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MikeG
02-25-2007, 19:41
can anyone give me the lowdown on solo tents? what should i look for?

i was browsing around and found this tent by northface, looks pretty nice.

http://www.backcountry.com/store/TNF1333/c3/s28/The-North-Face-Solo-12-Tent-1-Person-3-Season.html

TJ aka Teej
02-25-2007, 19:45
Here's mine:
Eureka Spitfire $90
http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?memberId=12500226&productId=39168734

You should look for something light, sturdy, roomy, and cheap - in my opinion.

Blue Wolf
02-25-2007, 19:49
Heck I'm impressed, damn sure is light, I have a msr hubba it weighs right at 2.8 and has plenty of ventilation I like it but wish i had seen this tent before I bought mine would have liked to check it out.

MikeG
02-25-2007, 19:49
well it says packed weight is 2 lbs 2 oz's.....im really thinknig about picking this up.

rafe
02-25-2007, 19:53
Look at Tarptents. To get lighter than that, you have to go to a tarp or bivy.

Frolicking Dinosaurs
02-25-2007, 19:57
No one tent is right for everyone. If I were thru hiking alone and a flexible 19 yo, I'd seriously consider the tarptents - the Contrail (http://www.tarptent.com/contrail.html), Squall (http://www.gossamergear.com/cgi-bin/gossamergear/Squall_Classic.html?id=gZgh3IIA:24.159.188.211), Lunar Solo (http://www.sixmoondesigns.com/shop/shopexd.asp?id=36) and Brawny (http://www.antigravitygear.com/store/product_info.php?products_id=246&osCsid=52f2a5f4416b)

mountain squid
02-25-2007, 19:58
These are popular on the AT:

http://www.sixmoondesigns.com/

http://www.tarptent.com/

I use the Lunar Solo and like it. Alot of "useable" interior space.

See you on the trail,
mt squid

rafe
02-25-2007, 20:00
No one tent is right for everyone. If I were thru hiking alone and a flexible 19 yo, I'd seriously consider the tarptents - the Contrail (http://www.tarptent.com/contrail.html), Squall (http://www.gossamergear.com/cgi-bin/gossamergear/Squall_Classic.html?id=gZgh3IIA:24.159.188.211), Lunar Solo (http://www.sixmoondesigns.com/shop/shopexd.asp?id=36)and Brawny (http://www.antigravitygear.com/store/product_info.php?products_id=246&osCsid=52f2a5f4416b)

Don't forget the Tarptent Rainbow. 2 lbs on the nose, with sewn in floor. Trail-ready, in its stuff sack, with stakes. Much roomier than the North Face that MikeG linked to.

MikeG
02-25-2007, 20:01
no i dont have a problem with the weight. i dont like tarps, tarptents or any other variation. when i sleep at night i like a nice stable fully covered sleeping enviroment. however if ventilation is a problem i might have to look on.

saimyoji
02-25-2007, 20:02
I'm still on the hunt for that perfect solo, spacious, large vestibule, free standing, ultralight, well ventilated, packs small, keeps the weather off, and doesn't put me in the poor house tent.

Frolicking Dinosaurs
02-25-2007, 20:02
I came back to edit my post to include the Rainbow, but see I was beaten by a terrapin - man I'm slow these days. :D

Spork
02-25-2007, 20:04
well it says packed weight is 2 lbs 2 oz's.....im really thinknig about picking this up.

Actually, the 2 lb 2 oz is the minimum or trail weight (tent body and poles only). The average weight (including things like stakes, guy line, stuff sack) is listed at 2 lb 8 oz. Bear in mind that this is a single wall tent (no fly). If you're interested in alternatives for single wall structures I suggest you look at Tarptents http://www.tarptent.com/products.html and Six Moon Designs http://www.sixmoondesigns.com/default.asp both of whom make excellent quality, lightweight solo shelters beginning at around a pound and a half. (even lighter without floors) You'll find lots of threads about them here at WB.

Baum Trigger
02-25-2007, 20:05
These are popular on the AT:

http://www.sixmoondesigns.com/

http://www.tarptent.com/

I use the Lunar Solo and like it. Alot of "useable" interior space.

See you on the trail,
mt squid

How many places to need to stake the Lunar Solo down at? Only curious, .. wish I had seen this tent a couple of years ago.. don't have the $235 for it now...

TDale
02-25-2007, 20:05
You should look for something light, sturdy, roomy, and cheap - in my opinion.

Here ya go:

http://www.texsport.net/willowbend-person-trail-tent-p-42.html

2 lb, 12 oz if you leave the poles and use trekking poles or tie it to a tree.

MikeG
02-25-2007, 20:05
this looks interesting

http://www.rei.com/online/store/ProductDisplay?storeId=8000&catalogId=40000008000&productId=47975642&parent_category_rn=4500666

Frolicking Dinosaurs
02-25-2007, 20:05
Many people who like full coverage like this tent - the mesh doesn't rain on you if brushed. http://www.sierradesigns.com/tents.display.php?id=45

rafe
02-25-2007, 20:06
no i dont have a problem with the weight. i dont like tarps, tarptents or any other variation. when i sleep at night i like a nice stable fully covered sleeping enviroment. however if ventilation is a problem i might have to look on.

