PDA

View Full Version : In camp shoes



pickle
05-08-2019, 12:49
What are your preferences for in camp shoes=Crocs or what other brand

linus72
05-08-2019, 13:08
some thrus we met a few years back had these and recommended them.
Vivobarefoot Ultra Pure
(https://www.amazon.com/vivobarefoot-ultra-pure/s?k=vivobarefoot+ultra+pure)we love them. great for water crossings too as you can secure the speed laces. they're pricey but wait for a sale like we did and get them at a more reasonable cost. though they don't come down THAT much if you find a sale and have coupons you can get them around 35-40. we used to use flip flops which are of course smaller and lighter, but after a bunch of stubbed toes and poison ivy ended our flip flop run. crocs are bulkier than these but less expensive, and harder to walk around in if you ask me, especially through water.

HooKooDooKu
05-08-2019, 13:33
I would specifically NOT recommend Crocs as a camp shoe because they are just so heavy.

What I currently used (though I found mine at WalMart years ago) is this that can be found at Bass Pro Shop:
RedHead Ragin' (https://www.basspro.com/shop/en/redhead-ragin-water-shoes-for-men)

D2maine
05-08-2019, 13:42
Cheapest pair of flip flops I can find at the dollar store or Walmart


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Astro
05-08-2019, 14:14
some thrus we met a few years back had these and recommended them.
Vivobarefoot Ultra Pure


(https://www.amazon.com/vivobarefoot-ultra-pure/s?k=vivobarefoot+ultra+pure)we love them. great for water crossings too as you can secure the speed laces. they're pricey but wait for a sale like we did and get them at a more reasonable cost. though they don't come down THAT much if you find a sale and have coupons you can get them around 35-40. we used to use flip flops which are of course smaller and lighter, but after a bunch of stubbed toes and poison ivy ended our flip flop run. crocs are bulkier than these but less expensive, and harder to walk around in if you ask me, especially through water.

This is what I use, and yes I bought them on sale.

HooKooDooKu
05-08-2019, 14:55
Cheapest pair of flip flops I can find at the dollar store or Walmart
My camp shoes double for water-crossing shoes (ok, actually my water crossing shoes double as camp shoes as I frequently leave them at home if I know my hike won't require fording any streams). So I want something to protect my toes to avoid hurting them if they get jammed in rocks while crossing waters.

HooKooDooKu
05-08-2019, 14:58
some thrus we met a few years back had these and recommended them.
Vivobarefoot Ultra Pure (https://www.amazon.com/vivobarefoot-ultra-pure/s?k=vivobarefoot+ultra+pure)
But they don't seem to really be getting sold anymore. Even the link above is only for a limited set of men's sizes (as most of the ones pictures are women's).

chef4
05-08-2019, 17:19
They've upgraded them, the retail ones are now up to $95.00, and apparently are made from algae-based foam; this would seem to price them well out of the range of camp and water shoes. I picked up a like new pair (the 'pre algae/vegan model') for about $30 on ebay a few years ago, and they are durable and quite comfortable. They're very light and have a fairly sticky sole, but if you walk far in them you do feel every sharp stone.

Turk6177
05-08-2019, 17:47
I have croc knock offs called Waldies. Not sure where they came from, but I bought them at Mountain Crossings.

D2maine
05-08-2019, 18:14
My camp shoes double for water-crossing shoes (ok, actually my water crossing shoes double as camp shoes as I frequently leave them at home if I know my hike won't require fording any streams). So I want something to protect my toes to avoid hurting them if they get jammed in rocks while crossing waters.

my water crossing shoes are my hiking shoes, camp shoes are for around camp only for me.

JG13
05-08-2019, 20:21
I think this was mentioned on backpackinglight (not sure) but there was a guy who sprayed FlexSeal on the bottom of a pair of Darn Toughs and it worked decently around camp.

MuddyWaters
05-08-2019, 20:42
I set up tarp, eat dinner and go to bed.
Don't have no need for camp shoes.
My feet are perfectly comfortable in the shoes I hike in.
Just another useless item.
Imo

So yeah, currently my Camp shoes are inov8 295.

