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cafequaid1
03-19-2006, 21:53
I am doing a research project for a grad class on the culture/community of the AT. I would love to know some of the folkways and Norms of the trail, if there are any? What are the cultural dos and donts of the AT?
Thanks,
Cafequaid1

MOWGLI
03-19-2006, 22:23
I am doing a research project for a grad class on the culture/community of the AT. I would love to know some of the folkways and Norms of the trail, if there are any? What are the cultural dos and donts of the AT?
Thanks,
Cafequaid1

Rule #1. Don't steal from another hiker. Hikers (generally) only carry things they really need.

Rule #2. See rule #1.

Marta
03-19-2006, 22:31
Funny you should ask this...

I was on an overnight hike in Western NC this weekend. Five thru-hikers told me about a certain hiker they are all doing their best to escape. The offending hiker's misdeeds were basically various forms of mooching (money and food), not being self-sufficient emotionally, wanting to be the center of attention at all times, and demanding more than her share of public resources (internet time in a motel). I won't go into specifics here, but all five hikers were busting their butts to get at least a day ahead of this other hiker.

cafequaid1
03-19-2006, 22:32
Thanks,
If you think of anymore, just shoot them my way.
B3

The Hog
03-20-2006, 07:40
Don't brag about how many miles you've done, or how far you've come, or how far you're going or how fast you're hiking. Realize that bragging inevitably has an opposite effect to the one intended. People will be less impressed with you.

If you're a gearhead, don't bore others with talk about gear until you ascertain that they have an interest in the topic. Many don't.

There's [almost] always room in a shelter in bad weather. If there's even a tiny amount of space that could be created, don't tell someone the shelter is full.

MOWGLI
03-20-2006, 07:59
Another thing. In our society, social groups generally tend to form around folks that come from similar socio-economic groups. On the trail, you find doctors hanging out with house painters. Retired executives hiking with recent high school grads - and treating each other like peers.

Another thing.... Unlike activities like tennis, golf, or chess - you don't find a "better" hiker. Oh sure. There are always strong hikers who can bang out the miles, but to try and portray yourself as somehow "better" is generally verboten.

Blue Jay
03-20-2006, 08:17
Leave No Trace
Help others if you can
Be grateful if you receive help, but never expect it.
Try to be up beat even if situations are difficult

shades of blue
03-20-2006, 08:36
One part of the culture (can be disputed) is trail magic/trail angels.

Trail magic can be when some unexpected good thing is done for a hiker...sometimes who is in great need. This can be a ride into town on a horrible weather day, food/soda, someone putting gallon jugs of water in a section that doesn't have good water sources for many many miles. You never take more than you need. The unexpected help can change a difficult day into a good one. A person who dispenses trail magic is usually known as a trail angel.

Some people do "trail feeds" and other large trail magic events. Some say it's trail magic...some don't.

Tractor
03-20-2006, 08:43
BJ

"Be grateful if you receive help, but never expect it."

I like your short list and this part the very best.

Jaybird
03-20-2006, 08:51
I am doing a research project for a grad class on the culture/community of the AT. I would love to know some of the folkways and Norms of the trail, if there are any? What are the cultural dos and donts of the AT? Thanks, Cafequaid1





DO help fellow hikers...w/ advice (when asked)..helping hand..etc,etc


DONT leave trash along the trail, in shelters or around campsites...pack it out!:D

Moxie00
03-20-2006, 09:58
Dont's include:
*Don't give advice if it isn't requested.
*Remember we all know alot and no one knows it all.
*There are different styles of hiking, ultra lites and regular, Don't be critical of someone with a style different than yours.
*Never mooch. If you are short on food or money there is no harm in mentioning it but then let it go.
*Remember all thru hikers are equal, old, young, men & women. Don't run another person down.
*Do not bragg, If you did a 35 mile day it is okey to mention it when you all gather around the shelter at night but don't try to wear it like a badge and belittle others who hiked lesser miles.
Good Do's
*Get away from the group to smoke of use your cel phone.
* Remember some tent, some use hamocks, some stay in shelters. Respect the other hikers style and choice.
*If you see another hiker is short of food or has lost or broken equipment share if you are able.
*Remember 9pm is "hikers midnight" so be quiet and let your fellow hikers sleep.
* Always check on the well being and health of fellow hikers and be intrested in those you share the adventure with.
*We all have very bad days on the trail, if you are having one just suck it in and smile.
*If you really need help ask for it. It is not mooching if you get into a bad situation out of your control.
*Try very hard to not stink too bad.:banana

Blue Jay
03-20-2006, 11:08
*Get away from the group to smoke of use your cel phone.


Yes, I forgot about this one. Burning your cell phone is a very important part of trail culture. Just be sure to pack out the remains.

Midway Sam
03-20-2006, 13:41
If you choose to "pack heat" don't even mention you are, let alone bring it out for show and tell. You may find comfort and security in bringing it along, but others might be weirded out knowing you have it.

weary
03-20-2006, 14:05
I would add, Be aware of how your actions affect others. For instance, keeping a light on in the shelters at night attracts mosquitoes and other bugs. When someone complains about a light attracting bugs, ponder for at least a moment or two whether your need to read or journal outweighs another hiker's desire for sleep.

I'm not saying you should necessarily bow to another's wishes. But if the inconvenience to you is minor, think about doing so, even if you know the complainers carry tents and can escape the bugs anytime they want.

