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frieden
07-19-2006, 09:27
After getting winded running down the street, I realized I had to do something. Yesterday, I stopped at the gym, and picked up a class schedule. I circled the classes that I wanted to take with red pen, and put it in my boss' mailbox, with a note that stated I needed off for 2 classes per week (of any of the ones circled). Seriously, my doctor said that I needed to start taking Yoga classes again, so that's what I'll start with. Has anyone else started physical training? You young whipper-snappers probably don't need as much as us old geezers do!

kyhipo
07-19-2006, 09:31
I will say my last hike felt like old times,because I have stayed in pretty good shape,after a acl tear and other probs I can now easly hike20 mile days if needed or wanted,I prefer 15nsh.I think staying active most certainly helps.ky

gregdog
07-19-2006, 09:41
tru dat. staying active inbetween hikes is the key. Sounds elementary, but it creeps up on you. I switched to a desk job a few years ago and man it doesn't take long to get soft if you don't watch it. My last hike really let me know that I need to work harder on conditioning. The lbs. don't come off like they used to and without regular cardio you get punked out real quick on a climb. Time is the key.....making the time to do it. So far I'm not doing good at setting time aside to exercise, air conditioning and cold beer are just too appealing.

Pacific Tortuga
07-19-2006, 10:15
2 - 3 10 rough trail miles a week with 4,200 ft. of elevation gain and loss with each hike. A 3 day trip every 6 weeks and a conservative weight loss goal of 25 lbs. As we get into fall and winter the same 20 to 30 mile weeks with my pack and gear on. My legs are no longer feeling soar the day after the 10 mile hikes has been very satisfying and my feet are tougher through the rocks. I'm betting on this program to ease me into AT life, going for the long haul.

onicoe
07-19-2006, 10:37
i've been doing general floor exercises. heel lifts, stomach stuff, weights for my arms, popping down to my mom's when i get a chance for swimming laps in the pool.

i got an old bike i'm in the process of fixing, i'm just being lazy about that. [:

Stonewall
07-19-2006, 10:53
I had taken a class in Tai Chi Chan,Yan style short form to get my PE credits. Since then I had desired to hike the AT, so I went back to my teacher who has be studying martial arts for over 35 years and started to pick up private lessons once a week practicing Chen style I now practice the form everyday to try and raise my flexablity so i am not so sore after practice. to compare the two to a sport the best i can is that Yan style is like touch football short suddle moves, Chen style is like full contact football large explosive moves. Tai Chi Chan is definatly helping me with my agility, balance, endurance, and sanity. plus I am starting to walk park more.


Oh btw is it better to walk or run/jog to build muscle in the legs. I would think that walking would be better since that is the motion that you will be doing on the AT versus run/jog since that is haveing the muscles work in a diferent way.? idk any insight??

StarLyte
07-19-2006, 11:02
Here is a GREAT work out prior to a hike.

Hike up a river with light weight waders on.

Your entire body will feel it afterwards.

The water should be at least 2 feet deep. Walk 1 mile to begin with, then work your way up each time. Obviously walking against the current will result in a better work out.

Don't forget your bug spray. And don't attempt this after a rain.

I walked 3 miles up the Chagrin River here east of Cleveland Ohio. I was walking north towards Lake Erie. We were supposed to hike but it was 95 degrees. The river walk was a more intense workout but at least it was cooler.
Three miles doesn't sound like a lot, but believe me it is when you're river walking.

I picked up a water snake in the river and it bit down on my finger and wouldn't let go, I had to yell for help to get it off---that was exciting :o

When you get out of the water and take your waders off, you feel like you can jog 10 miles. It's great !!!

frieden
07-19-2006, 11:39
Oh btw is it better to walk or run/jog to build muscle in the legs. I would think that walking would be better since that is the motion that you will be doing on the AT versus run/jog since that is haveing the muscles work in a diferent way.? idk any insight??

That depends on your weight. If you are at all overweight, you should walk, or do your running in water (in a pool, at least past your waist). If you are going to run, consider what we used to call "telephone poles" - jog from one telephone pole to the next, then sprint to the next one, then jog to the next one, and so forth. I used to suggest to my clients to strengthen their ankles and knees first.

Sit in a chair, lift your leg slightly, and draw the alphabet (upper and lower case) in the air with your big toe, with each foot.

Sit in a chair, point your toes to the ceilling (think like you are pulling it back to your knee), and raise and lower your lower leg, keeping your foot flexed back. Never lock your knee, and never lower to a 90 degree angle. Don't use weights. Do this with each leg, whenever you think about it.

These two exercises are really easy to do, while sitting at your desk, and it helps with circulation too. Also, when you are waiting for something (the microwave, the shower to heat up, etc.), do calf raises.

Phreak
07-19-2006, 19:10
I make it a point to stay in shape all the time, so there is never a need for getting in shape. I find it a lot easier to maintain a fitness level rather than to try to get 'back into shape' after a layoff from exercise. I ride my bicycle to/from work whenever possible.. typically 150-200 miles per week, play tennis 2-3x per week, and lots of backpacking. I do a lot of trail running with my dogs, which helps as well.

c.coyle
07-19-2006, 19:44
There's nothing better than hiking regularly. 8-10 miles once a week with some ups and downs does wonders for maintaining a decent level of fitness. Also, regular walking, ride a bike, run steps if you have access to a building or your local high school stadium.

