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Rain Man
09-08-2003, 15:41
Just ran across this story today (8 Sept 03) on Yahoo.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=519&ncid=519&e=4&u=/ap/20030908/ap_on_re_us/exp_bionic_hiker

This guy has his own web site at:
http://onelegwonder.faithweb.com/

I can only wish him the best!!!


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2,168-Mile Trail Awaits 'Bionic' Hiker
Mon Sep 8,10:16 AM ET
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By DUNCAN MANSFIELD, Associated Press Writer

WASHBURN, Tenn. - Scott Rogers, whose daily journey begins with a single step on a bionic leg, is preparing for a hike up the 2,168-mile Appalachian Trail.

Photo
AP Photo



"I have been told I can't do it, that I won't make it. But how do you know?" the 34-year-old says.

Rogers hikes with the help of the "C-Leg" a prosthetic powered by a battery, driven by hydraulics and controlled by microprocessors that monitor his movement 50 times a second to create a natural, stable gait.

The affable Georgia native, whose Web and e-mail addresses say "onelegwonder," finished a grueling seven-day, 65-mile practice hike on the Laurel Highlands Trail in Pennsylvania.

Next April, he plans to start a seven-month trip along the Appalachian Trail, walking from Georgia to Maine. "If I fail at it," he says, "at least I tried."

Rogers lost his left leg below the knee in 1998 when he accidentally shot himself while hunting a snake. He says the accident, unexpectedly, made him stronger.

"What can hurt worse than being shot by a shotgun and surviving?" he asks.

With only one leg, he learned to water ski, bought an ultralight aircraft and returned to work as a paramedic. Wearing a below-knee prosthesis was "no more of a chore than putting on a shoe."

But when chronic pain got worse two years ago, Rogers had to quit his job. He sold his house and moved his family from Milledgeville, Ga., to Washburn, about 50 miles north of Knoxville, just to be closer to the mountains.

The leg was amputated in March 2002, and he faced the prospect of spending the rest of his life on crutches and in a wheelchair. But four months later, Medicare helped pay for a $48,000 "C-Leg," an artificial knee, shin and foot made by the German company Otto Bock Orthopedic and available in the United States since 1999.

"Science will never be able to replace what God gave me, but they came close with this," says Rogers.

Hanger Prosthetics and Orthotics in Kingsport fitted the artificial leg on Rogers, but even the specialists there are amazed by his plans for the Appalachian Trail.

"You've got to have somebody who's got the nerve to do all this," says prosthetist Paul Meyer. "I am not sure I would walk 65 miles on a trail, and I have both of my God-given legs. He's a real gutsy guy."

On the practice hike in Pennsylvania, Rogers drained all the power from the battery on his bionic leg after the first day, and found he'd left his backup battery at home on the kitchen counter. Otto Bock had specially designed a soft panel, solar-powered battery charger, but Rogers was hiking in a steady downpour.

Without power, the C-Leg goes into fail-safe mode the leg stiffens, although the knee continues to flex. Rogers walked for three more days before a charger that Meyer shipped from Kansas City reached a ranger station along the trail.

"I was hoping he would succeed because I didn't want to live with him if he didn't," his wife, Leisa, says with a laugh. "I figured if he didn't do it he was going to be miserable. ... He did real good."

She paralleled his route in the family van and left love notes along the trail to encourage him. The oldest of their six children, Tyler, 12, and Hannah, 11, walked with him part of the way.



Around 2,400 backpackers each year set out on the Appalachian Trail, which stretches from Springer Mountain in Georgia to the summit of Mount Katahdin in Maine.

Fewer than one in five completes the journey. A few have used crutches. At least one was blind. But none so far had an artificial leg, says Brian King, spokesman for the Appalachian Trail Conference in Blacksburg, Va.

"It is tough for anybody," King says. "There are hard places, especially coming down hills, even if you have two original legs."

With technical support and a backup leg from Otto Bock and Hanger Prosthetics, Rogers is ready to try. He hopes to raise money for a motor home so Leisa and the children can meet him at various points along the trail.

Paddy Rossbach, president and CEO of the Amputee Coalition of America, finds Rogers' plans exciting. Her home in Salisbury, Conn., overlooks the Appalachian Trail.

An amputee athlete herself, Rossbach says, "I think it is absolutely wonderful ... to hear about people taking on things that people who are able-bodied find difficult anyway."

