a loser...:rolleyes:

Almost There
03-01-2006, 14:24
Lobster,

Summitted Katahdin 21 times? Question: As a troll how many of the worlds bridges have you stayed under or called home??? Inquiring minds would like to know!

lobster
03-01-2006, 15:20
<TABLE id=HB_Mail_Container height="100%" cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0 UNSELECTABLE="on"><TBODY><TR height="100%" width="100%" UNSELECTABLE="on"><TD id=HB_Focus_Element vAlign=top width="100%" background="" height=250 UNSELECTABLE="off">I was born in Maine and am a resident of Maine. I have climbed Katahdin many times.

No, I haven't completed 21 thruhikes!!
</TD></TR><TR UNSELECTABLE="on" hb_tag="1"><TD style="FONT-SIZE: 1pt" height=1 UNSELECTABLE="on">
</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

Gray Blazer
03-01-2006, 15:46
I was born in FL and I've climbed Mt. Dora at least 100 times. Maybe I can be called moosecock!?:rolleyes:

Blue Jay
03-01-2006, 18:29
I was born in FL and I've climbed Mt. Dora at least 100 times. Maybe I can be called moosecock!?:rolleyes:

Sorry but no. You are not pathetic enough.

Wolfpaw
03-01-2006, 22:42
It's better than mousecock.this is only the second time i have laughed out loud so far on this site. (the other was the story about the guy with the m-16 and his friend runnin his ass off. peace paw

The Desperado
03-01-2006, 22:57
Jack, you are a jem ! Moosecock.............geez, that's a great one!!!
Hey wait a minute, I was born in N J and climbed Sunrise Mt. a gazillion times [at least], does that qualify? ha ha ha ........D

Almost There
03-01-2006, 23:18
Um:-?...growing up there was this big dirt pile at my school. I climbed it a bajillion times and I was a master at king of the hill....does that count???:D

Trooper347
03-01-2006, 23:38
Um:-?...growing up there was this big dirt pile at my school. I climbed it a bajillion times and I was a master at king of the hill....does that count???:D



ONLY if there was a moose in the schoolyard, and you followed the proper blazes:p

Miss Janet
03-02-2006, 11:41
Lobster does seem to love a ruckus... and you all never fail him!

I saw a quote somewhere that says something like:

"The hardest step on a trip of a thousand miles is the one you take out of your front door."

Most hikers AT experience will not be a completed Thruhike but the experience of ATTEMPT. I hope that after attempting an AT Thruhike that each of these brave people will find it easier to ATTEMPT many other adventures in their lives.

The real quitters and losers are the ones who will never even try!

Mother Nature
03-02-2006, 11:50
Right on the money, Miss Janet! Good post.

Congrats on the new grannyship as well.

Mother Nature

Fiddler
03-02-2006, 11:53
I saw a quote somewhere that says something like:

"The hardest step on a trip of a thousand miles is the one you take out of your front door."

The real quitters and losers are the ones who will never even try!
Agree 100%. And then some. I have failed at a few things during my life. But I can stand beside many people I know and say proudly "I TRIED!" I look forward to a thru-hike attempt probably in 2007, maybe not til 2008. Might make it, might not. BUT I WILL TRY!

Old Spice
03-02-2006, 12:24
All of this aside, could I rephrase the query? How many peope have started and dropped out so far? No names, just numbers. Pure statistics baby. Though, when I look at the date, I realize this question would probably be better to ask in a month or so.

Red Hat
03-02-2006, 12:48
Well, let's see... In 2003 I attempted a 450 mile section hike and did 120. In 2004 I attempted a mere 80 mile section and did 40. In 2005 I attempted a thruhike and did 600. So I guess I failed three times. Do I regret one minute of one day of any of my hikes? Not one bit! I'll be out there this year to do another section. I'm hiking from Erwin to Damascus in time for trail days. Anyone care to join me?

MacGyver2005
03-02-2006, 13:41
...I'm hiking from Erwin to Damascus in time for trail days. Anyone care to join me?

I'll see you at Trail Days, my friend.

Regards,
-MacGyver
GA-->ME

Blister
03-02-2006, 15:00
Actually the hardest distance of any long distance trail is the space between your ears. Obviously the bottom feeding lobster has a true void where others have logic and compasion. Moosecock 100% (love that one Jack!)

