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View Full Version : What kind of stove will you use on your present/future hike



napster
03-07-2006, 18:45
With the new Jetboil being so popular I am curious as to what kind of stove you will use on your next/present hike?

Ridge
03-07-2006, 18:51
Congrats, this is the one millionth time the stove question has been asked or surveyed here on WB. I use and will continue to use as long as scraps of wood, pine-cones are available to burn, the Sierra Zip Woodburner, this I believe is my 784,043rd time in response to the stove question.

Lone Wolf
03-07-2006, 18:53
Pocket Rocket

Disney
03-07-2006, 19:05
I've got one of Sgt. Rock's alcohol stoves. .5 ounces.

napster
03-07-2006, 19:15
Congrats, this is the one millionth time the stove question has been asked or surveyed here on WB. I use and will continue to use as long as scraps of wood, pine-cones are available to burn, the Sierra Zip Woodburner, this I believe is my 784,043rd time in response to the stove question.
Ridge
Sorry dude I looked before I posted but you still need to get your counter for your post fixed its off by 783,245
:eek:

irritable_badger
03-07-2006, 19:35
Everybody seems to hate them but I have used an MSR Whisperlite Intl for a long time and I don't see myself ever using anything else. It's incredibly easy to use, wide and short enough to be stable, and it will burn unleaded gasoline. You can always find unleaded, try finding canisters/alcohol/white gas anywhere, it won't happen.

Plus the jet engine sound it makes is cool. It instantly makes you feel warmer in the morning.

stag3
03-07-2006, 19:35
Use wood..cheap and easy. I carry an alky stove + 5 oz of HEET just in case. In case of what?? I don't know, but just in case of something.

Footslogger
03-07-2006, 19:40
Trangia (alcohol) ...works first time, every time. A tad heavier but totally reliable.

'Slogger

irritable_badger
03-07-2006, 19:41
Trangia (alcohol) ...works first time, every time. A tad heavier but totally reliable.

'Slogger

Unless it's cold outside right?

Skidsteer
03-07-2006, 19:44
Unless it's cold outside right?

No, even when it's cold.

irritable_badger
03-07-2006, 19:46
No, even when it's cold.

Cool! How is it different from all the other alcohol fuels/stoves I read about that don't work well in cold temps?

Skidsteer
03-07-2006, 19:52
Cool! How is it different from all the other alcohol fuels/stoves I read about that don't work well in cold temps?

I don't know. As much as I know about alcohol stoves, I can't figure it out.:confused: But I've used one at 23 degrees with 20 mph winds and it took perhaps 25% more fuel at most. It's a poser.

khaynie
03-07-2006, 19:58
You can always find unleaded, try finding canisters/alcohol/white gas anywhere, it won't happen.



Unleaded gas wasn't as common an item as white gas/denatured alcohol/fuel cannisters were at most hostels and or General Stores along the trail... Perhaps in a pinch, you siphon some 87 octane out of an automobile for some warm ramen.

Back to the orginal ?, we use budweiser stoves. You can get 24 of them for $13.99 (roughly 0.58/piece) in South Carolina. It's a great deal. And we never ran into an issue where finding denatured alcohol was a problem.

irritable_badger
03-07-2006, 20:07
Unleaded gas wasn't as common an item as white gas/denatured alcohol/fuel cannisters were at most hostels and or General Stores along the trail... Perhaps in a pinch, you siphon some 87 octane out of an automobile for some warm ramen.

Back to the orginal ?, we use budweiser stoves. You can get 24 of them for $13.99 (roughly 0.58/piece) in South Carolina. It's a great deal. And we never ran into an issue where finding denatured alcohol was a problem.

Are you telling me that sub-standard fuels and containers are more readily available than gasoline? It's not that I doubt your word it just seems like gasoline is far more prevelant than an odd ball product used by a tiny portion of the populatoin.

sleepwalker
03-07-2006, 20:08
Snowpeak Ti GigaPower, is there another kind of stove?

RLC_FLA
03-07-2006, 20:10
When we did an overnigther up to Springer, last Nov we took a Trangia alcohol stove. Our first attempt with alhohol, based solely on discussions found on Whiteblaze. I can say with confidence that our Trangia will take an honored place in our storage room alongside our sporks, and Sierra Cups.