I think you have the wrong idea about tarptents. Check out the website (http://www.tarptent.com/rainbow.html) or a few of my own photos (http://www.terrapinphoto.com/tarptent/).

MikeG
02-25-2007, 20:09
no im pretty sure in my opinion i dont like tarp tents. ive used them and dont care for them. thats why im asking about solo tents specificly. not lightweight shelters.

Topcat
02-25-2007, 20:11
I like cowboy camping more than tents when i know the weather will let me. Learned a valuble lesson when i was 16 though. I always set up my tent, even if i plan on doing the cowboy thing. One night in PA, it was clear and we were sure it wouldnt rain. Laid out our pads next to the fire, fell asleep to the sound of a stream next to the site and woke up to the sound of rain pelting my sleeping bag. Good thing i could set the tent up blindfolded, but I was soaked by the time i was inside it.

Spork
02-25-2007, 20:12
no i dont have a problem with the weight. i dont like tarps, tarptents or any other variation. when i sleep at night i like a nice stable fully covered sleeping enviroment. however if ventilation is a problem i might have to look on.

The Tarptents and SMD tents mentioned so far are all offered with full floors and mesh insect protection equal to any tent, so you might want to reconsider and check them out...

MikeG
02-25-2007, 20:16
i dont need to repeat myself anymore.

if anyone if willing to share information on solo tents it would be greatly appriciated.

MikeG
02-25-2007, 20:19
at the moment im looking at...

http://www.rei.com/online/store/ProductDisplay?productId=47975642&storeId=8000&catalogId=40000008000&color=SAGE/EARTH&img=/media/623063.jpg&view=large

and

http://www.rei.com/online/store/ProductDisplay?storeId=8000&catalogId=40000008000&productId=48111901&parent_category_rn=4500666


anyone have any experince with the two?

Baum Trigger
02-25-2007, 20:23
at the moment im looking at...

http://www.rei.com/online/store/ProductDisplay?productId=47975642&storeId=8000&catalogId=40000008000&color=SAGE/EARTH&img=/media/623063.jpg&view=large

and

http://www.rei.com/online/store/ProductDisplay?storeId=8000&catalogId=40000008000&productId=48111901&parent_category_rn=4500666


anyone have any experince with the two?

I've used a Hubba before and it is a good tent, however, there are better tents out there that weigh less (see reccomendations from other users above). On the other hand, if you are set on these two, than thats cool too, just please oh please buy from somewhere else than REI. They charge out the a$$ for shipping and you could probably find another site having a deal on it that also offer free shipping. Good luck to you and your tent hunting!

mountain squid
02-25-2007, 20:24
How many places to need to stake the Lunar Solo down at?
6. And, I will admit that it took me until The Birches in Baxter SP to figure out how to set it up on a tent platform effectively:). It is a great tent. It isn't too much more than the Tarptents when you factor in the floor.

See you on the trail,
mt squid

MikeG
02-25-2007, 20:26
well im not exactly set on the two, just throwing ideas around.

saimyoji
02-25-2007, 20:30
Check out the following: (do a search on Cammore or backcountry gear . com)

Sierra Designs Iota
Mountain Hardwear Meridian
Big Agnes Seedhouse 1 or the SL

gold bond
02-25-2007, 20:51
how about the Montain Hardware PCT1 or the PCT2? I have both. I have been "tinkering" With them as I had a small problem with condensation at first but realized I did not have them guyed out. I not only looked at pack weight, I look at pack size. Also The tent has a foot print that allows you to just set up the fly when you just need to get out of the rain or don't want to set up the whole tent. Kind of the best of both worlds, solo tent and tarp!

Spork
02-25-2007, 20:55
i dont need to repeat myself anymore.

if anyone if willing to share information on solo tents it would be greatly appriciated.

Mike:
I don't believe anybody here is trying to p##s you off or ram a tarptent down your throat, we have simply been responding to your questions and comments as best we understand them. As you can see your thread has generated a lot of interest and quick responses from people who are simply trying to be helpful. I my case I haven't been able to keep up with the speed of your replies, and so I wasn't aware of your mindset on tarptents when I made my last post. So no, you don't have to repeat yourself anymore. Sorry for any misunderstanding.

Eureka also makes a UL version of the Spitfire, and also the Solitaire which are resonably priced and light weight. Black Diamond makes a solo tent called the OneShot and Mountain Hardware makes the Sprite 1. Big Sky makes some lightweight tents although they have a reputation for VERY slow delivery, so I would be wary. Whatever you choose, here's wishing you and your new tent Happy Trails!:sun

rafe
02-25-2007, 21:02
Eureka also makes a UL version of the Spitfire, and also the Solitaire which are resonably priced and light weight.

FWIW... I am a long time fan of Eureka tents, but not the Spitfire UL. And for that matter -- though I could be mistaken -- the Tarptent Contrail has one crucial design feature in common with the Spitfire UL, which makes me wary. The regular (non-UL) Eureka Spitfire is probably fine.

The crucial diff is that the Spitfire UL (and Contrail) have a fly that goes "flat" over much of its area. In both these tents the smaller hoop at the foot end of the tent has been replaced by two short vertical poles. From my experience with the Spitfire UL, that's a mistake.

