PDA

View Full Version : Good stove for a big eater...



Orange_Crush
03-02-2007, 15:44
Okay, I'm gathering my equipment for the hike and next on my list is a stove. Apparently, there are as many types of stoves as there are...well...theres a lot of types of stoves.
Now, I'm probably going to go used because stoves are apparently made out of platinum and diamonds.
My question to the experts on the board is...what should I get? I have pretty much decided against alcohol and wood just because I'm not handy enough to cut up a beer or tomato juice can and, with wood, there's just too much prep.
This leaves me with white or multi fuel and canister as the two obvious choices.
So what's better? I'm leaning towards white fuel because of easy resupply (if needed...I'm only hiking nine days) and from what I hear, the burn hotter for easier cooking. Am I way off track here?
Also, what stove would you recommend so I can start perusing the ebay ads...
Thanks for your help.

Jack Tarlin
03-02-2007, 15:47
If you're only out for nine days, a big cannister will last that long.

But really, it doesn't really matter whether or not you get a white gas or a cannister stove, as long as you get a good one. For the former, check out MSR (like the Whisperlite) ; for the later, look at MSR (Pocket Rocket) and Snow Peak (Giga).

Lone Wolf
03-02-2007, 15:48
MSR Pocket Rocket cannister stove. You can simmer or go full blast. I eat big too. I carry two pots. I make sauses for my pasta.

Grinder
03-02-2007, 15:54
There is anarticle titled "about stoves" the describes the various types along with their advantages and disadvantages. I still haven't masterd cut and paste here, but go to White Blaze from top links. It's about third item dowm from top.


the extremes are the ultra light guys with freezer bag cooking on one end and the clydedales with a full kitchen in their 50+ pound pack.

No one can tell you which stove is right for you. (Although many will tell you their stove is right for you). You gotta sort through it and make your decisions.

Miles of Smiles

buckowens
03-02-2007, 16:23
I used my Pocket Rocket to cook at home when the power went out. I used about a 2 gallon spaghetti pot and it cooked it well. Stability was a little iffy, but it boiled it quickly!

As Teblum said, it's still a very personal decision. Sort of like the boxers or briefs question...:p

Lyle
03-02-2007, 16:34
Also, if the only thing keeping you from condisering alcohol is that you don't want to make one, you can purchase one already made. Their price generally reflects the fact that they aren't made of platinum and diamonds. For example:

http://www.antigravitygear.com/store/product_info.php?cPath=3_39_40&products_id=55

or

http://www.minibulldesign.com/fs2.htm

I'm sure there are others.

Lyle

RockStar
03-02-2007, 16:56
MSR Pocket Rocket cannister stove. You can simmer or go full blast. I eat big too. I carry two pots. I make sauses for my pasta.


What kind of sauces??? :o

Joshrm78
03-03-2007, 00:57
Can u use any fuel with the snow peak giga?

eventidecu
03-03-2007, 01:15
I have the Giga as well and love it. You can use any type of canister, any size, it doesn't have to be "snow peak" brand. Smaller and more compact, it and canister fits down in your pot for packing. Forget the "auto igniter" one, save 10.00 bucks and just put a small lighter in the box it stores in, smaller than a pack of cigs, and go with it. You can go full blast or simmer.

K0OPG
03-03-2007, 10:19
jetboil cooking system. fast boil and large pot. I love it.

SunnyWalker
03-04-2007, 21:28
Stratus Trail stove. You can use wood in it or alcochol. Its great and has works terrific. In my humble opinion. I also have a MSR Whisperlite. I prefer the Stratus cuz I don't have to carry any fuel. Glory! Light!
-SunnyWalker

Trailwind
03-04-2007, 22:14
My question to the experts on the board is...what should I get? I have pretty much decided against alcohol and wood just because I'm not handy enough to cut up a beer or tomato juice can and, with wood, there's just too much prep.
You don't have to make your own alcohol stove. If that's all that is stopping you they are very inexpensive at www.antigravitygear.com (http://www.antigravitygear.com) and I saw demo's today of their stoves at Amicalola State Park. Many, many folks picking them up for use. I do think they require more skill to use but are the lowest cost stove both in terms of initial purchase and long term fuel cost.

