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Paws
09-19-2006, 23:14
My husband will be starting his thru-hike March 5, 2007 - we usually use some type of camp shoes when we backpack - usually crocs or some type of sandal, also used for water crossings. Given his start date, we are unsure of what type of camp/water crossing shoe would be a good choice. He plans on using gators and more of a trail shoe than hiking boot, so maybe there is no need for camp/water crossing shoes, or atleast not for a while anyways? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

MOWGLI
09-19-2006, 23:23
My husband will be starting his thru-hike March 5, 2007 - we usually use some type of camp shoes when we backpack - usually crocs or some type of sandal, also used for water crossings. Given his start date, we are unsure of what type of camp/water crossing shoe would be a good choice. He plans on using gators and more of a trail shoe than hiking boot, so maybe there is no need for camp/water crossing shoes, or atleast not for a while anyways? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Based upon my experience (started March 7, 2000) water crossings shouldn't be an issue for a couple of months. The first time it was an issue for me was near Pearisburg, VA. I forget the name of the stream - but it had a high water route just in case. Wolf Creek maybe??? Almost all streams of significance are bridged until you reach Maine. Of course - a storm with torrential rains could change things.

Crocs work well, and as you know, they are comfortable. Some folks will tell you that they are heavy. :D I say that's silly. Carry them if you own them and like them.

Have a great hike!

Footslogger
09-19-2006, 23:36
Have you seen the AirWalk Connect water sandals ?? At first glance they look like Keens in terms of shape/style but they are made of the same material as the Waldies/Crocks but are actually lighter. Saw them at Payless and I think they would make an excellent camp shoe and river crossing shoe.

http://www.payless.com/Catalog/ProductDetail.aspx?&TLC=Mens&SLC=MensSandals&BLC=MensSandalsBeach&Width=Regular&ItemCode=54069&LotNumber=045233&Type=Adult&Popularity=1&DescriptiveColor=Black


'Slogger

FanaticFringer
09-20-2006, 00:22
Look interesting. Will have to check them out.

hammock engineer
09-20-2006, 01:04
Have you seen the AirWalk Connect water sandals ?? At first glance they look like Keens in terms of shape/style but they are made of the same material as the Waldies/Crocks but are actually lighter. Saw them at Payless and I think they would make an excellent camp shoe and river crossing shoe.

http://www.payless.com/Catalog/ProductDetail.aspx?&TLC=Mens&SLC=MensSandals&BLC=MensSandalsBeach&Width=Regular&ItemCode=54069&LotNumber=045233&Type=Adult&Popularity=1&DescriptiveColor=Black


'Slogger

Man, couldn't you have posted this yesterday. I went out tonight and bought a pair of crocs.

Footslogger
09-20-2006, 08:33
Man, couldn't you have posted this yesterday. I went out tonight and bought a pair of crocs.
===================================

Just saw them for the first time myself yesterday. Good news is that you can get these for around $17 (according to the person I saw wearing them) so they are about half the price of the Crocs.

'Slogger

Ewker
09-20-2006, 08:56
Have you seen the AirWalk Connect water sandals ?? At first glance they look like Keens in terms of shape/style but they are made of the same material as the Waldies/Crocks but are actually lighter. Saw them at Payless and I think they would make an excellent camp shoe and river crossing shoe.

http://www.payless.com/Catalog/ProductDetail.aspx?&TLC=Mens&SLC=MensSandals&BLC=MensSandalsBeach&Width=Regular&ItemCode=54069&LotNumber=045233&Type=Adult&Popularity=1&DescriptiveColor=Black


'Slogger

I will check a payless out. Looking at them they can't be any lighter than crocs.

Footslogger
09-20-2006, 09:14
I will check a payless out. Looking at them they can't be any lighter than crocs.
====================================

Haven't had the opportunity to put them on a scale but I have handled them and to me they seem lighter. The material is thinner that that used on Crocks and there are more "air holes". What I like about them at first glance is that you can adjust the velcro closure to make them tighter when necessary.

'Slogger

millergear
09-20-2006, 09:22
These are lighter than crocks by a few ounces. I used them last week for 10 creek crossings in one day and they were excellent. Even hiked a half mile with them. They provided good protection from rocks, etc. and a good grip. Unlike Crocs at camp the straps can be loosened to fit comfortably with socks.

Cuffs
09-20-2006, 10:13
These new shoes look pretty interesting.... I like the idea of a more fitted shoe than a clog. Ive crossed a few streams with a bit of a current and have worried about losing a shoe to the flow... Payless, here I come!

FWIW - I have found Croc knock offs at local discount stores (Fred's & Big Lots) for about $7.

