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Former Admin
09-10-2002, 05:27
Info, questions, comments, experiences (good or bad) regarding - Blood Mountain Shelter

Past/Present hikers - what can future hikers expect here? Have any good stories or memories from here?

Future hikers - any questions?

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Hammock Hanger
09-10-2002, 06:02
I remember this shelter back in it's better days. I spent a night in April that plummented down into the teens. Burr!! There were 21 hikers that night, mostly begining thrus. There were shutters on the windows, doors and we had a roaring fire in the fireplace. I was sectioning at the time and it was great fun trying to pick out the thurs we thought had a chance. Today it is a relic of that shelter, but I still enjoyed my night as a potential thur-hiker in 2001. HH

chris
09-11-2002, 09:47
I liked this place when I first saw it, but at night a feroious storm blew in through the open windows, making things a bit damp. There was only one other person on Blood and this was in May.

Peaks
09-11-2002, 17:09
I'd like to see some work done on that shelter. Otherwise, keep going down to Neels Gap. That's what I did.

Hammock Hanger
09-11-2002, 18:31
In 01 when I last went through the change over hadn't taken place and the hostel still wasn't opened. Stayed at Blood to get a early morning in at the store and move on. HH

hacksaw
09-13-2002, 00:19
I don't think it has become official as yet, but this shelter will soon be closed completely as it is within the Blood Mountain Wilderness area and therefor subject to the most stringent rules the USFS and GADNR can come up with regarding maintenance and improvements to the shelter. Except for its historic value (originally built by the CCC during the great depression) I think it would have been removed long ago. Essentially there can be nothing done to the shelter without the Feds and State of Georgia being dead in the middle of it, and it is a difficult site to reach for maintenance crews.

It is a very difficult area to provide space for tents (on the summit that is) and there is a total open fire ban (even when there isn't a drought) from Slaughter Gap to Neel's Gap (possibly even further south than Slaughter now) there is a serious problem with human waste already since this is one of the most popular day hiking destinations in the state and it is not possible to get water from Neel's Gap to Slaughter Gap- ever, drought or not.

Although this is one of the coolest spots on the entire AT in Georgia, it is not, in light of todays park rules, a suitable location for a shelter. This has been the general consensus for many years and it doesn't look too promising for this shelter's active future.

All that said, I still love the place and try and overnight in the vicinity of the summit whenever I'm in that area. I've had some of my more memorable hiking moments on Blood Mountain over the years including sunrises and sunsets, down right scary thunderstorms and winds and the coldest I've ever been in the woods during a raging blizzard about 20 years ago. Not to mention that Blood Mountain was the first place I ever spent the night on the AT (1962, BSA Troop 39).

This area is as fragile as the Maine tundra above tree line and in a state of tremendous over use, so if you do choose to stay here, please respect it for what it is and treat it gently.

One last comment. Unfortunately, or maybe not, there has been a recent relocation on the north slope of Blood Mountain between the Freeman Trail junction and the summit (on the Neel's Gap side of the mountain). They put in a series of switchbacks and steps to get traffic off some of the worst abused areas. While it has helped with the destruction somewhat, it has taken one of the more difficult sections out of service thereby making the overall ascent from the north a lot easier, which in turn allows a lot more people easy access to the summit and on and on ad infinitum.........

Hacksaw

Whittler
02-27-2003, 11:56
Just got a Report from Walk about Charlie who is on the trail now .Blood Mtn Shelter is in Bad shape. All the window have been broke out, and the place is trash.
Whittler:(

max patch
02-27-2003, 12:40
One of the best, if not THE best, place to see a sunrise/sunset in Georgia. You'll stay in plenty worse places if you thru-hike.

smokymtnsteve
02-27-2003, 13:47
was up on blood mtna couple of weeks ago in the snow ,,,the ole rock house has seen it's better day..the shutters are all off of the windows and snow had blown onto the sleeping areas ..but it seems that the roof is sound...the place was clean ..meaning there was no trash around..summit of blood is beautiful ...lot of rock...weather permitting a great place just to sleep under the stars....Rock is a durable surface and one of the LNT 'rules" is Camp and travel on Durable surfaces.

Waterbuffalo
02-28-2003, 13:58
I'm headed up blood tomorrow hopefully the clouds will be gone
WB

Bandana Man
02-28-2003, 20:19
Hacksaw, thanks for the info but it sure is sad to to hear the shelter may be closed. Does that mean it will be removed (in other words, "destroyed") or does it mean that the doors and windows will be shut up so that hikers can't get in? If it must be closed, it would be nice if they could somehow preserve it. This is probably completely unrealistic, but they could put wrought-iron bars across the doors and windows so you can see in without actually getting inside. Shame to destroy it. I'm sure relocation is out of the question. This was the first AT shelter I ever stayed in. Enjoyed it for the "history" but otherwise it convinced me to avoid shelters in the future!

Virginian
02-28-2003, 20:30
Cold ,Windy and full of mice

smokymtnsteve
02-28-2003, 20:39
....

Ramble~On
04-14-2004, 01:09
I hiked in 1996. The shelter was full and some of us tented not far from the shelter...I remember being visited by two skunks...I forget their names but they did introduce themselves......fortunately, not in the smelly way

Jaybird
04-14-2004, 06:40
Info, questions, comments, experiences (good or bad) regarding - Blood Mountain Shelter...................................





Sad to hear of possible closing of Blood Mtn Shelter soon too!


when i hiked there in April 2002...i summitted in late afternoon toward sunset...took many photos...signed the shelter register...(noted the many comments about mouse "infestation")...enjoyed seeing this Civilian Conservation Corps 1930s-built shelter. enjoyed the sunshine from this peak (the highest peak on the A.T. in Georgia @ 4,461ft elevation) & views from all sides... :D

steep, painful descend down Blood Mtn (my knees were killin' me!) but, Ben & Jerry & "TeePee" was waiting on me @ Walasi-Yi Center!
woooooo-hoooo!

Baldy
07-21-2004, 12:41
When I was there in Summer '03 it was in an okay shape. It hadn't been trashed, but the sleeping platform seemed to be soaked with water. It was so damp we had to put down a tarp in order to keep our sleeping bags dry.

The mouse "infestation" is quite true. I was sitting outside alone, the rest of my group having gone to scout out sunrise photo locations. I was about to get up and climp to the top of the rock when I heard what sounded like 100 mice scrambling through our packs. (I'm not kidding, it was that loud.) I ran inside and started hanging the packs. (They were still in the front room where we had dropped them.) The next morning, I found tan "fluff" on my green shirt where a mouse had crawled into my bag (while I was in it) and chewed a bit off of the inside of my fleece sleeping bag.

Needles
07-21-2004, 14:51
I stayed at Blood Mt. Shelter in April of 97 and it was, by far, one of my most memorable nights on the AT. The hike from Woody Gap was cold and rainy and I wasn't feeling any where near 100% when I got to the shelter, I had brought just enough water up with me to make it through the night and planned on a evening meal of bagels and peanut butter.
I was surprised to find a group of day hikers sitting in the shelter when I got there with a camp stove roaring full blast and a pot of home made soup bubbling away on it. They said they were just leaving and asked if I would like any of the soup, plus some cheese, and a couple of oranges. You won't be surprised to find out that I said yes :-) I ate the soup and cheese, picked the shutters up off the floor and placed them into the windows to keep the wind down, and got ready to go to sleep, the ony person in the shelter.
A few hours later I woke up needing to relieve myself and hearing loud blasts of tunder. I peered out through the cracks in one of the shutters and saw that it wasn't raining and decided to step outside quickly before the storm got to me. When I got outside I noticed several flashes of lightening but it seemed like the strangest lightening I had ever seen, carefully I made my way over to the edge of the summit and saw why it seemed so odd, the storm had already made it to Blood Mountain, but I wasn't getting rained on because it was all below me and I was able to watch the lightening from above! I watched this amazing light show for several minutes before getting chilled and heading back to my sleeping bag.
The next morning I awoke to find the sun shining brilliantly outside of the shelter and when I walked outside and looked up I could see there wasn't a cloud in the sky, at least the sky above me. All around the summit clouds filled in every possible space with just a few "islands" poking above the surface of the clouds. It was nothing short of astounding.
I returned to the shelter and grabbed one of the oranges the day hikers had given me and climbed out onto the rocks directly in front of the shelter. The orange was ice cold and sweeter than anything I had put in my mouth before, or since. I sat perched high up on this rock, looking at the clouds below me (and wishing I had sunglasses, those cloude reflected a LOT of sunlight) when I spotted a hawk out of the corner of my eye, it slowly glided towards me, getting closer and closer, seemingly curious as to who or what I was. It got so close that I thought I might have to duck to prevent being hit by it, but just a few feet away from me it suddenly flapped its wings and headed off into space, it was so close when it flapped its wings that I felt the strong, cold, breeze hit my face it generated. If I had fallen from my perch at that point and not lived to tell about it I would have died a very happy hiker.

Kerosene
07-21-2004, 23:22
Cool. I had a similar morning experience of the sun reflecting off the clouds below me at Mt. Everett in March 1975. Please post any pictures if you took any.

Pencil Pusher
07-21-2004, 23:58
Nice writeup, Needles.

ffstenger
07-22-2004, 01:55
Stayed in the shelter on Blood late Sept '03. It is run down, but there were no mice, just a cat wondered through. I couldn't imagine not spending the night here ! There is a huge rock next to the shelter and the area around the top of
Blood has the most awsome viewing in north Georgia. From the top of the big rock on a good clear night (that I was lucky enough to have) you can see every star in the sky. I will never forget my night on Blood! BTW, no water there, you have to bring your own up from either way..... Showme

Needles
07-22-2004, 02:03
Cool. I had a similar morning experience of the sun reflecting off the clouds below me at Mt. Everett in March 1975. Please post any pictures if you took any.