Weary

Seeker
03-20-2006, 14:07
-speak softly, especially between 9pm and 8am, as others may be sleeping.
-use radios, cell phones, games, and other items of the beeping/ blinking/ electronic sort out of hearing of others, who may have made this special trip just to get away from that sort of thing on their only vacation of the year.
-don't discuss your gear with anyone unless they ask first.
-ask others about themselves, but let them tell you about job/ family/ etc... some folks are on the trail because of problems with those things, and don't necessarily want to bring it up.
-don't brag about anything.
-keep your dog well away from others. even if you think he's well behaved, someone else doesn't, but won't tell you.
-when you get into a shelter, find a space, and keep in it... don't spread your stuff out everywhere.
-don't mooch- food, money, cell phone, dry towel, toilet paper, duct tape, aspirin, band aids, etc... if you're an ultralighter (and i am, by others' definition), you should have brought your own.
-keep your smoking supplies (of all sorts) out of sight of children, and out of smell of all others. believe it or not, it's offensive.
-do look out for others.
-do share what food, fuel, or TP you can afford to.
-do know how far back the last water source or trail crossing was.
-don't stick your hand in anyone's GORP bag... ask them to pour it into yours.
-do keep yourself reasonably clean. we all stink. but there are limits, and no one likes a pig.
-don't wash in water sources.
-bury your crap and TP far away from the trail.
-don't use foul language, especially around young kids. the f word is just a noun/adjective/adverb to a lot of young people, but some of us are deeply offended by it, among words that are "popular".
-if you spill food in a shelter, PLEASE clean it ALL up... i know the mice need to eat, but not here. also, don't drain your pasta water outside the shelter door.
-don't complain. if you're hot, wet, tired, itchy, or sore, chances are good someone else is too. don't bring them down when they're trying to stay positive about a bad situation.

Sly
03-20-2006, 15:02
#1. Don't listen to anyone else's idea of what's right and wrong.

#2. Just use common sense (what it would be like if a 1000 hikers did the same) and common courtesy and you should be fine.

Almost There
03-20-2006, 15:18
Screw the rules and do what you want. Everyone has equal right to a shelter.

Other than LNT the only rule I agree with is Mowgli's 1 and 2. Anyone with self righteous rules is looking for them to be broken!!! Hike "YOUR" own Hike!!!

orangebug
03-20-2006, 15:37
Well, as AT knows, I can be a "Miss Manners" while hiking.

The trip involved me berating some ill supervised religious kids who were burning plastic, trying to dry shirts over a campfire and other hazardous or LNT activities. It helps to have a thick skin when attempting to manipulate others into a better behavior pattern, and to allow them some distance to process your misguided attempts at education.

Sometimes, other folks do get the point, even when it takes some time.

RockyTrail
03-20-2006, 15:57
Especially in towns, don't think anyone owes you anything just because you're a hiker a long way from home. You decided to put yourself there, so deal with it. And for gosh sakes please don't stand on a corner with a sign saying "AT Hiker, need money/food".

Be prepared.

weary
03-20-2006, 15:59
Screw the rules and do what you want. Everyone has equal right to a shelter.
Other than LNT the only rule I agree with is Mowgli's 1 and 2. Anyone with self righteous rules is looking for them to be broken!!! Hike "YOUR" own Hike!!!
Right on! Let's hear it for Warren D.

Just Jeff
03-20-2006, 16:42
Well, the thread isn't titled "Rules of the AT" - it's "Cultural Dos and Donts of the AT". So the only "rules" are the ones imposed by the land management agencies, laws, etc.

But there are still some general "cultural dos and donts" that most people follow. Traditions, norms, etc. Making room in the shelters when it's raining is one of them - even if it's not a rule. Being polite, respecting others' sleep times, and not contributing to the mice problem are others that have been listed.

Basically, the trail culture follows the same principles as society - respect others, don't impose, be self-sufficient, etc. They're just applied differently. And just like society, some people get indignant about common courtesy because it's not a law and they know their rights...

the goat
03-20-2006, 17:02
do hike naked on june 21st.
do moon the cog railway on mt washington.
do yogi food from dayhikers.
do not yogi food from thru hikers.
do not sleep in shelters if you snore really loud.
do not sleep in a shelter if you arrive later than 10pm.
do not steal things from other hikers....or anyone for that matter.
do not use offensive language in mixed company.
do not freeload off of the "donation" hostels.
.....and most important: do have a good time.

soad
03-20-2006, 17:42
Don't slow down faster hikers coming up behind you, let them pass. Yield to those coming the other way out of respect.

mrmike48/4000
03-20-2006, 18:00
if you have to think twice about something if it will bother a person or group than maybe you might want to save that someting for another time or just get out of sight for the time being...LNT is a must...snoring, well i know a few people who snore and they are ignorant to the fact that there are other people in the shelter.i need to keep my hiking poles close by so that i can use them as anti snoring devices[leg poke] and what kills me the most is in the morning they say "i slept great how about you" errrrrrrrrrrr.........peace out, nitewalker:mad:

Almost There
03-20-2006, 20:35
Oh yeah...and I forgot one other thing....only the cool hikers blue blaze!!!

Lobo
03-20-2006, 20:49
Don't bring your dog into the shelter. Thank you.

neo
03-20-2006, 21:19
:D if you are neo,dont stay in a shelter,cause people will give you a hard time since you say ya dont like shelters lol.i agree dont take anything that is not yours,:cool: neo

neo
03-20-2006, 21:21
Don't bring your dog into the shelter. Thank you.

yeah i got pissed when i used to stay in shelter when a hikers wet dog layed on my sleeping bag,i hate wet smelly dogs:cool: neo

bfitz
03-20-2006, 22:22
#1. Don't listen to anyone else's idea of what's right and wrong.