Moxie00
03-02-2006, 20:42
Actually the hardest distance of any long distance trail is the space between your ears. Obviously the bottom feeding lobster has a true void where others have logic and compasion. Moosecock 100% (love that one Jack!)
Right on Sister Blister. Leave it to Jack to come up with Moosecock. Miss Janet and Mother Nature, you said it very well. I am planning to run for the Maine State Legislature (no kidding) and I will introduce legislation to disown Lobster as a Maine native and to close Baxter Park to moosecocks.

Skidsteer
03-02-2006, 20:54
I am planning to run for the Maine State Legislature (no kidding)

I suspect thru-hiking is easier. Good luck with that!:)

weary
03-02-2006, 21:45
....Most hikers AT experience will not be a completed Thruhike but the experience of ATTEMPT. I hope that after attempting an AT Thruhike that each of these brave people will find it easier to ATTEMPT many other adventures in their lives. The real quitters and losers are the ones who will never even try!
Well, sure. Trying is better than not trying. But let's not get too wrapped in the idea.

There will always be a thousand plausible excuses for not completing a thru hike. A few are even legitimate. Most, however, stem from dreams totally unrelated to reality. People who can bring themselves to think realistically, I suspect, will have a better chance of realizing their AT dreams. POsts that suggest otherwise may be more destructive than constructive.

Weary

gweet4
03-02-2006, 22:27
You guys sound like a bunch of ********, just answer the question if it pertains to you.

I am a nobody, but I thought the thread seemed ok. I am starting to hike it on Tuesday, and if I bail out for whatever reason, I would have no problem replying to this thread, saying, "I'm out!"

Programbo
03-04-2006, 10:12
This whole thread (And many other threads) show me how much the reality tv,X-Games,extreme sports,type A personality, mentality of modern society has become the norm for AT hikers...By the Fall I should be in good enough physical shape once again to try an overnight hike but I worry that unlike 30 years ago when you could go to the AT and escape all the ills of society, all the things in society that made one wish to go to the AT will now be out on the trail

mrmike48/4000
03-04-2006, 10:55
maybe sum people drop out beacause they are section hikers...who really cares if the ? is asked about droping out...it makes good talk...

Ridge
03-04-2006, 13:13
I talked to the folks at Walasi-Yi this morning and they estimate that anywhere from 1/3 to 1/2 have left the building (trail). It's probably not an accurate count since the bulk of thru-hikers haven't hit yet.

crutch
03-04-2006, 14:53
Lobster does seem to love a ruckus... and you all never fail him!

I saw a quote somewhere that says something like:

"The hardest step on a trip of a thousand miles is the one you take out of your front door."

Most hikers AT experience will not be a completed Thruhike but the experience of ATTEMPT. I hope that after attempting an AT Thruhike that each of these brave people will find it easier to ATTEMPT many other adventures in their lives.

The real quitters and losers are the ones who will never even try!

Couldn't have said it any better......way to go Miss J.

Crutch

Old Spice
03-04-2006, 21:36
This whole thread (And many other threads) show me how much the reality tv,X-Games,extreme sports,type A personality, mentality of modern society has become the norm for AT hikers...By the Fall I should be in good enough physical shape once again to try an overnight hike but I worry that unlike 30 years ago when you could go to the AT and escape all the ills of society, all the things in society that made one wish to go to the AT will now be out on the trail

I highly doubt you could escape the ills of society by hiking the AT 30 years ago. The ills of society start with the ills of persons and I highly dounb there ever was such an Appalachian utopia.

Rain Man
03-05-2006, 02:14
... I'm hiking from Erwin to Damascus in time for trail days. Anyone care to join me?

Kathy, that's a possibility! Stay in touch.

Rain:sunMan

.

Heater
03-05-2006, 07:54
While searching for a word on the web, I uncovered this:

Two hunters are sitting in the woods, getting bored. They decide to play 20 questions. The first hunter tries to think of a word, and after a little pondering he comes up with the word he wants to use: moosecock

So, the second hunter asks his first question, "Is it something good to eat?"
The first guy thinks for a moment, then laughs and says, "Sure, I guess you could eat it."

The second hunter replies, "Is it moosecock?"

lobster
03-05-2006, 12:25
Are these 2 guys hunting on Brokeback Mountain?

Programbo
03-05-2006, 22:40
I highly doubt you could escape the ills of society by hiking the AT 30 years ago. The ills of society start with the ills of persons and I highly dounb there ever was such an Appalachian utopia.