"I have a lot of friends that are disabled," Rogers says. "If what I do motivates one of them, I guess that is what it is all about.

"And I guess also to prove to myself: 'Yeah, you can do it, Scotty.'"

chknfngrs
09-08-2003, 15:53
with a gun?

One Leg
01-18-2004, 00:29
Don't believe everything you read.
My name is Scott Rogers, and I am the "amputee hiker" you may have heard about. Contrary to what the AP article said, I was not 'hunting a snake'. I was severely misquoted, and have taken flack for that since the article was released back in September. Here's the real story, if you're interested:
On May 25, 1998, I was at my brother-in-law's lake property, and was headed down to the lake, downhill with a loaded shotgun. I had the gun in my possession because I had always carried a gun when going around the boat house, which was a haven for water moccassins. Somewhere between my truck (at the top of the hill) and the boat house (at the bottom of the hill), I tripped on the root system of a Georgia pine, which grows on the top of the ground. I fell, the gun discharged, and the rest is history. I'm just glad that it was my leg and not my head, otherwise, I wouldn't be here to talk about it.
For those interested about my upcoming March 22 thru-hike, you can check out http://www.onelegwonder.com and keep up with what's going on.
Thanks, and God bless,
Scott Rogers

Shoe Leather Express
01-19-2004, 19:52
The affable Georgia native, whose Web and e-mail addresses say "onelegwonder," finished a grueling seven-day, 65-mile practice hike on the Laurel Highlands Trail in Pennsylvania.
You were short changed, Scott. The LHT is 70 miles long. ;) I hike this trail multiple times in the summer. The first 6 miles will make or break you with that camel back. Good job, Scott. :clap

One Leg
01-20-2004, 12:42
You were short changed, Scott. The LHT is 70 miles long. ;) I hike this trail multiple times in the summer. The first 6 miles will make or break you with that camel back. Good job, Scott. :clap


Shoe Leather: I hiked the LHT backwards, which is something I won't repeat again. I looked at the topo map (at home, of course), and saw the "dolly partons" and decided that I didn't want to tackle those right off the bat. I figured that by starting in Seward, I'd build up endurance to tackle those before exiting at Ohiopyle. They looked gargantuous on the map, but were nothing in comparison to the Blue Hole Creek, which was nothing but a small 'blip' on the map.(Straight line verticle descent.ascent with no switchback) I'll take the dollies over the Blue Hole any day of the week.
All in all, it was a great experience, one that I'd love to repeat one day. Obviously, it can't compare with the terrain I'll encounter on the A.T., but definately was a great way to get my 'feet' wet. With the A.T. coming up in 61 days, I find myself experiencing the same emotions I encountered just before I started the LHT. Nervousness, trepidation, wondering what the heck I am getting myself in, but am moving forward with excitement, and not looking back.
~Scott

Blue Jay
01-20-2004, 13:26
Don't believe everything you read.
My name is Scott Rogers, and I am the "amputee hiker" you may have heard about. Contrary to what the AP article said, I was not 'hunting a snake'. I was severely misquoted, and have taken flack for that since the article was released back in September.

I loved that misquote. Actually every single time I have been directly involved with a story reported in newspapers, it is always completely wrong. The "Enquireer" is the most accurate because they at least admit that they make up 90% of their stories.

cfromberg
03-22-2004, 20:52
http://www.ajc.com/news/content/news/0304/22hiker.html



Man with bionic leg starts hike

The Associated Press
Published on: 03/21/04

The moment has come for Scott Rogers, the hiker with the bionic leg with aspirations of being the first amputee to walk the entire 2,168-mile Appalachian Trail from Georgia to Maine.
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Rogers, 35, is set to leave today from Amicalola Falls State Park in Dawsonville with a deaf companion, 32-year-old Allan Bernier of Phoenix.
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"I have met tons of skeptics, people I don't know," Rogers said. "But people who know me know that if there is any way possible for me to do it, I am going to do it."
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Rogers' artificial limb, called "C-Leg," is a strap-on, silver and blue prosthetic leg, knee and foot assembly powered by a battery, driven by hydraulics and controlled by microprocessors that monitor his movement 50 times a second to create a natural, stable gate.
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Rogers' wife, Leisa, will be following from campsite to campsite in a 27-foot motor home loaded with their six home schooled children. Their oldest, 13-year-old Tyler and 12-year-old Hannah, plan to hike with their dad for short periods.
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"We are looking at it as an adventure," Leisa Rogers said.