Weight training is nice for other things, but it won't help your cardiovascular fitness much.

Blissful
07-19-2006, 20:26
Wow some great tips.

We've been walking around the neighborhood and I use my poles. I'd like to get out on a trail at least once a week. Last week I was out though it was 100% humidity and I almost croaked. Only got 7 miles in. And my knee's been hurting ever since. Ugh.

Hope to start doing the neighborhood soon with a pack on my back. That should get some stares.

blindeye
07-19-2006, 20:29
i was 60lbs overweight when i decided to hike the trail. i have hemed and hawed and done all kinds of diets, and i lost a whopping 15 lbs over 6 months ( note the sarcasim) so now i walk ( or hike) 3 or 4 days aweek and on the off days i lift weights not big weight but 20 to 30 lbs. i REALLY try to keep my caloric daily intake to 2500 calories a day. i have lost 25 lbs in 2 months. it works for me . hope this helps

Daddy Longlegs
07-19-2006, 21:33
If you are in ok shape you can always start the trail without workout before and building yourself up over the next few weeks to a month. But I think that you would have a better time at the beginning if you had been atleast walking a few miles 2 or 3 times a week and a nice long trail of 8 to 10 miles a weekend a few months before your thur. Personally I will probably be doing what I normally do which is walking a few miles 2 twice a week then an 8 to 10 mile hike every weekend or every other weekend. For me this will not start until mid September.

VictoriaM
07-19-2006, 23:21
Yup, I've started. I'm a bellydancer, and I've been dancing up a storm lately. There's no better exercise for women than that. Once I get my pack, I'm going to start walking a few miles with it here and there. I'm also looking to join a yoga class soon, but that's for my own enjoyment, not to get in shape.

mrc237
07-19-2006, 23:44
Started treadmill workout carrying 20 lb weightvest to simulate pack walking 8 miles at 3.1 mph. Anyone out there have any experience with weightvest?

hammock engineer
07-20-2006, 00:35
Here is a GREAT work out prior to a hike.

Hike up a river with light weight waders on.

Your entire body will feel it afterwards.

The water should be at least 2 feet deep. Walk 1 mile to begin with, then work your way up each time. Obviously walking against the current will result in a better work out.

Don't forget your bug spray. And don't attempt this after a rain.

I walked 3 miles up the Chagrin River here east of Cleveland Ohio. I was walking north towards Lake Erie. We were supposed to hike but it was 95 degrees. The river walk was a more intense workout but at least it was cooler.
Three miles doesn't sound like a lot, but believe me it is when you're river walking.

I picked up a water snake in the river and it bit down on my finger and wouldn't let go, I had to yell for help to get it off---that was exciting :o

When you get out of the water and take your waders off, you feel like you can jog 10 miles. It's great !!!

I'll have to try that again, a lot of that growing up. Does it count as a workout if I bring my fishing pole?

Nightwalker
07-21-2006, 23:19
Just hike; as often as you can; multiple hard days in a row.

ridefast
07-22-2006, 01:11
i went for a run yesterday, finished and realized i had done slightly more than 11 miles....didnt hurt today

figure im off to a good start :D

frieden
07-22-2006, 08:35
Started treadmill workout carrying 20 lb weightvest to simulate pack walking 8 miles at 3.1 mph. Anyone out there have any experience with weightvest?

Personally, I don't like the weight vest. It doesn't distribute the weight the same as a pack, and it puts stess on your body, before the supporting muscles are strong. Build your supporting muscles up, then your major muscle groups, and then think about the weight vest. If you are already Arnold, then go for it!

FLHiker
07-22-2006, 14:50
Here's an odd one - Rollerblading. (I hate running)

Great for leg strength, good cardio. - But this only suppliments hiking full pack weight. However, for those of us in flat 'ol F-L-A, we need to work legs some other way!

frieden
07-22-2006, 20:17
Here's an odd one - Rollerblading. (I hate running)

Great for leg strength, good cardio. - But this only suppliments hiking full pack weight. However, for those of us in flat 'ol F-L-A, we need to work legs some other way!

