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attroll
04-24-2006, 12:56
wbdent I took over a section of the Appalachian Trail for maintaining recently. The section I took over here in Maine is a section that is not very easy to get into. I have to hike about 3 1/3 miles in and then over a mountain to get to the beginning of my section. I know there are others out there that are probably in the same situation I am in. I hiked into it this weekend and it was not a bad hike. But if I were to carry a chainsaw into it then it would be come a very long and miserable hike and take forever. I would need to carry a chainsaw in to tackle the large blow downs.

wbdent Here is my question. How to others that have this same problem do this? I have though of making a backpack that will accommodate a chainsaw. But then it would not leave much room for the other items I need to carry in.

wbdent Any ideas or suggestions would be appreciated.

Bjorkin
04-24-2006, 13:35
Perhaps you can carry a chainsaw in on one hike and hide it off trail in it's own stealth shelter for future use. Of course this means you'll need to purchase another chainsaw. Just make sure it's a cheapie in case someone finds it and makes off with it.

jlb2012
04-24-2006, 13:39
if you only have one big blowdown to do then it may be easier to use a crosscut saw instead of the chainsaw - it is definately lighter to carry and much quieter to use - you also need somewhat less PPE (no chainsaw chaps) - also consider using a big pruning saw like the 21 inch Corona Pro - its good for up to 12 inch hardwood and 18 inch softwood for the middle sized blowdowns

attroll
04-24-2006, 13:42
Perhaps you can carry a chainsaw in on one hike and hide it off trail in it's own stealth shelter for future use. Of course this means you'll need to purchase another chainsaw. Just make sure it's a cheapie in case someone finds it and makes off with it.
You know that may not be a bad idea. I think I still have my old junk McCullough chainsaw out in the garage. This way I would only have to carry up gas and oil every time. I will have to look to make sure I did not give the old chainsaw away.

If anyone has any other ideas or suggestions that would help. I would like to hear them.

SGT Rock
04-24-2006, 13:52
Get an old Army rucksack and use if for toting your tools. I use a 5 gallon bucket in mine and then put most of the tools in that. It is good for carrying dirt when needed and also helps maintain a good shape of the pack with multiple tools in it.

Sly
04-24-2006, 13:57
A good pair of loppers and a trail saw will help clear a path remarkably well. You can then go back with a chainsaw if necessary.

attroll
04-24-2006, 13:57
Get an old Army rucksack and use if for toting your tools. I use a 5 gallon bucket in mine and then put most of the tools in that. It is good for carrying dirt when needed and also helps maintain a good shape of the pack with multiple tools in it.
Wow, another good idea. I could break down my small chainsaw into pieces and put it in the 5 gallon bucket and then put it in a backpack and carry it up. This way I could assemble it at my section and when I am done I could break the saw back down and put it in the 5 gallon bucket and hide it.

Thanks Rock

Sly
04-24-2006, 14:00
Perhaps you can carry a chainsaw in on one hike and hide it off trail in it's own stealth shelter for future use. Of course this means you'll need to purchase another chainsaw. Just make sure it's a cheapie in case someone finds it and makes off with it.

That's great idea. You could also chain it to a tree and hope someone doesn't bust it if found 'cuz they can't steal what's not theirs.

attroll
04-24-2006, 14:02
A good pair of loppers and a trail saw will help clear a path remarkably well. You can then go back with a chainsaw if necessary.
What kind of loppers do you recommend? What do you mean when you say loppers. I think I have called them something else.

Sly
04-24-2006, 14:07
Big pruners, like chain cutters but for branches. You can cut 1" or slightly bigger branches, enough to open a trail/path and climb over many blowdowns.

Within reason the longer the better, like 2'. They can be had at most garden/landscape stores.

SGT Rock
04-24-2006, 14:19
My favorite tools:

Machete - the thing I carry and use most

2' handel loppers

Sling Blade - the second thing I use a lot.

But other tools I use...

Long handel shovel, mattocks, pry bar, hand saw, first aid kit, and other tools.

The good thing is if you are an ultralight hiker, you can still pack some gear in a large rucksack with your tools, pack into your maintenance section and make it into a base camp and work from there for a couple of days. It is the boys favorite way to do it.

Doctari
04-24-2006, 14:39
Perhaps you can carry a chainsaw in on one hike and hide it off trail in it's own stealth shelter for future use. Of course this means you'll need to purchase another chainsaw. Just make sure it's a cheapie in case someone finds it and makes off with it.

Yea. Lots of the shelters in the GSMNP have "Tool boxes" near them, I suppose for the heavy stuff like saws & stuff.

Much of "My trail" has quite a hike to get to, so I carry: a CC saw, an axe, & hand pruners. Sometimes I carry loppers (much like hand pruners but more robust & with a longer handle).

For me, the "Big blowdowns, mean going around them or contacting the park people to come do the chain saw stuff due to the hassle of getting a permit (8 hour class, endless paperwork) for using a chainsaw on park property.