This shows a lack of knowledge of what "society" was like 30+ years ago and how common things are today which back then were almost unheard of...That plus the lack of readily avaliable info about the trail outside of certain circles (i.e. no internet,magazines or chain "outdoors" stores in malls) kept trail usage down to a certain type of person (In general..Yes there was the stray variation)

Old Spice
03-05-2006, 22:46
Did you even read what I posted? I'll repeat it for you. The ills of society are nothing more than the our collective ills as people. Thus, I stand by my point that there was never any AT utopia where one could escape societies ills, as I doubt human nature has changed all the mutch in the last 30 or so years.

Pacific Tortuga
03-06-2006, 13:38
Did you even read what I posted? I'll repeat it for you. The ills of society are nothing more than the our collective ills as people. Thus, I stand by my point that there was never any AT utopia where one could escape societies ills, as I doubt human nature has changed all the mutch in the last 30 or so years.

Yes we read what you posted and your not only wrong your historicaly clueless.Benton McKaye first and formost reason was a vision of a industrial respet from the ills of society.Stand by your point do not assume you understand that it was in the late 60's and early 70's that we not only questioned athority many people felt they had a right to disrespect it.So mutch has changed in 30 or so years on trails and campsites,a global economy then was not buying Japan's radio's. This is not a age thing this is readable political sceince American history 101.


So,to make this post relevent,how many hiker :( dogs have droped out?

Stix
03-06-2006, 15:57
Yep, Iím out. Way too much Barbra Streisand for me. For the love of hiking, would someone please kill this thread?<o:p></o:p>

Old Spice
03-06-2006, 16:16
Yes we read what you posted and your not only wrong your historicaly clueless.Benton McKaye first and formost reason was a vision of a industrial respet from the ills of society.Stand by your point do not assume you understand that it was in the late 60's and early 70's that we not only questioned athority many people felt they had a right to disrespect it.So mutch has changed in 30 or so years on trails and campsites,a global economy then was not buying Japan's radio's. This is not a age thing this is readable political sceince American history 101.


So,to make this post relevent,how many hiker :( dogs have droped out?

No need to get salty here. Historically clueless? I am not even talking about history. So again, maybe you should read what I posted again. I am making a philosophical/sociological point regarding the all to often accepted myth that one can escape the ills of society simply by retreating to the woods and living some Waldenesque lifestyle.

Seriously, you should learn to make sure you know what the other person is saying before you try and prove them wrong in debate.

Mags
03-06-2006, 17:12
I am making a philosophical/sociological point regarding the all to often accepted myth that one can escape the ills of society simply by retreating to the woods and living some Waldenesque lifestyle.


The largest burden we carry into the wilds is our mental ones. If we do not confront these fears, demons and thoughts, nothing will take that burden away.

Many people immerse themselve into the wild hoping for their problems to be taken away...but they will not for many of the reasons OS stated.

The wilderness can be healthy for doing some mental housekeeping, but ONLY if the person works at it themselves.

Red Hat
03-06-2006, 17:17
Rain Man, it would be great to see you! Creaky Bonz and I were to get together before she leaves on Saturday, but too many things came up, so we didn't get to. I hope to meet a number of my buddies from last year out there. See you!

Programbo
03-06-2006, 20:12
Did you even read what I posted? I'll repeat it for you. The ills of society are nothing more than the our collective ills as people. Thus, I stand by my point that there was never any AT utopia where one could escape societies ills, as I doubt human nature has changed all the mutch in the last 30 or so years.

Yes I read it..Unfortunately you are looking at life and society thru eyes that grew up after the decline and accept what once was unacceptable behavior as normal behavior..The people who were commiting the ills and negative social behavior back in the 60`s-early 70`s weren`t of a mental bend to go hiking in the wilderness away from what civilization had to offer..Unfortunately that is no longer the case as the trail and what is out beyond "civilization" is now common knowledge and the means to reach it is now commonly avaliable...Now I`m sure the people who are out there don`t consider themselves to be the "ills" of society but that is because in this/their world what they do and think and react as is perfectly normal..My point is that what is now "normal/acceptable" was once behavior that you only saw among the lower rung of societies ladder
So in a way you are correct that human nature may not have changed(Aside from the fact that what was once bad is nor normal) but what has changed is that the bad element is now free to roam where it once did not care to go

Just Jeff
03-06-2006, 21:07
Haha...so there were no social ills when you grew up? Or maybe it was mostly behind closed doors, so women didn't talk about domestic abuse. Husbands and wives never cheated, and organized crime didn't exist. And of course there were no alcoholics and drug addicts, no genocide or racism, and no child abuse, either. And obviously there was no poverty or ignorance or kids dropping out of school. And no fearmongering by the government during the Cold War, no McCarthyism...