If you just want the easiest to use stove and are willing to pay more, in my opinion it is the Snow Peak Giga with electronic ignition. Screw the canister on, barely crack the gas on and push a button to light it. Boils a cup of water in 20 degree weather in less than 2 minutes. You can do that lots and lots of times on a single canister. A guy tenting near me last night had an MSR canister stove with MSR fuel and it froze up on him both last night and this morning with temps in the teens.

SunnyWalker
03-10-2007, 00:17
No, the lowest price stove is the Stratus Trailstove.


-SunnyWalker

Sly
03-10-2007, 01:11
No, the lowest price stove is the Stratus Trailstove.


It's $20. Certainly not the lowest price but perhaps the most economical over time.

http://www.trailstove.com/

dla
03-10-2007, 14:10
But this is the best "I didn't build it myself" alcohol stove setup
http://www.clikstand.com/products.htm


This might give you some ideas http://mysite.verizon.net/restoq6v/id1.html , in your case, note the cozy in the background and consider freezer bag cooking.

Unfortunately I like to eat, and freezer bag cooking is the best way I've found to eats lots of varied grub. Something to consider.

SunnyWalker
03-30-2007, 22:45
Yeah, one question though on the Stratus Trailstove. Can one use this when there is a fire ban on? Does that refer only to "open" fires. And so would use of the Stratus constitute a violation of that ban?
-SunnyWalker

atmooney
03-31-2007, 08:52
Pocket rocket is a nice stove, made of white gold instead of platinum. Very small diamonds, spread out... I like mine alot, came with a Ti kettle for like $69 I think...

Tacoda
03-31-2007, 20:40
cheap pepsi can stoves are the best. They are light wieght and boil water fast enough. minibulldesigns.com makes quality lasting stoves. antigravitygear.com has some great pots with cozy's.

The pots and cozy from antigravitygear.com is great becuase you can boil some water, add your ingredients to the pot, cover it with the cozy and do camp stuff for 15 minutes. Heck, with the thier pot and cozy you could do camp stuff, go for water, or a small hike, and come back to a scorching hot dinner.

The thing about alcohol stove is the simplicity of it all. You never have to worry about a malfunction in anyway. It no longer becomes a piece of machinery that deserves your respect. No pumping, no compressed fuel bottles.

My Optimus Nova stove became an artifact 2 years ago.

Nothing beats the simplicity of a lightweight alcohol stove, and it requires even less know-how and fidgeting than a white gas stove made in China.

Coldest temps I have used this kind of stove is at 34 degrees with no problems. Wind was never a problem.

Don't be afraid to try one.

iesman69
03-31-2007, 21:10
I agree with Tacoda. I'm new to the UL way of hiking, especially in relation to stoves and cooking, but alcohol seems to be the best solution for my cooking needs. I've tried to make the Heineken stove, Pepsi stove, Guiness stove, etc, etc.....but thanks to Jim Woods for his instructions for the SuperCat. I've found a winner!

SunnyWalker
05-16-2008, 21:53
How about the Esbitt stove and tabs?

Tinker
05-16-2008, 22:05
Different strokes for different folks (and hikes). When I go out for a couple of days, I usually just boil some water and rehydrate a Knorr-Lipton dinner and maybe some mashed potato flakes. A Heineken "pot" stove works fine for that. In weather in the twenties and thirties I like a cannister stove because it puts the heat to the pot faster than the cold can take it away. In really cold weather I like a liquid fueled stove for the above reason. I haven't used an alcohol stove in two years. The fuel is relatively inefficient for the weight, it can spill, starting a fire in a shelter or on a picnic table, and, of course, my old Supercat (the best of all I've made) leaves a nice black ring on wooden surfaces unless you are very careful (place alum. foil underneath).
Alcohol, however, is a readily renewable resource, so I can say that the use of it leaves less of a "footprint" on the environment.

rafe
05-17-2008, 08:49
How about the Esbitt stove and tabs?

That's for minimalists, ultralighters and gram weenies. Not for a "big eater" I don't think...

warraghiyagey
05-17-2008, 10:57
Try the Amana RadarRange :)

Feral Bill
05-17-2008, 11:27
SVEA white gas stoves can be had via Ebay. Exremely reliable and they can simmer. Classy too.

LIhikers
05-18-2008, 14:10
My wife and I have had good success with an MSR Simmerlite. We use it year round and in all kinds of weather.

rafe
05-18-2008, 14:22
My wife and I have had good success with an MSR Simmerlite. We use it year round and in all kinds of weather.