Ooohhhh! I loved my roller blades, before one of them broke. My daughter and I used to play roller blade basketball. Excellent workout!

mrc237
07-22-2006, 21:40
Original post by frieden: Personally, I don't like the weight vest. It doesn't distribute the weight the same as a pack, and it puts stess on your body, before the supporting muscles are strong. Build your supporting muscles up, then your major muscle groups, and then think about the weight vest. If you are already Arnold, then go for it!--------------I put 17.5 lbs in rear and 7.5 lbs in front seems balanced enough. Dosn't seem to stress out any particular muscle group. In the movie Twins I resemble Arnolds brother.

mike!
07-23-2006, 05:08
i know this is kind of weird, but my biggest challenge for getting in trail shape is learning to sleep on my back. i've been a hardcore side sleeper my entire life, and with my horribly boney hips, foam pads can be quite cruel on shelter floors. side sleeping really does suck, because i need a bigger pillow, a thicker sleeping pad, and my neighbors have to wake up to me staring at them. sleeping on my back could solve all these problems, but alas no luck tricking the body. anyone else have this problem?
mike!

frieden
07-23-2006, 07:58
i know this is kind of weird, but my biggest challenge for getting in trail shape is learning to sleep on my back. i've been a hardcore side sleeper my entire life, and with my horribly boney hips, foam pads can be quite cruel on shelter floors. side sleeping really does suck, because i need a bigger pillow, a thicker sleeping pad, and my neighbors have to wake up to me staring at them. sleeping on my back could solve all these problems, but alas no luck tricking the body. anyone else have this problem?
mike!

Yes, I'm still battling with this. Currently, we sleep on the cheap blue foam pads from Walmart, with a sleeping bag spread over the top. I put sheets on top of the sleeping bag, and use a regular pillow. All of this is setting on top of carpet-covered concrete. This isn't the set up in the tent, but it's close (I don't bring a pillow, when hiking, though). I don't always end up on my back, but I try. My back feels a LOT better, since I started sleeping on the floor.

The ground will be a lot softer than a shelter floor. Do you have a self-inflating pad? I can't use them with Ed (and 3 cats), but that might help you. If you want to train your body to sleep on your back, you'll just have to accept some sleepless nights. Go to bed on your back, if you can't sleep after awhile, then get up - read, play solitare, etc (don't watch an action movie). Try to go back to bed. Eventually, you'll be so exhausted, you'll sleep. Don't eat or drink anything after 9pm, no sugar or other non-sleepy stuff after 7pm, yadiyadiya..... Try Sleepy Time tea around 7pm. You could cut right to the Tylenol PM, but I wouldn't advise it. Have you thought about giving up your bed, and sleeping in your bag on the floor? Good luck!

Amigi'sLastStand
07-23-2006, 08:00
i know this is kind of weird, but my biggest challenge for getting in trail shape is learning to sleep on my back. i've been a hardcore side sleeper my entire life, and with my horribly boney hips, foam pads can be quite cruel on shelter floors. side sleeping really does suck, because i need a bigger pillow, a thicker sleeping pad, and my neighbors have to wake up to me staring at them. sleeping on my back could solve all these problems, but alas no luck tricking the body. anyone else have this problem?
mike!
Man, I am the exact same way. I feel like I cant breathe on my back. I sleep on my sides or on my stomach ( less now that my back isnt so good anymore ). The only place I can sleep on my back ( Just Jeff and neo will love this ) is in a hammock. I only use my hammock in Fl since the ground is always wet, at least during hiking season. Otherwise, I think they arent worth the hassle, at least for me.
If you have to sleep in a shelter ( I prefer em ), buy a thermarest as opposed to a blue foam pad. I just bought one and it makes a big difference for me. That or get into hammocking. I think the slight head inclination makes it easier for me to sleep on my back since I dont feel like I'm gonna suffocate.

swede
07-24-2006, 16:38
Well, I'm a relative newbie to hammocking, and I am a side sleeper as well. I can manage to sleep comfortably on my left side in my HH. After a few nights, I usually just put my cloths bag under my knees and sleep well on my back. Unless circumstances force me, I won't go back to the ground. Borrow a hammock, and test it yourself in the backyard, or one a few shakedown hikes. The hammock side is calling you...:cool:

Blissful
07-24-2006, 17:46
i know this is kind of weird, but my biggest challenge for getting in trail shape is learning to sleep on my back. i've been a hardcore side sleeper my entire life, and with my horribly boney hips, foam pads can be quite cruel on shelter floors. side sleeping really does suck, because i need a bigger pillow, a thicker sleeping pad, and my neighbors have to wake up to me staring at them. sleeping on my back could solve all these problems, but alas no luck tricking the body. anyone else have this problem?
mike!

I'm a side sleeper and found the Big Agnes Insulated Air Cord pad to be comfortable. It's a little cold below 35 degrees, so I plan to supplement with a short ridgerest for the first part of the hike. Also, I only plan to sleep in shelters in inclement weather and will use my tarptent.

Honestly, with all things like the hike itself, your body will get used to sleeping outdoors on harder surfaces. I hear it takes a few weeks to acclimate.

mrc237
07-24-2006, 18:07
BA-IAC works for me but I'd still like to sleep on my back. I'll keep an eye on this tread.

frieden
07-25-2006, 09:22
We've started our fitness and nutrition logs, today. Wish us luck!

gsingjane
07-25-2006, 11:25
The best thing I ever did for my backpacking was to get down to an appropriate body weight for my height (had to lose 25 lbs. to do it, NOT FUN). But the resulting decrease in stress on my joints and musculature was well worth the deprivation, as well as the increase in ease of climbing hills and boulders. I have enjoyed being in better shape so much that I have finally found the courage to enter a marathon, something I had always wanted to do but knew I was too overweight to try. Now I am going for it at the end of October... no matter how old you are, there are always new challenges and worlds to conquer! And thank goodness for that!