Do y'all bring pajamas and bathrobes too?

HooKooDooKu
05-08-2019, 21:17
I set up tarp, eat dinner and go to bed.
Don't have no need for camp shoes.
My feet are perfectly comfortable in the shoes I hike in.
Just another useless item.
Imo

So yeah, currently my Camp shoes are inov8 295.

Do y'all bring pajamas and bathrobes too?
Well... sort of...
I try to keep a set of clean cloths to sleep in and another set for hiking... with the clean clothes acting as a backup set if something goes wrong with my hiking cloths.

Since most stream crossings in GSMNP are only a few inches deep, I hike in boots rather than hiking shoes. So to avoid hiking in wet boots, I need water shoes for the fords (as I don't want to risk my bare feet).

And when you have to make a "midnight run", it's quicker and easier to slip into the water shoes than put your boots on... Heck, even if you don't have to get out of your tent at night, it's still nicer to be able to slip into your water shoes while sitting on the ground allowing you to hold off on putting tall boots on when you can get out of the tent and sit on a log or something to put your boots on...

But again, I don't recommend camp "shoes" just for that purpose, so the water shoes generally stay at home if I know I won't be fording any creeks.

MuddyWaters
05-08-2019, 22:06
Dont make midnight runs
Thats what ziplocks is for....

Feral Bill
05-08-2019, 22:34
Another no camp shoe guy here. My Altra trail runners are plenty comfortable after hiking. On a really long hike, or one with a lot of fording, I'd consider sandals, maybe.

OwenM
05-09-2019, 00:48
My camp shoes double for water-crossing shoes (ok, actually my water crossing shoes double as camp shoes as I frequently leave them at home if I know my hike won't require fording any streams).
Likewise. Mine get left a lot, too, but always come along in winter.
Even if you don't change into them for a crossing, or can't wear them to explore up a creek or something, it's nice to have dry feet in camp when temps are way below freezing, and the hiking shoes and socks that ended up getting wet during the day freeze solid before you even get a fire going.
45152
:D

capehiker
05-09-2019, 01:07
I bought a pair of Waldies (the original before Crocs) at Mountain Crossings and they are almost half the weight of crocs and more comfortable. Still going strong 3 years later.

Strategic
05-09-2019, 09:37
I use a pair of Dawgs Ultralight Spirit Shoes (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00O9HCN78/ref=twister_B07CR34NZS) for both camp and fording. They're much lighter than Crocs, they're not clogs and actually stay on your feet fairly well (which means I can use them for emergency hiking shoes just in case) and they're cheap ($9 a pair or so.) Since they're made of EVA, just like Crocs are, they're completely waterproof and work well for fording pretty much anything you'll come across. They also slip on easily, making them more convenient than my boots for those late-night privy trips. I find it very nice to be able to slip on different shoes in camp at night, letting my feet and my boots have a bit of a rest apart from each other.
(https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00O9HCN78/ref=twister_B07CR34NZS)

Billy Goat
05-09-2019, 13:29
I don't mind the weight, necessarily, of crocs. I have a knock off pair that I started with. Super light, super cheap from Wal-Mart. Plenty comfortable, even. The BULK absolutely kills me, though. The pair of them is bigger than a long weekend's worth of food for the wife and I. I don't love having a bunch of crap hanging off my pack, as where we hike typically can get a little narrow from time to time and snag stuff. I mind less about losing a $7 pair of camp shoes than I do about tearing shoes off my pack and littering in a wilderness area. I wear Merrel barefoot vapor trail shoes when I'm not on trail and they are super comfy. If I know the trail will be dry, I leave them in the truck at the trail head. If it's going to be cold or wet on trail, they come with. They pack flat and are extremely light.

Cheers,
The Goat

Captain Panda
05-09-2019, 14:23
Crocs Swiftwater Sandal; 13.8 oz. Very comfortable.

