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Smile
07-30-2006, 20:05
This came through to me fromt the WSPD tody for those interested. I know it is not actually on the AT but the appalachian region itself will be chipped away at over time.

Call to action to protect Appalachian mountains from mountaintop
removal coal mining - Aug. 4-6, Charleston, South Carolina.

National Governors Association Convention

This weekend, while United States governors are milling around in
luxuriant hotels and admiring old slave plantations, residents in the
coalfield regions of Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, and Tennessee,
are experiencing firsthand the dire effects of mountaintop removal coal
mining. Because of the indifference and complicity of the governors of
these states, over 500 square miles of forested mountains have been
leveled in southern Appalachia, lost forever to the greed of politicians
and businessmen. So while America's state leaders are patting each
other on the back and rubbing shoulders with obscenely wealthy corporate
executives, let's get out there and let them know that we're not going
to sit idly by while they reduce the natural world to coal dust and capital
returns.

Come to Charleston, South Carolina, August 4th-6th! Join coalfield
citizens and community activists as we confront the injustices
perpetrated by a government driven by profit. With creative irreverence and insightful confrontation we will hold our supposed representatives
accountable -to their peers and to the public- for their insatiable
appetite for industrial expansion, and the havoc it wrecks on the land
and people of Appalachia!

For more information & details of the weekend's actions:

Email: MTNcommunityinfo@riseup.net
Call: 843-723-5203

& get on down to Charleston!

Newb
07-31-2006, 15:34
Mountain Topping won't be stopped. Just go ahead and get depressed now.

Pennsylvania Rose
07-31-2006, 17:29
But it's worth trying!

http://www.kftc.org/our-work/canary-project

Amigi'sLastStand
07-31-2006, 17:54
Could you provide a link that is not so biased.

satchmo
08-01-2006, 12:57
Its has its ups and downs. If it is reclaimed right it actaully makes some nice recreation land. Its provides alot in my area with a way to make a living. It does have its downside tho.

satchmo
08-01-2006, 12:59
If you want a good look at it. Try the pine mountain trail birch knob section. On the KY VA line.

Pennsylvania Rose
08-02-2006, 10:42
Could you provide a link that is not so biased.

Nope, sorry. After witnessing the effects on family, friends, and others in Eastern Kentucky, my opinion will be "biased" forever. We're talking about folks whose families "sold" mineral rights a hundred years ago, whose surface rights are nonexistant or ignored; kids who have almost been killed by flying rocks in their backyards; people who have been shot at because they wouldn't sell their land, then the mining companies remove the mountaintop to within 5 feet of their land, leaving 100 foot drops along the property line; wells tainted; landslides destroying homes; folks refused access to accounts meant to compensate those who suffer damage; even Wal-Mart, Lowe's, and a Holiday Inn in one town were lied to by the mining companies - the "reclaimed" land they bought is not stable and has caused structural damage to the businesses. And, then, there is the irrevocable environmental damage...

Imagine struggling up a climb on the AT, reahing the top, getting out your camera...and as far as you can see mountain tops have been cut down hundreds of feet and the valleys are filled with the debris. The viewshed disturbance of a few windmills is nothing compared to this.

The coal will be gone soon and we'll be left with a wasteland.

Two Speed
08-02-2006, 11:05
Not much middle ground on this subject. I'm convinced the damage isn't worth the coal we're getting. If you're interested there's a great deal of info on the web. Try searching "valley fill mining,"

Newb, the mining WILL stop one day, unless the coal companies continue mining after the coal's gone, which I don't view as very likely. Of course, the mountains and valleys will be gone too, along with the wildlife, plants, clean water, etc. There will be lots of tainted run-off available, though.

Time To Fly 97
08-03-2006, 10:20
I read an article recently about Australia being in the planning stages of a massive solar power plant (2 miles in diameter). The heat generated will be so intense that it will force super heated air through a huge tower in the center that houses the generators. They expect this plant to produce enough energy for 100,000 homes! China is interested and plans to build some as well.

We have deserts in the US that could support power plants like these easily. Why isn't the US leading the way with this? Seems like the oil companies have purchased the right people in our government and the policy now is to look the other way while the profits flow in.

Sketchy!