Ewker
09-20-2006, 10:21
These are lighter than crocks by a few ounces. I used them last week for 10 creek crossings in one day and they were excellent. Even hiked a half mile with them. They provided good protection from rocks, etc. and a good grip. Unlike Crocs at camp the straps can be loosened to fit comfortably with socks.

I never pull the strap down on crocs unless I am crossing a creek.

MOWGLI
09-20-2006, 10:29
I saw some new sandals by Crocs in Lone Pine, CA after finishing the JMT. They looked nice & comfy, but I can't afford any more gear. Especially when I own several pairs of camp shoes already.

hammock engineer
09-20-2006, 11:04
Let me know how the feel and what they weigh. The XXL crocs I bought weigh 13.4 oz for the pair. That makes them lighter than my filter, but heavier than my camera.

Blissful
09-20-2006, 12:04
The Payless fake crocs are great too. Fall is the time to go to the store, they should be reducing them soon. I got mine last year for $6 and they are still going strong whereas my son broke his Holies in two months.

Footslogger
09-20-2006, 12:10
Let me know how the feel and what they weigh. The XXL crocs I bought weigh 13.4 oz for the pair. That makes them lighter than my filter, but heavier than my camera.
===================================

With a little luck I'll have some by Monday and I can get you an actual weight. I'll be amazed if they weigh as much as my Waldies (which as I remember are lighter than Crocks)

'Slogger

Midway Sam
09-20-2006, 13:35
Have you seen the AirWalk Connect water sandals

Thanks for the heads up 'Slogger! I went to the Payless next door to my office and they did not have them. The girl called another store in town and they had a pair in my size. She then presented me with a coupon for $1 off my next purchase. When I got to the other Payless, the Connets were marked down to $12.99. After my $1 off, I paid $12.71 for 'em.

Super comfy and super light!

Footslogger
09-20-2006, 15:26
Thanks for the heads up 'Slogger! I went to the Payless next door to my office and they did not have them. The girl called another store in town and they had a pair in my size. She then presented me with a coupon for $1 off my next purchase. When I got to the other Payless, the Connets were marked down to $12.99. After my $1 off, I paid $12.71 for 'em.

Super comfy and super light!
======================================

Glad to be of assistance. Now ...if I can only score a pair for myself I'll be in business. I've seen them on another person here and handled them but no Payless in Laramie. So, I've got people looking around for me in surrounding towns.

By the way ...what size did you get and how does that compare with your street shoe size ?? I'm a 10.5 in regular shoes and am thinking of going with the 11's if I can find them.

Thanks,

'Slogger

Midway Sam
09-20-2006, 15:51
I am a 12 in street shoes and 13 in hiking boots. I bought size 12 and they fit just like I want them to. Lemme call my local Payless and see if they have a 10.5...

Footslogger
09-20-2006, 15:54
I am a 12 in street shoes and 13 in hiking boots. I bought size 12 and they fit just like I want them to. Lemme call my local Payless and see if they have a 10.5...
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Pretty sure they only come in full sizes and I figured I'll probably be wearing them with liners or lightweight socks so I'm guessing I'll end up in the 11's.

But thanks for checking ...

'Slogger

Ewker
09-20-2006, 17:21
I went to a Payless at lunch today. They had two, one in a size 10 and a 12. The checked and no other Payless in Nashville had a size 11. They are light but I can't tell if they are lighter than my Crocs. No more than a few ounces one way or the other.

mweinstone
09-20-2006, 18:10
one hiker , one pair of footwear. common allready. you guys, hello? poles, crocs, and ridgrunners are for kids. silly rabbit. get some boots, feel the wetness. become one with the damp. invite the chill in . then they are your friends. lock them out and walk around like they suck,.. well you got commin to ya what you got. flimsy danger. all human beings know not to walk in a river or stream with anything but your primary heaveyest footwear, socks removed. laced tight,.. so you dont go boo boo on the slippery rocks in the heavy current. or do it your way and die having ,.... death. love ya . gotta run. give my love to the kids. have fun. by!

Midway Sam
09-20-2006, 18:47
one hiker , one pair of footwear. common allready. you guys, hello? poles, crocs, and ridgrunners are for kids. silly rabbit. get some boots, feel the wetness. become one with the damp. invite the chill in . then they are your friends. lock them out and walk around like they suck,.. well you got commin to ya what you got. flimsy danger. all human beings know not to walk in a river or stream with anything but your primary heaveyest footwear, socks removed. laced tight,.. so you dont go boo boo on the slippery rocks in the heavy current. or do it your way and die having ,.... death. love ya . gotta run. give my love to the kids. have fun. by!



http://www.southparkstudios.com/img/content/characters/49a.gif

Drugs are bad, mmmmm-kay?

