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poison_ivy
09-14-2003, 07:46
Beautiful shelter located just south of Stratton Pond -- though it is one of the pay shelters that requires $6 to stay. It has room for at least 12 inside and a large porch with benches that could easily sleep more on a nice night. The water source is a spring located down by the pond.

I spent a terrific evening here by myself watching a snake slide around in the grass near the fire pit logs. Good times...

- Ivy

LIhikers
08-27-2007, 18:45
My wife and I spent a night here on our recent section hike. Actually we got in at 1 in the afternoon and decided to call it a day because this place was so nice. I think the best part was going down to Stratton pond and soaking my legs and feet in the water, ahhhhh :sun

OldFeet
08-28-2007, 08:12
The beginning of August I did my first section hike and will always have fond memories of the Stratton pond shelter. We had 8 or 9 great folks there and the pond felt great after a day on the trail that ended with a terrific sunset over the pond.

7Sisters
08-29-2007, 02:14
Although I didn't stay there, I did enjoy taking a dip in the pond. It was chilly when I was there (Sept), but boy did it feel good.

The shelter does look real nice. Glad to see you enjoyed it so much.

Rainman
08-29-2007, 09:25
I stayed at Stratton Pond on July 4, 2005. We had a grand time. The caretaker had some sparklers to celebrate.

I was hiking with a guy called Fish Outta Water. He met Tumblina there that day and now they are getting married. Last spring they hiked in for the memories and he popped the question near the shelter. Apparently there was still to much snow to actually get to it.

Shades of Blue was also there that night in 2005 with his girlfriend. We also had Slow Walker, Prairie Dog and Phaedrus, among others. I think there are some pics in my gallery.

Altogether, it is a wonderful place with wonderful memories.

atraildreamer
08-29-2007, 16:23
When I stayed at Stratton Pond Shelter in the early 70's, it was a lean-to...it cost 75 cents, if you could afford it (the caretaker was lenient on that point. :))

Annoying porcupines were supplied at no extra charge! :D

(Ever wake up to see one about 2 feet from your face?:eek:)

jrue1985
06-15-2009, 18:33
my boyfriend and I are hiking the bourn pond stratton pond loop this month. any suggestions? Comments? anything to tell us? this is our first shot at the at.

Kanati
06-15-2009, 18:51
I also stayed there early last August and had the whole place to myself. Not even a mosquito to bother me. That is a beautiful area.

Funkmeister
06-15-2009, 19:12
A coupla years ago, there was a woodpecker that hammered on the side of the shelter at just after dawn. REALLY LOUDLY. Anyone know if it's still there?

Jeff
06-15-2009, 20:02
We have had lots of rain in VT this spring. Bourn Pond Loop can sometimes be muddy with standing water. Bring crocs or sandals if you want to keep your hiking shoes dry.

tiptoe
06-16-2009, 14:08
I enjoyed my stay there last summer, too, especially since it poured that night. Good company, good conversation as well.

buckwheat
06-16-2009, 16:48
We have had lots of rain in VT this spring. Bourn Pond Loop can sometimes be muddy with standing water. Bring crocs or sandals if you want to keep your hiking shoes dry.

I hiked the Stratton Pond Loop this past weekend, and found it to be fairly dry. But in some spots, you will still encounter some mud. Not too deep. I wore convertible hiking pants and the bottom half were fairly dirty when I got done, but overall, I found it relatively dry given the season.

I parked at the AT trailhead on the Stratton-Arlington Road (copy these coordinates into Google Earth for the exact location): 43 3'40.33"N 7258'3.62"W

My hike followed the AT to the summit of Stratton Mountain, where there is a caretaker from the Green Mountain Club. There are no views on the trail itself, but there is a 40' fire tower you can climb.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3618/3633653246_7b081abc08.jpg

There's a good 360-degree view from the top of this fire tower. Here's the view looking South towards the Somerset Reservoir, which also shows the caretaker hut (very nice caretaker, very informative).

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3636/3632917409_58ac904c75.jpg


You can take a side trail over to the Stratton Mountain ski resort, where you'll get some more open views (such as this):

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3354/3633653000_76060ff6e7.jpg

Although the resort is closed, there is a bathroom facility that was left open, with running water and flush toilets (heaven!). You'll also find the USGS marker as you enter the unsigned trail that leads to the resort:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3336/3633653450_9b60db8765.jpg

After a snack at the ski resort, I hiked back up to the fire tower and took the Applachian Trail to the right, which continues on down to Stratton Pond, descending about 1400 feet along the way. You will reach a signed junction at the pond. To the right is the pond. To the left is the very fine, large shelter and several tent sites. Huge shelter. Could probably hold 25 people comfortably.