Jane in CT

Time To Fly 97
07-25-2006, 15:30
I'm into weight vests. I started with a 25 pound barbell weight in an old (but indestructable) TNF pack with a waist belt. I put a towl inside to cushion my back. I did that for a year and pushed it up to 50 pounds. I ended up being able to average 3.5 MPH with hills included. My new thing is an X-Vest (84 pounds) attached to a 6 pound aluminum frame (ASUS). The X-Vest is a waste unless you plan to get a frame to attach it too!!! I absolutely use my leki poles and just walk around my neighborhood, which is hilly, with a headlamp if it is dusk. with 90 pounds I do 3/1.5 MPH (level/hill) and do as many miles as I feel comfortable with that day (I believe quality of sleep, what you eat, stress, etc all play a part in how much energy you have).

I hydrate, hike with an iPod shuffle and enjoy a puff or two before I go.

I love this workout because it is relatively low impact, safer than many of the other sports I do and works exactly the muscles I need for hiking. 90 pounds is extreme, and but it took a couple years to build up to and I am very careful to only push the envelope a little each time.

What is a little untintended side enjoyment is how fun those competitive situations can be when my buddies try to "challenge" each other. The leader sets the pace, etc. It means I can keep up without breaking a sweat....and have plenty of energy to get a campfire going, help out, etc.

TTF

1Pint
07-25-2006, 21:33
I have finally found the courage to enter a marathon, something I had always wanted to do but knew I was too overweight to try. Now I am going for it at the end of October...

Jane in CT

Jane, Best of luck with your marathon! Just watch out... you might get addicted and start obsessing about running marathons in all 50 states or some such silly notion. ;-)

the goat
07-25-2006, 22:16
I love this workout because it is relatively low impact

relative to what?..a sledgehammer to the knees?

running on asphalt/ concrete w/ 90 lbs. on the back & chest is about as high impact as you can get, imo.

Skidsteer
07-25-2006, 22:23
relative to what?..a sledgehammer to the knees?

running on asphalt/ concrete w/ 90 lbs. on the back & chest is about as high impact as you can get, imo.



My new thing is an X-Vest (84 pounds) attached to a 6 pound aluminum frame (ASUS). The X-Vest is a waste unless you plan to get a frame to attach it too!!! I absolutely use my leki poles and just walk around my neighborhood


He's walkin', Goat. But with 84 lbs it still qualifies as high impact, IMO. :D

gsingjane
07-26-2006, 06:29
1Pint, between you and my husband, I think I'm going to be busy for a few years ... he was musing the other night that if I enjoyed doing this marathon, I might consider moving up to ultra's. He thinks that the backpacking experience might somehow translate... good grief! Is this really what's in store? Did you do a 50-stater?

Jane in CT

the_iceman
07-26-2006, 08:08
i know this is kind of weird, but my biggest challenge for getting in trail shape is learning to sleep on my back. i've been a hardcore side sleeper my entire life, and with my horribly boney hips, foam pads can be quite cruel on shelter floors. side sleeping really does suck, because i need a bigger pillow, a thicker sleeping pad, and my neighbors have to wake up to me staring at them. sleeping on my back could solve all these problems, but alas no luck tricking the body. anyone else have this problem?
mike!

I am a side sleeper as well. I have tried carrying an extra pad on short trips which helps some. I finally got the Big Agnes insulated air core 2 inches thick. I also plan on tenting more than shelters. Much softer, especially the baseball bat floor shelters in Maine. A shelter is attractive in the rain but in the height of bug season, filled with snoring back sleepers, mice, and a rock hard floor the tent may still look good.

1Pint
07-26-2006, 09:13
1Pint, between you and my husband, I think I'm going to be busy for a few years ... he was musing the other night that if I enjoyed doing this marathon, I might consider moving up to ultra's. He thinks that the backpacking experience might somehow translate... good grief! Is this really what's in store? Did you do a 50-stater?

Jane in CT

No, haven't finished the states, just started... 3 down, 48 (50 + DC) to go. Was sidelined by an overuse knee injury this Spring, so I won't be doing another until after my 2007 thru because I don't want to jeopardize my hike. I thought I was just going to do just 1, but it's completely addictive.

Yes, ultras will start calling your name too. Afterall, aren't those of us interested in a thru just really in life for the challenge? And once you conquer 26.2, don't you want to know if you can do 30? or 35? or ..... My brother's an Ironman, so he's been trying to get me to do some of the long races he likes. Definitely after my thru, I'm going to start training for an ultra (and they count for the 50 states.) So, enjoy the expanding challenge. At least it's a healthy addiction!