Oh, but those things were never in the upper crust of society - only the lower classes did those sorts of things (and probably not the white folks, either).

Just because people didn't talk about it in public doesn't mean it wasn't normal. Or even accepted.

saimyoji
03-06-2006, 22:07
I suspect there were pockets of rich blacks, rich kikes, rich spics, rich waps, richs mics, and whatever label you could apply back then. BACK THEN....

Grow up, live in the times you live in. Here is now. Don't try to apply societal rules from 100 yrs ago. Times change, get over it.

Not aimed at anyone in particular.....

saimyoji
03-06-2006, 22:08
I suspect there were pockets of rich blacks, rich kikes, rich spics, rich waps, richs mics, and whatever label you could apply back then. BACK THEN....

Grow up, live in the times you live in. Here is now. Don't try to apply societal rules from 100 yrs ago. Times change, get over it.

Not aimed at anyone in particular.....

Me too.:eek:

Programbo
03-06-2006, 22:32
I can see one of the biggest problem of modern youth is very obvious among these replies..Over simplification and a failure to comprehend and grasp..These are the result of growing up having everything spoon fed to you and a constant instant gratification or electronic stimulation..The majority of the things people listed as "social ills" are merely the timeless weakness of the human condition and not the modern twistings of acceptable and not acceptable..The things which once allowed one to identify the lower rung and outcast from respectable society have now become the socially accepted norm..I`ll spare everyone a semesters worth of social evolutionary classes which would consume the boards bandwidth as I doubt people who grew up in this period could relate anymore than I could probably relate to someone from 15th century China...OK so I`m stuck in the 60`s mentally as far as the AT goes..That`s really not a bad thing if you could understand what that means...I think it is true that you can never go home again and that the beauty and eternity of the Appalachian Trail that I and many others loved has long died..The trail may still be physically the same for the most part but what it was and was not is gone and who travels it`s length has changed it`s spirit forever..Perhaps I should scrap my whole plan to return to it before the memories I have are totally destroyed by what I find there :(

Just Jeff
03-06-2006, 23:18
Disagreement, or pointing out a factual inaccuracy, is not failure to comprehend and grasp.

Mags
03-07-2006, 14:21
I can see one of the biggest problem of modern youth is very obvious among these replie

"Children today are tyrants. They contradict their parents, gobble their food, and tyrannize their teachers."


Was this line said by James Bennet or Jerry Falwell talking about how society has declined? How nothing is as good as things used to be?

No..it was said by Socrates 2500 years ago.

The previous generation looking upon the current generation with mild horror is nothing new. I am sure the "Greatest Generation" looked upon Programbo's "Baby Boomer's" generation much the same way he is looking upon Gen X or Gen Y. My generation ( Gen X) can be heard to make comments about people twenty years younger than us...

Programbo, it is easy to look down upon the AT experience of 2006 when you have not hiked the hike. Hike the AT and then tell me how you feel.

No, it is not 197x. It is a different trail. Is it bad? Is it good? Nethier..it is different.

What IS the same is the beauty of the trail. Fraconia Ridge will be rugged long after all of us have left this earth. The damp smell of leaves on a Fall day will always be a wondeful memory of hiking back east. Those white blazes will always lead to a beauty that is seldom seen by most people alive today.

I'll leave you with one final quote from the Romans (toga wearing variety, not the Vespa scooter riding variety):

"All things change. Nothing is lost".

The essence of the Applachian Trail will not change. Mackaye said it best many years ago: "To walk. To see. To see what you see.".

It was true in the 1920s. it was true in the 1960s and it is true today.

Sly
03-07-2006, 16:46
Programbo, it is easy to look down upon the AT experience of 2006 when you have not hiked the hike. Hike the AT and then tell me how you feel.

I think Programbo has been reading too much...

Of course the trail is getting busier (actually the numbers have fallen since 2000) but if he wants more of a "wilderness experience" Horace Greely said it best, "Go West!"

Mags
03-07-2006, 17:50
I think Programbo has been reading too much...

Of course the trail is getting busier (actually the numbers have fallen since 2000) but if he wants more of a "wilderness experience" Horace Greely said it best, "Go West!"