I took several, not a one of them came close to showing what I saw, I don't know if any camera could have dealt with those lighting conditions without the use of a polarizing filter and a nuetral density filter, of which I had neither :(

Drala Hiker
09-13-2004, 21:30
I spotted a privy in a state of construction, about 50 yd N of the shelter, down in the woods in the E side of the trail. I'll see if it's finished next time I'm up there.

BlackCloud
10-19-2004, 14:48
I spotted a privy in a state of construction, about 50 yd N of the shelter, down in the woods in the E side of the trail. I'll see if it's finished next time I'm up there.As of mid October, '04, the new privy is complete, however I did not visit it intimately. Although all windows and shutters are gone, the state of the shelter is ok; no trash but quite damp, seeing that it had been raining on & off for several days. The fog that nite was so thick, one could never see the bottom of the stairs, & at one point I couldn't see my outstretched hand! As for the wind, a clown by the name of Mike (w/ his sidekick Carl - both old navy men who'd never served aboard a floating ship!) put up a plastic bag over the upwind window & that seemed to do the trick.

As for the mice, they were MIA, thank god. It may have been the temps (below 50), the sound of the flapping window-bag, and/or the fact that we kept two candle lanterns burning all nite in a deserate effort to ward them off. The place looks like mice city. The only visitor was a flying mammal or two. The resident bats seemed to create quite a stir.

As for the many claims here & elsewhere that Blood is the best view in GA, has anyone driven up to Brasstown Bald, GA's highpoint? I can't compare, b/c all I saw was white fog..............

Tractor
11-07-2004, 19:17
Well, early November and the first time we had a clear view from Blood Mountain! Shelter fairly clean but lots of day traffic yesterday (one asked where the water fountain was...one gentleman wore street clothes/shoes up & down...). I have to say, with this much day traffic, hardly a bit of trash on the trail or at the shelter. No mice/No bats this trip. Wasn't looking for it but had a clear view of Atlanta high rizes. Fire ban in force, "fire permitted at least 300 feet from the trail" all the way to Slaughter Gap I think.

Nearly Normal
06-01-2005, 03:09
Hopefully hikers in the future will be more respectful of this landmark.
I understand the value of this shelter. So many hikers have visited and enjoyed the site. It's an AT hiker's mile stone for sure.
In June 2004 I was happy to visit and get out of the weather to change and take a break. It was a cold, rainy and windy afternoon, but a short visit was all I could stand.
I would not enjoy an overnight there. The shutters were gone, the floor was filthy with about 1/2 inch of dirt, the walls were moldly and the shelter stank just like a side ally on Bourbon Street. I can't believe hikers would use the shelter for a urinal.:eek: Also there was no broom or register. Only in the worst of weather conditions would I consider staying there.

I always tell hikers going to this area to visit but either stay at Wood's Hole or push on to Neel's Gap.

HYOH doesn't mean anything goes.
pete

Lone Wolf
06-01-2005, 06:38
That rat trap needs to be torn down.

MOWGLI
06-01-2005, 07:48
As for the many claims here & elsewhere that Blood is the best view in GA, has anyone driven up to Brasstown Bald, GA's highpoint? I can't compare, b/c all I saw was white fog..............

For my money, Tray Mountain has the best view in GA. And regarding the Blood Mtn Shelter, I'd only stay there if I was in a really bad way - like caught in a blizzard. The shelter is just unappealing to me as a place to sleep.

Freighttrain
06-01-2005, 07:52
its haunted , if your lucky, youll hear doors closing, shudders banging, chains rattling, moans comming from underneath.. etc etc

The Solemates
06-01-2005, 09:37
there used to be a blair witch hanging from the rafters.

and i've witnessed a resident skunk more than one time...

Frosty
06-01-2005, 10:11
its haunted , if your lucky, youll hear doors closing, shudders banging, chains rattling, moans comming from underneath.. etc etcI heard plenty of snoring. DOes that count?

BlackCloud
06-03-2005, 18:08
That rat trap needs to be torn down.
While I understand LW's elegantly articulated position, i disagree. I would prefer that it be "remodeled". Chestnut Knob shelter is a former warden's cabin & is one of my favorites......:-?

mark10203
06-03-2005, 21:04
During a section hike last spring, we camped on the ledge on the west side of the mountain. Nice wind break and large rock for cooking. Shelter was pretty ratty but being used by four thruhikers.

Whistler
07-19-2005, 20:43
I was up there on 7-16/17. It still smelled faintly of urine, and the resident skunk made an appearance. It seems that the recent storms also split the large tree on the southside of the shelter, part of it resting on the roof. It looked like there had already been some trimming and damage control, though. And no journal around, either :[

On the upside, my friend and I spent about an hour sweeping out both rooms from floor to ceiling, and I built some window sculptures out of those tiles you see outside the shelter.

I also got a pleasant surprise from a group of 4 section hikers, one of whom had lugged a chocolate coca-cola cake up for an afternoon snack. Great guys.
-Mark

The Solemates
07-20-2005, 09:31
gonna make a side trip up there this weekend when we do the coosa backcountry trail. looking forward to it.

Belgarion
01-25-2006, 10:53
I attempted a thru-hike in 99. When I walked through Slaughter an overwhelming feeling came to me. That night at Blood Shelter I was alone til just before dark when two couples came in. It was a very cold and windy night, the windows were out and it was comming in like crazy so I put my tarp on the window and we all finally could get some sleep even though it was a little noisy. When I desended the next morning that feeling I had when I went through Slaughter came back with such a force that I sat down and broke into tears.
When I got home I talked to my mother about it. She told me that her relatives lived in the area that I walked through. I can't explain what it was that happened to me there. All I know is on this years thru-hike I will be staying the night in Slaughter Gap and the next night at Blood hoping that whatever happened to me in 99 will come back and show me what it was all about.

Almost There
01-25-2006, 13:18
Folks the authorities that be don't want people staying there anymore so they will do nothing to encourage y'all to stay there. This is the policy they have enacted, so either stay at Wood's Hole or go up and over, because there is no great place to stay and no water to be had anywhere near the top. To renovate the shelter would simply encourage more people to stay up there, something they do not want!

Almost There
01-25-2006, 13:18
Yes, that means I agree with LW, tear the old place down, it's purpose has been served!

general
01-25-2006, 14:19
I attempted a thru-hike in 99. When I walked through Slaughter an overwhelming feeling came to me. That night at Blood Shelter I was alone til just before dark when two couples came in. It was a very cold and windy night, the windows were out and it was comming in like crazy so I put my tarp on the window and we all finally could get some sleep even though it was a little noisy. When I desended the next morning that feeling I had when I went through Slaughter came back with such a force that I sat down and broke into tears.
When I got home I talked to my mother about it. She told me that her relatives lived in the area that I walked through. I can't explain what it was that happened to me there. All I know is on this years thru-hike I will be staying the night in Slaughter Gap and the next night at Blood hoping that whatever happened to me in 99 will come back and show me what it was all about.

that land is said to be inhabited by the Nunnehi, a mythical indian tribe that is the protector of the Cherokee. legend has it that they live under Blood Mountain and at nearby Nottley Falls. lots of folks have reported hearing "the drums" and when they try to find where they were coming from, they appear to have come from somewhere else. it is also Cherokee legend that it was the Nunnehi, that came from everywhere by the thousands, that allowed the Cherokee to defeat the Creek in the battle that gives Slaughter Gap and Blood Mountain their names.

that strange feeling is very real, and it doesn't happen to just you. that area is, and has been, a very spiritual place (before the battle) especially for folks who may be sensitive to that kind of stuff. the area around Balance Rock (about 1/2 mile south of Neel's Gap) is that way as well. there is a indian trail marker tree just to the right of the rocks that points to Neel's Gap.

if your interested in that kind of stuff, a good book to read:
Song of Sprit by Nagal Logute Iyapa

Almost There
01-25-2006, 14:30
Come to think of it, the area of Balance Rock has stuck in my head since I hiked the area for the first time. I can picture it as clear as day and an awe like feeling came over me much like when I stood at Gettysburg looking out towards the Confederate staging area where Pickett began his fateful charge.

general
01-25-2006, 18:44
Come to think of it, the area of Balance Rock has stuck in my head since I hiked the area for the first time. I can picture it as clear as day and an awe like feeling came over me much like when I stood at Gettysburg looking out towards the Confederate staging area where Pickett began his fateful charge.

when you go through there, it is always good to bury a little tobacco. if you take anything from there, you should verbally ask permission (rock, stick, anything). if you believe in that kind of s**t.

Belgarion
02-06-2006, 20:04
I remember being there in April of 99. I got there alone around 3 or 4 and around 7 a storm started to blow in. Two couples showed up right around sunset and just set up their sleeping bags and we all tried to go to sleep with the wind just howling through the window. I got up and tacked my tarp to it and then laid some rocks along the base of it. It helped some and we were able to get some sleep, but every once in a while old wind decided to show us who was boss and give us a big boom.
All in all, the biggest reason I am going back this year is Salughter Gap and Blood Mountain. The feelings i get there are almost Magickal.

Skidsteer
02-06-2006, 20:19
I remember being there in April of 99. I got there alone around 3 or 4 and around 7 a storm started to blow in. Two couples showed up right around sunset and just set up their sleeping bags and we all tried to go to sleep with the wind just howling through the window. I got up and tacked my tarp to it and then laid some rocks along the base of it. It helped some and we were able to get some sleep, but every once in a while old wind decided to show us who was boss and give us a big boom.
All in all, the biggest reason I am going back this year is Salughter Gap and Blood Mountain. The feelings i get there are almost Magickal.