Whisperlites and Simmerlites don't get much respect these days among long-distance hikers. But 15-20 years ago they did (along with Sveas and some nearly-equivalent Coleman stoves.) I think that's because folks now think in terms of "base weight" rather than long-term weight (ounce-miles, if you will.)

I still think they make some sense for couples and groups on hikes of more than a few nights; in such cases the extra weight of the stove and fuel container is "amortized" and the efficiency of white gas (BTU per unit weight of fuel) comes through. I could spell it out with some simple math, but I think my point is clear.

Squeamish
05-18-2008, 17:17
SP Giga w/ piezo.

Wags
05-18-2008, 22:23
there's a guy on here named 'zelph'. i'd suggest you pm him to see if he can see you one of his little alcohol stoves. he's probably got hundreds laying around. they're cheap comparatively (for both stove and fuel) and easy to use

zelph
05-19-2008, 11:16
Heard my name:)

The Fancee Feest stove has the capacity of 3 ounces of fuel and burns at a steady pace. Will boil 1 gallon of water with three ounces of fuel. That's a good start for all you big eaters out there. It works with big 1 gallon pots and goes all the way down to the Heineken Pots.This stove lights easily in sub zero temps. It's available on ebay.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v228/obijiwa/sub%20one/th_Ultimatepot006.jpg (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v228/obijiwa/sub%20one/Ultimatepot006.jpg)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v228/obijiwa/sub%20one/th_fanceefeestebay001.jpg (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v228/obijiwa/sub%20one/fanceefeestebay001.jpg)

88BlueGT
05-19-2008, 23:50
Sounds like you are on a budget so this might not be the best choice for you but I have an Optimus Nova + stove that I love. Easy to use, super reliable, adjustable flame, durable, quick boiling time, and many other nice features. I baught mine on ebay from a store but it was like 20 or 30 cheaper than buying directly. Heres the link to their site.

http://www.optimus.se/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=7&Itemid=27

rafe
05-20-2008, 01:32
Heard my name:)

The Fancee Feest stove has the capacity of 3 ounces of fuel and burns at a steady pace. Will boil 1 gallon of water with three ounces of fuel. That's a good start for all you big eaters out there. It works with big 1 gallon pots and goes all the way down to the Heineken Pots.This stove lights easily in sub zero temps. It's available on ebay.

3 oz volume or 3 oz weight? If the former, call me amazed and a bit skeptical. I could not reliably get 2 cups boiled from one oz. (volume) of alcohol.

t-bor
05-20-2008, 03:15
the pocket rocket worked really well for me all you have to whatch out for is the O ring busting if its really cold

88BlueGT
05-21-2008, 00:51
I can get a full rolling boil with 1/2oz in stove and 1/8 ounce in primer pan with my pepsi can stove. Took some adjusting to get it to boil like that but it wasnt that difficult. 2 cups straight out of the faucet.

sarbar
05-30-2008, 14:22
That's for minimalists, ultralighters and gram weenies. Not for a "big eater" I don't think...
My hiking partner Mugs makes a Esbit tablet stove that we carry on the site. Doug is a tall guy who likes to eat. But....Esbit fueled stoves are for those who don't need immediate satisfaction either. They do need tinkering and attention.

sirbingo
05-30-2008, 15:39
I would recommend the Sierra Zip stove. You can cook for hours on the thing.

minnesotasmith
05-30-2008, 16:24
Heard my name:)

The Fancee Feest stove has the capacity of 3 ounces of fuel and burns at a steady pace. Will boil 1 gallon of water with three ounces of fuel. That's a good start for all you big eaters out there. It works with big 1 gallon pots and goes all the way down to the Heineken Pots.This stove lights easily in sub zero temps. It's available on ebay.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v228/obijiwa/sub%20one/th_Ultimatepot006.jpg (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v228/obijiwa/sub%20one/Ultimatepot006.jpg)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v228/obijiwa/sub%20one/th_fanceefeestebay001.jpg (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v228/obijiwa/sub%20one/fanceefeestebay001.jpg)

Link no work.

4eyedbuzzard
05-30-2008, 17:11
Going one step beyond the zip: Get three stable rocks of similar height. Gather small pieces of fuel from forest floor. Just f****** light it and cook to your heart's content. Total carried weight of stove and fuel = 0 oz. Carry a few esbits or a small alky and a few oz of fuel for really wet weather emergencies.

oops56
05-30-2008, 18:34
Do you realize how hard most of the time to find the just right stone. Leave alone 3 :-?

