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enari
07-21-2006, 04:31
Hi.

I first learned about the AT 14 years ago, and it has always been a dream of mine. I used to backpack regularly for short trips. However, that was a few years ago. I sort of gave up on my dream when I was diagnosed as Bipolar.

Somehow, the conversation came up, and my doctor told me he thought I was stable enough to do it, with enough planning. He said there probably wouldn’t be any problems getting medications to me or handling the dosages while I was on trail and that he thinks I could attempt it.

We have talked about it a few times since then, and he is fully encouraging me to take a look at my gear, inventory what I need and start training and taking some shorter trips over the next year.

It is good to have a goal, and I like the idea of going back to something I really enjoy. I trust him and his assessment of what I can do, but, seeing as he had never heard of the AT before I told him about it, I can’t help but feel that he doesn’t have a good idea of what this would entail.

I am pretty stable, and my meds haven’t been adjusted in over a year. However, backpacking can be very challenging and the idea of getting sick is terrifying to me. My body is guaranteed to change over the trail, and I’m sure my brain chemistry will as well. I’m afraid I might get into a situation where I need psychiatric care and need to get back home quick.

Before I commit myself to the possibility of this dream, I wanted to get the opinion of others who have more experience with backpacking and maybe connect with someone who has attempted the trail with an illness?

Thank,

Victoria

blindeye
07-21-2006, 06:24
although my ilnesses are different than yours, i am legally blind, i've had a heart attack,and triple bypass and i am planning a 2008 SOBO thru hike. my feeling is as long as your doctor gives a thumbs up GO FOR IT. my doctors' think it's great, it,s my family who think it's a bad idea. i love the moral support! my attitude is the hell with them. DO IT!

Amigi'sLastStand
07-21-2006, 08:02
Recently there have been many threads regarding ppl with bipolar or GAD. I dont have your issue ( check my trail posting in the Article section ), but my headaches go away when I hike. My doctors are miffed and confused at it as none of them want me to hike. At least yours does. Give it a shot. Find a partner to hike with who can understand your stiuation. Put up a post here to find a partner, lot's of ppl do. You may be suprised that once you get on the Trail, things may change for the better.
Good luck and I hope you can do it.
Chuck

Frolicking Dinosaurs
07-21-2006, 08:11
Enari, you are never going to know what you can do until you get out there and try. Perhaps you could do some section hiking near your home and get an idea of how your body reacts to hiking before leaving the 'safety net' so far behind. This should give you more information about how to prepare and more confidence in your ability to do this.

While your doctor may not know the AT's situation and terrain specifically, I'm sure he knows the effect of strenuous activity and physical stress on a person with you medical malady.

I don't have any personal experience with brain chemistry imbalances, but I have a friend who does (bipolar with psychotic features). She is able to backpack for weeks at a time without any problem and would stay longer, but she must have monthly liver panels (a blood test) due to one of her non-psych meds.

frieden
07-21-2006, 08:35
My illness is different from yours as well, but my headaches go away when I hike, too. We "hiked" 9 miles from the ER to the car the other night, and it relieved a little of the pressure in my brain. I was having a lot of pain from moving boxes around and packing, so Ed and I went out for a mini-hike. I felt a lot better, and was able to continue with the house.

The doctor did another CAT scan, and said there was nothing new (my mom had a brain tumor by this age, so with all the bleeding I've been having lately they were worried something else was wrong), so I'm still at "you could die at any moment, and there is nothing we can do; just ride it out at home." I've been given the go-ahead to do anything I want to, because "it doesn't matter anyway". You know, any of us could go at any moment, sick or healthy. Gosh, just live life to the fullest, without being stupid (jumping off a bridge attached to a rubber band, or out of a perfectly good airplane). Just think of all the joy that hiking gives you, and go out and have fun! :sun

As far as hiking and medication is concerned, your metabolism is going to be soaring. Just keep an eye on your dosage, and how you are feeling - without stressing about it. As with everything else, you'll just adjust it. Towns are never far away on the AT (which is why I'm doing it for my first long-distance hike), and everyone seems to look out for eachother out there.