Slaughter gap is closed to hikers for the time being.;)

Nagal Logute Iyapa
02-13-2006, 02:08
Your cat may well have been a certain female spotted skunk, the self-appointed hostess of the Blood Mountain Shelter. I've had the priviledge of her company on several occassions. She is fairly tolerant of humans as long as you don't try to extricate her from the shelter. A hiking companion of mine considered this by slapping his hand on the floor. She locked eyes and slapped back with a determined paw. He realized the error of his ways and turned over, allowing her free run of the shelter for the rest of the night.

RITBlake
02-13-2006, 03:04
as a nobo why would you stay there when you could be at neels gap in 30 minutes. The hostel there is great. Tons of bunks and a good movie supply. But I guess if you're a nobo you're probably itching to sleep outdoors. For us sobos neels gap was a great way to spend one of the last nights on the trail. Just mike and I relaxing with some movies, some bbq and some ben and jerrys

Nagal Logute Iyapa
02-13-2006, 03:06
Blood Mountain is a special place...sacred to indigenous people...particularily the Cherokee and the Creek Indians. On the Western slope is Slaughter Gap, the scene of a particularily deadly territorial battle between these two, once powerful peoples. On the Eastern Slope is "Council Rock" also known to many as "Balanced Rock". It is an ancient meeting place of the Cherokee, the Creek, and the Nunnehi. Many people hear drums on the mountain. To spend a night at "Council Rock" when the moon is full is a unique experience. I have known some hikers to come down from the summit of Blood Mountain in the dead of night because of the drums and voices they hear. There are certain special times when the clouds surround the mountain entirely and a lightning storm ensues...but there will be clear skies overhead. It is a strangely wonderful and magical place, if you are attuned to such mysteries. We do need to do some work on the shelter. And do watch out for "Missy" the female spotted skunk who is the self-appointed hostess of the Blood Mountain Shelter. If you happen to have a bit of tobacco with you...for ceremonial purposes...and you burn it on the mountain, you may well expect sudden wind changes, fog banks to appear unexpectedly...etc. I would recomment an ancient greeting in those moments..."Enowah Awaho" which translates as "All is one...come and go in peace." This sets your intention as a peaceful traveler through the area. Walk quietly and be careful to guard your thoughts and emotions if you are in the area between Neel's Gap and Woody Gap on the Appalachian Trail. This is the Blood Mountain Wilderness Area, home of many an ancient soul. Kind Regards,
Nagal

max patch
02-13-2006, 12:36
as a nobo why would you stay there when you could be at neels gap in 30 minutes. The hostel there is great. Tons of bunks and a good movie supply. But I guess if you're a nobo you're probably itching to sleep outdoors. For us sobos neels gap was a great way to spend one of the last nights on the trail. Just mike and I relaxing with some movies, some bbq and some ben and jerrys

Well, you can spend the nite on top of blood where you arguably have the best views in GA or you can spend the nite in a motel watching TV. Depends on your interests, I guess.

general
02-13-2006, 19:03
Blood Mountain is a special place...sacred to indigenous people...particularily the Cherokee and the Creek Indians. On the Western slope is Slaughter Gap, the scene of a particularily deadly territorial battle between these two, once powerful peoples. On the Eastern Slope is "Council Rock" also known to many as "Balanced Rock". It is an ancient meeting place of the Cherokee, the Creek, and the Nunnehi. Many people hear drums on the mountain. To spend a night at "Council Rock" when the moon is full is a unique experience. I have known some hikers to come down from the summit of Blood Mountain in the dead of night because of the drums and voices they hear. There are certain special times when the clouds surround the mountain entirely and a lightning storm ensues...but there will be clear skies overhead. It is a strangely wonderful and magical place, if you are attuned to such mysteries. We do need to do some work on the shelter. And do watch out for "Missy" the female spotted skunk who is the self-appointed hostess of the Blood Mountain Shelter. If you happen to have a bit of tobacco with you...for ceremonial purposes...and you burn it on the mountain, you may well expect sudden wind changes, fog banks to appear unexpectedly...etc. I would recomment an ancient greeting in those moments..."Enowah Awaho" which translates as "All is one...come and go in peace." This sets your intention as a peaceful traveler through the area. Walk quietly and be careful to guard your thoughts and emotions if you are in the area between Neel's Gap and Woody Gap on the Appalachian Trail. This is the Blood Mountain Wilderness Area, home of many an ancient soul. Kind Regards,
Nagal

Nagal,

can we get together to discuss some things? i'm interested.

general

Klezmorim
03-09-2006, 20:53
It was sad to see the Blood Mtn. Shelter yesterday (3/8/06). It looked rather derelict. No window panes, no door, fireplace blocked. Depressing, really. All thanks to easy accessibility to day-hikers and weekenders (the "Yee-haw Crowd") without respect for the value of this shelter.

I think it needs to be restored to as original condition as possible and then barred-off from use. Tear the nearby privy down and post a sign encouraging folks to 'just move on.' Set up a tent south of the summit or hike the 2.5 miles down to Neels. Gosh, who would want to sleep on that musty platform with the wind blowing from one open window to the other, anyway?

Again, very sad....

Lone Wolf
03-09-2006, 20:55
I first saw it 20 years ago. It totally sucked then. It needs to be torn down.

Klezmorim
03-09-2006, 21:28
I first saw it 20 years ago. It totally sucked then. It needs to be torn down.

"Torn down"? No, I think it has too much historic value, but I do think it needs to definitely be placed out of service (abuse). Turn it into a National Historic Landmark or a museum-piece. Put steel bars over the windows and door to protect it from "idjits." It'll make a great backdrop for photos.

Mountain Man
03-09-2006, 21:46
It's sad to see the shelter in such bad shape. The reason there are no shutters or doors,it seems some low life wanted some fire wood for the fireplace thus one of the reasons the fireplace is sealed off with rocks. A new moldering privy has been built near the shelter within the last year. We built some tent pads on the south side of the Mountain but they are also within the Blood Mt. Wilderness area thus no campfires.

Jack Tarlin
03-10-2006, 03:56
I haven't read this whole thread as it goes back to 2002, but a few quick thoughts:

*The summit of Blood Mtn. suffers horribly from overuse. Camping on the immediate summit is uncool, even if there are lots of spaces under the trees.

*The shelter has been kind of a dump for at least a decade and probably longer, mainly from overuse and slob guests. I wouldn't sleep in there unless I was getting paid to do so, and maybe not then.

*If you MUST overnight, then overshoot the shelter, and find yourself a Leave No Trace campsite north of the actual summit; there are many. I'd return to the actual summit by the shelter and catch sunset from the big rock there, which can be spectacular.

*Bring water.

*It's possible that camping has been banned totally on the summit; if so, dis-regard the above.

Klezmorim
03-10-2006, 10:21
I haven't read this whole thread as it goes back to 2002, but a few quick thoughts:

*The summit of Blood Mtn. suffers horribly from overuse. Camping on the immediate summit is uncool, even if there are lots of spaces under the trees.

*The shelter has been kind of a dump for at least a decade and probably longer, mainly from overuse and slob guests. I wouldn't sleep in there unless I was getting paid to do so, and maybe not then.

*If you MUST overnight, then overshoot the shelter, and find yourself a Leave No Trace campsite north of the actual summit; there are many. I'd return to the actual summit by the shelter and catch sunset from the big rock there, which can be spectacular.

*Bring water.

*It's possible that camping has been banned totally on the summit; if so, dis-regard the above.

There are a number of designated tent spots on a side trail a little bit south-east of the summit. The side trail and tent sites are clearly marked as you ascend from the south.

There was no indication of a camping ban on the summit - indeed, there's a new privy near the shelter. I agree, though, overnighting on the summit should be banned. We have a similarly popular hiking spot in upstate SC, Table Rock, that has banned camping for many years due to over-use. (BTW: It's a great practice-hike for Blood Mtn.) Come, hike up, see views, hike back down.

River Runner
04-27-2006, 02:20
Visited Blood Mountain and the shelter but didn't overnight there on Good Friday, April 14. The shelter was clean and neat but the sleeping platform shows signs of deterioration from weather/dampness. There were a lot of day-hikers out, but I can't really say the area was "suffering" because of their presence. I didn't notice any litter or signs of deliberate defacing of property, and the rock in the area doesn't seem to be suffering signs of excessive wear from hikers walking on it. I'm glad the privy was there - with the low scrubby growth not being fully leafed out, there sure isn't much privacy to do one's "business".

RITBlake must be a speedy hiker - it took us about 2 hours to navigate the 2 rocky, steep miles to Neel's Gap. We found it slow going over the rough terrain, and hot as blue blazes, exposed on the mostly shadeless rocky trail.

Farmer
04-30-2006, 18:31
Two hours from Blood Mountain to Neel's Gap? What were you carrying?

brancher
04-30-2006, 19:22
I was there three weeks ago, sectioning GA. It was a hot and sunny day, and I had left Woody without eatin a thing. By the time I got to Blood, I was exhausted, so I staggered inside to the 2nd room and just lay there til I got enough strength to fix some food. Only two things I noticed: 1: it was cold inside, and 2: It was a WELCOME break. Views were spectacular, rocks further on were spectacular, and the break allowed me to throw down some Grits and cocoa, and set me up for my hike the rest of the day.