Skidsteer
05-30-2008, 21:05
Link no work.

Try this link for info:

http://www.bplite.com/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=105

and this link for sales:

http://www.bplite.com/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=619

SunnyWalker
07-11-2008, 21:24
How much do those SVEA stoves sell for?

Marta
07-11-2008, 22:10
About a hundred bucks:

http://www.campsaver.com/itemdesc.asp?ic=opt0004

oops56
07-11-2008, 22:10
new 95.00 new or e bay sometime less somtime hi.

generoll
07-11-2008, 22:45
jump in here, stove and cookset a match a close to heavenly as possible.

http://cgi.ebay.com/SVEA-123-OPTIMUS-COMPACT-CAMPING-STOVE-MESS-KIT_W0QQitemZ200237602471QQcmdZViewItem?hash=item2 00237602471&_trksid=p3286.m14.l1318

yaduck9
07-11-2008, 23:02
Not a cannister or white gas but it works very well and you cannot beat the price.


http://cgi.ebay.com/WHITE-BOX-STOVES-BACKPACK-ALCOHOL-STOVE-4000-SOLD_W0QQitemZ320271857971QQcmdZViewItem?hash=item 320271857971&_trksid=p3286.m14.l1308


Have had mine for over a year and will not wear out.

Bob S
07-11-2008, 23:20
Svea 123, great stove and worth every bit of the price.

MOWGLI
07-11-2008, 23:22
MSR Pocket Rocket cannister stove. You can simmer or go full blast.

Bought one recently, and I'll be cooking for two on the JMT with it.

zelph
07-12-2008, 10:38
Not a cannister or white gas but it works very well and you cannot beat the price.


http://cgi.ebay.com/WHITE-BOX-STOVES-BACKPACK-ALCOHOL-STOVE-4000-SOLD_W0QQitemZ320271857971QQcmdZViewItem?hash=item 320271857971&_trksid=p3286.m14.l1308


Have had mine for over a year and will not wear out.

Reports are coming in that the WBS burns dirty with denatured alcohol, what have you found with your use?

I recomend HEET yellow bottle.

yaduck9
07-12-2008, 10:55
I use the proverbial denatured alcohol from the paint aisle of Home Depot and I have not seen any soot issues. maybe mine is jetted differently.

I do want to say that I have purchased a fancy feast stove from you. I haven't had time to really put it through its paces but I think its going to be replacing my white box.

zelph
07-12-2008, 21:29
I use the proverbial denatured alcohol from the paint aisle of Home Depot and I have not seen any soot issues. maybe mine is jetted differently.

I do want to say that I have purchased a fancy feast stove from you. I haven't had time to really put it through its paces but I think its going to be replacing my white box.

It seems tha batches may differ from one to the next. I guess it depends on whats available at the time a batch is made.

My tests showed the same results using 2 differnt gal. cans purchased months apart. The same denatured burns clean in other types of stoves. Others are experiencing the same sooting with the bios stoves made by minibulldesigns. The bios stoves being a direct copy of the WBS. Same jetting, same problems.

Thanks for the info on your fuel results. And thanks for your interest in the fancee Feest. Just yesterday I created a new stove using 2 catfood cans. I did a test burn today and it boiled 2 cups with 16ml of denatured. It will hold 3 ounces of fuel just like the FF. I'll show you all the stove next week sometime and show how it's made.

Bob S
07-12-2008, 21:41
Alcohol absorbs water over time, could this have something to do with this?

take-a-knee
07-12-2008, 21:56
Alcohol absorbs water over time, could this have something to do with this?

That's why I like HEET (yellow bottle). It has an unlimited shelf life in an unopened bottle, and when you do open it, the 12oz gets used up fairly quickly. Auto parts stores and Walmart even puts it on sale occasionally.

Nomad94
07-13-2008, 10:28
jump in here, stove and cookset a match a close to heavenly as possible.

http://cgi.ebay.com/SVEA-123-OPTIMUS-COMPACT-CAMPING-STOVE-MESS-KIT_W0QQitemZ200237602471QQcmdZViewItem?hash=item2 00237602471&_trksid=p3286.m14.l1318

That right there is a nice set. Don't know if it is a sigg cook set-- they've been going for a pretty penny over there (well north of $100).