When we do our GA section hike starting April 16th, we will be taking our "20 yr old, trusty, reliable, burns 9 different types of fuel MSR XGK". In 2100+ miles during our 89 thru, this little teacup sized stove never failed us. No matter what the weather, wind, rain, sleet, hail or snow, it fired up first time, everytime. And we could boil/heat as much water as we ever wanted.

Love the sound!!!!

khaynie
03-07-2006, 20:18
Are you telling me that sub-standard fuels and containers are more readily available than gasoline? It's not that I doubt your word it just seems like gasoline is far more prevelant than an odd ball product used by a tiny portion of the populatoin.

The sub-standard fuels aka denatured alcohol/white gas/cannisters were never a problem finding along the AT. Obviously, if you hitched into town you could certainly find plenty of unleaded fuel if that was your fancy.

My point is this: If your thru-hiking the AT, sub-standard fuels aren't going to be a problem finding. Alternatively, if your hiking through Mississippi, you may want to bring your Whisperlite.

That's all my friend.

Ridge
03-07-2006, 20:23
I know that a significant amount of time is spent searching for fuel along the trail. Usually, one has to quit the trail early or start late in the day because of the times the stores are open. Then, they have to find or hitch to get there and back. Every time I use my zip woodburner, I think of the times I had with my msr and how I had to ration or watch my fuel consumption. I got the zip when I was traveling to Australia to backpack many moons ago. The airlines where giving me static about carrying fuel containers and I was concerned about finding places in a foreign country to buy fuel. I figured I had nothing to lose and really had great reservations about the stove. Got one and have been thankful ever since. I keep it in my car just in case I want to fix some coffee when traveling. I have actually swapped stove usage for some of the food other hikers wanted to prepare because they were low or out of their store bought fuel. I even have a mylar bag shower to use. I also never worry about my water filter
quitting, I just have to boil it. My next major purchase will be a titanium zip.

hopefulhiker
03-07-2006, 20:25
I dropped the Jetboil in favor of Sgt Rock's ion stove last year.. do not regret it, saved weight and the fuel was easier to find and to deal with... The Jet Boil people did not have their cannisters in the most of the outfitters yet.. The little suckers are expensive too... You have to carry two of them and most of the time you have to carry the bigger MSR cannisters.. You can't legally mail drop these things.. With Alcohol you know how much you have left too .. Heet is available a bunch of places...

JJB
03-07-2006, 20:30
In the summer I'll use a MSR Supper Fly. It takes anyone's canisters, supposidly. I've never had to use anything other than the MSR cans. In the winter I'll use a white gas stove. I have a old MSR XGK that I just retired after getting a Whisperlite, that just needed the jet cleaned out, at an REI garage sale for $25. The sound of that XGK has had people ask "Is that thing going to blow up?"

C_Brice
03-07-2006, 21:37
Woodburning Nomad Stove, batteries not required.

Woodburners rule!!

Enjoy,
Chris

Ridge
03-07-2006, 21:53
Woodburning Nomad Stove, batteries not required.

Woodburners rule!!

Enjoy,
Chris


Yea, I got to try one of those, or at least see one in operation. I agree that the wood-burners are the only way to fly. I use to be a die-hard alcohol stove and msr stove hiker, but not anymore.

Trooper347
03-07-2006, 21:57
Woodburning Nomad Stove, batteries not required.

Woodburners rule!!

Enjoy,
Chris

Right on Chris. The Nomad is the way to go!

Ridge
03-07-2006, 22:04
http://zenstoves.net/Wood.htm


I like the stuff at this site. He covers a whole lot of woodburning stove info.

Little Brother
03-07-2006, 22:16
Sorry this is the million and oneth time for this subject but.... I have always carried a Coleman Peak 1 and have been very satisfied. Every through hiker I have met up in New England has opted for an alcohol stove. So I purchased a soda can stove set up from Naked Hiker on E-Bay and am considering using this for an upcoming hike in MD in two weeks. My question is for two people how much fuel will I need for 5 days?:confused:

Skidsteer
03-07-2006, 22:21
Sorry this is the million and oneth time for this subject but.... I have always carried a Coleman Peak 1 and have been very satisfied. Every through hiker I have met up in New England has opted for an alcohol stove. So I purchased a soda can stove set up from Naked Hiker on E-Bay and am considering using this for an upcoming hike in MD in two weeks. My question is for two people how much fuel will I need for 5 days?:confused:

Depends on the stove. Have you tested it?