Spork
02-25-2007, 21:10
The crucial diff is that the Spitfire UL (and Contrail) have a fly that goes "flat" over much of its area. In both these tents the smaller hoop at the foot end of the tent has been replaced by two short vertical poles. From my experience with the Spitfire UL, that's a mistake.

I wasn't aware of the design difference; thought the UL simply shaved weight with sil-nylon. A hiking partner carried the regular Spitfire on a section hike we did, and was very happy with it. Lots of mesh, good headroom. Looks like a neat little tent...

swingerofbirches
02-25-2007, 21:13
So I've looked long and hard at both the tarptents and the solo tents, and if your tarptent has a floor, what's the difference between the two? I gather tarptents are lighter (and tarps are the lightest), but they just seem to be that: lighter tents. ???

bigcranky
02-25-2007, 21:19
In my mind, a TENT has walls that are sewn to the floor, creating a windproof barrier. In a TARPtent, the walls don't meet the floor. There is some bug netting, but that's all. Great for ventilation and views out the side of the tarptent (when you are lying down, anyway). Not so great in cold, windy weather.

MikeG
02-25-2007, 21:21
im liking the space with the msr hubba, but is it worth the price? wieght is no issue.

Spork
02-25-2007, 21:27
So I've looked long and hard at both the tarptents and the solo tents, and if your tarptent has a floor, what's the difference between the two? I gather tarptents are lighter (and tarps are the lightest), but they just seem to be that: lighter tents. ???

DISCLAIMER: I do NOT purport to be an expert on tarptents/single wall shelters, especially since Henry Shires and Ron Moak are regular posters on WB and could make anything I say sound even more stupid (and I don't generally require much help in this area). However, in my mind there isn't much difference. Tarptents and SMD tents are lightweight, single wall shelters using sil-nylon and mesh to minimize weight and maximize ventilation while providing full protection from the elements and insects. Sounds like the definition of a single wall tent? It does to me, too. I guess "traditional" single wall tents use pole hoops and can be freestanding whereas "traditional" tarptents use trekking poles and need to be staked out, although neither of these descriptions is accurate anymore. At the end of the day it comes down to features and functions and they seem to be the same to me, with Henry's and Ron's products weighing quite a bit less. I sleep quite nicely in my Squall II and my Lunar Solo e and my back thanks me for saving the pound.

maxNcathy
02-25-2007, 21:32
Check out Big Agnes Seedhouse SL1 for lightness and full protection. I am happy with mine.

Chache
02-25-2007, 23:34
no i dont have a problem with the weight. i dont like tarps, tarptents or any other variation. when i sleep at night i like a nice stable fully covered sleeping enviroment. however if ventilation is a problem i might have to look on.
I am like you. I need a real tent. I just got the Big Agnus Seedhouse 2SL
http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=39202196&memberId=12500226&storeId=226&catalogId=40000000226&langId=-1

MikeG
02-26-2007, 00:01
just to be clear, im not knocking tarptents, or tarps its just not my deal.

that seedhouse 2SL looks interesting 3lbs 6 oz's with room for two.

Earl Grey
02-26-2007, 00:05
I have the Hubba and love it.

MikeG
02-26-2007, 00:20
the only thing i read that people have a problem with is the rainfly dosnt go all the way to the ground and it can get breezy, is it a big problem? now im torn between the hubba and 2SL....

Jim Adams
02-26-2007, 08:36
Mike,
I am hiking the PCT this year and have the same problem. I've hiked the AT x2 and only used a tarp and was happy but feel as though I need a tent out west.
I've purchased 5 tents / tarptents since October. I'm taking the Hubba. Seems like the best of the bunch for me. Got it used on ebay, in new condition set up twice by the original owner---$110.
Good luck and have fun.

geek

Chache
02-26-2007, 09:29
the only thing i read that people have a problem with is the rainfly dosnt go all the way to the ground and it can get breezy, is it a big problem? now im torn between the hubba and 2SL....
I read that too but I also see that they say they didnt stake out the fly right either. I just got it so I cant say much other than I set it up a REI and broke it down real fast by myself. It is free standing with a good vestibule. Lite for its size.Roomy for one with your pack. Watch out if you buy the Seedhouse 1SL online. They use the picture of the Seedhouse 2SL. This is not what the poles look like. The poles are not the same. You need to use stakes to hold one end so its not really a free standing. You could use a hiking pole side ways to hold it open. I didnt like it.

Chache
02-26-2007, 09:35
Mike,
I am hiking the PCT this year and have the same problem. I've hiked the AT x2 and only used a tarp and was happy but feel as though I need a tent out west.
I've purchased 5 tents / tarptents since October. I'm taking the Hubba. Seems like the best of the bunch for me. Got it used on ebay, in new condition set up twice by the original owner---$110.
Good luck and have fun.

geek
I set up the Hubba at REI. It seemed like a big Bivy to me. It is easy to set up but i am 5' 11'' and I was almost touching both ends. Go to REI they carry both Seedhouse and Hubba

Jim Adams
02-26-2007, 11:04
I set up the Hubba at REI. It seemed like a big Bivy to me. It is easy to set up but i am 5' 11'' and I was almost touching both ends. Go to REI they carry both Seedhouse and Hubba

Chache,
I can appreciate your problem----I am only 5'6" but I touch both sides!!!!:banana
I hope to get thinner but...good luck with the height thing!

geek

MikeG
02-26-2007, 11:10
yea i dont plan on buying online, i'd rather have the chance to see it in person.

