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View Full Version : Difficult terrain- Is Virginia as Rocky as Pennsylvainia?



driver126
10-08-2006, 20:11
We took a shakedown cruise on the At near Delaware Water Gap in preperation for a section hike in Virginia next spring. My buddy is thinking about backing out because of the rocky terrain in Pa. Can anybody reassure him that Virginia is nothing like the glacila tallus that you find through Pa ans Nj?. Thanks and good luck to all.

Footslogger
10-08-2006, 20:18
There is no such thing as a totally "rock free" section of the AT. That said ...Virginia, for the most part, is not as rocky as northern PA. Specifically, there are none of those sharp rocks standing on end a few inches apart.

'Slogger

A-Train
10-08-2006, 20:19
Overall PA is a lot more rocky than VA, but Virginia is so big, its tough to clasify. VA has a little or lot of everything because its so long. There are short stretches that are bad, but nothing for as long as eastern PA. Depends where you go. I remember some pretty rocky stretches near Pearisburg up on the ridges, but then again there are miles in VA that are flat farm land and smooth trail.

MOWGLI
10-08-2006, 20:22
I hear what 'Slogger says, but there are plenty of rocks in Virginia, a bunch in New Jersey, and lots in New England (but that's a whole other issue :D).

I didn't find PA to be all that bad. Yeah, my feet were tenderized, but they pretty much ALWAYS hurt during my hike - and for months after.

Don't sweat it. You'll survive.

Lone Wolf
10-08-2006, 22:52
We took a shakedown cruise on the At near Delaware Water Gap in preperation for a section hike in Virginia next spring. My buddy is thinking about backing out because of the rocky terrain in Pa. Can anybody reassure him that Virginia is nothing like the glacila tallus that you find through Pa ans Nj?. Thanks and good luck to all.

Your "buddy" will be a pain in the ass no matter where he hikes if he thinks PA is tough. Backpacking ain't for him.

saimyoji
10-08-2006, 23:06
Your "buddy" will be a pain in the ass no matter where he hikes if he thinks PA is tough. Backpacking ain't for him.


Yep. The last thing you want is someone complaining every mile, especially someone who's supposed to be your friend. Tell him to stay home and use the stair master.


"No snivelling."

Nean
10-08-2006, 23:18
Your "buddy" will be a pain in the ass no matter where he hikes if he thinks PA is tough. Backpacking ain't for him.

Tell your "buddy" he must first go to Damascus and spend time w/ LW.:eek:
After a few rounds :D (hey- maybe I meant golf :rolleyes: ) perhaps he will have a better understanding.;)

hopefulhiker
10-08-2006, 23:18
I thought VA was relatively easy except for The Priest and three ridges.. It was long and many people drop out.. I resorted to an mp3 player to play books on tape during the Green Tunnel.

Lone Wolf
10-08-2006, 23:19
The WHOLE AT is easy.

hopefulhiker
10-08-2006, 23:21
Yeah, that's what I say, Hiking the AT is Easy EXCEPT for the hiking part...

Nean
10-08-2006, 23:22
I thought VA was relatively easy except for The Priest and three ridges.. It was long and many people drop out.. I resorted to an mp3 player to play books on tape during the Green Tunnel.

I'm not sure of my luck, but I never got to see the Green Tunnel.:-?
If all goes well I may have another chance next year!:)

Nean
10-08-2006, 23:29
The WHOLE AT is easy.

I gotta agree.:eek: Compared to almost anything else in this wacky world :confused: , walking is natural:sun; hiking is fun. :)

MedicineMan
10-08-2006, 23:30
and the rocks are interesting..there are places where you can't 'stride' like normal, places where you have to pay attention to where you step...but so far (from Pen-Mar to Swatara) there have been no climbs to speak of...the only downside of PA so far is no sweet tea or grits.

Nean
10-08-2006, 23:40
and the rocks are interesting..there are places where you can't 'stride' like normal, places where you have to pay attention to where you step...but so far (from Pen-Mar to Swatara) there have been no climbs to speak of...the only downside of PA so far is no sweet tea or grits.

The southern half is pretty darn flat. The closer you get to New Jersey the more rocks. When you get past the Delaware...... it's pretty much smooth sailing from there.;) :)


At least, thats what I heard.:eek:


From LW.:D

emerald
10-08-2006, 23:41
I've said it before and I'll say it again and again. If you think Pennsylvania's tough, you might as well stay home.