Something that might make you feel better is a log. At the end of the day, jot down how you are feeling, medication taken, food eaten, mileage done, etc. When you mail your letters or whatever home, include the full journal pages, and ask that copies be sent to your doctor. That way, you'll know that he's following your progress, and he'll alert you to any major warning signs that you might not recognize.

Good luck! I hope we'll see you out there! When were you planning on starting out? We are hoping for March, but it will probably be closer to April.

orangebug
07-21-2006, 09:30
Don't be so sure your psychiatrist doesn't know anything about the AT. I know at least one who is pretty familiar.

The major issues in managing BPD on a hike would include 1) Lithium toxicity detection and treatment(if used); 2) adequate sleep to help prevent relapse; 3) avoidance of alcohol and other drugs; 4) close budgeting to avoid unrealistic spending or goal setting; 5) episodes of down time with familiar friends/family to sort of keep an eye on things.

Lithium remains the gold standard for treatment of BPD. Yet, it remains a very challenging treatment that can cause death during episodes of dehydration. Heat acclimazation will make changes in how your body manages lithium in sweat and urine. I suspect that one might consider changing to one of the "anticonvulsant mood stabilizers" as a safety measure, although others would argue that changing a working treatment is hazardous on it's own merits.

For men, there will be weight loss that might complicate dosages of some of the mood stabilizing drugs. However, the exercise will tend to help promote mood stabilization. Sleep is vital for folks with affective disorders - both to moniter as symptoms and for prevention of relapse. I tell my patients that 2 consecutive nights of poor sleep should be a frightening as severe substernal chest pain.

We have seen at 4 Pines a man who said he allowed alcohol and stopped his Bipolar meds - leading to an infamous assault and controversy. You just can't risk the sequelae of partying as other hikers will.

Anyone who has been manic knows the problems of budgeting. Spending sprees are famous - and can end the chance of a hike long before you get to Georgia.

Having visits to family members will help you stay grounded and reassure them that this crazy idea is actually a pretty good one.

Now, the issue I suspect is under-appreciated will be the "My hike is over. What do I do for the rest of my life?"

Lone Wolf
07-21-2006, 09:34
Sounds like the cast from "One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest" is gearing up for a thru-hike.:D

One Leg
07-21-2006, 09:48
Sounds like the cast from "One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest" is gearing up for a thru-hike.:D

LMAO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! You're on a roll, Wolf.

Frolicking Dinosaurs
07-21-2006, 10:09
I wanna be Nurse Rachet. I can be a bee-otch. Just ask the male dino :D

Hammerhead
07-21-2006, 10:09
Sounds like the cast from "One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest" is gearing up for a thru-hike.:D

The more posts I read from you the less I like you. Unless you suffer from one of the above mentioned illnesses keep your little high school comments to yourself. And before you ask, yes, I'm bi-polar.

Lone Wolf
07-21-2006, 10:27
The more posts I read from you the less I like you. Unless you suffer from one of the above mentioned illnesses keep your little high school comments to yourself. And before you ask, yes, I'm bi-polar.
Don't read what I write. Put me on your ignore list. And get a sense of humor. Have a nice day.

undergroundnathan
07-21-2006, 10:30
Im paranoid scesaphrenic,sorry cant spell it good.Ive hiked the trail while on my medication and I did fine and so can you.I had some hard times once and a while and some crying spells,but other then that I was fine.If you hike the trail youll enjoy it.Take care, sincerly underground.

Hammerhead
07-21-2006, 10:31
Don't read what I write. Put me on your ignore list. And get a sense of humor. Have a nice day.

I've got a sense of humor, and I do joke about mental illness from time to time --- BECAUSE I HAVE IT. GET IT?

At any rate, consider yourself ignored. Have a nice day sir.

mingo
07-21-2006, 10:33
they're coming out of the woodwork. i'm as sympathetic as the next guy but this is a hiking forum, not dr. phil

Lone Wolf
07-21-2006, 10:33
I've got a sense of humor, and I do joke about mental illness from time to time --- BECAUSE I HAVE IT. GET IT?