I forgot to photograph the shelter, darn it. Oh look, a pretty butterfly lunching on honeysuckle:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3370/3632840619_9b9dc5e9d9.jpg

If you are tenting, I'd recommend you make your way to the pond and talk with the Green Mountain Club caretaker at pondside. She can direct you to two tent locations on the pond itself.

One (I was told) is very hidden for added privacy, but she will show you the way. Cost is $5 ... but I imagine a tip is expected if she shows you a really good private tentsite from which you can skinny dip in the pond. I discovered two girls skinny dipping whilst walking the lake perimeter trail - woo hoo! Skinny dipping is no fun unless there's a chance you'll be caught, so I'm sure I made their day! The pictures came out looking really good. If you're reading this, and you were the skinny dippers, PM to purchase the negatives. Only $50! :eek:

A really bad storm was brewing, so rather than stay the night, I decided to hike out. I had to really hoof it out of there, so no photographs of the pond or my hike out, unforunately.

To descend Stratton Mountain and finish the loop, you can use the Stratton Pond Trail, which descends to a different parking area further down the Stratton-Arlington Road.

To find the trail from the pond, head from the pond back up to the shelter. The Stratton Pond Trail is the last trail leading off to the right before you reach the shelter. It's marked, but the sign is slightly confusing to some people I am told.

Once you reach the Stratton-Arlington Road at the end of this trail, you'll have about a 3/4 mile roadwalk (to your left) back to your car at the Appalachian Trailhead parking area.

Enjoy your hike!

Cheers,
Buckwheat

mxzrevman
06-28-2009, 12:17
I parked at the AT trailhead on the Stratton-Arlington Road (copy these coordinates into Google Earth for the exact location): 43 3'40.33"N 7258'3.62"W

i was on that road yesterday
and took a short hike on down branch pond road
and fri did a little hike around part of sommerset res

the bugs were not too bad

mxzrevman
06-28-2009, 12:22
btw the scenery up there, especially the river on Arlington road is just incredible

Chenango
06-29-2009, 14:42
Beautiful shelter located just south of Stratton Pond -- though it is one of the pay shelters that requires $6 to stay. It has room for at least 12 inside and a large porch with benches that could easily sleep more on a nice night. The water source is a spring located down by the pond.

I spent a terrific evening here by myself watching a snake slide around in the grass near the fire pit logs. Good times...

- Ivy

Stratton Pond is the best. I have been going there on and off for over 30 years. You were very fortunate to have the shelter to yourself. It can get very crowded. I remember one night throwing one of my boots at a porcupine. Big mistake. I found it in the morning all chewed up. I guess it tasted better than gnawing on the shelter.

Landshark
06-30-2009, 00:31
A coupla years ago, there was a woodpecker that hammered on the side of the shelter at just after dawn. REALLY LOUDLY. Anyone know if it's still there?


I stayed there Friday night and yes, the woodpecker is still there! At about 6 am, BANG BANG BANG BANG. If I hadn't already read the log and known to expect him, it would have scared the crap out of me. It sounded like gunshots.

wystiria
08-17-2009, 15:48
Stopped in Sunday 8/17 on our way out, great shelter, clean with a lot of space!!! from the register it is hopping. there are a few tent spots right at the shelter. but the best tenting is on stratton pond!

wystiria
08-17-2009, 15:55
also since there isn't a seperate spot for the North Shore tent site - the trail around stratton pond on the North side is completely under water! so you must go the long way to the tent site. My sister, and nephew + friend, took the trail regardless of the warning and ended up waist deep getting the the tent site.

the rest of our group didn't chance it and walked around the lake via the south side with no problem.

1azarus
08-17-2009, 17:03
caretaker let my daughter and I hang our hammocks alongside the trail to the lake campsites so that one side was dry... and the other over the water! what a great memory. way nicer than the shelter with no water view...

Jeff
08-17-2009, 18:03
Agreed, one of the nice stops on the AT/LT. Do not understand why they put the shelter where they did. A lake view would have been amazing.

