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woodsy
12-29-2006, 06:56
Any birders here that have pos. ID on this tiny bird along the AT in Maine? If so, when and where. Besides their physical characteristics, they are constantly in motion. Possibly in NH too.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden-crowned_kinglet

MOWGLI
12-29-2006, 09:17
Here's a better site - http://www.birds.cornell.edu/AllAboutBirds/BirdGuide/Golden-crowned_Kinglet.html

I believe I saw both Kinglets during my hike in 2000. I saw a Ruby Crowned in the Whites - for certain. http://trailjournals.com/entry.cfm?id=87815

They are hard to see because they are so small - and like you said - always moving. They are not rare however.

Here's another link about the Golden Crowned Kinglet - http://www.dlia.org/atbi/species/animals/vertebrates/birds/regulidae/golden-crowned_kinglet.shtml

woodsy
12-29-2006, 10:40
Hoped you would chime in on this MOWGLI16, you seem to be a knowledgeable birder here at WB. I have probably seen one or two of these
in my travels but didn't know what they were at the time. Now that I do, I'm in search of seeing them again.
A great study of these hearty birds was done by a biology professor from U of VT. His name is Bernd Heindrich and the book is titled Winter World, the ingenuity of animal survival. Most of his studies on Golden Crowned Kinglets and a extensive one on Ravens was done not far south of the AT in an area called MT Blue state park,in Weld, S. of the Rangeley area. . Maybe you've read or heard of some of his writing, another great book of his is Ravens in Winter which I couldn't help but think of yesterday while on a hike watching a pair of them soaring high and effortlessly on the air currents over that area. Anyway, this guy is a great writer/story teller and wildlife researcher if you or anyone else has the time or interest. It takes an incredible amount of patience to be a wildlife researcher as I learned from his writings.

MOWGLI
12-29-2006, 11:05
Heading out on an Audubon Christmas bird count tomorrow. Should be fun.

And yes, I've heard of Heindrich, but have not read any of his books. The stack next to my bed is pretty tall however. Just finished Grapes of Wrath this morning. One down - umpteen to go.

woodsy
12-29-2006, 11:49
well ok then, thanks for the better links.
They are more abundant and wide ranging than I thought.

weary
12-29-2006, 12:41
Heading out on an Audubon Christmas bird count tomorrow. Should be fun.

And yes, I've heard of Heindrich, but have not read any of his books. The stack next to my bed is pretty tall however. Just finished Grapes of Wrath this morning. One down - umpteen to go.
Bernd Heinrich is one of my favorite outdoor writers. (I think his last name is spelled without a "d", but I'm not sure and all his books are upstairs -- a place i only crawl to once a day until my achillies tendon heals.)

I don't buy many new books. I tend to wait for the paperbacks or until they are remaindered. But I buy Bernd as soon as he shows up at my local book store. Aside from his incredible nature writing, he has a fascinating life history, hiding out in a forest with his family during the Nazi years in Germany, immigrating to this country, attending high school while living in a home for poor kids in Maine, and going on to earn a PHd in biology.

One book tells of his transformation in one year from an amateur jogger to a brief reign as the world champion ultra marathoner, along with an explanation of the biology of running from dung beetles to antelopes.

Weary

MOWGLI
12-29-2006, 13:00
Bernd Heinrich is one of my favorite outdoor writers. (I think his last name is spelled without a "d", but I'm not sure and all his books are upstairs -- a place i only crawl to once a day until my achillies tendon heals.)

I don't buy many new books. I tend to wait for the paperbacks or until they are remaindered. But I buy Bernd as soon as he shows up at my local book store. Aside from his incredible nature writing, he has a fascinating life history, hiding out in a forest with his family during the Nazi years in Germany, immigrating to this country, attending high school while living in a home for poor kids in Maine, and going on to earn a PHd in biology.

One book tells of his transformation in one year from an amateur jogger to a brief reign as the world champion ultra marathoner, along with an explanation of the biology of running from dung beetles to antelopes.

Weary

Weary or Woodsy:

Got any copies of Heinrich's books lying around you'd be willing to swap for something new? I've got The Wilderness Reader from the University of Nevada Press. Or The Last Season by Eric Blehm, or dozens of other books you might want to trade for. Send me a PM if you're interested.