D2maine
05-09-2019, 17:01
I set up tarp, eat dinner and go to bed.
Don't have no need for camp shoes.
My feet are perfectly comfortable in the shoes I hike in.
Just another useless item.
Imo

So yeah, currently my Camp shoes are inov8 295.

Do y'all bring pajamas and bathrobes too?

this post belongs here:

https://www.reddit.com/r/ultralight_jerk/

The Kisco Kid
05-10-2019, 15:06
I posted on this before, after an exhaustive search I settled on Teva Mush II flip-flops. 7.2 ounces per pair in size 12. Lightest flip-slops I could find that won't break in a day (which happened to me with the cheap versions). Vibrafoot I ordered and returned. Expensive, uncomfortable, and actually heavier than the average pair of flip flops which over a lot more cushy comfort--very important after a long day of hiking.

As for crossing rivers, I forded exactly three streams (all in Northern Maine) on my section hike. So, stream crossing shouldn't really be a consideration when choosing camp shoes. More hype than reality.

Daideo
05-10-2019, 21:22
I've gone around and around with camp shoes ... Vivobarefoot Primus Lite (very comfy but heavier), Shamma Warriors (very light but not comfortable), plain old flip-flops (very light but not durable) ... settling on Adidas Adizero Sub 2 running shoes. Pricey but just under 12 oz for the pair and very very comfortable. I should point out that cost has never been an issue for me, which no doubt is not typical.

OwenM
05-12-2019, 01:43
I posted on this before, after an exhaustive search I settled on Teva Mush II flip-flops. 7.2 ounces per pair in size 12. Lightest flip-slops I could find that won't break in a day (which happened to me with the cheap versions). Vibrafoot I ordered and returned. Expensive, uncomfortable, and actually heavier than the average pair of flip flops which over a lot more cushy comfort--very important after a long day of hiking.
Best flip flops I've found, too. Durable, comfortable, and inexpensive. Got 2pr in size 10, and they're 190g/6.7oz.
They don't work with regular socks, which is the dealbreaker for me. But if you're gonna get flip flops, those are the ones, IMO.

PennyPincher
05-12-2019, 11:06
my trail runners are so light I have actually considered carrying a second pair. this would have many benefits. dry shoes at end of day. dry shoes next day if trail runners didn't dry overnight. if 1 pair "blows out" I can still hike without issue and grab a second pair and ditch the "blown out" pair. I would never have to worry about getting a brand new pair and having issues until they get broken in as I could swap between the new and old pair during the break in period if necessary.

Game Warden
05-12-2019, 15:09
https://xeroshoes.com/shop/gender/mens/ztrail-men/

Light, less than 1 lb, very slim profile, but sturdy enough to hike in, or water cross when needed. Used to use flipfops but hated how they felt between my toes after my feet expanded in camp. Also, size 11 Walmart FFs are Chinese size 11, about a real size 10. As a very fragile and delicate outdoorsman, I like having something besides trail shoes at the end of the day.

Randy Watson
05-14-2019, 00:06
I use a pair of Dawgs Ultralight Spirit Shoes (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00O9HCN78/ref=twister_B07CR34NZS) for both camp and fording. They're much lighter than Crocs, they're not clogs and actually stay on your feet fairly well (which means I can use them for emergency hiking shoes just in case) and they're cheap ($9 a pair or so.) Since they're made of EVA, just like Crocs are, they're completely waterproof and work well for fording pretty much anything you'll come across. They also slip on easily, making them more convenient than my boots for those late-night privy trips. I find it very nice to be able to slip on different shoes in camp at night, letting my feet and my boots have a bit of a rest apart from each other.
(https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00O9HCN78/ref=twister_B07CR34NZS)

What's the weight on those?