Tinker
08-17-2009, 20:55
It was right on the pond in 1992 the first time I went through.

Sorry, that was Vondell shelter. I believe it was taken down due to too much litter and general abuse.

dsquid
10-12-2010, 17:05
Three of us hiked most of LT section 3 on Columbus day weekend. We visited Stratton shelter before heading to the tenting area north of the lake.

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4132/5074142730_34eedf1a5c_z.jpg

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4103/5073540089_ec2e9293c5_z.jpg

The intersection:

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4090/5073533303_a8863ec45a.jpg

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4149/5073535187_6320c5269a.jpg

Access to the north shore tenting area was re-routed due to flooding. It's a longer path now, but it's an easy and pretty walk.

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4148/5074159624_b01bd3f460.jpg

Only 3 platforms, but there are plenty of areas available for pitching. Fires restricted to the central pit. It got down to the mid 20's, so we contributed plenty of wood to the communal supply and enjoyed the fire until about 10pm.

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4084/5074178676_1f2119cb82.jpg

Osama Llama
07-09-2011, 20:56
Okay shelter, but not next to lake. Not really worth the $5 (not $6 as mentioned above), but nice if you tent. Too bad campsites are almost a mile off the trail. Beautiful views of the lake and surrounding mountains. Good spot for hikers descending Stratton later in the day.

Jeff
07-10-2011, 08:18
You only pay in the summer months. Another good reason to hike after Labor Day.

Driver8
07-10-2011, 08:35
Not really worth the $5 (not $6 as mentioned above), but nice if you tent.

I'd say it's a bargain for all the good work the Green Mountain Club does. ...

Osama Llama
08-05-2011, 22:32
I didn't mean it like that. The GMC does GREAT work and I appreciate everything they do. I was just saying there are nicer shelter that are free. I had no problems donating $5. I am all for them and their work and I had a great stay there! Oh what a beautiful area that is.

Driver8
08-06-2011, 01:52
Three of us hiked most of LT section 3 on Columbus day weekend. We visited Stratton shelter before heading to the tenting area north of the lake.

I was there same weekend as you, Saturday 10/10 - Stratton-Arlington to the summit and back. Had to rush to get up and down fast enough to beat the dark - my first time up there, and I underestimated how much leaf-peeping traffic would slow me down from Brattleboro onward. Hiked the last half-mile or so back in the almost dark - used the Droid Light app on my then-new cell phone for the first time. Helpful!

Was crystal clear atop the tower at 5 pm, 38* F and about 35 mph NW steady. Was clear enough that day to see Mt. Washington and other Whites, but I only lingered long enough in the tower to take a few pics - good ones of Killington, Dorset and Equinox, but the sun, at a low angle, fouled the Greylock-ward photo, alas. The Dorset shot and one of me at the fire tower base can be seen in my gallery. The trip was an early birthday present to myself - my last name is Stratton, so it was special for me. Got my dad some VT maple syrup from a roadside store on the way home.


I didn't mean it like that. The GMC does GREAT work and I appreciate everything they do. I was just saying there are nicer shelter that are free. I had no problems donating $5. I am all for them and their work and I had a great stay there! Oh what a beautiful area that is.

No worries. I hope to either tent or overnight at the pond in the next few months. Love that place - would even if it weren't a family namesake, do the moreso since it is.

sponia
09-06-2012, 12:39
There used to be a shelter right on the little peninsula on the north side of Stratton Pond. The Green Mountain Club realized that any environmental impact on or around the shore wound up in the pond, eventually. So low impact zones like tent platforms are still allowed closer to the water. High impact zones like shelters have been gradually moved farther away. There used to be a lean-to on the island in the middle of Little Rock Pond, too; also removed for the same reasons.

Cookerhiker
09-06-2012, 19:18
There used to be a shelter right on the little peninsula on the north side of Stratton Pond. The Green Mountain Club realized that any environmental impact on or around the shore wound up in the pond, eventually. So low impact zones like tent platforms are still allowed closer to the water. High impact zones like shelters have been gradually moved farther away. There used to be a lean-to on the island in the middle of Little Rock Pond, too; also removed for the same reasons.

I remember that going back to my first backpack - 1977, Rt. 30 south to Rt. 9.