#2. Just use common sense (what it would be like if a 1000 hikers did the same) and common courtesy and you should be fine.
Same ideas that work well in any circumstance. Funny how "common courtesy" and "common sense" are so uncommon...
MYOB and remember TANSTAAFL.

cafequaid1
03-22-2006, 17:41
Thanks for all the useful posts!!!:banana I maybe asking more questions soon. :eek:
Cafequaid

dje97001
03-22-2006, 19:47
I was excited there for a minute.. I thought the thread was talking about donuts... not donts (skimming too quickly!) :(

Skidsteer
03-22-2006, 19:58
I was excited there for a minute.. I thought the thread was talking about donuts... not donts (skimming too quickly!) :(

LOL! Are you a police officer, by chance? :D

hobbit
03-22-2006, 22:42
if your an eliteist please don't brag about bagging all of the 4000 footers in whatever state your in even us weekenders find that annoying as hell and your not going to impress anyone

Disney
03-22-2006, 23:47
yeah i got pissed when i used to stay in shelter when a hikers wet dog layed on my sleeping bag,i hate wet smelly dogs:cool: neo

And therein lies the root of the hammock love affair. I feel like a mystery has been solved.

My meager to what has already been said:
1. If you don't carry a tent or a tarp because you're ultra-light, do not expect someone in a completely full shelter to pitch their tent in the rain to accomodate you.

2. Don't abuse the hostels, that means don't buy alcohol it's not allowed. And do not ever jump in the next door neighbors pool for a little thrill.

3. Keep religion and politics to yourself.

4. If you're learning a musical instrument while hiking, don't practice at the shelter.

5. Do not ever ever ever call a trail angel for a ride into town and then hit them up for money. Ever.

6. Do not go to sleep in the shelter at 5 pm and ask those coming in to accomodate you with silence.

longshank
03-23-2006, 02:26
.
quote:-don't complain. if you're hot, wet, tired, itchy, or sore, chances are good someone else is too. don't bring them down when they're trying to stay positive about a bad situation.[/quote]

I have to disagree wit this postulation to some degree. Although a negative attdude could well affect others morale negatively, don't be shy about expressing distress. Sometimes you need to let it out and relating it to others who are going through the same thing is a way of dealing with it as a community. Sometimes it helps to hear someone else is going through the same turmoil, and you are both able to process it into something more positive by relating with each other. It can serve to create bonds between hikers and a sense of commraderie, which, I believe, could prove invaluable. Everybody needs support sometimes. Give it to someone when you see they need it, because you may be the one in need at some point. But still and all, don't take that as a pass to be a whiner.

longshank
03-23-2006, 02:29
Especially in towns, don't think anyone owes you anything just because you're a hiker a long way from home. You decided to put yourself there, so deal with it. And for gosh sakes please don't stand on a corner with a sign saying "AT Hiker, need money/food".

Be prepared.
I beleive one should always be gracious and humble when entering a town in the tru-hiker's position. be appreciative of what you are offered, and your karma will hook you up.

partly cloudy
03-28-2006, 22:37
mrmike48/4000
Were you at Lakes of the Clouds in August of '01?? Someone in the same room as I was hitting me all night long with their walking stick. I don't think I snored that bad. Were you also responsible for have my picturs with a red line thu it at all the high huts? If I ever meet you, I'll buy you a "rubber" walking stick, hurts less.

joel137
03-29-2006, 00:23
I agree with the sentiment, but would modify this one slightly:



-when you get into a shelter, find a space, and keep in it... don't spread your stuff out everywhere.

I have sometimes gotten in early to a shelter early and by myself and "spread out"; however (and this is important) when someone else arrived, I'd immediately make clear to them that I would move my stuff to an appropriate sized area and would immediately proceed to do it.

Dances with Mice
03-29-2006, 00:44
3. Keep religion and politics to yourself.Amen to that!

Frolicking Dinosaurs
03-29-2006, 15:29
When section hiking or day hiking, we always try to take along enough extra goodies to leave some hanging or share some with those at shelters. The general community norm is that we are all tackling a daunting task and everyone has a better chance of making it if we work together and pool our resources / help one another achieve the goal.

A second aspect of the society of hikers is that some thru-hikers seem to feel that they are somehow better than section hikers. While I can understand that thru-hiking involves the rigors of hiking for longer periods, section hikers must still hike every mile that you do and most with loads similar to those you carry. Not all of us have the option of just walking away from our regular lives for 4 to 6 months.

The female dino hikes with two off-set canes due to muscle injuries. Most people she meets on the trail are very supportive of her being out there. However, we have encountered several people who told her in no uncertain terms that she had no business being out there because she would likely have to be rescued - and that would put another at risk. Don't assume you know what another hikers abilities and weaknesses are based solely on how they look.

joel137
03-29-2006, 16:51
When section hiking or day hiking, we always try to take along enough extra goodies to leave some hanging or share some with those at shelters.



bringing goodies to share is nice,

but I wouldn't leave goodies hanging around, it attracts varmints. I've seen many a shelter that were made unnecessarily unattractive due to goodies being left hanging around.

bfitz
03-30-2006, 07:05
You can leave some goodies in a bear bag up on a pole at a shelter during thru hiking season...it wont be there long....

virgil
03-30-2006, 07:35
no radios, or shall we say, "an extremely high level of restraint about use of electronic devises that are audible to others", like walkie-talkies, cd players, etc.

virgil
03-30-2006, 08:01
---electronic devices as well as electronic devises ;-)

---don't correct peoples grammar and spelling.