Ewker
02-26-2007, 11:24
I set up the Hubba at REI. It seemed like a big Bivy to me. It is easy to set up but i am 5' 11'' and I was almost touching both ends. Go to REI they carry both Seedhouse and Hubba


I am 5'10 and have no problems storing items at the head or the foot of the Hubba. I picked it over the Seedhouse. I just didn't like that tent.

vipahman
02-26-2007, 12:40
I like my SMD Lunar Solo given that it packs about the same size as a 1L Nalgene. Internal space is great. Vestibule is very usable. And it is light at 1 lb 11 oz for the heavier floor. My stakes and poles do double duty so I don't count their weight.

shoe
02-27-2007, 23:20
I don't know if I missed any responses so if I did I am sorry.

I tried out the Single wall Northface at REI. I got in with no sleeping bag and I was touching at both ends.

I am torn between the Seedhouse SL and the Hubba as well. I currently have a quarterdome which I love but I think it's a bit heavy to carry on a long trip.

Freestanding is a big issue with me, although I think the Seedhouse has to be staked a bit but still freestanding enough for me.

Good luck on your decision.

rafe
02-27-2007, 23:33
Freestanding is a big issue with me, although I think the Seedhouse has to be staked a bit but still freestanding enough for me.

I know Mike G. isn't interested in this, but for what it's worth: if you've got a pair of hiking poles, the Tarptent Rainbow is every bit as freestanding as the Big Agnes SL1.

I'll also say that the BA SL1 would be my 2nd choice after the Rainbow.

shoe
02-27-2007, 23:38
I thought about the rainbow but I don't have the cashflow to get one.
I do have gift cards from REI though and a store credit of 100 bucks.

I am defenitely checking out the tarptents in the future though.

rafe
02-27-2007, 23:46
I thought about the rainbow but I don't have the cashflow to get one.
I do have gift cards from REI though and a store credit of 100 bucks.

I am defenitely checking out the tarptents in the future though.

Obviously the credits & gift card matter -- but REI's price on the SL1 ($249) exceeds the price of the Rainbow with floor ($215) or Rainbow w/o floor ($185.) Anway, the SL1 is a nice tent. Enjoy.

gearhound
02-28-2007, 00:41
If you are fond of the MSR tents check out the zoid 1 and zoid 1.5

stag3
02-28-2007, 00:47
Mike G,

Wow, lots of opinions and experience in this post. FWIW, I have a $30 texsport "bivy". I don't know the definition of a bivy, but for $30 and max 3# it's a great deal. Real roomy for one, tight for two.

After seam sealing I've never had a leak. IMO, you can spend a lot more $$ to get marginal benefits.

Stag3

Hoku
03-01-2007, 14:52
I like my Black Diamond Firstlight. It weighs 2 1/2 lbs packed, you can pitch it blindfolded from inside the tent and it'll hold you and all your gear easily. It will also hold a friend you are close with. If you vent it properly you won't have issues with condesation, especially sleeping alone - you won't touch the walls and there is a lot more room for your vapor to dissipate compared to solo-single-walls. I wish it wasn't quite so yellow, and it isn't cheap, but if you like having a real tent you'll have a hard time finding better, in my opinion.

Chache
03-01-2007, 19:54
I like my Black Diamond Firstlight. It weighs 2 1/2 lbs packed, you can pitch it blindfolded from inside the tent and it'll hold you and all your gear easily. It will also hold a friend you are close with. If you vent it properly you won't have issues with condesation, especially sleeping alone - you won't touch the walls and there is a lot more room for your vapor to dissipate compared to solo-single-walls. I wish it wasn't quite so yellow, and it isn't cheap, but if you like having a real tent you'll have a hard time finding better, in my opinion.
That was my other choice before I got the seedhouse2 sl. It does look very nice. I am sure I will own it someday. I seem to be on a gear obsession. Just got the Seedhouse, marmot atom sleeping bag and jetboil on Monday. Somebody stop me

dloome
03-01-2007, 21:36
Hey, I was a flexible 19 year old when I thru hiked... I used a tarp and think they are superior to tents for three season use as a backpacking shelter, especially in consistently wet, rainy weather. I'm using my tarp on the PCT this year as well. Tarps are great.

But if you REALLY want a tent, the MSR Zoid solo tents are pretty good. I've used the Zoid 1 fairly extensively for bicycle touring and it's always been solid. Had it in very cold, windy weather, light snow loads. No issues except for a little condensation in the foot area when it's battened down tight. A little heavy and overkill for for something like the AT in my opinion. It's still a nice product, I just wouldn't carry it on a thru hike.

Chache
03-01-2007, 23:33
Hey, I was a flexible 19 year old when I thru hiked... I used a tarp and think they are superior to tents for three season use as a backpacking shelter, especially in consistently wet, rainy weather. I'm using my tarp on the PCT this year as well. Tarps are great.