At any rate, consider yourself ignored. Have a nice day sir.
You're an angry man. Lighten up. You live in America!:banana

Hammerhead
07-21-2006, 10:46
You're an angry man. Lighten up. You live in America!:banana


look, the girl had a legitimate question, and whether or not you were trying to lighten the mood is irrelevent. my main question is why were you posting in this thread? the title is travelling with an illness----if the topic doesn't apply to you you should have realized that and then just left.

Two Speed
07-21-2006, 10:50
Sounds like the cast from "One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest" is gearing up for a thru-hike.:DYou never know, they might be the best crowd to hike with. Kinda screwy, comfortable with the fact that they're slightly off . . . kind of like Billville w/o the "organization?" :-?

I can think of a whole lot of folks I'd be less likely to want to hang around with.

One Leg
07-21-2006, 11:05
Hammerhead:

You've got to know Wolf in order to understand him. He didn't mean anything derragatory by what he said... He's actually quite a likeable fellow.

As one person with a disability to another: Learn to laugh at yourself every once in awhile... Life's too short for the b.s.

Lone Wolf
07-21-2006, 11:06
I've got a sense of humor, and I do joke about mental illness from time to time --- BECAUSE I HAVE IT. GET IT?

At any rate, consider yourself ignored. Have a nice day sir.
Kinda like only black folks can call each other ni**ers but crucify a whitie if they use the term. OK I get you now. Double standards rule.:D

One Leg
07-21-2006, 11:06
You never know, they might be the best crowd to hike with. Kinda screwy, comfortable with the fact that they're slightly off . . . kind of like Billville w/o the "organization?" :-?

I can think of a whole lot of folks I'd be less likely to want to hang around with.


Amen to that... Remember the Island of Misfit Toys?? Let's hear it for the Misfit Hikers!!!

Frolicking Dinosaurs
07-21-2006, 11:11
Darn it, anyone who knows L. Wolf knows he's gonna fit rigth in with all us misfit toys. I see him yanking our chain aa the same as a woman calling a whole group of women including herself "broads' - it's OK 'cause he's one of us.

Hammerhead
07-21-2006, 11:12
Fine, I won't add him to my ignore list. But he definitely ain't gettin a Christmas card this year!:)

Lone Wolf
07-21-2006, 11:15
Fine, I won't add him to my ignore list. But he definitely ain't gettin a Christmas card this year!:)
Good. Cuz I'm Jewish.:D

Hammerhead
07-21-2006, 11:16
Good. Cuz I'm Jewish.:D

Then imagine how dumb I would have felt if I did send ya one!

One Leg
07-21-2006, 11:16
Good. Cuz I'm Jewish.:D

You're getting bacon in your stocking this year...

Lone Wolf
07-21-2006, 11:17
Now I"M offended!:)

One Leg
07-21-2006, 11:18
Now I"M offended!:)

Well it's about time!!! <Grin>

enari
07-21-2006, 15:23
Thanks for the laugh and encouragement! :D

neo
07-21-2006, 15:25
Hi.

I first learned about the AT 14 years ago, and it has always been a dream of mine. I used to backpack regularly for short trips. However, that was a few years ago. I sort of gave up on my dream when I was diagnosed as Bipolar.

Somehow, the conversation came up, and my doctor told me he thought I was stable enough to do it, with enough planning. He said there probably wouldnít be any problems getting medications to me or handling the dosages while I was on trail and that he thinks I could attempt it.

We have talked about it a few times since then, and he is fully encouraging me to take a look at my gear, inventory what I need and start training and taking some shorter trips over the next year.

It is good to have a goal, and I like the idea of going back to something I really enjoy. I trust him and his assessment of what I can do, but, seeing as he had never heard of the AT before I told him about it, I canít help but feel that he doesnít have a good idea of what this would entail.

I am pretty stable, and my meds havenít been adjusted in over a year. However, backpacking can be very challenging and the idea of getting sick is terrifying to me. My body is guaranteed to change over the trail, and Iím sure my brain chemistry will as well. Iím afraid I might get into a situation where I need psychiatric care and need to get back home quick.

Before I commit myself to the possibility of this dream, I wanted to get the opinion of others who have more experience with backpacking and maybe connect with someone who has attempted the trail with an illness?