Funny story: While fixing my feet, I was compelled to listen to a couple of guys (I call 'em Bryson and Katz) tell a dozen hikers how to fend off a charging bear - that is, one should aim one's trekking poles carefully and poke the bear's eyes as he charges in.

....boy, I hope those two are still alive.....

River Runner
05-02-2006, 02:11
Two hours from Blood Mountain to Neel's Gap? What were you carrying?

Food, water, first aid kit, jacket - slack packing.
I'm sure we are slower than most, but we found it slow going because of the steep rock, and rested a couple of times for about 10 minutes because of the heat.

BlackCloud
05-02-2006, 09:42
Food, water, first aid kit, jacket - slack packing.
I'm sure we are slower than most, but we found it slow going because of the steep rock, and rested a couple of times for about 10 minutes because of the heat.

2 hours from Blood Mtn to Neel's Gap!:eek:

Klezmorim
05-02-2006, 10:14
2 hours from Blood Mtn to Neel's Gap!:eek:

Yup, that's how long it took us in early March. The weather was cool, our packs were lighter than normal; but those da^% rocks were a booger to crawl over and around. Going UP was easier!

johnny quest
12-05-2007, 18:04
is this shelter still open?

max patch
12-05-2007, 18:08
is this shelter still open?
yes..............

pitdog
12-05-2007, 18:15
I hiked past blood mtn shelter to reach neels gag.It was raining all day and the thought of a shower and pizza seemed appealing.

johnny quest
12-05-2007, 18:18
i ask because the mileage spreadsheet here at whiteblaze had this note for blood mountain

Blood Mtn Shelter may be closed in future, check w/ USFS or ATC; No Water

max patch
12-05-2007, 18:32
Well, with no door, no shutters on the windows, a blocked up fireplace -- and now a resident skunk -- they certainly arn't encouraging anyone to stay there. Blood Mtn is a nice spot to camp. I wouldn't want to stay in the shelter again.

SGT Rock
12-05-2007, 18:36
I could imagine them "closing" it. But I imagine it would be a problem to actually keep people out.

briarpatch
12-05-2007, 20:00
Mr. Stripey (the resident skunk) has been there for years, or some of his relatives. I remember seeing some feeding Doritos to a skunk at that shelter in the eighties and tossing them further away each time in a futile attempt to get the skunk to go away. The skunk stayed till the bag was empty and then left.

I was there on Saturday. Someone had been building fires inside the shelter on the stone floor next to the sleeping platform. Not good!

I don't EVER recommend that anyone stay there. Woods Hole is just a little ways to the south, there are tent pads on the south side of the mountain, too, and Neels Gap is only an hour or so to the north.

Smile
12-05-2007, 20:01
When I was there in 2006 someone had spilled a huge pile of sunflower seeds still in their shell inside in a corner. Strange.

Definitely worth going on to Mtn Crossings :)

Survivor Dave
12-05-2007, 20:15
I hiked up there today. The view was beautiful. Then I walked in the shelter and there was scat. Not bear scat. It's ashame to whomever "gave a $hit".... (or not:confused: ), couldn't walk a few feet to do their business. Maybe the sunflower seeds will grow. :-?

SD

whitefoot_hp
12-05-2007, 20:50
i couldnt hold it.. you dont understand.

Lone Wolf
12-05-2007, 21:11
is this shelter still open?

yeah and it is a total s**tty dump. needs to be torn down

River Runner
12-06-2007, 01:24
yeah and it is a total s**tty dump. needs to be torn down

Just like you thing all the other shelters on the trail need to be torn down, LW?

;)

I thought it was a historically beautiful building when I hiked that section in 2006. Especially since I was visiting it during the day. It provided a nice place to rest in the shade a bit & ponder on all the people who had went before.

The sleeping platform was in bad shape though & I don't think I would want to spend the night there.

whitefoot_hp
12-06-2007, 12:53
they should leave the building but render it undesirable for sleeping in. i dont think removing the shelter would cut down on camping up there, but i could be wrong. actually i think i am. but tearing down the building would be a hell of a job and i dont think i would volunteer for it. it does have some historic value but it is a hell of a dump as wolf says. skunks mice, etc, the wind flows right through it like chinese food,

max patch
12-06-2007, 12:58
they should leave the building but render it undesirable for sleeping in. i dont think removing the shelter would cut down on camping up there, but i could be wrong. actually i think i am. but tearing down the building would be a hell of a job and i dont think i would volunteer for it. it does have some historic value but it is a hell of a dump as wolf says. skunks mice, etc, the wind flows right through it like chinese food,

I don't plan on ever sleeping there again, but many people prefer shelters AND SINCE THE SHELTER IS ALREADY THERE I think it would make a lot of sense to replace the door and the window shutters. I'd keep the fireplace blocked off for obvious reasons. Make it habitable.

whitefoot_hp
12-06-2007, 13:05
the local maintainers will never fix that shelter, as they already ask you not to camp on blood mountain to begin with, due to over impact.

there is no doubt that the shelter tempts people to stay up there, which is something they dont want.

if the doors and windows are replaced they will just get burned again in a fire on a cold night by people staying there.

Lone Wolf
12-06-2007, 13:07
board it up. lock it up. ban camping on the summit.

Smile
12-06-2007, 13:18
I figure if they can't mark the easy to miss left hand turn going down the mountain (that many hikers who haven't been there before miss) they won't take the time to do much to the shelter the way it is.

People using it as a toilet is just inconsiderate and disgusting! EEEWWWW, nasty.

max patch
12-06-2007, 13:21
the local maintainers will never fix that shelter, as they already ask you not to camp on blood mountain to begin with, due to over impact.



Is this written anywhere?

whitefoot_hp
12-06-2007, 13:30
i cant remember where i read/heard that. i believe it was a website or a sign in the area, maybe at the byron reece memorial trail head. it makes sense to me regardless if its written anywhere.

Footslogger
12-06-2007, 13:37
Well ...if they do end up tearing it down I am glad I got to see (and even stay inside) it in years gone by. During the 16 or so years I lived in the Atlanta area, the annual December Blood Mountain hike was one of our scout troops favorites. In the late 70's - early 80's the door was still attached and wooden shutters covered the windows. The fireplace was functional. I do painfully remember encountering the spotted skunk family that had taken up residence inside the building though. It was a shame to see the old place deteriorate and fall victim to damage by non-caring humans.

'Slogger

whitefoot_hp
12-06-2007, 13:50
thats humanity for ya.

max patch
12-06-2007, 14:05
During the 16 or so years I lived in the Atlanta area, the annual December Blood Mountain hike was one of our scout troops favorites.

I ran into another scout troop about 10 years ago in Jan/Feb. They went there every year the same weekend hoping for some cold weather hiking.

The last time I slept in the shelter was 1990ish. My wife and I had Thanksgiving Dinner up there. Had the place to ourselves. Still nice back then.

BlackCloud
12-06-2007, 18:51
If repaired it could be as glorious a spot as Chestnut Knob shelter.

Maintaining it, upkeep, and future acts of vandalism are other issues, but it could be ressurected from its currently sad state.......

Skidsteer
12-06-2007, 18:57
If repaired it could be as glorious a spot as Chestnut Knob shelter.

Maintaining it, upkeep, and future acts of vandalism are other issues, but it could be ressurected from its currently sad state.......

It's located on the most popular hike in GA and is close to a major highway.

Whatcha gonna do, post a security guard after it's fixed up?

whitefoot_hp
12-06-2007, 19:04
nah, no security needed. we'll just count on the good will of humanity. i mean, humans are inherently respectful people. :)

Skidsteer
12-06-2007, 19:35
nah, no security needed. we'll just count on the good will of humanity. i mean, humans are inherently respectful people. :)

Sure. Self-evident. :)

Dances with Mice
12-06-2007, 20:58
I have read (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_Mountain)in several (http://www.sherpaguides.com/georgia/mountains/blue_ridge/eastern/blood_mountain.html) places (http://www.n2backpacking.com/my_hikes/georgia/ATGA/blood%2011_02D.htm) that the Blood Mtn shelter is listed on the National Register of Historical Places. (http://www.nps.gov/nr/)If so this would protect the building and could influence the restorations and repairs that can be made.

I cannot confirm that it is listed, although the Blood Mtn Archeological Area (http://www.nationalregisterofhistoricplaces.com/GA/Union/state.html)is, as is the Walasi-Yi (Neels Gap) building.

Dakota Dan
12-06-2007, 21:27
At Blood Mtn during sunset look for Atlanta Skyline and reflections off the glass skyscrapers. Awesome on a clear day.

Stone Mtn laser light shows (when they do'em) can be seen on clear nights.

River Runner
12-07-2007, 01:42
they should leave the building but render it undesirable for sleeping in. <SNIP> it is a hell of a dump as wolf says. skunks mice, etc, the wind flows right through it like chinese food,

Couldn't that be said of most of the AT shelters? :-? Seems I've seen mice & a lot of wind at several. ;)

Nearly Normal
12-07-2007, 06:52
I've been there a couple of times.
It is a shame what some people have done.
I would like to see it fixed up. A privey installed close by and well marked.
Windows and door installed with very heavy timber or metal.
With no fire place maybe they wouldn't be torn down.
A developed cooking area would help too.
It's a good hike up from the road, most willing to make it are not the sort to tear it up just for the hell of it.
A broom always helps.
Some sort of developed plan would be better than tearing it down.

Dances with Mice
12-07-2007, 07:22
A privey installed close by and well marked.
...Done.

Nearly Normal
12-07-2007, 07:25
I've been there a couple of times.
It is a shame what some people have done.
I would like to see it fixed up. A privey installed close by and well marked.
Windows and door installed with very heavy timber or metal.
With no fire place maybe they wouldn't be torn down.
A developed cooking area would help too.
It's a good hike up from the road, most willing to make it are not the sort to tear it up just for the hell of it.
A broom always helps.
Some sort of developed plan would be better than tearing it down.