Little Brother
03-07-2006, 22:54
I tested it today. I can almost bring a liter of water to a boil with 1 oz of fuel. Using that as a guide I think I should be bringing about 24 oz of fuel. Yet the websites that I have seen are talking about 9 oz of fuel for the same time frame.

napster
03-07-2006, 22:55
Sorry this is the million and oneth time for this subject but.... I have always carried a Coleman Peak 1 and have been very satisfied. Every through hiker I have met up in New England has opted for an alcohol stove. So I purchased a soda can stove set up from Naked Hiker on E-Bay and am considering using this for an upcoming hike in MD in two weeks. My question is for two people how much fuel will I need for 5 days?:confused:

Litlle Bra:welcome
Sorry the last 12 days have been hell for you since you joined WB you should have quit surfing and joined the neghiobor sooner.Welcome to White Blaze.I myself started out with a coleman peak then went to primative style and from there to a serria and then a trangia and recently bought a jet boil aint tried it much yet.My wife bought me a surprise stove recently..Opps i meant my soulmate!!!

generoll
03-07-2006, 23:37
back to my trusty Svea

Footslogger
03-07-2006, 23:56
Unless it's cold outside right?
===========================
Nope ...warm or cold, the Trangia starts first time, every time !!

'Slogger

cup
03-07-2006, 23:58
Soda Can
123

Skidsteer
03-08-2006, 07:27
I tested it today. I can almost bring a liter of water to a boil with 1 oz of fuel. Using that as a guide I think I should be bringing about 24 oz of fuel. Yet the websites that I have seen are talking about 9 oz of fuel for the same time frame.

Are you sure that these websites are talking about fuel for two people?

You can reduce the amount of fuel you use by altering your cooking method( freezer-bag cooking, i.e. ), hot meals per day, not drinking coffee, tea, etc. But for a five day trip why not take the 24 oz. and see how much fuel you'll have left?

Oh yeah!:welcome Welcome to White Blaze!

weary
03-08-2006, 09:41
Are you telling me that sub-standard fuels and containers are more readily available than gasoline? It's not that I doubt your word it just seems like gasoline is far more prevelant than an odd ball product used by a tiny portion of the populatoin.
I mostly use a Zip Stove. But denatured alcohol is a standard hardware store item. Cooking use is mostly a recent fad. It is mainly sold as a solvent for cleaning stuff and for thinning shellacs.

Weary

LIhikers
03-08-2006, 10:02
My wife and I use an MSR Simmerlite, summer, winter, spring and fall.

workboot
03-08-2006, 10:37
Coleman Peak 1, a bit heavy but it works for me.

Jaybird
03-08-2006, 11:07
With the new Jetboil being so popular I am curious as to what kind of stove you will use on your next/present hike?



MSR POCKET ROCKET (w/ 4oz cannister)

faster than a JETBOIL & much LESS weight!:D

Trail Yeti
03-08-2006, 11:18
Alcohol....currently using Sgt Rock's Turbo v8 (or sobe adrenaline)....would like to make an ion....anyone got a link to it?

BTW, acohol still works in cold. All you have to do is keep a small 1 oz container in your pocket to warm it up. lights first time everytime.....no worse than canister stoves in cold weather.

Seeker
03-08-2006, 11:35
ion alcohol stove... my whole kitchen (stove, cup, lighter, bottle of campsuds, green/yellow scrubber/sponge, pot stand, and windscreen) fits inside my Titan Kettle, which then goes into a cozy i made from a blue foam pad. there's even room left over for a small bottle of seasoned salt or a couple soup/cocoa packets, so i don't have to go digging in my food bag for them.