For many people, Pennsylvania's infamous rocks become a self-fulfilling prophesy. They decide in advance that the rocks will make them miserable. Guess what, when they get here, people who expect to have that experience do. People who don't focus excessively on the rocks and find other things upon which to focus, while keeping their thoughts positive can finish the rest of the A.T. too.

That's what 2000 milers are talking about when they tell you the A.T. is a mental challenge by the time you reach Pennsylvania. Dealing with the rocks is one of those challenges. For many people it is more mental than physical. Combine that with the heat and you get a bunch of unhappy campers.

Really, the rocks aren't much much different north or south of here. There are some rough stretches here, but they don't extend the length of the entire state or even all the way from the Susquehanna River to the Delaware River.

Over the years, there have been many thru-hikers from Pennsylvania including the first, Earl Shaffer. The A.T. in Pennsylvania will teach you about the mental part of the hike!

Nean
10-08-2006, 23:56
Really, the rocks aren't much much different north or south of here. There are some rough stretches here, but they don't extend the length of the entire state or even all the way from the Susquehanna River to the Delaware River.


The A.T. in Pennsylvania will teach you about the mental part of the hike!

Well, I'm not sayin who I heard it from ;) ;) but I was told that hardly a day goes by w/o seeing rocks on the AT!:eek:

That part about PA/mental is true.........if'n yer a sobo. I'm told it's Virginny for nobos.:)

emerald
10-09-2006, 00:16
Well, I'm not sayin who I heard it from ;) ;) but I was told that hardly a day goes by w/o seeing rocks on the AT!:eek:

That part about PA/mental is true.........if'n yer a sobo. I'm told it's Virginny for nobos.:)

I said there are some rough stretches. These are the relatively short infamous sections where we hone the small, sharp rocks annually with the diamond files. We don't have enough files to maintain the entire Pennsylvania A.T. to those high standards! I didn't say there will be days when hikers won't see rocks, you emoticon hog, Nean. Doubling up on winks, now are we?

Virginia may be for lovers, but it goes on forever. It might be a good state for boy-blazing and/or girl-blazing (see other thread now viewing).

emerald
10-09-2006, 01:16
We took a shakedown cruise on the At near Delaware Water Gap in preperation for a section hike in Virginia next spring.

Don't let our replies scare you off. We are glad you have come to whiteblaze.net for advice.

Where in Virginia do you intend to hike and how much time have you allowed? To some extent, what you experience will depend upon where you hike and how many miles per day you cover. We can probably provide better information if you are more specific.:)

Nean
10-09-2006, 01:48
Don't let our replies scare you off. We are glad you have come to whiteblaze.net for advice.

Where in Virginia do you intend to hike and how much time have you allowed? To some extent, what you experience will depend upon where you hike and how many miles per day you cover. We can probably provide better information if you are more specific.:)

Shades is right, details help. I'm up past my bedtime, 'night all.

neo
10-09-2006, 08:55
We took a shakedown cruise on the At near Delaware Water Gap in preperation for a section hike in Virginia next spring. My buddy is thinking about backing out because of the rocky terrain in Pa. Can anybody reassure him that Virginia is nothing like the glacila tallus that you find through Pa ans Nj?. Thanks and good luck to all.



:) pennsylvannia and virginia easy,i would not worry about rocks i did 20 to 30 miles a day in those 2 states:cool: neo

Blissful
10-09-2006, 09:09
I've said it before and I'll say it again and again. If you think Pennsylvania's tough, you might as well stay home.

For many people, Pennsylvania's infamous rocks become a self-fulfilling prophesy. They decide in advance that the rocks will make them miserable. Guess what, when they get here, people who expect to have that experience do. People who don't focus excessively on the rocks and find other things upon which to focus, while keeping their thoughts positive can finish the rest of the A.T. too.



Seems like that's the same for other parts too. Like the Approach trail is tough, you get the blues in VA, Mahoosuc Notch takes a half a day for one mile, The Whites are -- well...etc etc. Yeah, and the rocks of PA. The bad news can psych you completely out.

I plan to take this one day at a time. Concentrate on that day and what it offers.

emerald
10-09-2006, 10:41
I plan to take this one day at a time. Concentrate on that day and what it offers.