Frolicking Dinosaurs
12-07-2007, 07:49
A privy would help and an outdoor 'shelf' for cooking similar to those found at more traditional shelters.

Not sure anything can be done about the place getting trashed. All shelters this close to roads have this problem. While it is a climb up from Highway 19, it is only a couple of miles.

Skidsteer
12-07-2007, 07:50
A privy would help and an outdoor 'shelf' for cooking similar to those found at more traditional shelters.

Not sure anything can be done about the place getting trashed. All shelters this close to roads have this problem. While it is a climb up from Highway 19, it is only a couple of miles.

A privy has been installed.

Frolicking Dinosaurs
12-07-2007, 07:57
A privy has been installed.::: Dino seen applauding the GA maintainers for this addition :::

whitefoot_hp
12-07-2007, 10:20
Couldn't that be said of most of the AT shelters? :-? Seems I've seen mice & a lot of wind at several. ;)

no, most are not completely exposed on top of mountains with wide open windows on two sides, and most at least have a solid floor.



the privy up there is veerrry nice!

whitefoot_hp
12-07-2007, 10:21
I have read (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_Mountain)in several (http://www.sherpaguides.com/georgia/mountains/blue_ridge/eastern/blood_mountain.html) places (http://www.n2backpacking.com/my_hikes/georgia/ATGA/blood%2011_02D.htm) that the Blood Mtn shelter is listed on the National Register of Historical Places. (http://www.nps.gov/nr/)If so this would protect the building and could influence the restorations and repairs that can be made.

I cannot confirm that it is listed, although the Blood Mtn Archeological Area (http://www.nationalregisterofhistoricplaces.com/GA/Union/state.html)is, as is the Walasi-Yi (Neels Gap) building.

i believe ive heard something along those lines as well.

nitewalker
12-07-2007, 10:32
i belive back in 03 my hiking partner lost his ems rain jacket in the shelter. that is the last place he remembers seeing it.. if any1 found it he says to enjoy it......what a dive this shelter is....some nice views from up on the rocks but alot of the time it sems to have a fog lurking over the area....

weary
12-07-2007, 11:13
Litter breeds litter. Vandalism breeds vandalism. Once something is trashed people feel no restraints against adding to the trash. In the 70s I cleaned up dozens of campsites. I was amazed when going back later how well they had been maintained.

For the most part these weren't sites with regular maintainers. They were just places along rivers and trails that had been traditionally used by campers. Once I buried the cans and carried out the plastic others instinctively took up the chore.

A couple of responsible maintainers assigned to Blood Mountain Shelter could do wonders. Because it is near the road kids will periodically trash it. But if trash is removed quickly the incidents will become fewer and fewer, at least that's been my experience.

Weary

Rain Man
05-30-2008, 10:00
The Georgia AT Club is asking for old photos of Blood Mountain Shelter.

Here is their request (May 29, 2008)- "Does anyone have a picture of the Blood Mountain Shelter showing the old window shutters and door?"

If so, please send directly to the GATC Trails Supervisor at --
trails_supervisor@georgia-atclub.org

Thanks in advance,
Rain:sunMan

.

bloodmountainman
05-30-2008, 10:12
Been to the top of old Bloody more times than I can remember! I have been camping on that mountain for 25 years ( not full time!) and I have never spent a night in the shelter. My kids refer to it as the "witches castle".
Good place to dodge a storm, but not good for overnight sleeping.

Lone Wolf
05-30-2008, 10:14
Been to the top of old Bloody more times than I can remember! I have been camping on that mountain for 25 years ( not full time!) and I have never spent a night in the shelter. My kids refer to it as the "witches castle".
Good place to dodge a storm, but not good for overnight sleeping.

yup. it should be boarded up and/or torn down

jersey joe
05-30-2008, 10:39
I spent a cold rainy night in this shelter on my thru hike and was happy that it was there, despite being one of the worst shelters I encountered.

rafe
05-30-2008, 11:26
I spent the prior night a few miles south, in my tent at Jarard Gap. When I got to Blood Mtn. Shelter the following morning, I was glad I hadn't tried to reach it. Something about small stone buildings gives me the creeps. I had the same reaction to the shelter at Chestnut Knob. Just couldn't stay there.

Berserker
06-09-2008, 14:37
Just got back from doing the GA portion of the AT (man...that's a tough section by the way). On the way up to the top of Blood Mtn I ran into a guy and his son that had their trail mix stolen by a bear that morning. I presume it was the same bear that was prowling around (cause I heard him) the Slaughter Creek tentsites (this is where I stayed) the night before. So watch your food (don't leave it unattended) if you go up there as there may be a "problem bear" up there.

Lone Wolf
06-09-2008, 14:39
i sleep with my chow. no critter will get it

Berserker
06-09-2008, 14:45
i sleep with my chow. no critter will get it

Based on the account I think the food was stolen during light hours. They made oatmeal, and I presume went up on the rocks (they said they were 50 yards from the shelter) to eat whilst leaving their stuff in the shelter. That's when the bear rolled in and got the trail mix.

earlyriser26
06-09-2008, 14:53
While last month I was finishing a section hike in Neels gap, I haven't been to the top of Blood since 1976. At that time the shelter was a dark dirty cave that would only be inviting if your life was at stake. Still, it is an historic shelter and should be kept even if not used.

Berserker
06-09-2008, 17:41
While last month I was finishing a section hike in Neels gap, I haven't been to the top of Blood since 1976. At that time the shelter was a dark dirty cave that would only be inviting if your life was at stake. Still, it is an historic shelter and should be kept even if not used.

It's apparently been cleaned up. It looks pretty nice inside. There are two rooms. The back room has a wood platform to sleep on. I would say that it does not look any worse than any of the other GA shelters. I have only seen shelters in GA, NC, TN and VA, and in my opinion the GA shelters are by far much nicer than the ones in the other 3 states (although the ones in the Smokys are supposed to be decent...haven't seen those yet though).

WILLIAM HAYES
06-09-2008, 22:23
my memory of blood mt shelter from several years ago -smelled like urine and it was dark and dirty. I did not think it was a good location for a shelter
A lot of day hikers use the shelter and if memory serves me there was no water source within a reasonable distance- I stayed at woods hole shelter just before reaching Blood Mt a smalll shelter but nice .It was november and freezing rain and one of the coldest nights I have every spent on the trail

Hillbilly

SunnyWalker
08-07-2008, 22:10
Hey Needles, that is a winner of a night.

GMTMinusFive
08-22-2008, 16:14
Did a Reece-to-Freeman-to-AT-to-Reece loop in early July and spent a while taking a break at this shelter. I have nothing to compare it to but it looked decent enough for a hiker to sleep in for one night. You would think, however, that hikers, of all people, would know better than to just piss off the front stairs in the middle of the night. The area immediately around the front stoop reeked of urine. Damn, people.

Pedaling Fool
09-17-2008, 16:05
I don't think it has become official as yet, but this shelter will soon be closed completely as it is within the Blood Mountain Wilderness area and therefor subject to the most stringent rules the USFS and GADNR can come up with regarding maintenance and improvements to the shelter. Except for its historic value (originally built by the CCC during the great depression) I think it would have been removed long ago. Essentially there can be nothing done to the shelter without the Feds and State of Georgia being dead in the middle of it, and it is a difficult site to reach for maintenance crews.

It is a very difficult area to provide space for tents (on the summit that is) and there is a total open fire ban (even when there isn't a drought) from Slaughter Gap to Neel's Gap (possibly even further south than Slaughter now) there is a serious problem with human waste already since this is one of the most popular day hiking destinations in the state and it is not possible to get water from Neel's Gap to Slaughter Gap- ever, drought or not.

Although this is one of the coolest spots on the entire AT in Georgia, it is not, in light of todays park rules, a suitable location for a shelter. This has been the general consensus for many years and it doesn't look too promising for this shelter's active future.

All that said, I still love the place and try and overnight in the vicinity of the summit whenever I'm in that area. I've had some of my more memorable hiking moments on Blood Mountain over the years including sunrises and sunsets, down right scary thunderstorms and winds and the coldest I've ever been in the woods during a raging blizzard about 20 years ago. Not to mention that Blood Mountain was the first place I ever spent the night on the AT (1962, BSA Troop 39).

This area is as fragile as the Maine tundra above tree line and in a state of tremendous over use, so if you do choose to stay here, please respect it for what it is and treat it gently.

One last comment. Unfortunately, or maybe not, there has been a recent relocation on the north slope of Blood Mountain between the Freeman Trail junction and the summit (on the Neel's Gap side of the mountain). They put in a series of switchbacks and steps to get traffic off some of the worst abused areas. While it has helped with the destruction somewhat, it has taken one of the more difficult sections out of service thereby making the overall ascent from the north a lot easier, which in turn allows a lot more people easy access to the summit and on and on ad infinitum.........

Hacksaw
This is from 2002, I guess it never happened, but was wondering if there is still talk about shutting down Blood Mountain shelter?

take-a-knee
09-17-2008, 16:40
Did a Reece-to-Freeman-to-AT-to-Reece loop in early July and spent a while taking a break at this shelter. I have nothing to compare it to but it looked decent enough for a hiker to sleep in for one night. You would think, however, that hikers, of all people, would know better than to just piss off the front stairs in the middle of the night. The area immediately around the front stoop reeked of urine. Damn, people.

The Blood Mtn Shelter reminds me of a Haitian jail.