But if you REALLY want a tent, the MSR Zoid solo tents are pretty good. I've used the Zoid 1 fairly extensively for bicycle touring and it's always been solid. Had it in very cold, windy weather, light snow loads. No issues except for a little condensation in the foot area when it's battened down tight. A little heavy and overkill for for something like the AT in my opinion. It's still a nice product, I just wouldn't carry it on a thru hike.
My problem with the idea of tarps is that it would seem that in a very heavy rain the bouncing water would make its way in your living area. For 1 pound more a tent seems like the way to go. Enlighten me

joel137
03-04-2007, 12:23
no im pretty sure in my opinion i dont like tarp tents. ive used them and dont care for them. thats why im asking about solo tents specificly. not lightweight shelters.

I've been pleased with my REI Roadster, I have the first version, It weighs in at 1630 grams ( 3 lb 9 oz). One can do better on weight, but I liked the design.

joel137
03-04-2007, 12:24
Don't forget the Tarptent Rainbow. 2 lbs on the nose, with sewn in floor. Trail-ready, in its stuff sack, with stakes. Much roomier than the North Face that MikeG linked to.

Its not quite trail ready as one has to seal the seems prior to use.

Mine weighed in at 967 grams (2 lb 2 oz), which includes the pegs & bag and pole.

eventidecu
03-04-2007, 13:32
I use the Seirra Designs Light Year and love it. Dang near bomb proof from my experiance. The only thing is it is just almost too short in height (but doable) and has no vestibule usable for anything other than boots. At 5'09" 180lbs I can just barley get my Aether 75 inside and use it as a pillow laying head between the belt straps craming the pack up front, which works. My buddy got a two man version (not sure of model right now) at right at 4.5lbs I think, and has much more room and height and vestibule. The LY is 2.7lbs. I like the SD lighting too. If I were looking at a new solo the most important thing to me now is height for sitting up. Most of them are way short and you can't sit up to change clothes or waiting out a rain storm. I'd look at a two man something just for that reason. Lots of light weight 2man jobs out there now around 5lbs. Shave a lb somewhere else to make up difference. The only real time you need shelter is for weather which is why you need dry and Shelter WILL be full in the rain.

I don't like the idea of tarp tents because of rain coming in under you. And I don't care what anyone says water migrates to dryness meaning you and your stuff which gets wet and heavy. If you carry a ground cloth then why not a tent with a bathtub floor. Same but sealed from bugs and weather, just not as "cool" looking.

Treadwell
03-04-2007, 14:23
hello all.

lots of opinions here, and i'd like to throw my hat into the ring too.

i style myself something of an involuntary expert on 1p tents. i've bought and returned/sold off many different models/manufacturers in a search for the ideal one. i'm over 6 ft, and this is my biggest complaint...none of the 1p tents i've ever used are long enough.

golite tents...too short. montbell tents...too short. msr zoids...too short.

i have a marmot eclipse 1p which they have unfortunately discontinued. it's the only 1p tent i've found and used that feels comfortable and roomy enough, but at just over 3 lbs i feel it's a touch heavy.

the TNF dyad 1p which started this whole thread of comments is very short. anyone over 5 ft 8 in will have condensation rolling down the walls into their face and onto the feet. i've heard that condensation is a real problem with this new model.

the black diamond tents one shot or first light are the absolute bomb! but be prepared to take out a second mortgage on your house to buy them...they're terribly expensive.

sierra designs light year was very popular for a while, but i found it short and that it had an odd floor plan. the iota is too much like a bivy sack, not enough headroom. but the baku 1p intrigues me, though i've not seen one or met anyone who's used it.

i like the mountain hardwear pct 1p...but i think they've discontinued it. you could probably still find it on campmor.com or you could google it. it too has an odd floor plan but i think it works better than the light year. looking at the MHW website seems they've replaced the pct 1p with the sprite 1p...but it's pretty much the same deal.

something that was written up in this month's backpacker magazine is a company called big sky international which i know *nothing* about. i took a look at their website (bigskyinternational.com) and was impressed with the number of 1p tents they had to offer. i like the options and the simplicity of designs...but i don't know anything about their performance...and they seem a bit pricey.

Quoddy
03-04-2007, 14:55
something that was written up in this month's backpacker magazine is a company called big sky international which i know *nothing* about. i took a look at their website (bigskyinternational.com) and was impressed with the number of 1p tents they had to offer. i like the options and the simplicity of designs...but i don't know anything about their performance...and they seem a bit pricey.


From all the unfortunate hikers who ordered them at BPL (check it out) you'll find that you may or may not ever see the item that you ordered, but if you do it may show up in about a year. I, personally, would be wary about parting with any money unless I had an infinite amount of time to wait and even then was ready to force the issue. See link below.

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/reviews/display_reviews.html?forum_thread_id=4923&cat=1%20%2D%20COMPANIES%20%28Customer%20Service%29&cid=67

GitRdone
03-04-2007, 22:55
Many people who like full coverage like this tent - the mesh doesn't rain on you if brushed. http://www.sierradesigns.com/tents.display.php?id=45


This looks more like what I'd like. I'm 6' 3"... I see that it is 113 inches long but it narrows down pretty quick in the front. Is it still too short for me... price is right also.