ANY stove takes longer to heat stuff in the winter... your water, fuel, stove, and pot will all obviously be colder in winter, and therefore take at least a little longer to heat, regardless of fuel source. the real issue with alcohol stoves is that the alcohol needs to boil to vaporize and then burn... THAT process takes longer in winter because of fuel temperature and the way that an alcohol stove works (open burner/pool of fuel vs the feeder tube system in a stove like a whisperlite/simmerlite) and it is a real issue. i'm not minimizing it. however, like anything, one has to plan around that limitation. it's not hard to do... just different... just carry your fuel in its little bottle (most of us use an old 12 or 16oz soda bottle) inside your jacket for an hour before dinner to get it a little warmer. and then, when you've set it up, put a small piece of cardboard or foam padding under the stove to keep it from touching the cold ground or snow... we live in a world that thrives on immediate gratification, and unfortunately, we seem to expect it from our stoves too... "i want heat now, dangit!" personally, i can wait the 15 minutes it takes for my noodles to boil and soak for a bit... it takes that long to set up my campsite anyway, so i'm in no hurry...

i prefer to keep it cheap, very simple, utterly reliable, and very light... but HYOH... and carry your own stove, whatever it is...

generoll
03-08-2006, 12:13
the point about insulating the bottom of your stove is a good one. my Svea works fine in cold weather, BUT it doesn't like to sit in snow or on cold ground. This is probably pretty obvious to most of you but I have to discover all these things the hard way. I use a small piece of CCF under whatever stove I'm using and it does make a difference.

Mags
03-08-2006, 12:18
Cool! How is it different from all the other alcohol fuels/stoves I read about that don't work well in cold temps?

I've used a alchie stove as high as 13k feet and when it was snowing outside.

Would I use it as my winter stove? No. But I don't worry about using it during in cold snaps.

Mags
03-08-2006, 12:32
I mostly use a Zip Stove. But denatured alcohol is a standard hardware store item. Cooking use is mostly a recent fad. It is mainly sold as a solvent for cleaning stuff and for thinning shellacs.

Weary

Yes and no.

It has been used in marine stoves for many years. Sinc alcohol is not as volatile as white gas, it has been the stove of choice for many people on small boats.

The Swedes of course being using alcohol stoves for a while.

So it is a fad of sorts for thru-hikers, not so much other users.

uncas
03-08-2006, 12:37
Hello,

I am surprised not to hear more support for the alcohol stove. I have been a white gas fan for years: Peak 1 Multifuel and MSR Simmerlite. But recently, I had a chance to try a coke can stove while kayaking thru the Glades: worked great for boiling water, heating canned beans, etc.

For my AT hike this year I am going to carry a pressurized version by www.minibulldesigns.com (http://www.minibulldesigns.com). Cheap, well made. You can find alcohol or Heet at a lot of places. It burn cleaners and if it leaks, it doesnt smell up your stuff like Coleman or unleaded does.

Does your dog bite?
No.
(Sounding of Dog biting)
I thought you said your dog does not bite!
But Monsieur, that is not my dog.

NapaMan
03-08-2006, 13:54
First time at this site. I'm starting to collect gear, going to yard sales, etc. I can see this is a huge website and I'll probably get valuable information here. A stove is one of the first things I'm looking for. I got the cloths and tent, sleeping bag stuff already, thanks to friends at Marmot, close to where I live. Is there a place on the web to buy used equipment?

napster
03-08-2006, 14:05
First time at this site. I'm starting to collect gear, going to yard sales, etc. I can see this is a huge website and I'll probably get valuable information here. A stove is one of the first things I'm looking for. I got the cloths and tent, sleeping bag stuff already, thanks to friends at Marmot, close to where I live. Is there a place on the web to buy used equipment?

Try This and welcome to WB

http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=69

NapaMan
03-08-2006, 14:07
Thanks, looks like I'll be busy for a while looking at all this stuff.

Seeker
03-08-2006, 14:38
the point about insulating the bottom of your stove is a good one. my Svea works fine in cold weather, BUT it doesn't like to sit in snow or on cold ground. This is probably pretty obvious to most of you but I have to discover all these things the hard way. I use a small piece of CCF under whatever stove I'm using and it does make a difference.

i've never tried this, but i've heard that you can actually extinquish an alcohol stove by setting it on a block of ice... shuts the fuel flow off by cooling it to the point that no vapors evaporate, and it can't burn anymore...

also of note, the swedes who invented the svea do/did their camping in the cold. seems to work well for them. i also like the fact that if my bottle leaks for some reason, it just evaporates and doesn't leave any of that nasty gasoline smell... with my simmerlite, i have to carry a special rag to catch all the drips that come out of the fuel hose when you unplug it from the bottle... ick.

bulldog49
03-08-2006, 14:50
I dropped the Jetboil in favor of Sgt Rock's ion stove last year.. do not regret it, saved weight and the fuel was easier to find and to deal with... The Jet Boil people did not have their cannisters in the most of the outfitters yet.. The little suckers are expensive too... You have to carry two of them and most of the time you have to carry the bigger MSR cannisters.. You can't legally mail drop these things.. With Alcohol you know how much you have left too .. Heet is available a bunch of places...