ChinMusic
09-17-2008, 16:50
The Blood Mtn Shelter reminds me of a Haitian jail.
Have you stayed in both? :D

take-a-knee
09-17-2008, 17:34
Have you stayed in both? :D

Luckily neither, I was the "sheriff" when I was in Haiti, the Macoutes didn't like us. That did'nt stop them from leaving dead people in the middle of the road for us to find some mornings though.

ChinMusic
09-17-2008, 18:07
Luckily neither, I was the "sheriff" when I was in Haiti, the Macoutes didn't like us. That did'nt stop them from leaving dead people in the middle of the road for us to find some mornings though.
Blood Mountain was the first shelter I ever saw on the AT. I thought it was pretty cool looking......not that I would want to stay there.

Dances with Mice
09-17-2008, 19:06
I know nothing. OK?

That being said, one of the options that the GATC has, and has always had, is to dismantle the shelter, strip out all the wood and just leave bare walls standing as a historical monument.

It's a tempting option. The shelter isn't needed, there is a hostel immediately north, campsites immediately south and a shelter just a few more minutes away walking south. There's no water and no firewood available. It's in a no open fire zone anyway. It's a bad place for a shelter and there's no reason to encourage anyone to stay there.

Its history discourages spending time and money to repair. The windows have all been broken out and the shutters and doors have been ripped off. I remember the shelter having shutters and doors so it's not like they disappeared way back in ancient times. The original tile roof was ruined by people throwing rocks on it from the overlook to the east of the front door and the present wood shingle roof is right now being torn apart the same way. There's no way to protect the shelter from axeholes.

The GATC has three basic options: Do nothing, tear it down to the stone walls, or fix it up. If it were your money, would you spend it to repair and fix it up?

If so, tell us why.

MoBill122
09-17-2008, 19:14
I think it would be a shame to let it fall apart. I was there this past weekend and I've posted a picture in the album on here.
Should be a $1000 fine for someone destroying property.... but then, could it ever be enforced.

ChinMusic
09-17-2008, 19:43
The GATC has three basic options: Do nothing, tear it down to the stone walls, or fix it up. If it were your money, would you spend it to repair and fix it up?

If so, tell us why.
You are correct in that there is no "need" for a shelter in this location. I would definitely NOT fix it up. It is in a high traffic area and will just get vandalized again.

I would not want to see it torn down as it is a point of interest to many hikers. Not all hikers are thru-hikers and seeing such a structure has value. I would leave it as is or just "repair" it to the point that it is not a danger. If it became a major PITA just to keep it "safe", only then consider tearing it down.

OldStormcrow
09-17-2008, 20:09
I was there in the late 80's when it still had a functioning fireplace. When I showed up late in the day and opened the front doors I heard a crashing sound in the back room. When I went back there the window shutters were wide open and something ( a bear, I presume) had just made a hasty exit out the window and down the hill. There was a pile of rocks in the front room by the door, I guess to keep it shut at night. I piled a few of these up against the door and settled back in the other room with my faithful flask of Bushmill's Irish whiskey and my candle lantern for a relaxing evening. Just as I was about to doze off, the door started sliding open, even with the stones against it. I got up and piled ALL of the stones in the place against it, the went back to my former reverie....leaving the candle lantern on all night. Lots of people up there during the day, though, because it's so close to the road.

FatMan
09-17-2008, 20:10
...The GATC has three basic options: Do nothing, tear it down to the stone walls, or fix it up. If it were your money, would you spend it to repair and fix it up?

If so, tell us why.Tear it down. Your arguments are compelling and I agree 100%.

JumpInTheLake
09-30-2008, 20:47
Blood Mountain was the first shelter I ever saw on the AT. I thought it was pretty cool looking......not that I would want to stay there.

Me too, it triggered a lifelong interest in the A.T. I think it should stay.

weary
10-02-2008, 16:43
Tear it down. Your arguments are compelling and I agree 100%.
In Maine, MATC is forbidden by the National Park Service from tearing down some of our remaining shelters that date back to the Civilian Conservation Corps days of the 1930s without a lot of complicated studies.

Things that CCC built are rightly considered historic structures from an historic time in our national history. I suspect tearing down the Blood Mountain shelter faces the same problem.

BTW, I stayed there in 1993. Aside from no nearby source of water it was a fine shelter. If it were in Maine we would simply assemble a crew of volunteers and fix it up.

Weary

Kirby
10-05-2008, 08:07
Put a couple rattle snakes in there, no one will ever sleep there.

Kirby

Hikes in Rain
10-05-2008, 08:31
Some of the thru-hikers I've met would consider rattlesnakes appetizers.

Egads
10-05-2008, 08:36
I consider this shelter more a monument than a viable place to sleep. There are much better places to camp close by.

SunnyWalker
10-07-2008, 20:50
When I went throght Blood Mtn and saw the shelter it was kind of dirty and smelly. I did not stay there, but I did not stay at any shelters. I am a hammock hangar and so far hve not depended upon the shelter system. So far I have not been disapointed. Blood Mtn was pretty neat though. It was fun following the blazes. Pretty unique. It must have took a lot of work to put that shelter together there. As I was hiking down to Wa-la-si-yi I passed a BSA troop. I got after a few of the young men who were using cut-backs.

freetoroam
12-13-2008, 17:48
i stayed on top of blood last weekend, all the doors and shutters are gone from the shelter and it is in bad shape, and boy does it get cold up there. it was worth enduring the wind and cold to watch the sun go down and the sun rise on the peak.

sticks&stones
12-13-2008, 18:00
One of my favorites. at night, in that shelter, lit by candle light, it has a very pleasant feel to it.

Jaybird
12-13-2008, 18:03
One of my favorites. at night, in that shelter, lit by candle light, it has a very pleasant feel to it.

the MICE love the ambience!
hehehehehe:D

Hate to hear its in such DIS-REPAIR...

Its been a nice old USEFUL bldg for all us hikers thru the years

Lone Wolf
12-13-2008, 19:16
it was in disrepair 22 years ago when i first saw it. what a dump

Jaybird
12-13-2008, 19:57
it was in disrepair 22 years ago when i first saw it. what a dump



Whatever happened to GEORGIA ATC Group refurbishing the old bldg?

Bulldawg
12-13-2008, 20:38
Whatever happened to GEORGIA ATC Group refurbishing the old bldg?


Government red tape!!

Dances with Mice
12-14-2008, 08:35
Government red tape!!

I don't know nothing, ok? I have no inside information. I am not talking outside of class. What follows is all from my overactive imagination. Its value is not worth the electrons from which it is made. Clear?

Its obvious that there does not need to be a shelter on Blood Mtn. Well within 3 miles in either direction there is either a developed campsite with water or a hostel. The nearest water supply is at the developed campsite. No campfires are allowed in the Blood Mtn Wilderness Area, which includes the shelter. As a shelter, Blood Mtn serves no purpose.

It is a historic building which cannot be torn down.

It is in a location that cannot be protected from vandalism. I'm not talking about carving "Cubby" or "DWM '08" into whatever wood hasn't been ripped off already. I'm talking about how whatever wood in that shelter that can be pried off has already been pried off, like the doors and window shutters. The roof is a shingle roof because the original tile roof was smashed to bits by people throwing rocks on it from the overlook above the shelter. The shingle roof is being smashed to bits today for the same reason. And I'm talking about literally TODAY some ahole, probably a day hiking kid, is going to think its great fun to throw a rock down onto the roof of the shelter. There's already a ton of rocks up there already to give him the idea, and besides what's just one more rock? Substitute carving initials into wood remaining inside, which happens to be irreplaceable American Chestnut, if you'd like. It's all the same.

Hell, there are people on this website, one for "enthusiasts of the AT" that think vandalism of shelters is 'human nature', its perfectly ok, can't be stopped and should be accepted. Let's encourage them! They are most probably right.

One option, which would be within the guidelines of both a Wilderness area and a historic shelter, would be to just accelerate what the vandals are doing. Tear off the roof. Take out the rafters before they rot away and just leave the walls standing as a monument to the CCC. In other words, the GATC could wash their hands of the whole damn thing. It's quite an appealing option. A bit of concentrated work for a short period of time would relieve the Club of a lot of work and expense spread over a long period of time.

Or they could find ways to vandal-proof the structure, then sink a lot of time and money into a shelter that isn't needed. And the last 80'ish years of experience indicates that all that effort will be wasted. There is no way to protect the shelter from vandalism.

The third option is to do nothing at all and waste no money on an shelter that isn't needed. In time the bare walls will serve not only as a monument to the CCC but also as a monument to the destructive force of 'human nature'.

So it's easy to ask why other people aren't spending their money. But let's say it's your money. And you're also in charge of allocating volunteer hours. What would you do? How much would you spend? How much is the BMS worth to you?

Dances with Mice
12-14-2008, 08:58
Whatever happened to GEORGIA ATC Group refurbishing the old bldg?I an't aware of no such thang as no "GEORGIA ATC Group".

MOWGLI
12-14-2008, 09:02
How much is the BMS worth to you?

Next to nothing.

Thanks for your volunteerism. And by the way... you make far too much sense. Cut that out!!

Samatva
04-26-2009, 18:49
Passed by the Blood Mountain shelter yesterday morning - still basically in the same shape that freetoroamm reported from December. It had rained a day or two before, and the shelter smelled musty (duh!).

I got caught out on Freeman (not a flat spot anywhere) Trial nearing dark, so camped at Flatrock Gap, but would have loved to stayed in Blood Mountain Shelter! Judging from the log book, quite a few others seem fond of it...