Thank,

Victoria

i was diagnosed with hepitis c 3 years ago.and type 2 diabetes in december 2006:cool: neo

Heater
07-21-2006, 18:18
Sounds like the cast from "One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest" is gearing up for a thru-hike.:D

LOL! I don't care who you are... :D :D

blindeye
07-21-2006, 19:41
L. Wolf i have often got a grin out of your posts BUT i laughed out loud on this one man! hope in 2008 we can have a beer.

blindeye

Lone Wolf
07-22-2006, 08:52
Beer, hell!! We'll have a coupla dozen. Gotta make up for what Minnesotasmith didn't drink with me.:D

blindeye
07-22-2006, 09:25
deal L. Wolf i'll be in touch!!!

Crazy Larry #1
07-22-2006, 14:02
Okay, I am going to stir the pot here.

In my opinion there are some mental illnesses that are purely mental illnesses. Like retardation, medicine induced, illegal drug or alcohol induced, brain injuries, and so on.....

Even schizophrenia falls in this class....Top Web Results for "schizophrenia" (http://dictionary.reference.com/go/http://www.reference.com/search?db=web&q=schizophrenia)

However, I do not agree that there is such a mental illness called bi-polar. I think this is just another way that the medical proffession and the drug companies have gotten together to scam the public, or gov't for millions.

If you want to get real technical about this whole bi-polar issue, then look around, because everyone of us suffers from bi-polar. there is not one person in this world who does not have highs and lows in their lives.

If anyone should get a pill for bi-polar it should be me, one day I have all the energy in the world and think I'm well enough to return to the trail and then the next day or two I'm so exhausted I don't want to get out of bed.
And I can't get the docs to hunt for the cancer until I get the medicade approved!

Hey doc! I need a pill, I don't feel good today! I'm depressed because I'm ill today! Please give me that little pill and diagnose me with bi-polar so I don't have to face the world on it's terms!

Horsecrap!

And this is not directed to "Undergroundnathan" or those who have legitimate mental and bodily illnesses.

I can be happy one minute and pissed the next, that's life!

We don't need pills and stupid diagnoses from doctors in order to get through lifes crisis! Just be truthful and face the truth head on and you will have cured yourself!

Besides this being 80% of the pharmacies and medical proffessions scam, I believe those who go to doctors with this "illness" are on the most part scamming themselves whether they realize it or not. How, you may ask? By believing the lie that the medical proffesions want you to believe so you and they can benefit from your "disability."

Since I have been out of the hospital I have been dealing with Social Security and just recently I had a conversation with one of my social workers about bi-polar. Social Security as a whole thinks this type of "mental illness" just stinks.

So do I.

One Leg
07-22-2006, 16:27
Wanderer:

The difference between "everyone else" and someone with a bi-polar disorder is the fact that most "normal" folk have average highs and average lows, when someone with bi-polar suffers extremes at opposite ends.

I will agree with you to a point: there are some who use the diagnosis as a way to suck milk from the government teat... But there are those who legitimately suffer from the extremes who do benefit from the medications. The only experience I have to quantify my stance is that my sister suffers from it, but when she's medicated, she seems to cope better.

All in all, I think that the pharmaceutical industry as a whole has made folks so dependent on them to be able to sleep at night, wake in the morning, and cope with the time in between.

To call Bi-Polar a mental illness or a disability is a stretch...

In an unrelated side note, I have a friend named Ronnie who suffers from *****zophrenia.. He sent this to me, so I share here with you:
Roses are red
Violets are blue
I'm *****zophrenic
And so am I

Scott

Nightwalker
07-22-2006, 19:01
Hi.

I first learned about the AT 14 years ago, and it has always been a dream of mine. I used to backpack regularly for short trips. However, that was a few years ago. I sort of gave up on my dream when I was diagnosed as Bipolar.
Hon, mine goes well past the "illness" stage. I'm crazier than a bedbug.

Yes, 'hiking while ill' is definitely possible. In fact, it's the only place that I feel semi-sane. Take my opinion for whatever it might be worth, but I recently estimated--while hiking, duh--that I've hiked over 5,000 miles, lifetime total, all trails.

You can do it. It's one of those 'If I can, anyone can' things.