Debatable if the AT was ever truly meant to be a wildenress trail. Remember, the original proposal was to have work camps and rustic retreats. Up until fairly recently (mid 1980os or so), a good chunk of the AT still went through towns, did road walks and went near farmland. (Granted, suburban development has accelerated since then, too). Now the AT tends to stick to ridgelines and mountain tops more than the valley walks of years past.

Thinking of Thoreau, the AT can have much WILDness..but wilderness is something I don't think of when it comes to east coast hiking.

The beauty of the AT is mainly subtle. Damp leaves. Spring flowers. Brooks reflecting the light of the sun. I actually miss the deep woods of the east coast. I am getting asked "What next after the CDT?". Utah comes to mind. A "thru-hike" through the mountains of Italy also comes to mind. A SoBo hike of the AT also comes to mind. The deep woods is a beauty I miss. The AT does not have much wilderness....but it can be wild.

lobster
03-07-2006, 18:34
Well, the "Long Green Tunnel" sometimes seems to be deep woods!

No Belay
03-08-2006, 21:45
Hey, sorry about the language and all that....I'm usually pretty good about that when on on-line, but lately there's been a lot of nonsense here: Betting on people's chances and posting odds; speculating on who's gonna quit the Trail, and when; keeping tabs on who's already quit, etc.

Pewrsonally, I think this is chickens*** of the first order.

It's tacky and ugly if it comes from folks who've already hiked, as they should know better and be a bit more respectful of the new folks, and more helpful, too---and when this horseflop comes from folks who've NEVER thru-hiked, and who in all likelihood, never will, it's pitiful. Anyone who posts s*** like this who hasn't walked the walk needs to shut off the computer, move outta their mom's basement, drop the donuts, and start hiking.

You wanna make fun of someone who's out there hiking in February, or you wanna talk about who's quit or is likely to? First off, get your ass out there yourself, or tell us how many Trail miles YOU'VE got. Otherwise, as far as I';m concerned, you're full of s***, and so are your posts on the subject.

Damn Jack, I've only been on WB for a short while but I'll have to tell you, I'm impressed! So often in life you meet folks that have no comprehension of the * much less the ability to use * in an effective manner. I was left in awe at your deft implementation of the * in your response to Lobster's immature and chicken**** post. It's apparent that you've taken graduate classes in *ese. Your kick*** response had me cheering you on and your description of Lobster's residence and major source of nutrition explained allot of the suspicions I've had about other post I've read from him. Chicken**** pretty well describes wannabes that try to inflate their insecure egos by focusing on others hardships and shortcomings but I felt your "Moosecock" so eloquently fit this individual that I'm nominating you for the 2006 ****ing Award. Thanks for your candor and hope to someday shake your hand.

"Lord, help me to be the person that my dog thinks I am."

lobster
03-08-2006, 21:53
Dragon,

What's with the use of the asterisk all the time?

Jack Tarlin
03-08-2006, 22:01
Gee, thanx for the vote of confidence, Dragon.

Very ******* gratifying!

And as for my original phrase that seem to have initiated this dialogue, I stand by it.

Anyone that thinks it's funny to initiate multiple threads on who's quitting or how many folks have quit, or whatever, has some problems. Chiefly, what I see here is someone who has doubts about their own ability to achieve things, so they take joy in deriding folks who also fall short of their dreams.

Basically, people who have abandoned their own dreams will take pleasure in
criticizing and making light of the dreams of others. It makes them feel better about their own failings.

The best way to deal with these folks is to ignore them.

Best wishes to all the folks starting up in the next few days or weeks.....I hope you all get as far as you want to go, and have a great time getting there.

Hikers hike mountains.

Crustaceans scuttle in the mud and bottom-feed.

Hiking is better.

saimyoji
03-08-2006, 22:14
Wow, the troll drudged up three pages. Way to go. Too bad so many people took you seriously and posted in genuine. ;)

Jack Tarlin
03-08-2006, 22:26
What's so bad about it?

All he got for his troubles was several dozen people agreeing that he's got a new, and quite apt nickname.

I'm GLAD he started the thread!

saimyoji
03-08-2006, 23:24
Too bad "for the people who took him seriously" would be another way to read my post.

No Belay
03-08-2006, 23:57
Too bad "for the people who took him seriously" would be another way to read my post.


Maybe too bad "For those that didn't take him seriously " would be more appropriate and allot more accurate.