If you're mind is open to fully absorbing what's offerred, you'll find much to focus upon which is pleasant.:) Live in the present and fear not what the future holds. Above all, dwell not upon the unpleasant. For many a hiker, going down that path has led to a failure to thru.:(

Your thoughts and the terrain will change like the weather.:rolleyes: Hold on to those thoughts which advance you up the trail and let the others be carried away as smoke by the breeze on a warm fall day.:sun

Appalachian Tater
10-09-2006, 10:42
We took a shakedown cruise on the At near Delaware Water Gap in preperation for a section hike in Virginia next spring. My buddy is thinking about backing out because of the rocky terrain in Pa. Can anybody reassure him that Virginia is nothing like the glacila tallus that you find through Pa ans Nj?. Thanks and good luck to all.

Reading through this thread could be confusing.
Bottom line, the terrain in Virginia is not like the terrain in Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania is miserably rocky. There are rocks everywhere along the AT but the rocks in Pennsylvania hurt your feet more because of their size, shape, placement, and quantity. If your friend was able to get through that section of Pennsylvania, he will find almost any section of Virginia to be a pleasant contrast: relatively easy and enjoyable.

DMA, 2000
10-09-2006, 11:15
I don't get people who say that PA isn't particularly rocky. The trail passes through an awful lot of rock fields...unstable rocks the size of footballs, just waiting to snap your ankles.

On the other hand, it's about the easiest state on the trail. For the most part it's as flat as can be. My mileage definitely peaked there.

driver126
10-09-2006, 11:34
Thanks to everybody. Thanks especially to Appalachian Tater and Slogger you guys hit the nail on the head. I should have been more specific, I don't mind rocks, it is those sharp edged rocks every two inches that I found to be painful. Thanks again everybody!!

emerald
10-09-2006, 11:51
Reading through this thread could be confusing.

Many whiteblaze.net threads share that characteristic.:confused:


Bottom line, the terrain in Virginia is not like the terrain in Pennsylvania.

Really? The two are similiar in that they both involve much hiking along ridges. The more significant ups and downs occur increasingly at water gaps as one advances north on the Virginia A.T. much as in Pennsylvania.

There is beautiful pastoral scenery in both states. There are many vistas offerring exceptional views of farm country.

Are Baer Rocks and Dragon's Tooth not similiar in effect if not in many other ways?


Pennsylvania is miserably rocky. There are rocks everywhere along the AT but the rocks in Pennsylvania hurt your feet more because of their size, shape, placement, and quantity.

Miserably is an adverb that might describe how one hikes in Pennsylvania if one so chooses. Reacting to the A.T. in Pennsylvania in that manner is not inevitable.

The size, shape, placement and quantity of rocks varies considerably from place to place.

Whether one's feet hurt when passing thru Pennsylvania depends to at least some extent upon what footwear one chooses to wear, the miles per day hiked and the care with which one places one's feet with respect to the rocks. I contend those of us who grew up here are more adept at the art of rock-hopping than those who learned to hike elsewhere. To some extent, it takes a slightly different approach.

Whether one's feet hurt more or less when hiking through Pennsylvania's 200+ miles than when hiking another portion of the A.T. of similiar length is at least somewhat subjective and depends upon the sections compared and one's recollection.



If your friend was able to get through that section of Pennsylvania, he will find almost any section of Virginia to be a pleasant contrast: relatively easy and enjoyable.

We will only know that if his friend does the hike and he reports back to us as it would be strictly his opinion.

gtothero
10-09-2006, 12:15
There is a definite technique to PA rocks. After 20 years of hiking in Rocksylvania, it becomes second nature.

emerald
10-09-2006, 12:36
There is a definite technique to PA rocks. After 20 years of hiking in Rocksylvania, it becomes second nature.

An excellent opening post! Sometime you and I should participate in a thread where those who understand this technique can attempt to explain it the uninitiated who may be able to learn a few things from us.