TTF

Alligator
08-03-2006, 10:31
I read an article recently about Australia being in the planning stages of a massive solar power plant (2 miles in diameter). The heat generated will be so intense that it will force super heated air through a huge tower in the center that houses the generators. They expect this plant to produce enough energy for 100,000 homes! China is interested and plans to build some as well.

We have deserts in the US that could support power plants like these easily. Why isn't the US leading the way with this? Seems like the oil companies have purchased the right people in our government and the policy now is to look the other way while the profits flow in.

Sketchy!

TTFThat sound interesting. It's definitely a positive step though that they are considering this method. OTOH, Australia is also looking to expand mining of uranium and is one of the largest coal producing countries.

Jaybird
08-03-2006, 10:38
This came through to me fromt the WSPD tody for those interested. I know it is not actually on the AT but the appalachian region itself will be chipped away at over time......blah,blah,blah,Call to action to protect Appalachian mountains from mountaintopremoval coal mining - Aug. 4-6, Charleston, South Carolina.National GovernorsAssociation .................................................. .......& get on down to Charleston!





i think the header on this page states: WHITE BLAZE.net..."a Community of Appalachian Trail Enthusiasts"



although i hate to see any land marred by coal mining...this is not A.T. related!:D

hopefulhiker
08-03-2006, 10:57
I saw a program on this. I looks terrible. I don't think the word "biased" is really appropriate here. Once they do this kind of thing it is permanent. Bias is a word that refers to a person's taste or behavior. This really is changeable and not permanent. Permanent destruction of the mountains is not a matter of taste. It is wrong. Again I think we should think about future generations. There are other ways to get more energy. Being an AT enthusiast also makes me an Appalachian mountain enthusiast in general..

Smile
08-03-2006, 12:49
Thank you Jaybird, I realize this, thus the beginning of the post ( below)


This came through to me fromt the WSPD tody for those interested. I know it is not actually on the AT but the appalachian region itself will be chipped away at over time.

I figured that this would be forum to post it in, since views and the entire region is multifaceted. The "trail" IMHO is not just the footbed one walks on ;-)

Great comments and interest regarding this issue, and thanks for reading the post and sharing thoughts and comments. I had not taken into the consideration the possible impact on 'views' after a long climb up a mountain somewhere.

I recently watched an awesome video about solar power and that a 20 x 20 square mile could provide enough electricity for the U.S. for a year. Would be interesting to know if this was indeed a fact. (I am assuming the statement= projection, since a solar plant of this size does not yet exist to study)

sourwood
08-04-2006, 20:25
This spring I rode my bike from here in Black Mountain to Louisville, Ky. Being a Ky native, I wanted to ride through eastern and northern KY to get a closer look at the countryside. I got some close views of mountain top mining.

1. When climbing out of Big Stone Gap, VA towards the KY line, I noticed that the stream alongside the road was gray and murky. It stayed that way until I passed a road leading into a mine site. Above the mine, the stream was clear, below, it was a mess. As I climbed I looked back and saw what was happening to the mountain top below. It was not pretty.

2. That night I stayed at a state park in KY....Carr Creek. I had thought that there would not be extensive mining near a state park. I was wrong. The mountaintop behind the park was gone. There was an active mining operation on the backside of the ridge across the road from the park. All night long I heard the trucks taking away that mountain. I was too pissed off to sleep.

Ky is a gorgeous state. What is happening to the eastern mountains, is, in my opinion, very very sad.

Julie

Sly
08-04-2006, 20:34
Of course this is trail related. If they're going to top a mountain within vicinity of the AT and perhaps it's view shed, what makes you think they're going to stop there?

Yeah, may as well let the Aussies and Chinese develop alternative energies.

saimyoji
08-05-2006, 12:40
The coal will be gone soon and we'll be left with a wasteland.

Anyone ever hike the trail around Palmerton, PA? Looks much better today than it did 8 years ago. Still a wasteland.

Smile
08-05-2006, 20:37
I remember when they sprayed sewage on the hills to try to revegetate, there were tomato plants everywhere that were from seed passed through people and then through the sewage system. They were interesting, but did not do the job, they killed off much of the added seed.

It has improved there over the past 10 years, but it's barely a dent. If you are ever in Palmerton, there is a place there - historical society or chamber of commerce or something that has photos from the first half of the last century - it was truly a bleak situation.

Smile
08-05-2006, 20:38
In reference to the previous post, I was referring to the Palmerton post ;-)