Dances with Mice, I have an unreliable sarcasm detector, so anyway: http://www.georgia-atclub.org/ FWIW...

ithai
07-06-2009, 15:06
The GATC has three basic options: Do nothing, tear it down to the stone walls, or fix it up. If it were your money, would you spend it to repair and fix it up?

If so, tell us why.

Why tear it down? It has so much character in it, especially in the night :)

unclehud
09-09-2009, 09:42
I don't know much, but I can tell you this. The first time I ever saw Blood Mountain Shelter I was amazed. Truly.

Blood Mountain is a hell of a climb, and that shelter is built from well over a thousand big rocks. Some serious sweat went into the construction of that baby, and the fact that it is still standing - yes, despite the best efforts of 80 years of vandalism - is a sobering testament to the CCC.

The ascent of Blood Mountain from Neel's Gap (Byron Reece parking lot) is a great trip for first-timers, and I take lots of 'em up that route. I always ask them to imagine the effort it took to move all those rocks, tote all that concrete and water, and build that structure. Perhaps it isn't an Egyptian pyramid, but it's as close as north Georgia's gonna get.

Don't tear it down, please! Perhaps spend a few bucks to post a plaque (that would have to be bolted and concreted to a boulder to prevent theft by vandals, I know) pointing out ...

"This cabin was built by the hand labor of CCC workers in the 1920's. How much do these rocks weigh? How many hours do you think it took to construct? How many men would have been needed? How long would it take? How much effort was spent gathering and stacking these rocks? During the past 80 years, how many people have used it as shelter from thunderstorms, lightning storms, snow storms, high winds, or very cold weather? And how many careless acts of vandalism will it take to destroy it? Please preserve a unique piece of Appalachian Trail history."

My naivete is on display this morning.

max patch
09-09-2009, 10:15
My naivete is on display this morning.

The section from Neels Gap to Blood Mountain is the most used section of the trail in GA.

I agree totally with your comments.

chefjason
09-09-2009, 10:53
The section from Neels Gap to Blood Mountain is the most used section of the trail in GA.

I agree totally with your comments.
I agree as well. That building is amazing. Why tear down a built by hand STONE building to construct some wooden box?! I remember that building from my very first scout trip on the AT, over 20 years ago. I still have very vivid memories of it. If votes here really do count for some thing, I vote to leave it the hell alone.

dreamsoftrails
09-09-2009, 11:56
I don't know much, but I can tell you this. The first time I ever saw Blood Mountain Shelter I was amazed. Truly.

Blood Mountain is a hell of a climb, and that shelter is built from well over a thousand big rocks. Some serious sweat went into the construction of that baby, and the fact that it is still standing - yes, despite the best efforts of 80 years of vandalism - is a sobering testament to the CCC.


the roof has been repaired and or replaced over the years.

AUhiker90
01-16-2010, 21:13
One of my favorite spots but its sad in what the condition is up there in the shelter. Very nice construction

Troy
02-07-2010, 00:19
Will be hiking in April north from Woody to Blood mtn and on to Neals Gap. Question: if we dont stay at the shelter is ther a good place to camp. How much further to Neels Gap ( for an old guy w/bad knes)

ChinMusic
02-07-2010, 00:23
Will be hiking in April north from Woody to Blood mtn and on to Neals Gap. Question: if we dont stay at the shelter is ther a good place to camp. How much further to Neels Gap ( for an old guy w/bad knes)
There are a couple obvious sites on the climb up Blood. After Blood, by the time you get to the next area for camping you are almost at Neels.

generoll
02-07-2010, 07:20
Will be hiking in April north from Woody to Blood mtn and on to Neals Gap. Question: if we dont stay at the shelter is ther a good place to camp. How much further to Neels Gap ( for an old guy w/bad knes)

If you are going to camp before you get to Neels Gap then I'd suggest taking the side trail to Woods Hole Shelter. There's room for tents and hammocks as well as the small shelter and nearby privy. The campsite at Slaughter Gap was closed due to overuse I believe and lacks the privy. It always provides a bit of comic relief to come upon a privy along the trail with a wheelchair ramp.

Rick Hancock
02-07-2010, 08:55
This shelter was in rough shape in 1980 when I thur hiked. Door was half off it's hinges tattered plastic over the windows, etc. I do see the historical value of the older shelters (there are only a few if any of the original baseball bat platforms in Maine) and the sense of nostalgia for what once was. I'd like to see it preserved, replace the sleeping platform, bar the windows but install thick lexan glass to keep the weather out same thing at the door (cut a l2x12 opening for viewing), and place a tamper proof plaque in the area with CCC info etc. Sure there's a chance that some dumbass will still find a way to screw it up for other's but I believe that most who visit the area (it's not an easy climb) will appreciate the significance! When you destroy one of these old sites you never can get them back.

Here's a thought, tear it down, remove it stone by stone, and rebuild it at the Appalachian Trail Museum!
Rick

Lone Wolf
02-07-2010, 09:01
Here's a thought, tear it down, remove it stone by stone, and rebuild it at the Appalachian Trail Museum!
Rick

best idea yet for that ****hole. just get it off the mountain

mweinstone
02-07-2010, 09:07
bloods my favorite mountain. i know where the gold is.

FatMan
02-07-2010, 09:23
Will be hiking in April north from Woody to Blood mtn and on to Neals Gap. Question: if we dont stay at the shelter is ther a good place to camp. How much further to Neels Gap ( for an old guy w/bad knes)The GATC built about eight tent pads just south of Blood Mtn when they relo'd the trail around Slaughter Gap about five years ago. If not carrying a tent then the next closest shelter would be Woods Hole. It is about a four mile hike from Woods Hole to Neels Gap.

Jaybird
02-07-2010, 09:29
Will be hiking in April north from Woody to Blood mtn and on to Neals Gap. Question: if we dont stay at the shelter is ther a good place to camp. How much further to Neels Gap ( for an old guy w/bad knes)


I had "bad knees" & was close to 50 years old when i hiked BLOOD MTN...
stopped on top for abt an hour rest & enjoyed the views....took a crap load of pictures & then hobbled down the other side & made it to NEELS GAP @ abt 5:30pm....(abt 3 hrs away) just before the owners were closing for the night (they were gracious enuff to let me get a sandwich & a few Snickers bars...hehehehehe):)

I wouldnt suggest spending the nite INSIDE Blood Mtn shelter...
its a MECCA for field mice.

Rick Hancock
02-07-2010, 09:38
Problem solved, mine the gold and use the proceeds to fund the removal/reconstruction project at the museum!

Pedaling Fool
02-07-2010, 10:05
I've always skipped Woods Hole and gone to Slaughter Creek (not gap) campsites with a spring right at the base, last time I was there was 2008. It is on the Trail and only about a mile from Blood Mountain Shelter OR ~ 3-1/4 miles from Neel Gap.

Is Slaughter Gap different from Slaughter Creek? I know there's a Slaughter Gap trail and I believe the campsites there have been closed, but not the ones on the AT. (To the best of my understanding).

BTW Troy, I've never stayed at Wood's Hole Shelter, but I understand it's nearly a 1/2 mile off the trail and very unreliable water source. If you don't feel up to going to Neel Gap (nearly 4 miles from this point) once you get to Woods Hole, I'd recommend you stop at Slaughter Creek Campsites, only about 1/2 mile north.

Also, I don't like using privies anymore, but if you must there are no privies at Slaughter Creek, but there is a privy at the top of Blood Mountain.


---And---

Blood mtn on the southside is an easy climb, very gradual. However, once you get to the shelter and start the decent it's a completely different mountain, very rock and steep for a ways.



.

njordan2
02-07-2010, 11:26
I recently stayed in Blood Mountain shelter and it is in excellent shape. Incredibly sturdy and very clean. It looks like it will stand for another 100 years. There is no trash strewn about and is a nice, roomy shelter. If you are in the area, I highly recommend the hike up to it to spend the night, or even just to go to for lunch.

oldmanhiker
02-07-2010, 12:10
In June,2009, while on a "go as far as I can" hike, I ascended Blood Mountain to witness the most spectacular views of the mountains(360) since Springer. I found the shelter to be clean but musty and damp. The look of the shelter was picture post card worthy with the large boulders that make up the walls. There were six of us that decided to stay the night within the structure as thunderheads and rain were in the forecast that evening. I settled into my sleeping bag about 9:00 but couldn't fall asleep, even though extremely tired. The of the sounds of scurrying mice and their squeeking chatter were in stereo. Finally asleep, I was awakened about 2:00AM to the sound of one of the other hikers(Long Stride)screaming profanities. I immediately shined my headlamp in his direction. What I saw scared the crap out of me and all the others who were awakened by the outburst. It appeared to be the size of a small cat with a tale approx. a foot long. It stared into the light showing red eyes that glowed and a rather long snout. It was, by far, the largest RAT I had ever seen and did not appear to be afraid of us one bit. Finally, it slowly made its way into a hole in the floor and disappeared into the underbelly of the shelter. Long Stride was up and out of the shelter, standing in the doorway, shaking and cursing the night. The rat had been chewing his hair as he slept, leaving a noticeable section missing in the back. Needless to say, none of us had a restful sleep for the remainder of the night and surprising to me, no one talked about it at all, not even the next morning. Later on in the hike, at a stopover in a Hostel, I mentioned the incident in passing and the conversation among the hikers present was how some had heard of the rat in that shelter from other hikers in the past. Apparently, it is a longtime resident. So with all that said...be warned.

bloodmountainman
02-07-2010, 16:50
The Blood Mt. shelter rat is named "Scurvy". He is a good friend of mine.;)

ChinMusic
02-07-2010, 17:11
Is there still a resident skunk up there?