Bud

stag3
03-04-2007, 23:01
I like my SMD Lunar Solo given that it packs about the same size as a 1L Nalgene. Internal space is great. Vestibule is very usable. And it is light at 1 lb 11 oz for the heavier floor. My stakes and poles do double duty so I don't count their weight.

Vipahman...How tall you be??

Stag3

imagine.peace
03-10-2007, 10:54
Hey
I was just wondering why dont you like tarptents? I was looking at getting one myself, but wanted some more feed back on them since i ahve not heard of them before. I see that they are open at the bottom, and where i live the bugs are horrible all summer and that could become a problem. So what are the pros and cons of tarptents compared to regular solo tents. I plan to hike a long distance and dont knwo which one would work better.

vaporjourney
03-10-2007, 11:05
I have the TarpTent Rainbow, and have been preetty pleased with it. There is a ton of space inside (maybe too much?), for minimum weight. There are other lighter options out there, but the pitch is easy, with more room than most 1 person tents. Not all of them are floorless, you have to designate whether you want the floor or not when you order. I opted to have the floor because of the bug-worry during the warmer months, but next time I order a similar product (possible SMD Wild Oasis!?), I would go floorless, and use a removable floor that could also be used in shelters if necessary.

TarpTents are completely sufficient for long-distance hikes. The only downfall is that condensation often builds up inside if you don't have proper ventilation. This is somewhat remedied if you pick a good camp site with great ventilation, but sometimes this isn't possible. The TarpTents try to give as much mesh as possible to help warm air escape, but I still wind up with condensation on the walls. This really isn't much of an issue since there tends to be lots of room inside anyway, and I rarely brush my sleeping bag agains the walls. Other than the condensation issue, the only slight annoyance I have found is that they ofter require a greater ground surface area to pitch the tent properly. I got spoiled with my Eureka Spitfire (a good cheaper alternative), where I didn't need much ground space. But the Rainbow is a solid rectangular shape on the whole floor, and considerably wider, which can often times limit site selection. I can remember one night in the Smokies spent cursing the ground. I had the Rainbow setup, only to realize that there were too many roots or rocks just where I needed to be, so I'd walk the tent to another area, repeated the process 3x before finding a crappier, sloped spot.

All in all, the Tarptent Rainbow is a great choice. If I were to repurchase, I probably would go with the TarpTent Contrail, mainly for the weight savings, and I also like the practical design. My vote goes for tarptents for a solo shelter.

maxNcathy
03-10-2007, 12:59
Big Agnes Seedhouse SL1 was tested by me in high winds and rain and snow. It passed the test with no leaks or tears and no snow blown inside despite lots of powder snow with side winds.

I weighed the tent with fly, ropes, poles, pegs and sacks and the actual total was 2 pounds 15 1/2 oz.
I added bungie shock cords on the ends of the ropes so my total is 3 pounds, 2 ozs.

Sandalwood

rafe
03-10-2007, 13:16
Hey
I was just wondering why dont you like tarptents? I was looking at getting one myself, but wanted some more feed back on them since i ahve not heard of them before. I see that they are open at the bottom, and where i live the bugs are horrible all summer and that could become a problem. So what are the pros and cons of tarptents compared to regular solo tents. I plan to hike a long distance and dont knwo which one would work better.

Most Tarptents can be bought with or without floors. The models with sewn-in floors offer complete protection from bugs.

Pros: Lighter than any comparable double-walled tent. Well-designed, quick setup. Very roomy for their weight. Cons: Condensation, not as warm as a comparable double-walled tent, can't be used "fly-less" like a double-walled tent.

As the name implies, Tarptent is a somewhere between a tarp and a tent. Sets up like a tent, though heavier than the lightest tarp rigs.

grysmn
03-10-2007, 13:57
Thinking out of the tent box; go with a hammock tarp, it is light easy to set up, spacious and will keep both you and your gear dry, it is almost like a portible shelter. While you are at it try a hammock.

panama snail
03-11-2007, 14:34
I HAVE THE Chrysalis UL tent linked above in MikeG's comments for sale for a hundred and twenty with footprint, plus postage about 15.00 insured, if interested PM me.

stuco
03-11-2007, 14:40
Tarptent Contrail $199. weighs next to nothing and you are fully protected from bugs,rain etc.

Chache
03-11-2007, 20:09
I have never used a hammock before but would think it would be a bit limiting to always be looking for two objects the right distance from each other to tie it to. I also hike in Southern Utah alot and I can't imagine it working in that situation.

Franco
03-11-2007, 20:28
Somehow reading in between the lines I get the impression that Mike is definitely, absolutely ,irrefutably NOT interested in a tarp tent or a Tarptent for that matter.
You know that I love the TT products, however what is the point pursuing this ?
Mike, have a look at the Moontrail site, http://www.moontrail.com/tents/3-season.html (http://www.moontrail.com/tents/3-season.html), lots of pictures there.
My suggestion for you is to compare the Seedhouse SL2, if you like a roomy interior, the Hubba
for the bigger vestibule and side entrance, and the Exped Vela for an even bigger vestibule and simultaneous fly/inner set up. The Vela is one of the many Akto clones, not rated 4 season , but has most of the characteristics of the Akto. Because of the set up and huge vestibule it would be a good choice for rainy weather.
Franco

rafe
03-11-2007, 20:31
Somehow reading in between the lines I get the impression that Mike is definitely, absolutely ,irrefutably NOT interested in a tarp tent or a Tarptent for that matter.