FanaticFringer
09-20-2006, 21:36
Just ordered some neoprene booties from www.adventurelite.com.
Around 2oz.
Fiddlehead is a regular here and I like to buy from cottage companies.

SouthMark
09-21-2006, 08:48
Just picked up a pair from a Payless here. On sale for $12.99 plus a dollar off coupon. Men size 10 weighs 12 oz. My crocks weigh 11.3 oz.

doodah man
09-24-2006, 18:54
Just ordered some neoprene booties from www.adventurelite.com (http://www.adventurelite.com). Around 2oz.
Fiddlehead is a regular here and I like to buy from cottage companies.

I also got some of these billabong neoprene booties from adventurelite.com a few weeks ago. Their web page says 3 ounces but my scale says 60.3 grams (2.13 ounces) for size XL. I have not tried this particular product in camp yet. However, for several years now I have been using vollyball sandsocks that are very similar (web search on vincere or sandskins). Sandsocks are a bit heavier than the billabong booties but do have some slight advantages in that the lycra upper would make them near impossible to get pulled off by the current during a stream crossing. In either case, the neoprene bottoms are much tougher than they appear and will last a long time if you are at all careful. To me, the half pound saved over a pair of crocs is worth it. doodah-man

Bravo
09-24-2006, 19:00
Check these out. They're not cheap at $70 a pair but they'll make you stand out in a crowd.

http://www.vibramfivefingers.com/index.html

FanaticFringer
09-24-2006, 19:07
Got my neoprene booties a couple of days ago. They are so small and lite they take up almost no space in my pack. Besides using them for the creek, I thought of a neat idea for them. When I get ready to sleep in my Hennessy Hammock, I will have these booties on. I will have a zip lock bag ready as I take off the booties after I sit in the hammock. I will put the booties in the bag and clip them to the ridgeline in the hammock. This will help to keep any dirt from getting in the hammock as well as not having to wrestle with my hiking shoes on the ground.

Footslogger
09-24-2006, 19:22
Being a diver in addition to a hiker, I have a couple pair of neoprene booties. I took them on some hikes several years ago. They worked well when crossing streams. But after the crossing they stay wet for quite a while. You can put them in a ziplock but then they just stay wet and start to stink.

After a lot of trial and error I have found that some form of rubber shoe works best for me. The trick is finding something that is light and yet has a thick outsole to prevent rocks from poking through from underneath.

To date ...the best thing I have worn is a trustworthy old Waldies from my thru in 2003. After seeing these new AirWalks from Payless though I do think that they will be even better, because they fit tighter around the foot.

'Slogger

FanaticFringer
09-24-2006, 19:27
Might just use these for the hammock only. Would avoid the wet issue.

doodah man
09-24-2006, 20:08
Being a diver in addition to a hiker, I have a couple pair of neoprene booties. I took them on some hikes several years ago. They worked well when crossing streams. But after the crossing they stay wet for quite a while. You can put them in a ziplock but then they just stay wet and start to stink.

After a lot of trial and error I have found that some form of rubber shoe works best for me. The trick is finding something that is light and yet has a thick outsole to prevent rocks from poking through from underneath.

To date ...the best thing I have worn is a trustworthy old Waldies from my thru in 2003. After seeing these new AirWalks from Payless though I do think that they will be even better, because they fit tighter around the foot.

'Slogger

Footslogger, I don't know what kind of booties you have tried, but the sandsocks dried pretty quick. The neoprene bottoms are not very thick and pretty 'open-celled'. A half hour or so lashed to the outside of my pack would usually do the trick. I have seen others using the diver grade neoprene booties and they are thicker and much denser, so I can see that being a problem. I switched to the billabong booties because they only cost $8 and the sandsocks are over $20. I guess time will tell if they also dry quickly but the neoprene is similar to the sandsock type and not so much the diver type. I have been pretty tough on the sandsocks but careful not to step on sharp objects and so far I have not had the neoprene itself wear out, the seams always failed first. Probably should have reinforced the seams prior to use (Shoe-Goo?, Silnet?, Frey-Stop?). doodah-man

Footslogger
09-24-2006, 21:13
[quote=doodah man;248713]Footslogger, I don't know what kind of booties you have tried, but the sandsocks dried pretty quick.
========================================

Ahhh ...you are talking about "aqua socks". I have those too and use them for kayaking but the soles are way too thin to suit my taste/needs in terms of river crossings.

But yes, that style is relatively light and does dry rather fast and much more quickly than neoprene dive booties.