Praha4
02-07-2010, 18:55
how about the Goths that like to party at Blood mtn shelter? there was a large group of them there in October when I passed thru there on the AT.... looked like they were getting ready for some kind of voodoo ritual

weary
02-07-2010, 19:14
The Blood Mt. shelter rat is named "Scurvy". He is a good friend of mine.;)
I have two suggestions.

First feed the rat some warfarin. If it's good enough for me, it should be okay for a big rat.

Second, leave the shelter alone. It's historic, and provides great views. Just remember to bring water. As for the rat, the warfarin should calm it down, permanently. I'll even feed it some of mine if I ever get to Blood Mountain again.

Weary

Skidsteer
02-07-2010, 19:33
I have two suggestions.

First feed the rat some warfarin. If it's good enough for me, it should be okay for a big rat.

Second, leave the shelter alone. It's historic, and provides great views. Just remember to bring water. As for the rat, the warfarin should calm it down, permanently. I'll even feed it some of mine if I ever get to Blood Mountain again.

Weary

Blood Mtn shelter doesn't provide a single view of anything except squalor, disease, and filth. The views are from the rocks. It should be torn down and moved to the museum.

weary
02-07-2010, 19:56
Blood Mtn shelter doesn't provide a single view of anything except squalor, disease, and filth. The views are from the rocks. It should be torn down and moved to the museum.
If one wants to see the sun rise or set, or the stars and moon at night above an unobstructed horizon, the shelter provides the only option in that area. Squalor is in the eyes of the beholder. I don't know of any special Blood Mountain diseases, do you? Filth is caused by humans, and only humans can eliminate it from an historic site. Think about volunteering if you don't like the Blood Mtn. Shelter. All of the trail lives or dies, depending on the dedication of volunters. Blood mountain is a special place. It's shelter is a slum only because most people everywhere are slobs that a few of us must pickup after. Closing the shelter; tearing down the shelter, solves nothing.

The slobs will continue to climb the mountain. The shelter only concentrates their filth, making it easier to clean up.

Weary

Kembo
02-07-2010, 20:43
I was the only one staying there May 22, 1972. It was crawling with mice. Five minutes after putting down my pack the mice were all over it. I retreated and camped 100 ft. away from the shelter that night.

Skidsteer
02-07-2010, 20:53
If one wants to see the sun rise or set, or the stars and moon at night above an unobstructed horizon, the shelter provides the only option in that area. Squalor is in the eyes of the beholder. I don't know of any special Blood Mountain diseases, do you? Filth is caused by humans, and only humans can eliminate it from an historic site. Think about volunteering if you don't like the Blood Mtn. Shelter. All of the trail lives or dies, depending on the dedication of volunters. Blood mountain is a special place. It's shelter is a slum only because most people everywhere are slobs that a few of us must pickup after. Closing the shelter; tearing down the shelter, solves nothing.

The slobs will continue to climb the mountain. The shelter only concentrates their filth, making it easier to clean up.

Weary

I would happily volunteer to help move the shelter to a museum.

weary
02-07-2010, 22:08
I would happily volunteer to help move the shelter to a museum.
The shelter is a museum where it is. Moving it would make it a less valuable museum piece. Keeping it there, keeping the site clean, just improves the Blood Mtn museum. Moving it simply diminishes the value of an important early trail artifact, without doing anything to improve the admitedly vandalized site. This just makes the situation worse.

Weary

max patch
02-07-2010, 23:15
Weary, you are right about the Blood Mtn situation, however, the typical WhiteBlaze mob mentality is now in play which means intelligent discussion of this issue going forward is impossible.

Lone Wolf
02-07-2010, 23:23
I would happily volunteer to help move the shelter to a museum.

me too for all my bitchin' and snivelin'. i'll show

weary
02-08-2010, 01:10
me too for all my bitchin' and snivelin'. i'll show
I'll be there also. As a one man picket, protesting the desecration of a bit of Appalachian Trail history

take-a-knee
02-08-2010, 08:58
I'll place the charges.

Sir-Packs-Alot
06-04-2010, 15:32
I live in Atlanta - and hike Blood Mt. frequently. The Georgia Appalachian Trail Club is trying real hard to figure out what to do about the shelter situation. They do the best they can to maintain it - but of course physical damage, mice problems, bear problems, garbage - these issues are more relevant here than at any other GA shelter because of the shelters age, weather exposure, it's a frequent tourist day hike where people leave trash and food, there are no bear cables up there to properly hang your food (mostly just small mountain laurels and rhodendrons-except the few tree in front of the shelter that are not good for bear bagging). I know they'd prefer that people not camp up there overnight - and everyone is scared of what a wind whipped campfire up there could become when it gets real dry and warnings are up. I hope the old historic shelter remains up there and is kept repaired indefinetely. They had bear problems that were substantial just recently - so I hope the GATC figures out whether they want to allow folks that do go up there to properly hang their foods (put up cables) - or fiigure out how to deter them from staying the night up there.

Good luck GATC !

GA BASS
06-04-2010, 16:31
put a cat in the shelter

B.B.
07-21-2010, 20:03
I hiked through there on 7-13-10. Did not stay, but I have to say it was not nearly as bad as what I had expected. It was pretty crowded. Most hikers were still asleep when I went through....about 7 or 8 people in there. The trash really didn't seem any worse than alot of the shelters I saw and/or stayed at. I was expecting much worse. Unfortunately, it was early when I was there and very cloudy...No visibility....felt like I was in a fog machine at Halloween!!!

Bidwell
08-02-2010, 15:47
I went up there over the past weekend. The shelter seemed to be in good shape, but close-by, there was an awful lot of garbage. No wonder why bears are so bad up here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ISUa6-K7ikU

Leave no trace, folks!

- Greg

Bornsouthern34
10-08-2010, 17:07
Any news on water or bears between Blood Mtn and Wood's Hole? Gonna camp with my boys end of this month.

jabowman7
10-08-2010, 19:30
Any news on water or bears between Blood Mtn and Wood's Hole? Gonna camp with my boys end of this month.

I was on Blood Mountain about two weeks ago and had no trouble with water. I talked to some rangers and they said they were still having problems with the bears, but nothing out of the ordinary (for Blood Mountain, anyway). Just be sure to bear bag all your food and smelly stuff and you should be fine.

Bornsouthern34
10-11-2010, 23:36
I was on Blood Mountain about two weeks ago and had no trouble with water. I talked to some rangers and they said they were still having problems with the bears, but nothing out of the ordinary (for Blood Mountain, anyway). Just be sure to bear bag all your food and smelly stuff and you should be fine.

Thanks for the update. I think I am going to just traverse Blood Mtn and stay at Jarrad Gap. I will post how it works out later.

Sierra Echo
10-12-2010, 07:18
I would happily volunteer to help move the shelter to a museum.

That shelter is about to get a massive face lift :)

mweinstone
10-12-2010, 07:33
this is what matthewski does for a living. i restore historical philadelphia landmarks . heres my idea:

all trees shadeing the site are cut. sunlight now baths the shelter makeing it a dryer place. thats number one.

an exspansive deck is built around the entire shelter allowing sleeping uncovered and covered(by pitching on the deck).sleeping is banned from the inside halting use of that space.

the inside is restored, closed, and secured with heavy wooden shutters.opened for events and fundraising only.

road and trail access points below the shelter area are marked with warnings concerning shelter rules. example: you are approching the historicaly renovated blood mountain shelter area,.. violations of shelter rules stricktly enforced.camping permitted outside shelter on deck areas only, pack all trash out, no fires permitted around shelter area. violators will be prosicuted.

Hikes in Rain
10-12-2010, 09:17
That shelter is about to get a massive face lift :)

Is it really? That's great, it's such a wonderful old shelter. Hmm...would you folks need the services of a relatively good engineer? My Georgia license is current, although I really haven't practiced there much.

max patch
10-12-2010, 14:26
That shelter is about to get a massive face lift :)

Thats great. What have you heard?

Scrapes
10-15-2010, 15:50
Just hiked thru there 10/13, glad to see and experience an historic shelter. It was clean, but did have the usual hiker graffitti.

Now the most disgusting part of the trail I've experienced is Wolf Laurel Top, there was toilet paper everywhere, crap visible, the hill side smelled like the worst privy I've ever been in. Sad.

Sierra Echo
10-15-2010, 15:53
Thats great. What have you heard?

Theres been a 50K grant to restore it. That however has caused controversy over the roof. One side wants it to be restored with the same materials and the other side wants to make it better.

max patch
10-15-2010, 17:13
Theres been a 50K grant to restore it. That however has caused controversy over the roof. One side wants it to be restored with the same materials and the other side wants to make it better.

I'm glad that the historic old shelter is being restored.

But...$50,000!!!!

Your tax dollars at work. :(

Sierra Echo
10-15-2010, 17:52
I'm glad that the historic old shelter is being restored.

But...$50,000!!!!

Your tax dollars at work. :(

Its not a government grant! I forgot where it came from, but it wasn't that.

MoodyBluer
10-19-2010, 14:40
Just hiked thru there 10/13, glad to see and experience an historic shelter. It was clean, but did have the usual hiker graffitti.

Now the most disgusting part of the trail I've experienced is Wolf Laurel Top, there was toilet paper everywhere, crap visible, the hill side smelled like the worst privy I've ever been in. Sad.


I agree...every time I pass by this area it's like a minefield of TP...but it's always been this way ever since the late 70's when I first starting hiking by here on an annual basis (not excusing it, I'm just sayin'). I think it's because this area is approx halfway thru that section and nature calls a lot of the day hikers at that point in the trip...