Here's a quick list in no particular order:

Wear heavier boots with heavy midsoles if not a steel shank.
An insole and heavier socks may help.
Don't step on sharp rocks, loose rocks or rocks that weigh less than you if it can be avoided.
Step only on large rocks or smooth treadway when presented with that option.
Pick up your feet.
Realize that you are more prone to misstepping when in a hurry or toward the end of a day.
Sometimes you may need to slow down.
Don't blame your stumbling on the rocks but rather the person who stumbled.
Accept the treadway for what it is rather than expect it to be smooth. You will be happier and enjoy yourself more.
Practice makes perfect.
The temperature has an impact upon one's level of hydration which, in turn, impacts one's hiking ability. Guess where most thru-hikers are at the hottest time of the year?
Successful rock-hopping is like driving a car in that you must concentrate on what you are doing and not allow yourself to be distracted.

c.coyle
10-09-2006, 13:26
...the only downside of PA so far is no sweet tea or grits.

It's been a few years since I dined there, but Esther's Diner on Route 22, a 10 minute hitch from Route 645 and maybe 20 minutes from 501, used to have grits. My old roomate from Louisiana thought they were the real deal.

Is "sweet tea" something more than tea with a bunch of sugar?

emerald
10-09-2006, 14:09
It's been a few years since I dined there, but Esther's Diner on Route 22, a 10 minute hitch from Route 645 and maybe 20 minutes from 501, used to have grits. My old roomate from Louisiana thought they were the real deal.

Is "sweet tea" something more than tea with a bunch of sugar?

I thought we might expect hear from you. I'm not so sure we will hear from our friend Fiddlehead today.

Did you realize MedicineMan will be visiting us soon? Maybe the 3 of us could meet at Esther's and get a second opinion from him.

These hikers from points south like their sweet tea and grits. We must try to accommodate their needs and make them feel at home even though they may feel they are in a foreign land.

Footslogger
10-09-2006, 14:43
[quote=Shades of Gray;254424]I've said it before and I'll say it again and again. If you think Pennsylvania's tough, you might as well stay home.
=====================================

Northern PA isn't so tough ...it's annoying.

'Slogger

emerald
10-09-2006, 14:44
When you get past the Delaware...... it's pretty much smooth sailing from there.;) [omitted smile]


At least, thats what I heard.:eek:


From LW.:D

You know better than that!:rolleyes:

emerald
10-09-2006, 14:47
I've said it before and I'll say it again and again. If you think Pennsylvania's tough, you might as well stay home.


Northern PA isn't so tough ...it's annoying.

'Slogger

For some, it most definately can be!:rolleyes: ;) :)

c.coyle
10-09-2006, 16:27
... These hikers from points south like their sweet tea and grits. We must try to accommodate their needs and make them feel at home even though they may feel they are in a foreign land.

Anything, within reason, to promote Pennsylvania, The Armpit of the A.T.

MOWGLI
10-09-2006, 16:35
I don't get people who say that PA isn't particularly rocky.

I don't think anyone has said that DMA. What people have said - is that you have to walk on a lot of rocks before you get to PA. Afterwards too. I just think it's a bit overblown, but then again I had walked 1000 miles when I got there. If you dropped me off today wearing a pair of trail runners - I'd be hurtin' for certain.

Johnny Swank
10-09-2006, 17:06
Well, I'm not sayin who I heard it from ;) ;) but I was told that hardly a day goes by w/o seeing rocks on the AT!:eek:

That part about PA/mental is true.........if'n yer a sobo. I'm told it's Virginny for nobos.:)


I don't know about that. By the time the SOBO's hit PA they've already done the hardest part up north and are pretty stoic about the rock thing. At least I was (n=1).

emerald
10-09-2006, 22:52
Anything, within reason, to promote Pennsylvania, The Armpit of the A.T.

Not sure if you're trying to help my advertising campaign or not Coyle.:confused:

Maybe what you're saying is like when I'm at my parent's home and people are hovering around the stove waiting to pounce. When something really good seems to be in the offing, someone is apt to say that whatever it is smells or probably tastes terrible!:eek: ;), the objective being to drive off the others so that more remains for the person who pronounced it to be unfit to eat.;)

Maybe we don't need to change people's minds about Pennsylvania. If we can make them go away, we can have it all to ourselves!

