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Brushy Sage
01-17-2007, 12:43
Hikers will now see a Civil War marker at the Hot Springs Spa, the site of a grand hotel during the 19th century. A special dedicatory ceremony will be conducted on Feb 3, 2007 at 2:00 p.m. Here is a press release:

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Press Release

Contact: Dan Slagle

Phone: (828) 686-3668

Email: dslagle@bellsouth.net
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

9 A.M. EDT, January 17, 2007

madison county dedicates three civil war trail markers

The Madison County Genealogical Society will dedicate newly installed markers on the state-wide North Carolina Civil War Trails on Saturday, February 3, 2007. The dedication will take place in three parts according to the schedule below:

- Mars Hill College on the campus quad, “ Strategic Location, Divided Loyalties” – 12:00 noon

- Marshall at the Allen House on Main Street, “Divided Loyalties” – 1:00 p.m.

- Hot Springs on Hot Springs Spa grounds, “Brother Against Brother” – 2:00 p.m.

In addition to Civil War re-enactors, state and local officials will be on hand at each site to commemorate this important milestone in preserving and interpreting Madison County history.

Local partners in planning and funding Madison County’s Civil War trail markers include the Madison County Genealogical Society, Town of Mars Hill, Gene Hicks, Madison County TDA, Mars Hill College, Richard Dillingham, Priscilla Hope, Clark Kimball, Hot Springs Spa, project chairman Dan Slagle, and the Madison County Heritage Council, an initiative of the Blue Ridge National Heritage Area.

The North Carolina Civil War Trails is a program of the Division of Tourism, Film and Sports Development. The markers on this battle route mirror those installed along the highly successful Civil War trail systems in Virginia and Maryland and will be easily identified by the same bugle logo these trails sport. This multi-state program is identified as one of the most sustainable heritage tourism programs in the nation by the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

Jack Tarlin
01-17-2007, 19:01
Brushy Sage:

Some of us here have a great deal of interest in American History, especially as relates events that took place on or near the Trail. Thank you for sending this along.

Brushy Sage
01-19-2007, 22:16
Maybe somebody hiking through Hot Springs this year will see the marker and remember that it was mentioned on Whiteblaze. It tells about an 1863 battle in which boys from the local area, in both Union and Confederate units, fought against each other. By the way, guests at the old hotel at Hot Springs, in the 19th century, took outings to places that are familiar to hikers, such as Lover's Leap rock and Deer Park Mountain -- sometimes on foot and sometimes on horseback.

joec
01-22-2007, 11:09
Last summer I did a hike from about 35 miles out of Hot Springs from the north. I came upon the gravesite of the Shelton family members that were killed during the civil war. They had sided with the Union and were ambused as they came home to visit. The gravesite has been kept up. It was remarkable the way some family member have gone through the trouble to go up on the mountain and do regular maintenance. The trail goes through the bottom side of the gravesite.

Brushy Sage
01-22-2007, 15:04
Kinship bonds are very strong and enduring among mountain families.

BlackCloud
01-23-2007, 09:51
I too enjoy the historical snippets one can glean along the trail. I have always said the the AT is not wilderness, in large part b/c much of it was previously utilized for agrarian purposes. South Mountian in MD for example is a major civil war battlefield, not wilderness.

Rain Man
01-23-2007, 11:51
Last summer I did a hike from about 35 miles out of Hot Springs from the north. I came upon the gravesite of the Shelton family members that were killed during the civil war. ... The gravesite has been kept up. It was remarkable the way some family member have gone through the trouble to go up on the mountain and do regular maintenance.

Earl Shaffer has a photo of this grave site in his book, "Walking With Spring." These graves are in a big sunny field in that old photo.

When I got to those graves last Fall, they were in a very small clearing in dense woods. I thought that change was remarkable, too.

Rain:sunMan

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