OwenM
05-14-2019, 00:25
These keep showing up on my facebook thing.
I want to check them out, but you have to install some app to look at or buy their stuff:thanksbutnothanks:
45172

Odd Man Out
05-14-2019, 13:21
Don't have camp shoes. Like others, I just have one pair of shoes (Oboz Sawtooth NOT waterproof, as of now). For water crossings, I just plow through. As they are not waterproof, they dry quickly. I will sometimes carry some light fleece slipper socks. They are not really camp shoes, but rather to wear in the tent to keep my feet warm. They have a rubberized sole so they can work to step out of the tent and pee in the middle of the night, if it isn't muddy outside. I got them in a ditty bag from a trans Atlantic flight. So they basically cost me $1000, but they came with a free trip to Istanbul.

Ashepabst
05-14-2019, 16:40
I've been using RocSocs for a few years.

T.S.Kobzol
05-14-2019, 21:57
Dont make midnight runs
Thats what ziplocks is for....

Hmm good idea. Must try it. Ive been doing the pee bottle shuffle for years


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

MuddyWaters
05-14-2019, 22:10
Hmm good idea. Must try it. Ive been doing the pee bottle shuffle for years
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Works for me
Good if can place off groundsheet, like with tarp. In a tent with bathtub floor...hmmm. pray dont leak
Roll up after emptying in morning, pocket on outside pack

Dont mix up with fbc ziplocks...

Thrifty Endurance
05-14-2019, 23:19
I love my crocs, but I don't want to look like Samwise Gamgee (Lord of the Rings) with it dangling from my pack. I might lose one if I brush up against a tree or boulder. I think I will opt for cheap $1 flip flops. I am a minimalist so I got new shoes arriving Wednesday I plan to use for my hikes and sockless water crossings. I have two back to back hiking and bikepacking trips in June where I plan to put them to the test.

TX Aggie
05-15-2019, 00:54
Xero Z-Trail sandals. Can double both for creek crossings and for actual trail shoes if your feet just need that little bit of airing out. Or simply full time shoe if you like minimalist hiking.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Starchild
05-17-2019, 14:52
some thrus we met a few years back had these and recommended them.
Vivobarefoot Ultra Pure


(https://www.amazon.com/vivobarefoot-ultra-pure/s?k=vivobarefoot+ultra+pure)....
I just got the Walmart knockoff brand sort of like these for under $8. Weight is about the same, or perhaps a smidge less from the review of Vivo Bearfoot. It's called Athletic works Beachwear Mens, but I can't find them on the Walmart web site. Size 13-14 weighs 15 Oz.

Five Tango
05-17-2019, 20:36
I don't carry camp shoes or water shoes anymore but I do use SealSkinz socks either to hike in if there's lots of water crossings or as backup when the shoes are wet.Of course you could use bread bags over dry socks when the shoes are wet.I tried the camp shoe thing and decided it was not worth it for me as I turn in early at night.

Kerosene
05-20-2019, 21:43
some thrus we met a few years back had these and recommended them.
Vivobarefoot Ultra Pure

(https://www.amazon.com/vivobarefoot-ultra-pure/s?k=vivobarefoot+ultra+pure)I bought these years ago, and they were expensive even when at the sale price, but I was desperate for something less bulky than Crocs. I ended up cutting their weight almost in have by removing the inner sockliner, and while they aren't as comfortable (or water resistant) they are only 7.8 oz for the pair (size 10) and take up a lot less space in my pack.

HighlandsHiker
05-20-2019, 22:22
https://xeroshoes.com/shop/gender/mens/ztrail-men/

Light, less than 1 lb, very slim profile, but sturdy enough to hike in, or water cross when needed. Used to use flipfops but hated how they felt between my toes after my feet expanded in camp. Also, size 11 Walmart FFs are Chinese size 11, about a real size 10. As a very fragile and delicate outdoorsman, I like having something besides trail shoes at the end of the day.

