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Former Admin
09-27-2002, 03:41
I use the following fuel for cooking?

highway
09-27-2002, 11:29
Try rubbing your tired, sore, burning feet, at the end of a long, hard, hot, high mileage day with any of the other fuels and you will see why...Alcohol is king!
Plus it is the lightest and most versatile cooking setup for gourmet trail fare:cool:

Peaks
10-05-2002, 07:50
Suggest that you retitle "propane" as "canister" Aren't there different varieties of fuel used by the canister stoves?

Also, how about adding "stove-less" for those who go with cold meals. Or in this case, "fuel-less."

Now, suggest that "white gas" be retitled as "white gas/coleman" for those that may not know the difference

chris
11-05-2002, 17:21
Dutch Treat gave me the tip to carry Everclear for fuel. Fairly pure alcohol, plus you can have afternoon cocktails at a scenic overlook. I haven't actually tried it, prefering a bit of bourbon or rum to Iced Tea and grain, but it sounds like a good idea.

Jaybird
01-16-2004, 09:51
i answered propane....because it was the closest to the propane blend used in many "canisters". i have a MSR Pocket Rocket that uses canisters



i've used the "home-grown" pepsi-can alcohol stoves...but, my experience has been....too bothersome....too messy....too many times i'm spilling the fuel! hehehehehehe ;)




see ya'll UP the trail in 2004!

Blue Jay
01-16-2004, 10:39
One night, dry weather, an army surplus twig and leaf burner. Summer, alcohol. Winter, gas. Spring and fall, the first one I can find in my mountain of gear.

cabalot
01-17-2004, 00:54
are there other brand name white gases besides coleman?
when i finish buying all my backpacking gear i will have a white gas stove. i plan to have fresh food for my first night or 2 depending on weather and need to do more than boil water. i used to be chef and would rather carry the extra weight than only eat rehydrated foods. i think the msr simmerlight stove will be my choice.

eldwayno
01-17-2004, 02:43
Cabalot... Simmerlite is a great stove, Coleman and Whitegas are pretty much interchangeable... coleman is the whitegas that most outfitters will carry.

Peaks
01-17-2004, 20:42
are there other brand name white gases besides coleman?


Coleman is probably the most familiar name. Can't think of any other major names.

In a pinch, use unleaded gas. That's what we used before Coleman started selling their fuel.

smokymtnsteve
01-17-2004, 20:55
ozark trails campfuel

SavageLlama
07-09-2004, 10:46
What's the best alcohol stove?

Ramble~On
07-09-2004, 16:33
:sun Alcohol. Just plain easy.
Stove, simple and lightweight.

What's the best alcohol stove ? No telling.
I have a few and they all do the job.

White Gas: Coleman is the best known but MSR has their own and Wal-Mart sells their own version under the "Ozark Trail" name.

SGT Rock
07-10-2004, 19:55
What's the best alcohol stove?

The best one is the one that matches your cooking style. For some that is a Cat Stove, for some it is a Brasslite, for some it is a simple cup of alcohol and three tent stakes. I might be able to help you better if you know what it is you want your stove to do.

My idea of a good stove is one that boils water, weighs very little, and uses the lest amount of fuel possible to make that happen. Mine weighs .6 ounces (that includes windscreen and stand) and uses about 15ml fuel to boil a pint. but my stove may be too small or too slow for others. have heard complaints about just about every model out ther from the Cat (uses too much fuel rapidly) to the Ion Stove (too slow). I have a fairly comprehensive set of tests and comparisons of many varios alcohol stoves over on my site. I don't try to say Cat is better than soda or anything, I try to compare speed, fuel efficiency, weight, and other factors in these evaluations, then allow the reader to pick what they need.

weary
07-11-2004, 10:34
Suggest that you retitle "propane" as "canister" Aren't there different varieties of fuel used by the canister stoves?

Also, how about adding "stove-less" for those who go with cold meals. Or in this case, "fuel-less."

Now, suggest that "white gas" be retitled as "white gas/coleman" for those that may not know the difference


I most often use either white gas or wood, depending on the situation. On a weekend hike with a light pack, I often just pack my whisperlight with a full tank. If I'm out for more than a couple of days I use my wood-burning Zip Stove to avoid the hassle of fuel worries.

If car camping with my wife and just day hiking, I usually just carry a heavy one or two-burner cannister stove.

Weary

mAineAc
08-09-2004, 18:34
what about sterno? Does anyone use this anymore? or does this fit inot one of the other categories? All I have for a stove is a sterno can with a sleeve and a couple of metal rods to hold the pan.

SGT Rock
08-09-2004, 18:51
Sterno is alcohol mixed with calcium acetate, so technically it is alcohol. It isn't as efficient as straight alcohol.

sgtjinx
08-09-2004, 20:07
I use a Colman Peak 1 X-pert canister stove. I would like to know if it's fuel is easy to find on the AT. Should I carry something else.

Sgt Jinx

SGT Rock
08-09-2004, 20:14
Homemade alcohol stoves are cheap, light, and fuel can be found easy. If you are cooking for one or two, it is probably a very good option.

Streamweaver
08-09-2004, 21:14
I picked alkyhaul cause theres no all of the above option and its what Ive been using most often for the last few years. I do also own a Coleman duel fuel,Gaz cannister,and esbit stove and still use all of them depending on the situation. When I finally get the time for a trhru I think alky will prolly be my choice because its just so easy to use ! Streamweaver

Ramble~On
08-10-2004, 02:52
Wow !!! Almost 50 % claim to use Alcohol stoves.

10 years ago it'd been white gas.