Thread drift. It's no longer about MikeG's tent. But that's OK, too. :D

Trailwind
03-11-2007, 20:37
at the moment im looking at...

http://www.rei.com/online/store/ProductDisplay?productId=47975642&storeId=8000&catalogId=40000008000&color=SAGE/EARTH&img=/media/623063.jpg&view=large

and

http://www.rei.com/online/store/ProductDisplay?storeId=8000&catalogId=40000008000&productId=48111901&parent_category_rn=4500666


anyone have any experince with the two?
The Chrysalis is a little heavier than I prefer for a 1 man tent. The MSR tent you linked to looks to be of very similar design to the Canyonlands tent that The North Face made a few years ago. There are a couple of differences, but the big pole that runs the length of the tent is similar. I like the Canyonlands a lot, and expect this tent may have a couple of improvements. The design lends itself to the tent having plenty of headroom whether laying in the bag or sitting up. I use it when I am out and expect really cold/windy weather or significant rain. It works well. I have room in both to get all of my gear in the tent with me. If fair weather is expected I go with a lighter weight Wanderlust Nomad that isn't made any more. If replacing my tent today I would be looking at http://www.sixmoondesigns.com/shop/shopexd.asp?id=36 or http://www.antigravitygear.com/store/product_info.php?cPath=1&products_id=246

imagine.peace
03-12-2007, 10:18
You will probably not like this as it has nothing to do with mikes question(sorry mike). They were saying i should look at hammocks and i ahve been, but theres no protection from busg in the ones i saw. That would be horrible for me, as the bugs are horrible hjere for a good 2-3 months. But i think i am going to try making one for myself. But as chace said, what happens if you cant find two objext close enough? Becuase then i think you would be in trouble.
Sorry about this.

Madmax
03-12-2007, 20:54
For 2 season go with Eureka Spitfire solo, it's nice, stable, light and takes pretty much weather.
Expecting harch weather, except heavy snow, stick to Hillebergs Akto.

PS: By the way, how could anyone possibly make it through a good Scandinavian winter snowstorm in a tarptent "thing" ? Ufff... :-)

Max

Frosty
03-12-2007, 21:13
If you carry a ground cloth then why not a tent with a bathtub floor. Because you can cowboy camp with just the ground cloth on nice nights, and you can put the ground cloth under your sleeping pad in shelters, keeping it clean and avoiding a possible puncture by a splinter or wayward mailhead.

You can snug down a tarp tent so that rain doesn't splash in, though if it rains for more than a couple of days, your stuff is gong to be damp no matter what kind of tent you have.

When it's 85* and muggy at night and the skeeters are out in full force, you don't turn your tent into a steam bath because all that mesh gives you good ventilation.

Plus tarp tent sounds a lot cooler, doesn't it? Don't you think "free-standing, double-walled tent with a bathtub floor" sounds kind of yuppie-ish? Whereas "tarptent" has an earthy, gritty feel to it.

And they are lighter.

Chache
03-12-2007, 21:27
Because you can cowboy camp with just the ground cloth on nice nights, and you can put the ground cloth under your sleeping pad in shelters, keeping it clean and avoiding a possible puncture by a splinter or wayward mailhead.

You can snug down a tarp tent so that rain doesn't splash in, though if it rains for more than a couple of days, your stuff is gong to be damp no matter what kind of tent you have.

When it's 85* and muggy at night and the skeeters are out in full force, you don't turn your tent into a steam bath because all that mesh gives you good ventilation.

Plus tarp tent sounds a lot cooler, doesn't it? Don't you think "free-standing, double-walled tent with a bathtub floor" sounds kind of yuppie-ish? Whereas "tarptent" has an earthy, gritty feel to it.

And they are lighter.
Call me a Yuppie and give me my Seedhouse SL2.

T-Dubs
03-15-2007, 21:41
Check out the following: (do a search on Cammore or backcountry gear . com)

Sierra Designs Iota
Mountain Hardwear Meridian
Big Agnes Seedhouse 1 or the SL

Does anyone have 1st hand experience with the SD Iota?
It seems a bit heavy by WB standards but it does have some nice space, especially the vestibule.

Thanks,
Tom

Ps. This opinion was posted later in the thread:
the iota is too much like a bivy sack, not enough headroom. but the baku 1p intrigues me, though i've not seen one or met anyone who's used it.

So, has anyone used it?

MikeG
03-16-2007, 00:32
yea i bought the SL2 in the first week of march. it was exactly what i was looking for. i wieghed the SL1 in one hand and the SL2 in th other and decided get get the two man because the difference wasnt that much. i've taken it out a few times and its great.

rafe
03-16-2007, 07:02
yea i bought the SL2 in the first week of march. it was exactly what i was looking for. i wieghed the SL1 in one hand and the SL2 in th other and decided get get the two man because the difference wasnt that much. i've taken it out a few times and its great.