TJ aka Teej
12-29-2006, 21:41
Here's my photo of the busy little guy, taken in Baxter this past October
http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=14216&c=675
(not the best photo ever taken...)

weary
12-29-2006, 22:04
Here's my photo of the busy little guy, taken in Baxter this past October
http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=14216&c=675
(not the best photo ever taken...)
TJ. Send me the best quality photo you can, and I'll use it in one or more of my several trail newsletters.

Weary

woodsy
12-29-2006, 22:09
Thats a fine picture of the busy little guy Teej(they seem to have a nervous twitch)Thanks for posting it, proof positive. Seen many of them in your travels? Uplands? lowlands? Trying to figure out where they like to hide .

MOWGLI
12-29-2006, 22:24
Nice photo Teej. They're hard to snap, being so small and flighty. I met this guy yesterday doing some digiscoping here in Chattanooga on the banks of the Tennessee Rivers. Here's a shot of Ruby Crowned Kinglet (http://richard-schier.smugmug.com/gallery/2188086) he took in Chattanooga.

He has a brand new Leica spotting scope, and has offered to provide me with some images. Here is an image of a Coopers Hawk (http://americanhiking.chattablogs.com/archives/043224.html) that he took. Nice guy!

TJ aka Teej
12-29-2006, 23:16
Weary: will do - but it'll be a bit out of focus due to the auto-focus digital camera I took it with.
Woodsy: Seems to me I see them both mostly in the fall and winter in northern hardwood forests in VT, NH, and ME. I've probably seen ten rubies to every one golden. I have seen them both as far south as Gettysburg.
Mowgli: nice pics! Have fun with the Christmas Count!

Mr. Clean
12-30-2006, 06:02
I see them in the Whites, but I'm surprised you're having a tough time seeing them in Kingfield. The ones I've seen have been around the spruce/hardwood line, and really only in the morning when the early morning chill has disipated somewhat. Funny little birds.

I also love the Boreal Chickadees; spent some time with about a half dozen on Mt. Clinton/Pierce last Sept.

woodsy
12-30-2006, 09:47
Now that I asked about the Kinglets, the information offered here should help narrow the search . The Boreal chickadee is also on my list and for those you need Boreal forest, Western Maine- Northern NH I think. Thanks
for the info guys. Don't forget to read WINTER WORLD by Bernd Heinrich(spelled it right this time Weary) to learn how all the little birds and other critters survive the harsh northern winters.

woodsy
12-30-2006, 10:45
Haha, just found this picture of a Boreal Chickadee and realized this is what I saw near the summit of S. Crocker Mtn. about 4 weeks ago. There were three of them and they came right down to within a few feet checking me out. I thought the light brown on the sides was a bit odd for a Black Capped.

http://www.mainenature.org/images/borealchickadee.jpgMonday, December 25 Rangeley (Map 28)
What better way to spend Christmas than a walk in the woods. Strange to have so little snow around here, just patches here and there. The smaller ponds are frozen, but the larger rivers and lakes are still very open save for some shelf ice on some protected coves. In the same place I photographed this boreal chickadee, the ground was covered with tracks on Friday when we had a dusting of snow, now that is gone. There was plenty of coyote,hare and squirrel tracks and a treat for me was the bobcat and marten tracks. A week before that I saw a large cow moose there. KB

MOWGLI
12-30-2006, 17:20
Haha, just found this picture of a Boreal Chickadee and realized this is what I saw near the summit of S. Crocker Mtn. about 4 weeks ago. There were three of them and they came right down to within a few feet checking me out. I thought the light brown on the sides was a bit odd for a Black Capped.



I saw one in the Carter Range. My favorite boreal bird species was the Black Backed Woodpecker I saw on Old Blue in Maine.

woodsy
12-30-2006, 17:31
I saw one in the Carter Range. My favorite boreal bird species was the Black Backed Woodpecker I saw on Old Blue in Maine.

You sure it had 3 toes?:rolleyes: LOL

woodsy
12-30-2006, 17:41
You sure it had 3 toes?:rolleyes: LOL

Oops, guess we are talking about two different woodpeckers.

Mr. Clean
12-31-2006, 12:59
I've seen neither the Black backed nor the three toed; both are on my list to see. Guess I'll have to spend more time out there...:D

MOWGLI
12-31-2006, 13:00
I've seen neither the Black backed nor the three toed; both are on my list to see. Guess I'll have to spend more time out there...:D

Black Backed Woodpeckers have almost ZERO fear of humans. You can get within 10' of them, and they don't pay you any attention.