Wrong on several points, Hopeful.

First, you don't have to use Jet Boil's cannisters. The MSR and Snowpeak cannisters, which are readily available along the trail, work just fine with the Jet Boil stove.

Second, you do not have to carry two cannisters. One will suffice for a week or more, allowing you to get to the next resupply point.

Third, you can legally mail them, via ground delivery, with the proper labeling.

:p

weary
03-08-2006, 16:09
Yes and no.

It has been used in marine stoves for many years. Sinc alcohol is not as volatile as white gas, it has been the stove of choice for many people on small boats.

The Swedes of course being using alcohol stoves for a while.

So it is a fad of sorts for thru-hikers, not so much other users.
You're right. I forgot about alcohol stoves on boats. Probably because my only boat these days is a 20-foot canoe.

irritable_badger
03-08-2006, 16:17
You're right. I forgot about alcohol stoves on boats.

Marine alcohol stoves are the most common source of shipboard fires and the largest singe factor cited in marine insurance claims. Few people consider them safe but there is not a better (economical) substitue for marine use. While I don't doubt anyone's word about how great alcohol stoves are for hiking I find it odd that anyone would use a product that is acknowledged to be fantastically dangerous when there are so many other options available.

Two Speed
03-08-2006, 16:36
Marine alcohol stoves are the most common source of shipboard fires and the largest singe factor cited in marine insurance claims. Few people consider them safe but there is not a better (economical) substitue for marine use. While I don't doubt anyone's word about how great alcohol stoves are for hiking I find it odd that anyone would use a product that is acknowledged to be fantastically dangerous when there are so many other options available.Iím not so sure about that. As opposed to a gas or kerosene fired stove an alcohol stove can be doused with water if it becomes a problem. Of course water would usually be available on a boat.


With the new Jetboil being so popular I am curious as to what kind of stove you will use on your next/present hike?Now to disclose the source of my prejudice, Iíll admit that Iíve transitioned from a Peak 1 to a Trangia Westwind

Mags
03-08-2006, 17:05
You're right. I forgot about alcohol stoves on boats. Probably because my only boat these days is a 20-foot canoe.

I never owned a boat, but growing up in Rhode Island, knew people who fished on both a casual and professional basis.

Despite what the other posts said, alcohol stoves are still a popular choice due to kerosene and gas being volatile.

Mags
03-08-2006, 17:07
stoves are for hiking I find it odd that anyone would use a product that is acknowledged to be fantastically dangerous when there are so many other options available.


:-? I find a simple alcohol stove to be far, far, far less dangerous than a stove such as a whisper lite. People have to be shown how to use a whisperlite a lot more than a pop can stove. Fantasically dangerous alcohol stoves? Can't say I agree.

irritable_badger
03-08-2006, 17:22
:-? I find a simple alcohol stove to be far, far, far less dangerous than a stove such as a whisper lite. People have to be shown how to use a whisperlite a lot more than a pop can stove. Fantasically dangerous alcohol stoves? Can't say I agree.

My only reference is the fact that alcohol stoves are responsible for more marine fires and insurance claims than any other factor. Even more prevelant than storm damage or wrecking a boat. People who have used the stoves for many, many years set their boats on fire on a regular basis. Maybe hiking stoves are somehow safer but they sure do go through a lot of trouble to make them safe onboard boats and that doesn't seem to do a lot of good.

Mags
03-08-2006, 17:30
My only reference is the fact that alcohol stoves are responsible for more marine fires and insurance claims than any other factor. Even more prevelant than storm damage or wrecking a boat. People who have used the stoves for many, many years set their boats on fire on a regular basis. Maybe hiking stoves are somehow safer but they sure do go through a lot of trouble to make them safe onboard boats and that doesn't seem to do a lot of good.