Adding up the weights, sveas are competitive with canisters when not using the stock brass wind shield/pot stand.

If you are interested, www.spiritburner.com has a lot of good info on classic backpacking stoves-- the svea being one. It definitely fits the bill for longer cooking times.

whitefoot_hp
07-13-2008, 20:32
what everyone has failed to address is that a big eater could eat 'cold' and just pack an enormous amount of food. any stove could be a stove for a big eater, provided you brought enough fuel.

one would need to know what types of food you want to eat big on. long simmering soups and rice? or a bunch of mac and cheese, mash potatoes, mountain house, pastas, etc?
an alcohol stove could do the latter, but not the former.

Nomad94
07-13-2008, 21:43
what everyone has failed to address is that a big eater could eat 'cold' and just pack an enormous amount of food. any stove could be a stove for a big eater, provided you brought enough fuel.

one would need to know what types of food you want to eat big on. long simmering soups and rice? or a bunch of mac and cheese, mash potatoes, mountain house, pastas, etc?
an alcohol stove could do the latter, but not the former.

The op stated he was interested in stoves (hot food), was not interested in alcohol or wood, and was leaning towards white gas. Inasmuch as those issues had already addressed, it seemed to be a pretty straightforward canister or white gas thread.

rafe
07-14-2008, 09:11
I would recommend the Sierra Zip stove. You can cook for hours on the thing.

That's true; it's a good stove for those who spend a lot of time in camp and don't mind the extra weight. But it's a fussy stove that needs constant attention. Not for those who want their meals fast.

zelph
07-14-2008, 11:04
The op stated he was interested in stoves (hot food), was not interested in alcohol or wood, and was leaning towards white gas. Inasmuch as those issues had already addressed, it seemed to be a pretty straightforward canister or white gas thread.

Good point!!! but he also stated:
My question to the experts on the board is...what should I get? I have pretty much decided against alcohol and wood just because I'm not handy enough to cut up a beer or tomato juice can and, with wood, there's just too much prep.


He said he's not handy enough to make them. He can purchase one.

Alcohol users are trying to educate folks a little here. He also stated he will be searching the ebay ads where there many alcohol stoves for sale. There are alcohol stoves that burn hot such as the White Box Stove and the Ion.

Nearly Normal
07-14-2008, 11:14
Tinny at Mini Bull has a variety of stoves. Different stoves for different jobs.
Check out the new sketti 2.
See July 3.
http://www.minibulldesign.com/myadventure/

Nomad94
07-14-2008, 12:30
Alcohol users are trying to educate folks a little here.

I hear you and can appreciate that. Afterall, alcohol awareness is a good thing :)

It can be tiring when people express a leaning away from a particular item (alky stove, hammock, tarping, etc) and the thread becomes a debate of those very same items. Often I create an excuse for not having interest in something out of politeness -- truth is I may have tried it in the past or just have some other reason for not being interested. Pretty much, just not interested in debating. Sounded like that to me... maybe not.

Regardless, not my thread, I'll shut up. I was just selfishly enjoying discussion of some terribly obsolete gear ;)

slow
07-14-2008, 21:09
How about the Esbitt stove and tabs?

That is the only thing i ever used for 25yr...Why change when it covers it all.

Crazy Larry #1
07-14-2008, 22:49
Okay, I'm gathering my equipment for the hike and next on my list is a stove. Apparently, there are as many types of stoves as there are...well...theres a lot of types of stoves.
Now, I'm probably going to go used because stoves are apparently made out of platinum and diamonds.
My question to the experts on the board is...what should I get? I have pretty much decided against alcohol and wood just because I'm not handy enough to cut up a beer or tomato juice can and, with wood, there's just too much prep.
This leaves me with white or multi fuel and canister as the two obvious choices.
So what's better? I'm leaning towards white fuel because of easy resupply (if needed...I'm only hiking nine days) and from what I hear, the burn hotter for easier cooking. Am I way off track here?
Also, what stove would you recommend so I can start perusing the ebay ads...
Thanks for your help.
Listen, when I was always hiking I would build a campfire at the end of the day if the conditions were okay and it was permitted. If not i enjoyed a store bought alcohol stove because in my opinion it was a whole lot quicker and whole lot less expensive for fuel, plus if you accidently spilled some it would evaporate and not leave a residue.........