Cookerhiker
03-30-2006, 11:16
....If you're a gearhead, don't bore others with talk about gear until you ascertain that they have an interest in the topic. Many don't.
.....

I like most of the suggestions thus far, especially this one. Resist the urge to start a bragging discussion about your cool equipment. If anyone wants to know, let them ask first.

Don't think I saw this one yet: Don't hog all the hooks, nails, etc in the shelter with your wet smelly socks, bandanas, shirt, whatever. If someone else strings up a clothes-drying line, don't just use it;ask if you can share space and don't hog it all. If you set up a line (I usually do), offer extra space to your fellow campers.

Lone Wolf
02-18-2008, 12:11
I am doing a research project for a grad class on the culture/community of the AT. I would love to know some of the folkways and Norms of the trail, if there are any? What are the cultural dos and donts of the AT?
Thanks,
Cafequaid1

if you're one of them go-lite hikers don't ask a real hiker to boil water for you

fiddlehead
02-18-2008, 13:05
simply build a fire and do it yourself.

Lone Wolf
02-18-2008, 13:06
that involves skills which most hikers don't possess

cannonball
02-18-2008, 14:01
When section hiking or day hiking, we always try to take along enough extra goodies to leave some hanging or share some with those at shelters. The general community norm is that we are all tackling a daunting task and everyone has a better chance of making it if we work together and pool our resources / help one another achieve the goal.

A second aspect of the society of hikers is that some thru-hikers seem to feel that they are somehow better than section hikers. While I can understand that thru-hiking involves the rigors of hiking for longer periods, section hikers must still hike every mile that you do and most with loads similar to those you carry. Not all of us have the option of just walking away from our regular lives for 4 to 6 months.

The female dino hikes with two off-set canes due to muscle injuries. Most people she meets on the trail are very supportive of her being out there. However, we have encountered several people who told her in no uncertain terms that she had no business being out there because she would likely have to be rescued - and that would put another at risk. Don't assume you know what another hikers abilities and weaknesses are based solely on how they look.


You go girl. I had major back surgery last year that has severally dampened my hiking ability. That plus being a jolly fat man makes hiking a challenge. HOWEVER, one can get busy living or get busy dieing. I choose to hike even if I can only do 6-9 miles a day. Don't let your pace or ability keep you from enjoying what you love.

ki0eh
02-18-2008, 14:16
if your an eliteist please don't brag about bagging all of the 4000 footers in whatever state your in even us weekenders find that annoying as hell and your not going to impress anyone

Man, I've climbed every 4000 footer in PA, DE, and MD, and I can't share my sense of accomplishment with this wonderful community?? :D

peakbagger
02-18-2008, 14:24
I like the concept that the space occupied by my sleeping pad and the area up against the wall at the head (or tail) of the pad in a shelter is reserved for me, anything outside that area is common space that is used with the consent of the others in the shelter.

Hotrod
02-18-2008, 14:44
Hikers going uphill have the right-of-way. This is something thru-hikers do but most day hikers have no knowledge of.

Always look out for your fellow thru-hikers. For example, if someone drops a piece of gear you should pick it up and carry to them.

Jason of the Woods
02-18-2008, 14:58
I am disabled as well with a lower back issue. I feel the pain. Mine is just dealing with the pain and the low miles each day though. I say hike on as long as you are able.

I think there are some very valid points here. The sad thing is that we should even have to tell each other how to act in the first place!


When section hiking or day hiking, we always try to take along enough extra goodies to leave some hanging or share some with those at shelters. The general community norm is that we are all tackling a daunting task and everyone has a better chance of making it if we work together and pool our resources / help one another achieve the goal.

A second aspect of the society of hikers is that some thru-hikers seem to feel that they are somehow better than section hikers. While I can understand that thru-hiking involves the rigors of hiking for longer periods, section hikers must still hike every mile that you do and most with loads similar to those you carry. Not all of us have the option of just walking away from our regular lives for 4 to 6 months.

The female dino hikes with two off-set canes due to muscle injuries. Most people she meets on the trail are very supportive of her being out there. However, we have encountered several people who told her in no uncertain terms that she had no business being out there because she would likely have to be rescued - and that would put another at risk. Don't assume you know what another hikers abilities and weaknesses are based solely on how they look.

Tinker
02-18-2008, 15:14
Respect the land owners who own property abutting the AT corridor. Don't ask to use their phone unless it's an absolute emergency. Don't ask to camp in their yard (unless you offer to pay them).
Don't shout to other hikers down the road when you're in town (I did this recently, and later realized I shouldn't have).
Nod or say "Hi" or something when you see a "local". Be nice. The rules are different in town.
OH! Almost forgot.
Don't decimate the salad bar at a small restaurant. Townsfolk who go there on a regular basis deserve to eat, too. The big chain restaurants, I don't have so much compassion for. They probably have plenty of food in the walk in freezer.

Lyle
02-18-2008, 15:22
And for gosh sakes please don't stand on a corner with a sign saying "AT Hiker, need money/food".

Be prepared.


Is this just a hypothetical, or has someone actually done this?

I would buy this person one meal, and a non-refundable bus ticket home.

Terry7
02-18-2008, 15:24
Do not talk religion unles both partys want to. I see how hot it gets here on the web site. I let people know my faith if it comes up but I never bring it up. O ya the same goes for politics. "Cant we all just get along" on the trail.

Tinker
02-18-2008, 15:39
Right, Terry. Usually when people disagree, they start to "lose it". Especially on the topic of religion.
Make sure the interest is mutual.