That's funny. In a thread titled, "Solo tents"... ;)

Madmax
03-16-2007, 09:25
Maybe not so funny, since the SL1 is a -man tent :rolleyes:

Madmax
03-16-2007, 09:33
http://www.moontrail.com/eureka-spitfire.php

I have one in my collection. If you can live with a small vestbule and grey colour (not green) it's a great little tent, very stable and light, under 3 Lbs total

Flaxseed
03-16-2007, 13:17
What is the best method to set up the lunar solo on a platform. Istart my trail hike in April
Flaxseed

Footslogger
03-16-2007, 13:32
What is the best method to set up the lunar solo on a platform. Istart my trail hike in April
Flaxseed

===================================

Ain't really no good method. It's all trial and error based on the layout of the platform and the placement of the tie down loops. Hiked Rangeley to Gorham last year and set up on the platform at Gentian Pond. Talk about laborius !! Ended up being a hybrid set up between the metal tie down loops at the edge of the platform and some rocks. Wasn't pretty but weather was good and for one night it worked.

You can do it ...but it takes more time and effor than pitching on the ground. Just prepare yourself for some left brain creativity !!

'Slogger

BrianLe
03-16-2007, 13:42
On the topic of hammocks versus tents, I own both as well as a bivy. I'm new to solo tents, having just tried my tarptent contrail in the backyard the last couple of nights, but of course I've slept in a number of tents over the years. Assuming I don't have too much trouble finding sites to pitch it, I think I'm going to love the contrail.

I don't know about Utah, but what I like about a hammock is just the opposite; I live in the Northwest (washington state), and for me the best feature of a hammock is that you just hike as long as you want and then look for two trees --- they're everywhere here. Sloping ground, brush, whatever, it all makes for a fine campsite. If you're hiking with a group, no competition for the best smooth/flat sites. The ultimate in "stealth" camping. And the commonly used hammocks (Speer, Hennessy) both have bug protection.

The big downside for hammocks IMO is just the weight you carry to stay reliably warm if you're concerned about temps getting much below, say, 40 degrees F. The ground is an insulator, hammocks lose heat underneath.

Many people report that they sleep better in a hammock; I unfortunately get a mild crick in my back sometimes, so that plus the weight trade-off has pushed me back onto the ground. If I find that getting good campsites is too difficult however (the contrail does have a fairly large solo footprint), I might still take the hammock on some solo trips.

I guess the footprint is the only advantage of a bivy now that solo single wall tents are so light. I was okay in my bivy for a PCT section a couple of years ago; the part I most disliked was when bugs are out and it's warm --- I couldn't retreat inside the bivy even if on top of my bag without sweating.

Franco
03-16-2007, 19:01
Platforms are a bit of a pain with some tents. In Tasmania with a friend of mine we arrived into a platform only campsite, it was raining and windy. So to me it was the perfect opportunity to set up my Rainbow in the freestanding mode. Of course because it was windy (very) I hade to guy out the corners anyway. Just about when I nearly finished I noticed that Adam (he knows nothing about tents....) had already finished pitching his Rainbow by just guying it out as usual and gone for a look around the place. If think that I muttered something afterwards about wanting to test the freestanding option.
Franco

imagine.peace
03-17-2007, 19:37
Its good to hear from people who have all types of shelters and what are good and bad about each ones. I was wondering since the tarptents are only one walled, do they get very hot durring the summer? and why is it hard to find a place to put your contrail compared to other solo tents.
Thanks

superman
03-17-2007, 20:24
In the spirit of half a man tents Wal-Mart sold a one person tent. It was undersized and it had to have about two tubes of seem sealer and water proofing all over. It was not any where near the best tent on the trail. What it did have was that it weighed two lbs and cost 20 bucks. It's fine if you don't mind not sleeping straight. I still have mine.

BrianLe
03-17-2007, 22:46
"I was wondering since the tarptents are only one walled, do they get very hot durring the summer? and why is it hard to find a place to put your contrail compared to other solo tents."

The contrail is my first experience with single-walled tents, so I have no personal experience to share beyond two nights in my backyard ...

The comment about footprint is about something that's a two-edged sword. Single-walled tents are prone to condensation, so you don't want to have a really small one where you can't avoid brushing the tent ceiling/wall and getting wet. Plus, of course, it's just nice to have a roomy tent, which the contrail is for a solo tent (IMO at least).

There's a range of sizes, and free-standing tents have different capabilities for pitching in smaller spaces sometimes than must-stake-it-out tents, though often your stake and associated cord can go into bushes you wouldn't want to sleep on. I've hiked with friends with double-walled solo tents that required less room than my new contrail. I was using a bivy at the time, and I needed less room yet, maximally easy to tuck myself into any space that would hold a human body in reasonable comfort.

So many trade-offs ... !

kyhiker1
03-19-2007, 11:43
I have been using the Eureka-Spitfire for 3 season hiking from spring to fall of 2006,works well with minor problems.

MikeG
04-03-2007, 09:46
just curious, has anyone ever tried out the kelty stick ultralight tent? or heard anything about it?