Nightwalker
07-22-2006, 19:05
Sounds like the cast from "One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest" is gearing up for a thru-hike.:D
Yeah, and sounds like nurse Ratchet's puttin' in her two cents worth.

Nightwalker
07-22-2006, 19:06
The more posts I read from you the less I like you. Unless you suffer from one of the above mentioned illnesses keep your little high school comments to yourself. And before you ask, yes, I'm bi-polar.
His disease is arseholedness. Pay him no mind.

Nightwalker
07-22-2006, 19:07
they're coming out of the woodwork. i'm as sympathetic as the next guy but this is a hiking forum, not dr. phil
So *** off. Along with yer woolfie pal.

Nightwalker
07-22-2006, 19:09
Kinda like only black folks can call each other ni**ers but crucify a whitie if they use the term. OK I get you now. Double standards rule.:D
Why don't you act here like you do in real life? Out there you're not an ass.

general
07-22-2006, 20:07
Why don't you act here like you do in real life? Out there you're not an ass.

damn, you may have an illness. this is real life man. real people on real computers with imaginary sticks and buckets.

Nightwalker
07-22-2006, 20:45
damn, you may have an illness.
Yeah, and you have no idea what it shows about people when they sneer at it.

general
07-22-2006, 21:24
Yeah, and you have no idea what it shows about people when they sneer at it.

you've got no idea about my ideas

Nightwalker
07-22-2006, 21:37
you've got no idea about my ideas
Right now all I've got is your words.

Frolicking Dinosaurs
07-22-2006, 21:43
There are varying types of bipolar disorder and some can be really hard to treat or to keep in remission. It honestly can be a debilitating disorder worthy of total disability, but I agree that it is often used as an excuse for behavior or a means to avoid having to work for a living.

mweinstone
07-22-2006, 22:02
take alot of meds for bipolar and go hiking.or ,...throw away your meds america. . you wont die right away. and in the few seconds you do live,... youll be free of bull*****.

Lone Wolf
07-22-2006, 22:29
Why don't you act here like you do in real life? Out there you're not an ass.
Huh? You off yer meds or somethin?

Nightwalker
07-22-2006, 22:43
Huh? You off yer meds or somethin?
No, but that don't keep me from wishin'...

Which are you denying? The nice guy part or the butthead part?

the goat
07-23-2006, 00:27
take alot of meds for bipolar and go hiking.or ,...throw away your meds america. . you wont die right away. and in the few seconds you do live,... youll be free of bull*****.

i believe you need meds more than anyone else i've encountered on WB thus far.....

Nightwalker
07-23-2006, 00:39
i believe you need meds more than anyone else i've encountered on WB thus far.....
Sock puppets don't do well on chemicals...

:)

Crazy Larry #1
07-23-2006, 09:01
Wanderer:

The difference between "everyone else" and someone with a bi-polar disorder is the fact that most "normal" folk have average highs and average lows, when someone with bi-polar suffers extremes at opposite ends.



one thing i will have to say here is, i can only see this from my point of view, however i would be wrong if i were not open to others views as well.......i don't know, i just think it's another crapping name they've put onto something that they don't have the foggiest clue on how to handle or even what causes it........they always say the brain, when it could be something else entirely............

Crazy Larry #1
07-23-2006, 09:02
Roses are red
Violets are blue
I'm *****zophrenic
And so am I

Scotti wonder if this could be Lone Wolfs problem:-?

Lone Wolf
07-23-2006, 09:07
So *** off. Along with yer woolfie pal.
You're an angry little b*tch. And humorless to boot! Unwad your panties.:cool:

Frolicking Dinosaurs
07-23-2006, 09:18
My son's father has bipolar disorder and we were married for seven years. While everyone has highs and lows, most people do not become so giddy during highs that they endanger themselves by taking risks that most would realize are too dangerous to attempt. Some examples:
drive a VW microbus into a city pond to see if it would float with your 2 yo son strapped into his car seat (thank God it was only 4' deep)
kick a hole in the ceiling just to see if you can (dislocated shoulder and concussion)
drive blindfolded before you have perfected the magic trick required to do so ($200 auto insurance deductible; fines,court cost and a weekend in jail for wreckless endangerment)
contract to be gone for 9 months out of the year on cruise ships without consulting your spouse
have multiple sexual liasons without protection and make little attempt to conceal extramartial affairs (finally resulted in divorce)As for the lows, not many people get so down they don't get out of bed, bath or eat for weeks on end nor do most contemplate ways to suicide.