Same goes for gear. I've met people who tell me to shut up, and others who I wish would stop asking questions.

It's a case-by-case thing. Just be kind and thoughtful.

tazie
02-18-2008, 15:51
Man, I've climbed every 4000 footer in PA, DE, and MD, and I can't share my sense of accomplishment with this wonderful community?? :D


Where is the 4000ft in MD?

Terry7
02-18-2008, 15:59
Right, Terry. Usually when people disagree, they start to "lose it". Especially on the topic of religion.
Make sure the interest is mutual.

Same goes for gear. I've met people who tell me to shut up, and others who I wish would stop asking questions.

It's a case-by-case thing. Just be kind and thoughtful.

O ya do not ever put down some ones gear!

ki0eh
02-18-2008, 16:08
Where is the 4000ft in MD?

It's right at the point where the 3 states meet. :D

(Although to veer back to truth, it does seem a bit unfair that the highest point in MD, at 3360' is higher than PA's highest at 3213'...)

warren doyle
02-18-2008, 20:48
Would be interested in discussing your study.
I'm just up the mountain in Banner Elk.

Roland
02-18-2008, 21:05
Would be interested in discussing your study.
I'm just up the mountain in Banner Elk.

This thread is nearly 2 years old, Warren. Maybe you knew that.

warren doyle
02-18-2008, 21:22
Thanks Roland. I didn't know that.
I appreciate the 'heads-up'.

Happy trails!

shelterbuilder
02-18-2008, 21:26
LW had nothing better to do today than to bring old threads back from the dead!:D

Jason of the Woods
02-18-2008, 22:09
I feel silly too.;()

Tin Man
02-18-2008, 22:54
LW had nothing better to do today than to bring old threads back from the dead!:D

He's been doing it for a few days now. Beware...or enjoy for what it is.

Dogwood
02-19-2008, 23:29
I am doing a research project for a grad class on the culture/community of the AT. I would love to know some of the folkways and Norms of the trail, if there are any? What are the cultural dos and donts of the AT?
Thanks,
Cafequaid1

1) Don't talk about Hike Club

2) Dooon't talk about Hike Club

3) Shut that mother #$@% cell phone OFF!

Monkeyboy
02-19-2008, 23:42
Don't pick your nose when hiking downhill......

Monkeyboy
02-19-2008, 23:45
Do smear your hiking partner with bacon grease.......it's a bear repellant for you.

Monkeyboy
02-19-2008, 23:46
Don't play with striped black cats.

Monkeyboy
02-19-2008, 23:47
Don't eat candy corn......it's neither candy nor corn

Monkeyboy
02-19-2008, 23:50
Don't drink all of your water.......drink your partners.

Monkeyboy
02-19-2008, 23:54
Don't eat the yellow snow.

Monkeyboy
02-19-2008, 23:57
Don't try to outrun a bear......try to outrun your hiking partner.

Monkeyboy
02-19-2008, 23:59
Do learn to recognize bear scat........

It's the ones with bells in it that smell like peppers.

Monkeyboy
02-20-2008, 00:01
When lost, do give three short bursts on your whistle periodically......

It helps the vultures to key in on your location.

Monkeyboy
02-20-2008, 00:04
Do not leave the trail........it gets lonely.

Monkeyboy
02-20-2008, 00:05
Do not clear your own site..........have someone else do it for you.

Monkeyboy
02-20-2008, 00:13
Minimize your impact...........eat less cheese.

ki0eh
02-20-2008, 08:23
Don't eat candy corn......it's neither candy nor corn * * * Don't eat the yellow snow.

Last month on a short outing south of Duncannon I saw a pile of candy corn below a sitting-log, melting into the snow turning it slightly yellow and orange.

So now you tell me I shouldn't have eaten it?? :D

Blue Jay
02-20-2008, 09:00
Last month on a short outing south of Duncannon I saw a pile of candy corn below a sitting-log, melting into the snow turning it slightly yellow and orange.

So now you tell me I shouldn't have eaten it?? :D

Of course you should have eaten it. Don't listen to Monkey Boy, hikers eat everything, especially candy corn yellow snow. M&M snow is also good.

Nearly Normal
02-20-2008, 09:40
Keep your eyes and ears open and your mouth shut.
You'll learn more.

TinAbbey
02-20-2008, 11:42
[quote=the goat;185771]do not sleep in a shelter if you arrive later than 10pm.
quote]

i disagree here.

jersey joe
02-20-2008, 12:16
I disagree too. I'm more than ok with a late arriving hiker finding a spot in a shelter as long as they are reasonably courteous and quiet. In fact, I'd say if you aren't ok with this then you should re-think staying in the shelter.

vonfrick
02-20-2008, 12:37
I disagree too. I'm more than ok with a late arriving hiker finding a spot in a shelter as long as they are reasonably courteous and quiet. In fact, I'd say if you aren't ok with this then you should re-think staying in the shelter.

agreed. i'm a sucker for sunsets and on more than one occassion have slithered into a shelter well past nightfall and completely unnoticed. just gotta be sneaky.

Deadeye
02-20-2008, 16:11
agreed. i'm a sucker for sunsets and on more than one occassion have slithered into a shelter well past nightfall and completely unnoticed. just gotta be sneaky.

Trust me, we all noticed.

Bare Bear
02-20-2008, 16:24
HYOH is SO basic need we say it?

About motivating others to your way of thinking. I have found that tying them (or yet another use for duct tape) to a large rock and throwing them into deep water is effective. LNT is a good idea but lets be sensible about it.