I also suspect that stoves are often the only device that has an actual flame on most boats as well. Statistics are a funny thing. Cars cause more accidents than bulldozers as well.

I should hope that ANY type of marine stove has more precautions as it can be much more dangerous on the open water.

Still don't see how marine stoves correlates to hiking stove use (other than mentioning that they are hardly a fad, except among thru-hikers).

FWIW, I have more problems with canister stoves (leaking canister) and white gas stoves (rotted o-ring, inexperience back in the day) than an alcohol stove.

regards,

PM

Alligator
03-08-2006, 17:33
...
Still don't see how marine stoves correlates to hiking stove use (other than mentioning that they are hardly a fad, except among thru-hikers).

...
It doesn't. Well, maybe in a mild earthquake.

Two Speed
03-08-2006, 17:40
My only reference is the fact that alcohol stoves are responsible for more marine fires and insurance claims than any other factor. Even more prevelant than storm damage or wrecking a boat.No problem there.
People who have used the stoves for many, many years set their boats on fire on a regular basis..I think something got lost in translation. Surely if a particular individual was setting his boat on fire on a regular basis they'd give up boating? ;)
Maybe hiking stoves are somehow safer but they sure do go through a lot of trouble to make them safe onboard boats and that doesn't seem to do a lot of good.Hiking stoves certainly are safer. If a hiking stove acts up on you a swim to shore won't be required shore, merely some of your best break dancing.:banana

OK, I'll stop being a wise guy for a minute. Given that alcohol can be readily doused with water and gas and kerosene stoves can't I'm going to argue the situation aboard would be much worse with gas or kerosene fueled stoves. What you don't hear about is the occasions when a boater successfully extinguishes a fire before major damage is done. Another factor may be that a boat owner who wishes to dispose of a boat COULD torch the boat and blame it on that pesky alcohol stove, which could distort the statistics.:-?

Back to being a wise guy: What kind of stove do you think would be best for a thru-float on the AT?

irritable_badger
03-08-2006, 17:43
I also suspect that stoves are often the only device that has an actual flame on most boats as well. Statistics are a funny thing. Cars cause more accidents than bulldozers as well.

I should hope that ANY type of marine stove has more precautions as it can be much more dangerous on the open water.

Still don't see how marine stoves correlates to hiking stove use (other than mentioning that they are hardly a fad, except among thru-hikers).

FWIW, I have more problems with canister stoves (leaking canister) and white gas stoves (rotted o-ring, inexperience back in the day) than an alcohol stove.

regards,

PM

There are huge correlations between the two. The biggest difference is that marine stoves have fuel plumbed in from a larger reservoir. The fuel and principals involved are identical; as are the dangers/instabilities. I'm not attacking the hiking applications of alcohol stoves but I am pointing out that an entire industry which has been using them for many, many years still has terrible problems with them. Hikers make up such a tiny subset of the population that it will naturally take longer for the dangers to effect them than it does the enormous marine industry. If the alcohol stove hiking fad continues I am willing to bet that the injuries/property damage from using them will become a lot more prevelant.

irritable_badger
03-08-2006, 17:47
No problem there.I think something got lost in translation. Surely if a particular individual was setting his boat on fire on a regular basis they'd give up boating? ;) Hiking stoves certainly are safer. If a hiking stove acts up on you a swim to shore won't be required shore, merely some of your best break dancing.:banana

OK, I'll stop being a wise guy for a minute. Given that alcohol can be readily doused with water and gas and kerosene stoves can't I'm going to argue the situation aboard would be much worse with gas or kerosene fueled stoves. What you don't hear about is the occasions when a boater successfully extinguishes a fire before major damage is done. Another factor may be that a boat owner who wishes to dispose of a boat COULD torch the boat and blame it on that pesky alcohol stove, which could distort the statistics.:-?

Back to being a wise guy: What kind of stove do you think would be best for a thru-float on the AT?

The fact that alcohol fires can be extinguished is the sole reason they still use them in marine applications. They are certainly safer than petrol based fires but almost no one in the marine industry considers them safe by any means. There aren't any better (affordable) options for boats but most boaters wish there were.