Doctari.

DebW
04-25-2006, 12:15
I second the suggestion of a large crosscut saw. If the saw is less than 4 feet long, you don't need any special training. Look on eBay for an old-time bucking saw. They come with a 2nd removable handle for 2 person use. Also a good pair of long-handled loppers - Fiskars makes nice ones with added leverage. Fiskars also makes some compact lightweight loppers in 14 and 15 inches (I prefer the bypass) that fit inside a day pack. Amazon.com sells them if you can't find then elsewhere.

Crazy Larry #1
04-25-2006, 14:06
Here is my question. How to others that have this same problem do this? I have though of making a backpack that will accommodate a chainsaw. But then it would not leave much room for the other items I need to carry in.

Any ideas or suggestions would be appreciated.i think that's what bob peoples does.........a suggestion is that you take an old exterior backpack and remove the bag and detach your blade from the saw and carry it in two seperate pieces.......

WalkinHome
04-25-2006, 17:29
I do what Rock says, an old ALICE Rucksack from old Army days, but I use a thick mil plastic bag and let the blade w/guard stick upwards. Fuel and oil I have in whisperlite fuel bottles all mixed and ready to go. The only time I hiked in any distance was working with the LL Bean's crew and working on the MATC portion creating the Grafton Loop Trail. Some pretty good pokes there plus all of our camping gear.

Rambler
04-25-2006, 21:45
The Park Service used packs that were boards on which tio tie the saw. Not that you want to spend $300, but maybe you can get some ideas from the picture of the "Mckenzie Pack".

http://www.forestry-suppliers.com/search.asp?stext=chainsaw%20backpacks

Do not work on a remote trail alone with a chainsaw if you can help it!

Tin Man
04-25-2006, 22:01
I would like to share my appreciation to all trail maintainers, especially those who need to take measures discussed here to get into the remotest sections. I only wish I had a supportive family so I could go out and help. There is an upcoming maintenance day posted by the CT AMC chapter and I may have to just excuse myself from my normal obligations for the day. Monetary donations do not satisfy my desire to contribute. You guys are the best and I am truly humbled by what you do to keep the trail open for my annual section hike.

Ridge
04-25-2006, 22:49
For long distances I carry a Poulan 1800, one of the lightest around. I use a homemade sling to carry it. One note, you should never operate a chainsaw without someone else with you, per USFS certification rules. One person to carry the saw, the other the misc eqiup: wedges, fuel, oil, tools, extra chain, hammer, hand saw, etc.

MedicineMan
04-25-2006, 23:33
time to rethink the Luxurylite pack frame--perfect for hauling a chainsaw, and remember you can haul the chainsaw in and hide (awesome suggestion posted above) and then send the Luxurylite back at the end of the month :)

Yonah Ada-Hi
04-26-2006, 22:12
Granite Gear makes a pack specifically for hauling tools and other gear- called a "flatbed" maybe??

Skyline
04-26-2006, 23:12
Is there a shelter within your section by any chance? If so, your Club could construct a padlocked tool shed nearby, or under it depending upon the shelter design. Then you could keep tools there instead of carrying them in each time. This sort of thing works well in parts of PATC-land; not sure it would work in Maine.

Tin Man
04-26-2006, 23:27
Have you considered one of these? (http://www.mountvernonnews.com/local/110105/trees.html)

JJB
04-26-2006, 23:30
Wow! I would hate be on the trail and see one of those mothers coming at me.

attroll
04-26-2006, 23:46
Is there a shelter within your section by any chance? If so, your Club could construct a padlocked tool shed nearby, or under it depending upon the shelter design. Then you could keep tools there instead of carrying them in each time. This sort of thing works well in parts of PATC-land; not sure it would work in Maine.
Yes. Hall Mountain Lean-to is the start of my section here in Maine. There is no place to lock up tools. But after I have had the section for a little bit I will bring this to the clubs attention and see if I can do something like this. I don't want to jump in and start making demands to quick.

Shutterbug
04-27-2006, 00:38
What kind of loppers do you recommend? What do you mean when you say loppers. I think I have called them something else.

I use a pair of these. They will cut through a 2" limb with ease. I bought mine at HomeDepot.

http://www.fiskars.com/US/Garden/Product+Detail?contentId=85527

Skyline
04-27-2006, 01:06
Yes. Hall Mountain Lean-to is the start of my section here in Maine. There is no place to lock up tools. But after I have had the section for a little bit I will bring this to the clubs attention and see if I can do something like this. I don't want to jump in and start making demands to quick.


Wow either way you go, north or south, is some challenging trail maintenance-wise as I recall.

My experience is that if you suggest an idea and offer to spearhead its implementation it gets done faster than if you simply suggest an idea :-)

I'm SO lucky that the shelter I help maintain has a double privy with a lockable toolshed in between each "stall." I've offered the shed for nearby trail maintainers to use for their tools also. Hope you can wind up in a similar situation--it definitely makes life easier.