Are you using your running for building endurance on the trail?

frieden
07-26-2006, 09:38
I did the Kona half-marathon in HI last year (they made me switch to the half-marathon, because I had a TIA after the flight). The feeling of accomplishment when crossing the finish line, is amazing. However, when I walked away from the finish line to find our tent, I saw this huge line. Free massages!!! A veteran said, "Oh, yeah, they have this stuff at every marathon." There was also free food and beer. :banana No wonder marathons are so addicting!

gsingjane
07-26-2006, 10:33
No, running was my first love (nothing like that first love!) back in the bad ole days, when it was thought that if "we girls" ran over one mile, we'd "injure our delicate female organs"... I guess it's a good thing it did in my case, because otherwise I'd have 10 kids instead of my 4!! I've been running the roads since about 1970, although I've definitely had my ups and downs (the aforementioned 4 pregnancies, plus professional school and other interruptions). My dad and I started running after he discovered Ken Cooper's "Aerobics" (anybody else remember that?) and we laced up our trusty Keds and got out there. Fun times.

I am a "Janie come lately" to backpacking - didn't really get started with any kind of outdoorsy/camping stuff at all until 2001 when I became a Girl Scout leader. But I have certainly found that running and staying in shape are tremendously beneficial for backpacking and hiking... in fact at my age (48) I can't imagine doing it any other way. I found backpacking to be extremely strenuous physically, much more so than long distance running, although maybe that's partially because my upper body strength was practically nil. I do find the two activities to be fairly similar, though, in that they are both more a matter of endurance rather than technique (good for me) and both permit you to withdraw and just think your own thoughts, while propelling yourself through the natural terrain under your own power.

Do you cross-train at all? I do, especially since (like you) I do suffer from overuse injuries, more so as I age, and I have to ration the knee-pounding. I run 3 days a week and then cross-train 3 days, primarily on the elliptical trainer with resistance. I have found that machine to be particularly helpful for building leg strength, which helps me power up those hills and also a bit with speed.

Oh, the Ironman. My husband is a long distance cyclist and is chomping to train for one of these. He finds the swimming part really tough though - he has very low body fat and tends to sink like a stone upon entering the water! But for me, no - cycling just isn't my thing and swimming, eh (even though I don't have the body fat problem!).

I love your idea of a 50-state marathon quest. That could actually be a goal to work towards, since a thru-hike is at least 10 years in my future...

Jane in CT

Time To Fly 97
07-26-2006, 15:29
relative to what?..a sledgehammer to the knees?

running on asphalt/ concrete w/ 90 lbs. on the back & chest is about as high impact as you can get, imo.

Hiking as opposed to running. When I run, I have sore muscles for days. Hiking, even with weight, is more like gliding along - no up and down. The frame I carry the X-Vest on (completely lashed to back of frame) has an outstanding waist belt (ARUC Systems). Very little of that weight is on my back and chest. Normal setup and a VERY gradual buildup to this weight.

TTF

Time To Fly 97
07-26-2006, 15:34
I also use lekis heavily - distributes the weight well, better balance, etc.

This is really good cardio. I did this last night and feel great today. Like Clark Kent : )

TTF

Frolicking Dinosaurs
07-26-2006, 15:40
Wow - I am in awe of all the athletes here. Keep up the good work.

In addition to 22 exercises prescribed for physical therapy to maintain the strength in my leg, I do the exercises with the uninjured leg, do some upper body work and walk daily. We try to get in a hike every week, but it rarely is possible.

1Pint
07-27-2006, 21:10
I found backpacking to be extremely strenuous physically, much more so than long distance running, although maybe that's partially because my upper body strength was practically nil. I do find the two activities to be fairly similar, though, in that they are both more a matter of endurance rather than technique (good for me) and both permit you to withdraw and just think your own thoughts, while propelling yourself through the natural terrain under your own power.

Yeah, getting into that zone where you're not even aware of what your body is doing and then coming out of it enough to realize what you've accomplished and then wondering how far you could go if you didn't stop yourself is amazing. It's only happened for me a few times but I long to be there again. And again.


Do you cross-train at all? I do, especially since (like you) I do suffer from overuse injuries, more so as I age, and I have to ration the knee-pounding. I run 3 days a week and then cross-train 3 days, primarily on the elliptical trainer with resistance. I have found that machine to be particularly helpful for building leg strength, which helps me power up those hills and also a bit with speed.
Jane in CT

Not as much as I would like or as much as I should. I love swimming and racquetball, but haven't managed to do either very much. I'm pretty much stuck on the running and machines (for core & upper body). Every week I tell myself I'm going to add at least 2 days a week of swimming, but it doesn't happen. Also plan to add floor exercises for core strength, but haven't followed through on that either. And only 7 1/2 months to get in trail shape! Aack!

I'd love to hear how your marathon goes. And, of course, whether you become addicted or not.

frieden
07-28-2006, 12:21
Best shoulder workout:

http://www.military.com/NewContent/0,13190,Smith_030904,00.html?ESRC=marine-a.nl

Frolicking Dinosaurs
07-28-2006, 13:30
Great find, Frieden. I can't wait to see his exercises for the knees and lower back.

Time To Fly 97
07-28-2006, 13:36
Believe it or not, stomach exercises are great for lower back!!

TTF

Rain
07-30-2006, 21:38
I've also recently joined the local gym. Hiking is the best workout, I've lost more weight out on the Trail than anywhere else. But ever since I returned from my '05 hike, my knees haven't been the same. So I hope the gym will help. Building my flexibility and leg strength are top priority.