The second bird I saw was along the X-Country Ski trails at the Mount Washington Hotel in New Hampshire.

woodsy
12-31-2006, 16:59
Found this interesting piece for you Maine mountain birders:
The Western Mountains
Boreal Forest

The Appalachians extend into western Maine 200 miles from southern Oxford to northern Piscataquis counties. Average elevation in the region ranges between 1500 and 2000 feet, with numerous peaks over 3000 feet. Katahdin is the highest point at 5200 feet.
The climate in this picturesque region is relatively severe. Northern hardwoods cover many of the sheltered slopes, but a boreal forest of spruce and fir dominates the exposed and higher elevation areas. Spruce grouse, black-backed woodpecker, yellow-bellied flycatcher, northern raven, gray jay, boreal chickadee, winter wren, Swainson's and gray-cheeked thrushes, golden-crowned kinglet, blackpoll warbler, white-throated sparrow, and dark-eyed junco are all among the characteristic birds to be found here.
Many of the species that live in this region are among the most sought after by birders from all over the country. Although many of these birds are comparatively tame and allow close approach, they typically live in remote places that require some hiking.


Where to Bird

Royce Mountain, Evans Notch area of White Mountain National Forest (trail access from Route 113); spruce-fir forest; spruce grouse, boreal chickadee.
Old Speck and Baldpate Mountains, Grafton Notch State Park; spruce-fir and northern hardwood forest; montane and boreal species.
Bemis Mountain, Appalachian Trail southwest of Rangeley; spruce-fir and northern hardwood forest; spruce grouse, boreal chickadee, gray jay, and other northern species.
Saddleback Mountain, Appalachian Trail east of Rangeley; spruce-fir and northern hardwood forest; many warblers, black-backed woodpecker, gray-cheeked thrush, and other northern species.
Borestone Mountain (http://www.maineaudubon.org/explore/centers/borestone.shtml), Elliotville; spruce-fir and northern hardwood forest; montane and boreal species.
Baxter State Park, trails and perimeter road; mountains, spruce-fir and northern hardwood forest, lake, river; water pipits, all northern Maine species.

mdionne
12-31-2006, 17:18
the grey-cheeked and bicknell's thrush have been separated into two species. bicknell's thrush (a species of special concern) is found in maine during the breeding season. if you detect a bicknell's thrush, report it and it's location to the audubon society.

woodsy
01-01-2007, 10:49
Studies show that bird species affected by pollution from coal burning power plants http://www.birdersworld.com/brd/default.aspx?c=a&id=705

MOWGLI
01-01-2007, 10:59
Studies show that bird species affected by pollution from coal burning power plants http://www.birdersworld.com/brd/default.aspx?c=a&id=705

Great article! I appreciate you sharing it.

MOWGLI
01-04-2007, 12:44
Name that bird! Here's a little contest to test your bird ID skills.

http://americanhiking.chattablogs.com/archives/043388.html

woodsy
01-04-2007, 13:01
Heard the crow in background LOL but hawk for sure.Couldn't tell which one though, ho hum.

MOWGLI
01-04-2007, 13:10
Heard the crow in background LOL but hawk for sure.Couldn't tell which one though, ho hum.

Which crow? :-?

woodsy
01-04-2007, 13:13
Sounded like a caw-caw in the background? No?

MOWGLI
01-04-2007, 13:21
Sounded like a caw-caw in the background? No?


Yes. What crow was that?

woodsy
01-04-2007, 13:26
Fish Crow! Can't say as i've ever heard of it before though.

MOWGLI
01-04-2007, 13:31
Fish Crow! Can't say as i've ever heard of it before though.

Wrong! :eek: Try again. :sun

woodsy
01-04-2007, 13:36
American Crow, final answer

MOWGLI
01-04-2007, 13:49
Correct! One down, two to go. You got the easy one. :sun

No more answers til next Wednesday.

STEVEM
01-04-2007, 18:15
My guess is sharp shinned hawk based on wingbeats.

STEVEM
01-04-2007, 18:30
I hiked up Peekamoose Mtn in the Catskills on 12/31. Saw all the normal winter birds. I got a surprise at about 2500 ft when I saw a flock of about 20 nice fat robins singing like it was May. I hope they made a wise decision to stay.