MedicineMan
10-09-2006, 23:51
I'm still scheduled for my next love affair with the AT in PA Nov. 10-14 beginning at Swatara Gap......and after being reminded of the rocks I'm still very much looking forward to Pennsylvania...compared to sitting in the hospital like i am now rocks are a beautiful thing....suddenly I'm reminded of One-Leg having met him in Harpers Ferry (that's also when B.Jack replaced a pair of poles I snapped in the Roller Coaster). After seeing Scot I'll never whine about walking amonst rock or anything else :)

emerald
10-10-2006, 00:10
I'm still scheduled for my next love affair with the AT in PA Nov. 10-14 beginning at Swatara Gap......and after being reminded of the rocks I'm still very much looking forward to Pennsylvania...compared to sitting in the hospital like i am now rocks are a beautiful thing....suddenly I'm reminded of One-Leg having met him in Harpers Ferry (that's also when B.Jack replaced a pair of poles I snapped in the Roller Coaster). After seeing Scot I'll never whine about walking amonst rock or anything else :)

Swatara Creek has receded. You won't need to take the high water route (http://www.trailjournals.com/photos.cfm?id=166658);). We look forward to entertaining those who take to the rocks like men!

Wine is a beverage pronounced like whine, produced by fermenting grapes. Whine is what some people do about rocks. It is undignified.

Kerosene
10-10-2006, 09:24
The original question asked about the rockiness of PA vs. VA as perceived by a section hiker. Certainly PA is pretty easy to get through after you've been walking for 3 months. However, a section hiker is likely to find VA easier, at least when it comes to the trail bed. You can at least build up a good tempo on the VA trail without endangering your ankles. PA has fewer significant elevation changes, but that wasn't the question. Frankly, I find that a highly irregular trail surface slows me down and tires me out, physically and mentally, a lot more than a mile-long ascent.

RadioFreq
10-10-2006, 12:21
Doubling up on winks, now are we?

We need an icon to signify "nudge, nudge" to go with the double winks. :D

emerald
10-10-2006, 18:11
We need an icon to signify "nudge, nudge" to go with the double winks. :D

Well, if Nean continues to insist upon doubling-up, I think we need a single emoticon to designate a double-wink, but I think I know where that's apt to lead already. Before long, the double wink won't be enough to satiate his insatiable desire to post emoticons and we'll find him doubling-up on double-winks.

I suppose I have no one other than myself to blame. I am glad we're limited to four. Some people just can't control themselves with those things.;)

saimyoji
10-10-2006, 18:37
:banana:banana:banana:banana

emerald
10-10-2006, 19:08
The original question asked about the rockiness of PA vs. VA as perceived by a section hiker. Certainly PA is pretty easy to get through after you've been walking for 3 months. However, a section hiker is likely to find VA easier, at least when it comes to the trail bed. You can at least build up a good tempo on the VA trail without endangering your ankles. PA has fewer significant elevation changes, but that wasn't the question. Frankly, I find that a highly irregular trail surface slows me down and tires me out, physically and mentally, a lot more than a mile-long ascent.

Part of what I object to is the notion that it is possible to generalize about the A.T. in Pennsylvania. We are after all talking about 229.3 miles or 9.5% of the entire A.T. There is one generalization that I have seen made that I think reasonable and accurate. The Blue Mountain from Swatara Gap to Delaware Water Gap does have more of the types of treadway that people area apt to find objectionable than the A.T. south of the Cumberland Valley. What I said about the Blue Mountain may also hold for the remainder of the A.T. north of the Cumberland Valley too.

Virginia with 547 miles or 25.2% of the entire A.T. contains more miles than any other state and more than twice as many miles as Pennsylvania. I really don't think it's possible to generalize about the physiography of the region through which the A.T. passes in Virginia or the treadway there. It's just too large an area to make any generalizations that are meaningful or useful.

Appalachian Tater
10-10-2006, 19:15
Many whiteblaze.net threads share that characteristic.:confused:



Really? The two are similiar in that they both involve much hiking along ridges. The more significant ups and downs occur increasingly at water gaps as one advances north on the Virginia A.T. much as in Pennsylvania.

There is beautiful pastoral scenery in both states. There are many vistas offerring exceptional views of farm country.

Are Baer Rocks and Dragon's Tooth not similiar in effect if not in many other ways?



Miserably is an adverb that might describe how one hikes in Pennsylvania if one so chooses. Reacting to the A.T. in Pennsylvania in that manner is not inevitable.

The size, shape, placement and quantity of rocks varies considerably from place to place.