One Leg
07-23-2006, 09:34
.......i don't know, i just think it's another crapping name they've put onto something that they don't have the foggiest clue on how to handle or even what causes it........they always say the brain, when it could be something else entirely............

You're on the money with that... We're so full of labels nowadays that it seems to be the 'in' thing. ADHD, Learning Disabled, Fibromyalgia, Bi-Polar, Mildly Mentally Retarded.... The list goes on.

Thing is, they're given lables because there's a (presumed) problem on the part of the sufferer. I used to be VERY dogmatic in believing that folks who adhered to a label were nothing but malingerers looking for a free ride. I felt the same way about folks who claimed backaches and stayed out of work milking the unemployment and workmans comp system..

That was then, this is now.

I can't say what it's like to suffer from any of the above-mentioned labels, but I can tell you from a personal standpoint what it's like to suffer from chronic pain - phantom pain. On average, I enjoy 2-3 days per week of reliving the accident all over again, feeling as though the shotgun has discharged into my leg all over again. Excruciating pain that gets really old to live with. Wishing, at times, that the gun would've finished me off the first time so I wouldn't be sentenced to a lifetime of chronic pain.

You're gonna have the malingerers, that's a given. There are folks who desire a label so that they can get out of working. I don't know who they are, so I ain't saying a word because it would malign the ones who really are suffering.

Mental illness is something that's long been misunderstood since the creation of man. There are real sufferers out there, and to deny that would be a grave injustice to the ones who opt to suffer in silence rather than have a label attached to them. I don't understand it, but neither have I walked a mile in their shoe(s).

-Scott

Nightwalker
07-23-2006, 12:37
they're coming out of the woodwork. i'm as sympathetic as the next guy but this is a hiking forum, not dr. phil
Yeah, and the question is about HIKING with an illness.

Dr. Phjil is a feel-good fraud. Did you have a real point to make, or just couldn't resist running your mouth? *NFS




*No Freekin' Smiley

Nightwalker
07-23-2006, 12:53
Mental illness is something that's long been misunderstood since the creation of man. There are real sufferers out there, and to deny that would be a grave injustice to the ones who opt to suffer in silence rather than have a label attached to them. I don't understand it, but neither have I walked a mile in their shoe(s).

-Scott
Well, you may be missing a leg, but you're a whole man.

About a week ago, I "came out" about being treated for mental illness for 31 years; different thread, different subject. I did it to make a suffering hiker feel less alone. I wonder now if it was a mistake.

There are two problems left in this world that people feel comfortable looking down their nose at another human about. One is being fat and one is having an emotional disorder. I brought the fat on myself, but hiking a lot keeps it somewhat in check. As to the emotional/mental illness, you or no one else wants to go through what it took to get me here. People that physically, emotionally and (the-thing-that-will-not-be-spoken-here) abuse a small child should be publicly exposed. That'd be the only punishment fitting. People that make light over living in a hell on earth are just stupid and need ridicule.

Do I have an anger problem? It depends on whether it's reasonable or unreasonable anger. The original poster made their first post ever by asking a serious HIKING RELATED question. A few good answers were given, and then the usual suspects showed up to turn this thread into the usual circus. Some of you should be ashamed of yourself. Will you? Do you have the morals involved to be able to even do that? I can't answer that question, but I have my suspicions.

Crazy Larry #1
07-23-2006, 12:54
You're on the money with that... We're so full of labels nowadays that it seems to be the 'in' thing. ADHD, Learning Disabled, Fibromyalgia, Bi-Polar, Mildly Mentally Retarded.... The list goes on.

Thing is, they're given lables because there's a (presumed) problem on the part of the sufferer. I used to be VERY dogmatic in believing that folks who adhered to a label were nothing but malingerers looking for a free ride. I felt the same way about folks who claimed backaches and stayed out of work milking the unemployment and workmans comp system..