MOWGLI
01-10-2007, 02:22
My guess is sharp shinned hawk based on wingbeats.

Very good guess Steve, but that is not the answer. To see the answer to the Bird Identification Contest - please visit the following link;

http://americanhiking.chattablogs.com/archives/043633.html

DawnTreader
01-10-2007, 12:44
I just Finished Bernd Heindrichs' A year in the Maine Woods. What a wonderfull book. Does anyone know if he has a private website that I can purchase some of his other books?? Amazingly enough, this one was found at Borders.

warraghiyagey
01-10-2007, 14:40
I just Finished Bernd Heindrichs' A year in the Maine Woods. What a wonderfull book. Does anyone know if he has a private website that I can purchase some of his other books?? Amazingly enough, this one was found at Borders.

Dude, this should be helpful. http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/ref=dp_srsubj_entry/105-9610793-5970826?%5Fencoding=UTF8&index=books&field-keywords=Heinrich%2C%20Bernd%2C

It lists all of his books including the story of Bubo, an owl that he nurtured to health. But I've got an even better address if you're interested.
Bernd.Heinrich@uvm.edu. Hope this helps. Great writer/lover of nature.

Peace

DawnTreader
01-10-2007, 16:37
excellent.. thanks man.. hope your well...

warraghiyagey
01-10-2007, 16:47
excellent.. thanks man.. hope your well...
I am. Got a CD package from TGrit yesterday. He's in Asia - hiking.

DawnTreader
01-10-2007, 16:49
Nice.. Everyone is hiking but us.... I'd like to see some of those pictures if you can get them online...

warraghiyagey
01-10-2007, 16:52
Why don't you PM me your address and we'll see about getting some of those pictures to you.:) :)

woodsy
10-31-2007, 19:56
Yes, i finally saw one! High attop Bigelow Mtn a few weeks back at the Col. I had just broken camp at the Col and within 1 minute of leaving camp at 3800' this lil bird landed in a tree beside me at eye level and bowed it's head for me to see it's golden crown. I was elated having been looking for it for so long.:) It is a rather rare sight IMO.
I had read much about this bird through Bernd Heindrich's book Winter World.
It's an amazingly small bird with the ability to survive through harsh alpine zone winters in the northeast's coniferous forests.
The book describes the study of these birds by none other than Bernd Heindrich himself on a ridge near Mt Blue State Park in Weld, Maine, not far from the Tumbledown Mtns., just south of the AT, Rt 17 and Rangeley area.
So birders, keep your eyes open, they really do exist on the AT high up in the northeast. ;)
http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna/species/301/articles/introduction

weary
10-31-2007, 20:38
Hoped you would chime in on this MOWGLI16, you seem to be a knowledgeable birder here at WB. I have probably seen one or two of these
in my travels but didn't know what they were at the time. Now that I do, I'm in search of seeing them again.
A great study of these hearty birds was done by a biology professor from U of VT. His name is Bernd Heindrich and the book is titled Winter World, the ingenuity of animal survival. Most of his studies on Golden Crowned Kinglets and a extensive one on Ravens was done not far south of the AT in an area called MT Blue state park,in Weld, S. of the Rangeley area. . Maybe you've read or heard of some of his writing, another great book of his is Ravens in Winter which I couldn't help but think of yesterday while on a hike watching a pair of them soaring high and effortlessly on the air currents over that area. Anyway, this guy is a great writer/story teller and wildlife researcher if you or anyone else has the time or interest. It takes an incredible amount of patience to be a wildlife researcher as I learned from his writings.
Bernd Heindrich has written many nature books, all of them excellent. I'm saddened when I see his books remaindered. Being poor, I don't buy many new hard covered books. But I can't resist buying Bernd's books, hard covered, or paperback, whenever I find them.

Weary

warraghiyagey
11-01-2007, 04:23
Any birders here that have pos. ID on this tiny bird along the AT in Maine? If so, when and where. Besides their physical characteristics, they are constantly in motion. Possibly in NH too.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden-crowned_kinglet

Woodsy, saw this little fellow a couple of times. The more memorable time was in that little sand beach area on (I believe) East Carry Pond in the shrubs. Straight up my friend. I haven't read the whole thread but have you seen them?