Good luck, Frieden!

tomman
08-13-2006, 20:21
I have just started reading this list about getting in shape. One point I have to strongly disagree with. C.Coyle said that weight lifting does not help your cardiovascular conditioning.

Come and do a leg workout with me. Start with 30 minutes on a treadmill at various angle to warm up the quads. Then go to 4 to 5 sets for leg extensions starting about 115lbs for 15 reps then rest 30 seconds and continue to raise the weight 5 to 10 pounds each set and try to maintain the 15 reps. You more than likely can not continuie do this but do as many as you can to complete failure. Then with a minute rest go to squats. Start as heavy as possible for 15 reps and continue to raise the weight for at least 4 or 5 sets with no more than 1 minute rest between sets. You may have to decrease the reps to continuie but be sure the reps are very good form and to full half squat. The good form form is very importrant in all these exrerises.

Now with no more than one minute rest go to leg presses. Start as heavy as possible for 12 to 15 reps. Rest thirty seconds then add 90 pounts and do 12 to 15 more reps, add 90 pounds and continue this for 4 0r 5 sets. I normally go up to at least 540 pounds, and I am 71 years old so if you are youngert should bve able to get close to 1000 pounds.

We are not done yet, with a 1 minue rest go hack squats. Start as heavy as possible for 12 to 15 reps, again rest 30 seconds and increase weight and do another set. Continue this for at least 4 sets and more are better.

I also do the rest of the body parts on different days, doing high reps with as much weight as I can. I am moere after endurence and muscle.

After this do hamstrings and calves for another 30 to 45 minutes with only 30 second to 1 miunte rest between sets. If you then have enough breath left to start all over again then I owe you an Apology.

A few younger people that tried this with me, unless they were in very good shape, almost had to crawl out of the gym and were breathing as if they had run a 10 mile race. Believe me it will differently increase your lung capacity.

Now as an example I have COPD.

I agree with most of the other coments on gettinmg in shape. I for certain agree with the Martial arts work outs. I do Karate 2 times a week and it seems to help a lot. I am here in the Dallas, Texas area so I have no mountains to climb so I have to try and find other things that will help. I also walk on a treadmill with a backpack and set to various angles and speeds.

I am still interested in any other things I can do to get ready for my 2007 AT hike.

Cherokee Tom

StarLyte
08-13-2006, 20:53
Cherokee Tom-

I am exhausted just READING your post. And you have COPD? Are you sure :confused:

I walk in my neighborhood wearing my pack, as a matter of fact, I just went shopping and wore my pack to carry groceries in. This winter I plan on purchasing a good treadmill. I have asthma, so in the winter months I need to workout. I swim a lot too.

A few weeks ago I went riverwalking. It's a great workout, wearing lightweight waders of course. Water was 1-3 ft. deep. Try it. I think you might like it.

So you're thru hiking next year? Great.

strnorm
08-13-2006, 21:11
I know this is not where i need to start a new thread, will someone tell me how. what i need to post is if anyone is looking for pokey who started in springer in april,i talked to her on the trail thur aug.10 between little gap and wind gap, Pa. she is still heading north doing good.

jimtanker
08-13-2006, 21:34
One of the gyms on Ft Lewis had a treadmill that went up to +60degree elevation. That thing was a monster. I used to walk that some mornings. If you can find one of them to add to your workout you'll be golden.

saimyoji
08-14-2006, 00:09
You guys are all wasting your time. Just listen to Dr. W. A. Yankovich: Eat Jelly donuts and lose 20 lbs a day!

saimyoji
08-14-2006, 00:15
I have just started reading this list about getting in shape. One point I have to strongly disagree with. C.Coyle said that weight lifting does not help your cardiovascular conditioning.

Come and do a leg workout with me. Start with 30 minutes on a treadmill at various angle to warm up the quads. Then go to 4 to 5 sets for leg extensions starting about 115lbs for 15 reps then rest 30 seconds and continue to raise the weight 5 to 10 pounds each set and try to maintain the 15 reps. You more than likely can not continuie do this but do as many as you can to complete failure. Then with a minute rest go to squats. Start as heavy as possible for 15 reps and continue to raise the weight for at least 4 or 5 sets with no more than 1 minute rest between sets. You may have to decrease the reps to continuie but be sure the reps are very good form and to full half squat. The good form form is very importrant in all these exrerises.

Now with no more than one minute rest go to leg presses. Start as heavy as possible for 12 to 15 reps. Rest thirty seconds then add 90 pounts and do 12 to 15 more reps, add 90 pounds and continue this for 4 0r 5 sets. I normally go up to at least 540 pounds, and I am 71 years old so if you are youngert should bve able to get close to 1000 pounds.

We are not done yet, with a 1 minue rest go hack squats. Start as heavy as possible for 12 to 15 reps, again rest 30 seconds and increase weight and do another set. Continue this for at least 4 sets and more are better.

I also do the rest of the body parts on different days, doing high reps with as much weight as I can. I am moere after endurence and muscle.