Mags
03-08-2006, 17:47
Can't say I agree with you based on my experience, statistics and the fact that hiking stoves are far less complex than their marine counterparts .

I do not think we are going to sway each other though.
If you have more to say, great. But, I'm pretty much done.

regards,

PM

irritable_badger
03-08-2006, 17:48
should read "extinguished with water" sorry.

irritable_badger
03-08-2006, 17:51
Can't say I agree with you based on my experience, statistics and the fact that hiking stoves are far less complex than their marien counterparts .

I do not think we are going to sway each other though.
If you have more to say, great. But, I'm pretty much done.

regards,

PM

You don't have to agree. I was simply pointing out that I doubt the insignificant number ( in terms of industries) of people who use alcohol hiking stoves sure are being arrogant about something they really don't know much about when compared to the marine industry which will gladly acknowledge the inherent dangers and instabilities of the stoves.

Mags
03-08-2006, 18:00
You don't have to agree. I was simply pointing out that I doubt the insignificant number ( in terms of industries) of people who use alcohol hiking stoves sure are being arrogant about something they really don't know much about when compared to the marine industry which will gladly acknowledge the inherent dangers and instabilities of the stoves.

Thanks.

But, please don't use phrases like 'arrogant about something they really don't know much about'. It does not help the conversation and it is rather rude.

It is possible to disagree without being disagreeable.

all the best,

PM

RMGreen
03-08-2006, 18:06
I got a MSR Dragonfly because I plan on backpacking internationally (and so got a stove which could run on a variety of fuels) and my wife wanted simmer control (which the Whisperlite doesn't really have). Seemed to work quite well on our first use, even if it was a little, er, vocal. Being new to hiking/backpacking, I don't really have a reference point for fuel usage, but I was impressed with its efficiency using the MSR fuel.

I guess we'll see how much we use those features as we get onto the trail more.

Ray

irritable_badger
03-08-2006, 18:07
Thanks.

But, please don't use phrases like 'arrogant about something they really don't know much about'. It does not help the conversation and it is rather rude.

It is possible to disagree without being disagreeable.

all the best,

PM

I truly apologize if you mistook my comments for being rude. I assure you that was not my intent. Words often have deeper meanings than people are aware of for instance one definition of arrogant is: "Making, or having the disposition to make, exorbitant claims of rank or estimation" which fits this converstation. Compared to the marine industry hikers have almost no experience with alcohol stoves. Once again I truly apologize if you thought I was being rude.

Weldman
03-08-2006, 18:24
I stand firm on my 20+ yr old Svea and the wife agrees. If we go with a group, it will be the Optimus 8R.

The new gas stoves maybe lite but drop it once in dirt or mud and you'll need to clean those small ports. I also carry a esbit as a emergency backup stove.

Mike

Skidsteer
03-08-2006, 18:46
Back to the question:) : I'll use a homemade alcohol stove, potstand and windscreen. It's simple, light, predictable, cheap, and satisfying.

crackwhore
03-08-2006, 20:23
I have this stove because it can use any fuel, it is light, and it works under cold temperatures. I love it so far but I have only used it on a weekend hike. I had to test out a few new things I got for the trail. I am thru-hiking and I start in May.

irritable_badger
03-08-2006, 20:29
I have this stove because it can use any fuel, it is light, and it works under cold temperatures. I love it so far but I have only used it on a weekend hike. I had to test out a few new things I got for the trail. I am thru-hiking and I start in May.

Don't worry, it's the best liquid fuel stove you can buy. :)

dla
03-08-2006, 22:49
Trangia burner, home made wire pot stand and windscreen. I've frozen the burner in a block of ice and used it - so I know it works in any "cold" I'm likely to ever try to cook a meal in. I'm not a high-end hiker, so I don't mind waiting longer to eat.

If I kicked it over, I would have a boring 3oz Alcohol fire. Whoopee. If the O-ring leaks my pack would probably smell better :) For relaxed hiking/camping I think Alcohol stoves are best. This is one area where the Europeans were way ahead of us.