ScottP
02-20-2008, 16:28
Talking about mileage and pack weight on trail is the social equivalent of talking about politics and religion.

Appalachian Tater
02-20-2008, 16:40
i disagree here.
I was tenting near a shelter once when a group of hikers came in after midnight, almost one a.m., walked all over the entire area shining multiple flashlights on peoples' tents, talking loud, set up their tents, loud, cooked dinner, loud, talked, loud. What a bunch of rude a**holes.

bfitz
02-20-2008, 17:36
I disagree too. I'm more than ok with a late arriving hiker finding a spot in a shelter as long as they are reasonably courteous and quiet. In fact, I'd say if you aren't ok with this then you should re-think staying in the shelter.Agreed, and furthermore....


I was tenting near a shelter once when a group of hikers came in after midnight, almost one a.m., walked all over the entire area shining multiple flashlights on peoples' tents, talking loud, set up their tents, loud, cooked dinner, loud, talked, loud. What a bunch of rude a**holes.
I never mind that stuff. Anyone seeking real quiet knows to sleep away from others. Near the shelter is the same as in. The folks who are always complaining when they get kept up by hikers making noise at night usually think nothing of making the same noises at dawn or earlier when they pack up and cook breakfast in front of the shelter etc. If you want people and conversation and social interaction, nightime campfire etc. the shelter is for you. If you want peace and quiet and early to bed early to rise you should camp somewhere alone. I hate when one person ruins everyone else's good time whining about hikers staying up talking keeping them awake. The woods are big enough for you to find a quiet place away from the shelter to camp. If folks want to saty up late and look at the stars and shoot the breeze around the fire or whatever it ain't your right to interfere with their good time.

bfitz
02-20-2008, 17:40
The worst is when one wet blanket thinks he has the right to scold a majority of folks at a shelter having a good time. Especially when you tell them to go tent somewhere if they're bothered and that person says something like "I have to sleep here, I don't have a tent."

Tin Man
02-20-2008, 19:02
I was tenting near a shelter once when a group of hikers came in after midnight, almost one a.m., walked all over the entire area shining multiple flashlights on peoples' tents, talking loud, set up their tents, loud, cooked dinner, loud, talked, loud. What a bunch of rude a**holes.

Got that beat, unfortunately. Had a group in MA came in did those things, drank heavily and then started firing a rifle! In the morning their empty beer ball, garbage, bottles, puke, were all over the place, and they were long gone.

Tin Man
02-20-2008, 19:05
Agreed, and furthermore....


I never mind that stuff. Anyone seeking real quiet knows to sleep away from others. Near the shelter is the same as in. The folks who are always complaining when they get kept up by hikers making noise at night usually think nothing of making the same noises at dawn or earlier when they pack up and cook breakfast in front of the shelter etc. If you want people and conversation and social interaction, nightime campfire etc. the shelter is for you. If you want peace and quiet and early to bed early to rise you should camp somewhere alone. I hate when one person ruins everyone else's good time whining about hikers staying up talking keeping them awake. The woods are big enough for you to find a quiet place away from the shelter to camp. If folks want to saty up late and look at the stars and shoot the breeze around the fire or whatever it ain't your right to interfere with their good time.

Agreed...until it turns really ugly as my experience above describes. That is a moment you feel like burning the shelters is the only solution.

Appalachian Tater
02-20-2008, 19:24
Got that beat, unfortunately. Had a group in MA came in did those things, drank heavily and then started firing a rifle! In the morning their empty beer ball, garbage, bottles, puke, were all over the place, and they were long gone. Yup, sounds pretty bad. Was it near a road?

Tin Man
02-20-2008, 19:54
Yup, sounds pretty bad. Was it near a road?

Of course. Stupid shelters near roads should all be burned. It was the Kay Wood lean-to just south of Dalton.

bfitz
02-20-2008, 19:58
Of course. Stupid shelters near roads should all be burned.
Well, yeah, but at least it keeps the mess concentrated around the shelter and the kids from going deeper into the woods. Let's face it, we were all kids once and you know they will always do stuff like that in the woods. Hell, we used to blow up pipe bombs in the woods.

Tin Man
02-20-2008, 20:01
Well, yeah, but at least it keeps the mess concentrated around the shelter and the kids from going deeper into the woods. Let's face it, we were all kids once and you know they will always do stuff like that in the woods. Hell, we used to blow up pipe bombs in the woods.

Amazing to have survived those years. Sadly, some don't.

bfitz
02-20-2008, 20:05
Amazing to have survived those years. Sadly, some don't.
Evolution in action...

ki0eh
02-20-2008, 20:51
I was tenting near a shelter once when a group of hikers came in after midnight, almost one a.m., walked all over the entire area shining multiple flashlights on peoples' tents, talking loud, set up their tents, loud, cooked dinner, loud, talked, loud. What a bunch of rude a**holes.

A KTA work crew had a similar experience - they were camped at Masten and a bunch of drunkards rolled in and proceeded to get drunker as the night wore on. Finally after about 3:00 a.m. all was quiet. Then - the trail clearing crew woke up at 6:00 a.m. Of course, each chain saw and brush cutter had to be extensively tested to ensure proper operation. The drunkards woke up mid-morning to find a forest ranger in their midst. According to him, they complained about the early morning ruckus. His reply: "well, they have a permit, you folks don't" and he sent each one of them away with a citation.