After this do hamstrings and calves for another 30 to 45 minutes with only 30 second to 1 miunte rest between sets. If you then have enough breath left to start all over again then I owe you an Apology.

A few younger people that tried this with me, unless they were in very good shape, almost had to crawl out of the gym and were breathing as if they had run a 10 mile race. Believe me it will differently increase your lung capacity.

Now as an example I have COPD.

I agree with most of the other coments on gettinmg in shape. I for certain agree with the Martial arts work outs. I do Karate 2 times a week and it seems to help a lot. I am here in the Dallas, Texas area so I have no mountains to climb so I have to try and find other things that will help. I also walk on a treadmill with a backpack and set to various angles and speeds.

I am still interested in any other things I can do to get ready for my 2007 AT hike.

Cherokee Tom

1) WTH is COPD? Many of us are afraid of you now. Please explain. :o

2) Don't disagree with ANYONE from PA. You'll only get hurt. Unless you are right in which case its a miscommunication. :)

Frosty
08-14-2006, 01:12
WTH is COPD? Chronic Obstructive Posting Disease

c.coyle
08-14-2006, 05:54
I have just started reading this list about getting in shape. One point I have to strongly disagree with. C.Coyle said that weight lifting does not help your cardiovascular conditioning.

Come and do a leg workout with me. Start with 30 minutes on a treadmill at various angle to warm up the quads. ... [describes whole routine]

Tom, I couldn't disagree more. In my experience, strength training and cardiovascular training are two distinct things. Trying to blend them leads to in mediocre results for both.

Long, complicated routines like this are why people are scared of weight training or quit. What you are describing is a cardiovascular routine with weights as props. A routine like that won't make you significantly stronger or build muscle mass. It's a bunch of redundant exercises for the same body parts which can only lead to overtraining and injury. Squats, hack squats, leg extensions and leg presses in the same workout? What's the point? I'm sure you are breathing hard!

A short, intense routine emphasizing the big compound movements (work multiple muscles at once), two or three times a week, is all you need to build and maintain a decent level of strength. I'm talking in and out in an hour, tops.

One compound lower body movement, such as squats or deadlifts, for your quads, butt, hamstrings and back. Leg extensions only work your quads.

One pushing movement, maybe two, (bench press, dips, mil press, pushups with or w/o added weight on your back) for your chest, triceps and shoulders

One pulling movement (rows, lat machine pulldown, chinups) for your lats, obliques, and biceps

Something for your abs.

Spend the rest of your time doing real cardio work, like hiking.

(I don't want to turn this into the weightlifting thread. Private message me if you want to talk lifting and compare routines)

rumbler
08-14-2006, 07:35
I find after spending 30-45 minutes on a treadmill/stairmaster the elevated heart rate transfers to my weight program, which immediately follows the cardio portion of my morning.

It may not be an extension of the cardio, but it sure FEELS like an extension of the cardio. :)

gsingjane
08-14-2006, 07:38
Have to agree with C.Coyle here...there are some folks (in a minority) who can spend 2-3-4 hours and more at the gym doing a monster workout. But if you set it up so that the choice is 3 hours or nothing, most people would have to choose nothing. I know I would! I'm in and out in 1 hour, 10 minutes (1 hour, 20 if I shower) and that's the absolute most I can squeeze out of my day.

I'm also curious how anybody could do that much lower body work and still have any energy to do any cardio. I used to squat and deadlift and found it blitzed my legs so extremely I could hardly run at all. Now that I'm marathon training, about the only thing I do is hamstrings... my legs are pounded out from all the running as it is and I think if I put heavy lifting on top of that, I'd have to really cut back on the mileage.

Jane in CT

frieden
08-14-2006, 13:31
Many people do cardio and strength training at the same time, meaning that they lift weights very fast. Many trainers promote this. I do not agree with this. I do not think it is effective, and it is an excellent way to injure yourself. I have had many clients who trained that way, which is how I got them. I got the tough cases. Take a big, tough guy, who can throw all this weight around really fast, and then make him do all of his movements s-l-o-w-l-y. He'll be spaghetti half way through the workout. It's actually sort of funny, but it's the best way to get them to realize how not-so-strong they are.

Do your cardio and strength training on separate days, or at separate times of the day (am vs. pm). I would rather run in the eary morning, and workout in the afternoon. Work with your strengths. If you are a morning person, and you need to lose weight, do your cardio in the morning, etc. Just remember, the more lean muscle mass you have, the faster you'll burn fat.

I suggest doing your exercises just as slow up, as down - controlled, with perfect form. Nothing is more important than form, when doing your exercises. However, I don't rest more than 30-45 seconds between sets (use a watch), and I do my exercises back-to-back. If you are doing a full-body beginner workout 3-4 times per week, your workout should take 1hr. If you are working certain body parts on certain days (split), your workout should take no more than 30 min.

That's just my .02 (hey, you're getting me cheap; I used to charge $35-50/hr!) :D

frieden
08-14-2006, 13:41
I would rather run in the eary morning, and workout in the afternoon.