'Slogger

Tinker
09-24-2006, 21:24
I don't feel the need to bring a second pair of footwear. I did, however, on my earliest hikes. I carried a worn out pair of running shoes. I wore them as my hiking shoes when I got blisters from my relatively new, custom made Limmer boots.

I only wear low top hikers now, unless I know there will be snow. I take off my socks, cross the stream, bang my shoes, upside down, on a rock to remove as much moisture as I can, put my dry socks back on, then put them in my wet (but not soaked) mesh upper shoes.

I canoe in cold weather with neoprene socks under old lightweight hikers.

Neoprene does get quite smelly.

Survivor Dave
09-25-2006, 07:14
Hello!

I have decided to wear my Teva sandals on the AT for camp and water crossing. The way I look at it, if my trail shoes have a "blowout" or I need to ford a creek/ river, I would feel much safer with a more durable piece of footwear. Just think about the rocfields. I would rather hike to the next town with a stable soled shoe. Yeah, they weigh just a bit more, but I really like them. They were on sale at the outdoor recreation store at a 50% clearance for $22.

Creek Dancer
09-29-2006, 13:41
ABC is looking for feedback from people who use Crocs and other plastic shoes. http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/story?id=2498777 Anybody have any problems with these shoes? I haven't.

highway
11-04-2006, 02:29
Hello!

I have decided to wear my Teva sandals on the AT for camp and water crossing. The way I look at it, if my trail shoes have a "blowout" or I need to ford a creek/ river, I would feel much safer with a more durable piece of footwear. Just think about the rocfields. I would rather hike to the next town with a stable soled shoe. Yeah, they weigh just a bit more, but I really like them. They were on sale at the outdoor recreation store at a 50% clearance for $22.

If your teva sandals are trail runners/hikers, leave them on all day and leave the heavier shoes at home. This way you dont even have to stop at any river crossing, just plow on through it without stopping. Even if you are wearing wool socks they dry quickly and you get a foot rinsing 'to boot'!

adh24
11-08-2006, 11:58
Got a pair of crocs before my SNP section. Glad I had them. Used to carry flip flops but when it's colder and you want some socks on your feet Flip flops are a bit uncomfortable. The crocs kick arss!!!!!

Jim Adams
11-08-2006, 12:09
i have both and also waldies. the payless shoes seem to hold up as well as my waldies. the sandal type are great for guiding raft trips (my second job) and they, as well as the croc knock offs are very light.
payless tip. if the store does not have your size or model shoe in stock they will find it for you in your area and then will always give you a coupon for a $1 off because they did not have it. want bigger savings? usually during a season change they will offer buy one , get 1/2 off on the second pair of shoes. i got the sandal type and the croc knock offs both for $14.99.
geek

jmcdonou
01-21-2007, 23:21
Without a doubt Vibram Five Fingers. Smartest thing I have done in a while.

The first night I wore them to the bar, I got 3 girls numbers(That same night I was challenged to step on a bottle. I broke it but didnít cut my foot) They are also quick drying, much lighter than crocks and IMO a much better grip on slippery rocks. After a long day of hiking it feels great to slip these babies on and walk around barefoot but not.

http://vibramfivefingers.com/

warraghiyagey
01-22-2007, 05:38
http://www.southparkstudios.com/img/content/characters/49a.gif

Drugs are bad, mmmmm-kay?


Exactlty.:)

Tipi Walter
01-22-2007, 14:42
I badly stubbed my toe in Crocs once and so those Vibram 5 Finger funny feet wouldn't have even fit over my poor swollen tootsie.

I do love the Crocs though, I carry them and use them often for butt cold creek crossings in all seasons and when I have to leave them on for long backpacking they work pretty good. They WILL blow out though, the strap will pul off and you'll lose the plastic connectors so I try to carry a few spares though reattaching with dental floss or string will work, too.

Footslogger
01-22-2007, 14:55
Posted about these earlier and ironically I jinxed myself ...cuz when I went to get some they were all out:

http://www.payless.com/Catalog/ProductDetail.aspx?&TLC=Mens&SLC=MensSandals&BLC=M ensSandalsBeach&Width=Regular&ItemCode=54069&LotNu mber=045233&Type=Adult&Popularity=1&DescriptiveCol or=Black

But ...good news ! Was down in Ft Collins this past weekend and stopped into a Payless on a whim and guess what ...they've got them back in stock in ALL sizes. Best time to get water sandals out here must be in Winter when no one is looking for them. Picked up 2 pair.

Have Waldies from my thru in 2003 but from what I can see these are going to be much more stable on my foot for water crossings and around camp.

'Slogger

J Link NJ
01-23-2007, 01:40
Crocs Mate!!