MOWGLI
02-20-2008, 20:55
A KTA work crew had a similar experience - they were camped at Masten and a bunch of drunkards rolled in and proceeded to get drunker as the night wore on. Finally after about 3:00 a.m. all was quiet. Then - the trail clearing crew woke up at 6:00 a.m. Of course, each chain saw and brush cutter had to be extensively tested to ensure proper operation. The drunkards woke up mid-morning to find a forest ranger in their midst. According to him, they complained about the early morning ruckus. His reply: "well, they have a permit, you folks don't" and he sent each one of them away with a citation.

Poetic Justice. :sun

Foyt20
02-21-2008, 00:19
^^^ Nice

dessertrat
02-21-2008, 00:49
I was tenting near a shelter once when a group of hikers came in after midnight, almost one a.m., walked all over the entire area shining multiple flashlights on peoples' tents, talking loud, set up their tents, loud, cooked dinner, loud, talked, loud. What a bunch of rude a**holes.

It is almost impossible to "be quiet" at night in the woods. People are too in tune to sounds, which sounds carry too far. You will not go unnoticed, even if you are quiet.

Appalachian Tater
02-21-2008, 02:07
It is almost impossible to "be quiet" at night in the woods. People are too in tune to sounds, which sounds carry too far. You will not go unnoticed, even if you are quiet.True, but there is a difference between not going unnoticed and being totally unconcerned about others.

jersey joe
02-21-2008, 09:53
It is also helpful to keep your gear concentrated in the shelter and leave space for someone that may arrive late.

Purple
02-21-2008, 20:46
My home is at the end of a 300' private driveway. A new family recently moved in a block past me and a half block behind my home. A family with many visitors, on foot. I have 'private property' and 'no trespassing' signs every 20' around my property. But that has not stopped the visitors from using my driveway and property (4.5 acres) as a cut through to their friends house. I would bet there is not a single person on the WB that would not be irrate if this same situation happened on their property ....

YET! some of you act as if the trails, land and shelters near these towns, communities and private properties is for Thru-hiker use only. You are the invader of their territory, that they live around every day of their lives. They grew up in those woods and it is HOME to them. You are the trespasser, you are only passing through. You should respect their "back yard" and stop complaining about THEIR behavior. After all it IS THEIR HOME! If Thru-Hikers continue to moan and groan about the behavior of the town people, then don't fool yourself, they do have the power to make it difficult for hikers to resupply, do laundry, eat and sleep in their communities. Without their permission to do these things there will be no THRU hiking.

Purple is folding her arms over her head and "DUCKING", big time on this one ... and hiding from the Impaler :o

bfitz
02-21-2008, 20:52
My home is at the end of a 300' private driveway. A new family recently moved in a block past me and a half block behind my home. A family with many visitors, on foot. I have 'private property' and 'no trespassing' signs every 20' around my property. But that has not stopped the visitors from using my driveway and property (4.5 acres) as a cut through to their friends house. I would bet there is not a single person on the WB that would not be irrate if this same situation happened on their property ....

YET! some of you act as if the trails, land and shelters near these towns, communities and private properties is for Thru-hiker use only. You are the invader of their territory, that they live around every day of their lives. They grew up in those woods and it is HOME to them. You are the trespasser, you are only passing through. You should respect their "back yard" and stop complaining about THEIR behavior. After all it IS THEIR HOME! If Thru-Hikers continue to moan and groan about the behavior of the town people, then don't fool yourself, they do have the power to make it difficult for hikers to resupply, do laundry, eat and sleep in their communities. Without their permission to do these things there will be no THRU hiking.

Purple is folding her arms over her head and "DUCKING", big time on this one ... and hiding from the Impaler :o.......Amen.

Wolf - 23000
02-22-2008, 15:46
Don't go around asking people what they carry. Think about it, most hikers spend several hundred of dollars or more on their gear. Do you really want to be advertising it to the world? Most hikers are good people but some are not. With more and more thief on the trail, it doesn’t take much to figure out if someone is telling the world they are using a XYZ sleeping bag or an YZX stove they had spent some good money for their gear.

If someone does do it, remind them it is extremely rude and more on.

Wolf

Wolf - 23000
02-22-2008, 16:00
My home is at the end of a 300' private driveway. A new family recently moved in a block past me and a half block behind my home. A family with many visitors, on foot. I have 'private property' and 'no trespassing' signs every 20' around my property. But that has not stopped the visitors from using my driveway and property (4.5 acres) as a cut through to their friends house. I would bet there is not a single person on the WB that would not be irrate if this same situation happened on their property ....

YET! some of you act as if the trails, land and shelters near these towns, communities and private properties is for Thru-hiker use only. You are the invader of their territory, that they live around every day of their lives. They grew up in those woods and it is HOME to them. You are the trespasser, you are only passing through. You should respect their "back yard" and stop complaining about THEIR behavior. After all it IS THEIR HOME! If Thru-Hikers continue to moan and groan about the behavior of the town people, then don't fool yourself, they do have the power to make it difficult for hikers to resupply, do laundry, eat and sleep in their communities. Without their permission to do these things there will be no THRU hiking.

Purple is folding her arms over her head and "DUCKING", big time on this one ... and hiding from the Impaler :o

Purple,

Well put. I use to live about 5 miles off of the AT in Waynesboro, PA. The people that I worked with were mostly non-hikers who spent little time on the trail but lived close or on the trail Several of them would tell me they thought most AT hikers were just a bunch of bums or criminals. I heard several stories were hikers would camp out in a shed or in someone yard without permission or make a mess at the local Post Office. To the hiker they may not think anything about it, if no one sees them. Well here a news flash for those hikers, people still know even if they donít see you than. And as Purple said, not one of us here would not be irrate if this same situation happened on their property and some of us might be a little bit scared finding out someone the person did not know sleep in their sled or backyard.