Thx for the tip, Game Warden - and also TX Aggie for seconding the recommendation. Followed the link and liked what I saw, ordered a pair of Z-Trails - they just came in, exactly what I was looking for, lightweight, flexible, don't take up much space in my pack, and they're actual shoes that I could hike in if needed. At $80 they're not cheap, but the 5,000 sole guarantee means I'll get my money's worth. Much appreciated -

OwenM
05-25-2019, 07:23
Thx for the tip, Game Warden - and also TX Aggie for seconding the recommendation....Much appreciated -
Thanking them? For seducing you? I just ordered a pair with a sale code for $66. Had been considering them for awhile, but feel like y'all pushed me over the edge, and should be held accountable. I think all three of you should have to send me $22 apiece for forcing me to buy them:mad:

I'll take them to the beach in a couple of weeks, but they'll be used almost exclusively for camp, and should last forever.

Wil
05-25-2019, 17:12
I use mesh shower slippers like these (https://www.wdrake.com/buy-mesh-shower-slippers-357613?sourcecode=WD299SHIP19&cmp=compare_shop&gclid=Cj0KCQjwz6PnBRCPARIsANOtCw1TKMWMORqYykNmUl-J4kOG-AqrJXOZ0lpA3qJ2aIBT9VqLvsOEFhMaApcQEALw_wcB).

The best of them (which I can't find anymore unfortunately) have a decent textured slip-resistant bottom and are available in large enough size; you need XL and XXLs for average foot size, they tend to run small. Obviously there's a tradeoff for the extremely light weight but these soles have stopped cactus spines and pretty hefty thorns I've stepped on (not the ones I kicked though); and protection from rocks on water crossings is better than, say, the Dawg slip-ons which have been mentioned here (again on the bottom, not from the sides where there is pretty much no protection at all).

The air on your feet really feels good no matter how comfortable you think your hiking footwear is.

sbhikes
05-28-2019, 08:47
I never bring camp shoes but I often wish I did. I either go barefoot around camp or I loosen the laces on my shoes a ton so that they become like slip-on slippers. It sucks if my shoes are wet, though. Sometimes I just do the hike in the "camp shoes", meaning that I'll hike in Chacos instead of trail running shoes and leave the trail running shoes at home. That works out pretty great as long as long as it's a trail that's in decent condition.

scope
05-28-2019, 15:17
...I loosen the laces on my shoes a ton so that they become like slip-on slippers. It sucks if my shoes are wet, though...

This is what I love about the Salomon lacing, I can leave real loose and as you say, use as slip-ons without having to worry about dangling laces to trip over on midnight excursions.

I'd use a P-bottle instead of getting my dry socks wet, though.

Around camp, if you're using trail runners you don't need any other shoes. I've hiked in boots before where the first thing you want to do in camp is take them off, and the last thing you want to do is put them on again before a.m. Used to take crocs. Heavy, really? So I get having "camp" shoes and the whole weight thing is a personal choice. If you're not doing loads of miles, why not crocs or whatever feels good on your feet as a luxury extra? For me, the Salomon's changed my view on the need for camp shoes.

GolfHiker
06-01-2019, 13:07
I bought these years ago, and they were expensive even when at the sale price, but I was desperate for something less bulky than Crocs. I ended up cutting their weight almost in have by removing the inner sockliner, and while they aren't as comfortable (or water resistant) they are only 7.8 oz for the pair (size 10) and take up a lot less space in my pack.

I agree... for a touch of added comfort, simply put a simple, flimsy running shoe insert instead of the liners, and you have your comfort for camp & town walking....

TX Aggie
06-01-2019, 16:54
Thx for the tip, Game Warden - and also TX Aggie for seconding the recommendation. Followed the link and liked what I saw, ordered a pair of Z-Trails - they just came in, exactly what I was looking for, lightweight, flexible, don't take up much space in my pack, and they're actual shoes that I could hike in if needed. At $80 they're not cheap, but the 5,000 sole guarantee means I'll get my money's worth. Much appreciated -


Thanking them? For seducing you? I just ordered a pair with a sale code for $66. Had been considering them for awhile, but feel like y'all pushed me over the edge, and should be held accountable. I think all three of you should have to send me $22 apiece for forcing me to buy them:mad:

I'll take them to the beach in a couple of weeks, but they'll be used almost exclusively for camp, and should last forever.