That was then, this is now.

I can't say what it's like to suffer from any of the above-mentioned labels, but I can tell you from a personal standpoint what it's like to suffer from chronic pain - phantom pain. On average, I enjoy 2-3 days per week of reliving the accident all over again, feeling as though the shotgun has discharged into my leg all over again. Excruciating pain that gets really old to live with. Wishing, at times, that the gun would've finished me off the first time so I wouldn't be sentenced to a lifetime of chronic pain.

You're gonna have the malingerers, that's a given. There are folks who desire a label so that they can get out of working. I don't know who they are, so I ain't saying a word because it would malign the ones who really are suffering.

Mental illness is something that's long been misunderstood since the creation of man. There are real sufferers out there, and to deny that would be a grave injustice to the ones who opt to suffer in silence rather than have a label attached to them. I don't understand it, but neither have I walked a mile in their shoe(s).

-Scotti can't even begin to imagine what you have to go through, but i really enjoy reading the way you write. yes there are people who are milking the system and i do not know who they are either, and it is unfortunate because when the real mccoy comes along he/she is more likely to get turned down for the help they most desperately need......and most likely they just let it go and don't never persue it again.......i mean i know people who definitely have something amiss and who are very lonely people because not only has their gov't abandoned them but people as a whole have abandoned them as well..........

at this point i think i owe an apology here, and not for my point of view because i still stand on that, but for posting it on this thread when i should have begun a seperate thread altogether......

there are people here on whiteblaze that suffer legitimately in this area, i have no doubt, and it is to YOU i apologize for my own ignorance in this matter.....

i owe no apology to those of you are willingly looking for a free ride.......

Nightwalker
07-23-2006, 13:06
You're an angry little b*tch. And humorless to boot! Unwad your panties.:cool:
If I made a ridiculously lame post in a forum about requests for information about hiking in Maine, I'd be wrong to do that. If I furthermore said that it had to be a piece of cake because the mountains weren't as high as the ones in NC, and I'd been to NC, I'd be showing stupidity to boot.

Wolf, not everything's funny. You're not actually required to make a smart-ass post in every thread on Whiteblaze. This would have been a good one to leave alone.

The OP made their first post with the original question in this thread. Because of the treatment received, who knows if they'll be back. Do you even care, as long as it don't end up with pee in your cornflakes?

One time in the past, you admitted that you were wrong about something. Why don't you be a man and do that one more time. It won't kill you.

Yeah, I'm angry. I ain't yours or nobody else's bitch, though. That goes back to the online/RL thing. You're a gentle, humorous, kind soul in the limited times that I've seen you on the trail or somewhere else out there. Why do you have to constantly cause trouble here? Maybe you gots an illness...

bearbait2k4
07-23-2006, 13:23
one thing i will have to say here is, i can only see this from my point of view, however i would be wrong if i were not open to others views as well.......i don't know, i just think it's another crapping name they've put onto something that they don't have the foggiest clue on how to handle or even what causes it........they always say the brain, when it could be something else entirely............

That's the point with mental illness. It's still a relatively new study and diagnosis, and most cases are trial and error. But, that should not take away from the severity and impairment of some of these disorders. Some people can do well if they just suck it up and realize their problems are a part of life, and they can make simple changes to fix their problems. Some people need medication, though. Whether this person is someone who can make changes and live a more productive life without medication is completely subjective to all of us, and I don't see that any person here, with the exception of the original poster, can really debate whether or not they should even classify their condition as an illness, or be taking medications at all. That person is not asking for a diagnosis, and I don't think any of us here are qualified to give the person a diagnosis.

However, advice can be given on hiking with an illness. I know there have been instances in that past, in regards to mental illness. I know that negative impacts can happen if a person decides not to follow their doctor's advice. The best advice this person can follow, at this point, is what has been given by the doctor. That doctor is going to know more than any of us, as far as the poster is concerned.

Take the doc's advice, and pay attention to the way your body and attitude changes throughout your hike. You will likely know if adverse change are occuring - and if they do, then be proactive about it. Call your doctor, seek additional medical advice. Enjoy your hike, and good luck.