Hahahaha! That would be "early" morning, folks, unless you are training with the military. I swear, they attract people with these huge ears. Dumbo would be proud! Maybe, that's why I keep my hair long.

Skidsteer
08-14-2006, 18:27
tomman, how frequent are your leg workouts? Once a week? Twice a week?

bido7614
09-09-2006, 20:45
hey the rollerblading thing sounds pretty easy.. i used to skate all the time and loved it.. i could start up again but does it really help?
lissie

Amigi'sLastStand
09-09-2006, 21:14
hey the rollerblading thing sounds pretty easy.. i used to skate all the time and loved it.. i could start up again but does it really help?
lissie
This just my little ol opinion....
But for me the toughtest thing isnt the distances or the altitude or the cold, it's the hills. Grayblazer likes to run stadium steps to prepare. I think that is about the best thing one can do, other than prep hike up in the mountains. For us Flat Earther here in the Sunshine State, rollingblading is probably good thing, but not the optimum thing overall.

chicote
09-13-2006, 14:13
I imagine anything you do to break a sweat and get that heart rate up will help. How much depends on how often and the intensity level. But if you don't do anything it will not go unnoticed come thru-hiking time. My wife runs (about 8 miles a day) and does weight training she is in much better shape than I am. When I get a chance I go for Mtn bike rides (about 10 miles) and I also teach a Capoeira class once a week. I think my wife will be far better off than me if I don't step up the workout regimen. Just last night she's started doing steps on our kitchen chair. Two 10 min sessions with a min break between. She's only 5 feet tall so these are big steps. I'm gonna join in on the fun and get those quads and glutes in good shape for those AT hills.

mweinstone
09-16-2006, 01:25
running is the life

tomman
09-18-2006, 00:47
In all fairness I do not do that work out since I have had COPD. The work out I refer to was many years ago when I was a bodybuilder. I would work out 4 days on and one day off. I was in very good shape and just kept getting better until I started traveling with my job for 5 to sometimes 7 days a week so my training stopped. I still remained in good shape for a long time. I not is all that bad a shape right now. I was mainly just joshing people.

I still stick with the idea that you can get a great work out for your lungs using weights but you need to go to failure on each set. I also disagree with what someone said about this would make you breath hard but not gain power. I started with about 90 pound squats and after a time I have done up to 450 pounds for 12 reps. To me that is gaining power.

I can still do a leg press of 450 pounds for 3 sets of 12 reps, just last week. So my legs are in fair shape but it is the lungs that will hold me back, I am working on that with the treadmill. I do about 2 hours on the treadmill at 2.5 to 3 mph with the angles varing in a random fashion from 3 to 15 degrees. I have to now start doing this with a loaded backpack.

I also try to walk around my area for 4 to 5 miles 2 to 3 a week and that will now start with a backpack since the weather is cooling down from the 100s

I went to REI on Friday and walked around the store about hour with a 30 pound backpack. The level floor did not bother me but the climbing stairs was hard. So I still have a long ways to go, but I will now step everything up a notch and also start doing some overnight hikes.

Tomman

Brad
09-27-2006, 16:54
Best shoulder workout:

http://www.military.com/NewContent/0,13190,Smith_030904,00.html?ESRC=marine-a.nl

Thanks for posting that. I'm hoping to thru next summer even though I'm still healing from a seperated shoulder. My shoulder can handle a 20 pound pack without too much pain, but 30 is torture.

CABBAGE
09-27-2006, 18:05
I'm In The Same Boat. Maybe I'll See You Lag 'n Somewhere On The Trail. I Will Be Slow And Steady Too. I've Found That The Seated Leg Press W - Lots Of Reps Has Helped Me. Along With Calve Workout. Hope To See Ya.

Cherokee Bill
09-27-2006, 19:00
:eek: I went out and purchased a "40-lb weight vest" from www.weightvest.com (http://www.weightvest.com) and use it 3-4 times a week for a few hours.

At 59 yo it has made a world of difference for me.

My 2-cents ;)

JoeHiker
09-28-2006, 18:53
On a slight tangent here:

I knew that distance running would have me in good shape for hiking and that proved to be true. But one thing I didn't expect was that distance hiking dramatically improved my running as well. It is the only alternative exercise (alternative to running that is) I've ever found that did that.

Last fall I did a started my Long trail hike 3 days after finishing the Chicago Marathon in a personal best time. I went north to south so right away I was going over nasty nasty 3000 to 4000 foot mountains, several times a day, day in and day out. I was on a tight schedule for the first week or so, trying to meet friends who would hike with me for a short while so I had to hike hard and fast with little time to rest. With all the hills, it was like getting 4 or 5 tempo runs in every day.

By the time I was done with that thing I had dramatically improved my running fitness (and this was after being in the best marathon shape of my life). After a week to get used to running again, I was floating along at insanely fast paces on training runs without even trying.

Sly
09-28-2006, 21:18
I'm "old school" and hardly do any prior conditioning beforehand, prefering to break in slowly as I go.

"Why hurt twice, when you can hurt once" -Squirell in "How to hike the PCT"