I stayed at the current Stratton Pond Shelter on my 2007 LT thruhike (http://www.trailjournals.com/entry.cfm?id=205059). Brought back lots of memories. The pond was a delightful swim on a hot afternoon.

Jeff
09-07-2012, 18:03
Back in the 1980's Stratton Pond had 3 shelters -- Vondell, Bigelow and Stratton View. It was and continues to be the most popular overnite spot in southern Vermont.

Driver8
09-08-2012, 12:26
Still got A.T. thrus coming by, Jeff, NOBO or SOBO? How late in season do you stay open? Do you keep going in order to accommodate leaf-peeping weekender and day hike traffic in the fall, or no?

Monkeywrench
09-08-2012, 13:52
Back in the 1980's Stratton Pond had 3 shelters -- Vondell, Bigelow and Stratton View. It was and continues to be the most popular overnite spot in southern Vermont.

The first time I was there was in the mid-70's, maybe '74. At that time the AT/LT did not go over Stratton Mountain, it used the route that is currently the Stratton Pond Trail. From Stratton Pond the AT / LT went west to Bourn Pond along the current Lye Brook Trail, where there were two more shelters. North Bourn Pond Shelter was on a small peninsula that jutted into the Pond; a gorgeous setting. From Bourn Pond the trail went north on what is now the Branch Pond Trail past William Douglas Shelter and on to Prospect Rock. At the end of the Rootville Rd was Swezey Camp, often referred to as Sleazy Camp because it was in such disrepair.

At that time the GMC had recently started their caretaker program. The area around Stratton Pond was very heavily used and abused. The caretaker program and moving campers back from the shore of the pond has been very effective, and the area around the pond has improved amazingly over the years.

When we hiked through Bourn Pond in '74 there were Forest Service rangers there taking a survey of hiker use, as part of the study for the Lye Brook Wilderness designation, if I recall things correctly.

Cookerhiker
09-08-2012, 14:12
The first time I was there was in the mid-70's, maybe '74. At that time the AT/LT did not go over Stratton Mountain, it used the route that is currently the Stratton Pond Trail. From Stratton Pond the AT / LT went west to Bourn Pond along the current Lye Brook Trail, where there were two more shelters. North Bourn Pond Shelter was on a small peninsula that jutted into the Pond; a gorgeous setting. From Bourn Pond the trail went north on what is now the Branch Pond Trail past William Douglas Shelter and on to Prospect Rock. At the end of the Rootville Rd was Swezey Camp, often referred to as Sleazy Camp because it was in such disrepair.

At that time the GMC had recently started their caretaker program. The area around Stratton Pond was very heavily used and abused. The caretaker program and moving campers back from the shore of the pond has been very effective, and the area around the pond has improved amazingly over the years.

When we hiked through Bourn Pond in '74 there were Forest Service rangers there taking a survey of hiker use, as part of the study for the Lye Brook Wilderness designation, if I recall things correctly.

I'm glad you mentioned the AT's route then. At that time of my first section hike, I was in such poor shape that when I saw the blue-blazed side trail up Stratton Mountain, I was profoundly grateful that the AT stayed in the relatively flat lowlands.

And at that time, a permit was necessary to camp in the Lye Brook Wilderness.

Moose2001
09-08-2012, 14:40
I didn't mean it like that. The GMC does GREAT work and I appreciate everything they do. I was just saying there are nicer shelter that are free. I had no problems donating $5. I am all for them and their work and I had a great stay there! Oh what a beautiful area that is.

The $5 charge helps pay for the caretaker and upkeep on privies, etc. Without the caretaker there, it would be a trash dump in no time.

RangerPhil
09-08-2012, 14:56
Stratton Pond is amazing! However, I had MAJOR issues with bugs when I passed through - no surprise, though, as it was May and frequently was raining in that section.

Monkeywrench
09-08-2012, 15:23
I'm glad you mentioned the AT's route then. At that time of my first section hike, I was in such poor shape that when I saw the blue-blazed side trail up Stratton Mountain, I was profoundly grateful that the AT stayed in the relatively flat lowlands.

And at that time, a permit was necessary to camp in the Lye Brook Wilderness.

I believe the Lye Brook Wilderness wasn't designated until 1975.

Cookerhiker
09-08-2012, 15:25
I believe the Lye Brook Wilderness wasn't designated until 1975.

Sounds right. I hiked there in '77 - remember stopping in the Forest Service office in Manchester for the permit.