No Belay
03-10-2006, 18:33
The jet boil was a good marketing idea (gimmick) but its only good for cooking liquid based food and boiling water. You can carry an MSR Simmerlite with a 1.3L Evernew pot and a full 11oz fuel bottle and get 6 more liters of water boiled for almost the same weight as a fully stocked Jetboil plus you have the option of frying. Also you don't have the by product of all those little empty canisters which as of yet, no one has found a use for. If you're a caffine addict, the jet boil coffee press is hard to beat. I traded my Jet Boil for a SVEA 123 and then traded that for a Pacer. Went back to using my beer can alcohol stove and burn HEET. Never had one fail on me... except for the one Rumbling Rhonda sat on. Recycled that one.

"Lord, help me to be the person that my dog thinks I am."

PKH
03-10-2006, 18:44
Zip stove, or Kelly Kettle - just depends on my mood. Both fine pieces of kit.

Cheers,

PKH

rithomas
03-11-2006, 21:17
I've got a Coleman Exponent stove that uses Powermax fuel. Can you track these canisters down on the trail? If not, can they be sent in my mail drops?

Anybody who's got any experience with these things - you're advice on they're use on a thru-hike would be much appreciated. My up-front budget is more of a concern than my total hike budget, so ideally I'd like to be able to bring this stove with me confidently.

brz
03-11-2006, 22:34
Jetboil is it. I've even managed to shave some weight of of it. It is the best water boiling engine around.

Since I ONLY use my stove for boiling water (mostly for freeze dried food, coffee etc.), Jetboil is the better option.

Alky stoves are cute - great for the weekend jaunt. However, IMHO not for a through hike.

Yes, alky stoves only weigh an ounce, but the fuel weight quickly surpasses the Jetboil. With a boil time of less than 3 minutes for the jetboil to over 10 minutes for an alky stove, there is no question, Jetboil rulz.

Jetboil needs to get rid of the plastic and reduce the weight of the stove.

Also, although titanium is much stronger than aluminum, it is a very, very poor heat conductor. Jetboil gets this.

I love titanium, but, aluminum is much superior with regard to heat transfer. It's one of those places were HYPE overwhelms reality. True titanium is stronger and lighter than the same aluminum container, aluminum however heats and moves heat much faster.

The ideal FUTURE jetboil cup will have an aluminum bottom and titanium sides. (That's possible Jetboil.)

rithomas
03-12-2006, 10:35
Do you need to use cozies with the Jetboil system?

Mags
03-13-2006, 13:43
Alky stoves are cute - great for the weekend jaunt. However, IMHO not for a through hike.


Hmm..thanks for the advice. I never knew what I was doing was wrong all this time. :D

Seeker
03-13-2006, 14:08
Alky stoves are cute - great for the weekend jaunt. However, IMHO not for a through hike.

Yes, alky stoves only weigh an ounce, but the fuel weight quickly surpasses the Jetboil. With a boil time of less than 3 minutes for the jetboil to over 10 minutes for an alky stove, there is no question, Jetboil rulz.

i disagree. it depends entirely on the distance between resupplies... at some point the alcohol fuel weight overcomes the alky stove's weight... but it's not for about 2 weeks... see SGT Rock's site for a very detailed study of three stoves' fuels actual weight over time... if you resuppy once a week, the alky wins easy...

and my ion weighs only 1/10 of an ounce, not an ounce. the potstand weighs 3/10ths of an ounce, and the resulting cut-down wind screen weighs 1.1 oz, a half ounce (30%) less than the full sized one i'd need for my msr simmerlite, because it sits 2 inches or so lower. a full small 12 oz soda bottle of alcohol will last me about 5 days if i heat two meals a day. no heavy aluminum bottle, no heavy stove... a larger 20 oz soda bottle will last even longer...

as always, anyone is entitled to carry whatever they want into the woods, so long as i don't have to carry it out... i'm just sharing my thought process and techniques. HYOH. YMMV.

JoeHiker
03-13-2006, 14:42
I used an alcohol stove on my last hike, but I might switch to the JetBoil on my next one.

Two Speed
03-13-2006, 17:49
Do you need to use cozies with the Jetboil system?If I understand correctly the Jetboil cup is insulated, so that pretty much fills the "cozy" requirement.

BTW, BRZ, if you like your Jetboil, that's fine, but I think you're going to be surprised how many "weekend" thru-hikers and long distance hikers are using those "cute" little alcohol stoves, weekend after weekend after weekend . . .