Lol, good stuff. For what its worth, I took my daughter on a single night hike last week, just over 7 miles round-trip. I wore my Xero Z-Trails the entire time, I did have a pair of trail runners just in case.

Trail was typical mid-Atlantic with a mix of dirt, roots, and rocks. On the trail the shoes were awesome. You do have to be careful for the rouge twig that jumps under your feet, but otherwise great.

We camped near an overlook that had a decent amount of bouldering. Before the rain hit, the shoes held fine. After the rains came, they were still as good as most any shoe, but wet, flat rocks sitting at an angle still caused me to slide a little. Not fast and hard enough to cause a concern, you just have to learn which boulders to be wary of and foot placement.

Overall I wouldnt hesitate to use them as a 3 season all use shoe for general hiking. If I were planning on doing 20+ mile days I might rethink it, but I would still have them with me for wet sections and for camp shoes.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

orthofingers
06-01-2019, 19:58
my trail runners are so light I have actually considered carrying a second pair. this would have many benefits. dry shoes at end of day. dry shoes next day if trail runners didn't dry overnight. if 1 pair "blows out" I can still hike without issue and grab a second pair and ditch the "blown out" pair. I would never have to worry about getting a brand new pair and having issues until they get broken in as I could swap between the new and old pair during the break in period if necessary.

Please, tell us which trail runners you use and if you know how heavy they are? You make some good points.

GolfHiker
06-02-2019, 09:33
my trail runners are so light I have actually considered carrying a second pair. this would have many benefits. dry shoes at end of day. dry shoes next day if trail runners didn't dry overnight. if 1 pair "blows out" I can still hike without issue and grab a second pair and ditch the "blown out" pair. I would never have to worry about getting a brand new pair and having issues until they get broken in as I could swap between the new and old pair during the break in period if necessary.
PP, I too am wondering about your so light trail runners. I guess Im just questioning, but Ive owned many pairs of running shoes and trail runners, and TR are almost never light, since they are obviously beefier than running shoes. Certainly, Id be surprised to learn that any running or trail running shoes are anywhere close in weigh to a pair of camp shoes ( say the Vivo Barefoot). That said, Ive hiked thousands of miles in TR, and never had a pair blow out. Maybe I was just lucky, but that seems like a lot of extra weight on a long distance hike just for a what if circumstance. Finally, as has been stated previously, new TR almost never need to be broken in.

We all know this is about doing what you want, what works best for you, Ive just never seen anyone carry two pair of trail runners.

GolfHiker
06-02-2019, 09:38
Heavy thumb.....

Portie
06-02-2019, 15:25
When I was a Boy Scout I used all-leather moccasins as camp shoes. They must weight less than Crocs and they certainly take up less space in the pack. I notice that Bass Pro still sells Minnetonka-brand leather-bottom moccasins.

PennyPincher
06-03-2019, 09:02
Please, tell us which trail runners you use and if you know how heavy they are? You make some good points.I currently, and for the last 4 years, wear New Balance Minimus, women's 8.5. I weighed both pairs. One pair is just shy of 12 oz, the other 13 oz.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

TX Aggie
06-04-2019, 10:45
I currently, and for the last 4 years, wear New Balance Minimus, women's 8.5. I weighed both pairs. One pair is just shy of 12 oz, the other 13 oz.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

I can vouch for the weight of the Minimus Trail as well. Very light, decent traction, just beware of pointy rocks. They are a minimalist/zero drop shoe, so just keep that in mind. I think the tread stack height is somewhere around the 6mm range. (Same goes for the Xero Z-Trail I mentioned previously)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

MtDoraDave
06-12-2019, 13:46
I just got my Redhead Ragin shoes delivered today.
Wasn't sure which size to order, so I ordered both up and down from the 11.5 hiking boots size I wear.
The 12 fits. The 11's will go to some lucky person who needs them.

Crushed Grapes
06-12-2019, 14:54
Current thru-hiker, no camp shoes. I wear Hoka Speedgoats and they are all I need.

If car camping I'll bring crocs or flip flops, but no camp shoes when I'm backpacking.