Wolf

wrongway_08
02-22-2008, 16:05
And for gosh sakes please don't stand on a corner with a sign saying "AT Hiker, need money/food".

Damn, there goes my funding...........................:mad:

ki0eh
02-22-2008, 16:57
To the hiker they may not think anything about it, if no one sees them. Well here a news flash for those hikers, people still know even if they donít see you than. And as Purple said, not one of us here would not be irrate if this same situation happened on their property and some of us might be a little bit scared finding out someone the person did not know sleep in their sled or backyard.


Amen to these two - always behave as if you ARE noticed - because, more than likely, you are. I grew up in a small town - believe me, small towns and rural areas have more "eyes" and "ears" than suburbs and cities.

There are always Trail maintainers, hunters, birdwatchers, and other people for whom the seemingly undistinguishable or hidden "green tunnel" is someone's pet area, where even a few stones gathered into an impromptu fire ring off-Trail will be noticed, all up and down the A.T.

Consider the Trail and its corridor the home of someone (certainly it is for the wildlife), where you, the hiker passing through, are the uninvited guest. Do not behave in a way that if it were yours (and certainly, the A.T. as a public trust IS yours and mine), you would be seen not only as uninvited, but as unwelcome.

As this is true for the A.T., it is doubly and triply so for other paths, where your indiscretion might cause the trail to be closed forever - ruining the work of the volunteers who created the trail and the future hikers who wanted to enjoy it too.

WILLIAM HAYES
02-22-2008, 17:54
don't assume that everyone wants to listen to you sit around the fire and play your guitar and sing= This is not a church campout most hikers want to go to bed by 9PM and not listen to some jerk off try to be the life of the party

mudhead
02-22-2008, 18:12
I would rather listen to insects.

bfitz
02-22-2008, 20:59
I would rather listen to insects.

Plenty of that.

buff_jeff
02-22-2008, 21:58
Don't **** in the fire ring.

Erin
02-22-2008, 23:00
Those of you with dogs? And I am a dog person. Please don't let your dogs go even remotely near the shelter/campsite. At Jerry's Cabin last sping we set up our tents and started cooking dinner and realized we were cooking dinner and sitting in a huge nest of doggie do. Yuck. Take 'em down behind the privy or up in the woods.

shelterbuilder
02-23-2008, 00:13
Those of you with dogs? And I am a dog person. Please don't let your dogs go even remotely near the shelter/campsite. At Jerry's Cabin last sping we set up our tents and started cooking dinner and realized we were cooking dinner and sitting in a huge nest of doggie do. Yuck. Take 'em down behind the privy or up in the woods.

...and if they do have "an accident" where people can tromp through it, have the common decency to scoop it up and toss it into the bush! (Yes, I'm a dog person, too.)

CaseyB
02-23-2008, 02:43
[quote=Purple;545392 But that has not stopped the visitors from using my driveway and property (4.5 acres) as a cut through to their friends house. I would bet there is not a single person on the WB that would not be irrate if this same situation happened on their property ....

[/quote]
Purple- Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but you are going to have to get straight-up redneck on these people. Take it from a redneck (I prefer hillbillly, thanks), one episode of irate gun-waving will permanently solve this problem.:cool: just act like you mean biznazz.

arasjane
02-25-2008, 11:25
Don't brag about how many miles you've done, or how far you've come, or how far you're going or how fast you're hiking. Realize that bragging inevitably has an opposite effect to the one intended. People will be less impressed with you. I have had this happen to me cause I intend on doing the AT in sections. Having limited time the first I went out & now I have a daughter, This is what will work for me.

Appalachian Tater
02-25-2008, 11:34
Purple- Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but you are going to have to get straight-up redneck on these people. Take it from a redneck (I prefer hillbillly, thanks), one episode of irate gun-waving will permanently solve this problem.:cool: just act like you mean biznazz.

It's a bad idea to wave guns around unless you're getting ready to shoot someone. They may see you as a crazy person getting ready to attack them and get proactive.

SunnyWalker
04-03-2008, 20:10
Purple, youre off here. The AT is a Nat'l/State park. I don't need locals permission. It is my park as much as any taxpayer.

KirkMcquest
04-03-2008, 21:27
I would say minding your own business is a huge DO.

Lone Wolf
04-03-2008, 21:31
I would say minding your own business is a huge DO.

dick :rolleyes::D

KirkMcquest
04-03-2008, 21:35
dick :rolleyes::D

Homo says what....?

Wilson
04-03-2008, 22:09
Kirk Mcqueer, You posted this at Trailforums...KirkMcQuest

http://www.trailforums.com/images/emailx.gif (javascript:newWindow1('96425');)


Classless
The only reliable information at that site is where the AYCE (all you can eat) places are at. Take a look at the WB members photos....Weight Watchers would have to start holding meetings on the Utah Salt Flats if that crowd joined. What GUTS.

Then you slither back to WB to post...Two faced.
Creeps like you always get found out.

buff_jeff
04-03-2008, 22:53
Kirk Mcqueer, You posted this at Trailforums...KirkMcQuest

http://www.trailforums.com/images/emailx.gif (http://javascript%3Cb%3E%3C/b%3E:newWindow1%28%2796425%27%29;)


Classless
The only reliable information at that site is where the AYCE (all you can eat) places are at. Take a look at the WB members photos....Weight Watchers would have to start holding meetings on the Utah Salt Flats if that crowd joined. What GUTS.

Then you slither back to WB to post...Two faced.
Creeps like you always get found out.

Boom!

Ouch...:D