Whether one's feet hurt when passing thru Pennsylvania depends to at least some extent upon what footwear one chooses to wear, the miles per day hiked and the care with which one places one's feet with respect to the rocks. I contend those of us who grew up here are more adept at the art of rock-hopping than those who learned to hike elsewhere. To some extent, it takes a slightly different approach.

Whether one's feet hurt more or less when hiking through Pennsylvania's 200+ miles than when hiking another portion of the A.T. of similiar length is at least somewhat subjective and depends upon the sections compared and one's recollection.




We will only know that if his friend does the hike and he reports back to us as it would be strictly his opinion.

I'm so sorry, what I meant to say is that the rocks in Pennsylvania suck.

emerald
10-10-2006, 19:18
:banana:banana:banana:banana

There you have a post with not 10, but 0 characters and 4 emoticons! Has our friend from Pennsylvania said anything, something or nothing in this case?

He does post good stuff about tea and rattlesnakes though.

emerald
10-10-2006, 19:31
I'm so sorry, what I meant to say is that the rocks in Pennsylvania suck.

Thank you for your clarification. I understand your point clearly now and am sure people new to the A.T. in Pennsylvania will find your comments informative.:D

saimyoji
10-10-2006, 19:59
I'm so sorry, what I meant to say is that the rocks in Pennsylvania suck.


Well, walking on them was your choice. I'm so sorry that you didn't enjoy your passage here. The trail is was it is, you either come to accept it and love it for what it is, or you move on. No reason to bad mouth, denigrate or insult.

And I repeat what I said earlier regarding double winker emoticons:

:banana:banana:banana:banana

emerald
10-10-2006, 20:00
I find that a highly irregular trail surface slows me down and tires me out, physically and mentally, a lot more than a mile-long ascent.

One of my favorite trails is the Abol Slide Trail, southbound. I like that almost more than hiking Pennsylvania's Blue Mountain.

A famous hiker on this site once said that the A.T. in Pennsylvania is like New England's, but laid out flat. Pennsylvania is a good warm up hike for northbounders, especially the ascent out of Lehigh Gap.

I find that kind of hiking challenging, even envigorating.

emerald
10-10-2006, 20:36
Read the linked journal entry (http://www.trailjournals.com/entry.cfm?id=147419) and the next one or two which follow it to learn something about the psychological aspects of hiking on Pennsylvania's rocks as well as the helpfulness and generosity of the people you might meet in Pennsylvania. I'm not claiming what the author wrote actually happened, but his journal entries serve to illustrate some of the points I've made.

Note what Baro was thinking as he hiked first northbound and then southbound. I couldn't help but notice how he makes better time on the return trip.

driver126
10-11-2006, 17:13
I agree with you, a 9 mile stretch of having to carefully select each footfall is a lot harder to me than a steep incline. I dig all the responses, even the ones that are off topic but you have helped to answer my question. Thanks

emerald
10-11-2006, 17:43
I agree with you, a 9 mile stretch of having to carefully select each footfall is a lot harder to me than a steep incline. I dig all the responses, even the ones that are off topic but you have helped to answer my question. Thanks.

I'm doubtful you could find a segment of the A.T. 9 yards long, let alone 9 miles where the rocks are all loose and uniformly football-sized.:rolleyes: I'm beginning to think this is A Gathering of internegators. Perhaps you might like hiking in the vicinity of the Tye River?:rolleyes::)

Maybe you should start with Shenandoah National Park and see if that works out for you. Here is a fun link (http://www.trailjournals.com/entry.cfm?id=142309) I've posted before that many have enjoyed. Read to Harpers Ferry.

driver126
10-11-2006, 19:45
Shades of Grey-I do not know your problem is , but I am glad others on this forum understood the question and are not just interested in putting others down. If the thread drives you crazy don't read it. Please don't send me any more private messages. Thank you

emerald
10-11-2006, 20:34
I don't believe I have a problem and this will be my last post to this thread.

As I said, you are talking about a very large area and you really haven't asked any specific questions yet.

You haven't said when you want to hike, how far or much of anything else, really.

You need to interact with the people here on this site by asking questions if you want to learn something. I can't waste any more of my precious time trying to help you.

I believe that's all I pointed out to you, privately. I was trying to help you and avoid a thread which goes on forever.

I believe I have provided more information to you than anyone, but if you're not listening, it's useless. Perhaps others may benefit. That was my thinking and still that may occur.

Have a nice day.:sun