Big Oak
08-10-2004, 03:31
Wow !!! Almost 50 % claim to use Alcohol stoves.
Lot more alcoholics these days.

highway
08-10-2004, 08:53
Wow !!! Almost 50 % claim to use Alcohol stoves.

10 years ago it'd been white gas.

Yep!

And they all wore heavy boots back then, too! :cool:

neo
12-04-2004, 14:11
i mainly use alcohol denatured or dri gas aka heet,make sure you get the methal alcohol version and not the isoprohal version,comes in a 12 oz bottle about .79 cents any were you buy gasoline,when i was in kent conn.a fellow hiker payed
.30 cents an oz for denatured alcohol in the outfitter shop there,i payed .79 cent for a 12 oz bottle of fuel line antifreeze,:clap :banana :jump :bse

fiddlehead
10-19-2005, 07:09
I would have chose more than one option as i use many different types depending on how many days i'm out before refueling. I use alcohol if i'm only out for 3 days or less, propane if it's 3-7 days and burn wood fires if it's more.
I found that it's lighter weight to carry the smallest propane canister (sno-peak) than it is to carry enough alcohol for more than 3 days. (i imagine that some of you will say you cannot find the small ones, and i do probably break the law when i ship them, but i do it anyway)
I carried a zip stove for years and love them but sometimes it is not easy to find fuel (desert, above treeline, nepal) and they don't burn well when your over 15,000 ft. so, i found propane/butane mixture to be the best fuel for me (sometimes)
I think it's best to have choices depending on your particular hike.
For a thru-hike of the AT, I would use propane and alcohol and keep the spare in the drop box.

sliderule
10-20-2005, 10:13
I have been using a Svea 123 (white gas) for over 30 years. It has been incredibly reliable and fuel efficient.

But this weekend I am going to try a canister stove. The Svea is a bit aggravating because you cannot turn it off for more than about a minute without having to reprime. So I will leave an old and faithful friend at home and try the convenience of instant on/instant off for a change.

Cookerhiker
01-01-2006, 17:09
Still a dinosaur - using white gas on a Coleman Peak stove.

Tinker
01-01-2006, 18:29
All of the above. Different fuels for different duties/seasons.

minnesotasmith
01-01-2006, 18:36
Two quick thoughts on alcohol fuels (I use an alcohol stove, BTW):

1) DON'T get methyl alcohol/methanol/wood alcohol/yellow HEET (all the same stuff) on your skin with any frequency (and for God's sake, don't ever drink any of it). That stuff is a neurotoxin, and goes straight to the optic nerve. It's pretty handy during cold weather compared with straight isopropyl, though (ISO-HEET; comes in red bottles).

2) Avoidably using beverage ethanol (any kind of legal booze) as stove fuel is dumb. BE has a tax of something like $16.00/gallon tax put on it. When it costs less than $2.00/gallon to produce, you'll end up paying a comparative fortune for something that doesn't really need to be consumed while on the Trail in any event. (Ethanol effectively has a negative nutrient content when you figure in the vitamins drinking it consumes, and in cold weather drinking it makes hypothermia much more likely.)

wyclif
01-17-2006, 03:56
My opinion is that it's hard to beat alcohol combined with a lightweight brasslite stove or homemade soda can stove. Why?


Denatured alcohol burns efficiently
Alcohol is available nearly everywhere in most towns off-trail
The Brasslite-style can stove is a triumph of simplicity: no valves or moving parts to fail or break on your hike

tech30528
04-29-2006, 10:40
Sterno is king!

I just got back from the Smokies, and tested an alcohol stove. It worked very well, seems to burn hotter than my sterno, but I'm going back to my jelly can. We started off in the rain, it rained until about mid afternoon. Nobody at Double Spring Shelter was able to get a fire going with the wet wood, despite three people trying, one guy using three fire sticks unsuccessfully. I don't normally stay in shelters, but was not looking for a fine for hammock camping, plus I was testing a Big Agnes bag with an inflatable pad. It slept great, btw. But when I do a three day, I usually use the days' socks with a little sterno to start my fire. The socks make a great wick, and then I don't have to carry them out. If I had brought my Sterno, I'm convinced we would have had a fire.

babbage
12-19-2007, 18:02
I have never cooked on dingle berries - does anyone have any specs on fuel consumption, stove types, and availability. Oh yeah -- and fuel storage.

CoyoteWhips
12-19-2007, 19:26
I will sometimes cook with tea candles -- paraffin.

Good for frying eggs, steaming biscuits and simmering.

budforester
12-20-2007, 00:25
are there other brand name white gases besides coleman?

I sometimes see another brand at Wallyworld, but I only bought a can once. It has some "perfume" in it that I don't like.

Jaybird
12-20-2007, 06:02
i tried Alcohol stoves....but all the other hikers kept drinking up my Jack Daniels....:D
so now its MSR propane canister (for my Pocklet Rocket stove)!

Wanderingson
12-20-2007, 06:39
I went from White Gas to Canister to DNA (alcohol). I just made my first Super Cat and loved it. I used it while on my 14-day safari to get my morning coffee. I'm hooked on the DNA option now.

tomsawyer222
12-20-2007, 07:07
I use white gas (primus omni fuel) with one of the flux ring pots. Can cook for about 14 mins on about 1.5 oz of fuel and that is at a low boil. It is possible to get the stove to simmer real low but it can be blown out by wind real easy then. Also no worries about fuel availability this stove will burn anything. even paint thinner and lighter fluid

Frolicking Dinosaurs
12-20-2007, 07:12
Alcohol. However, if I come upon the smoldering embers of someone's campfire from last night, I will often use those to cook instead.

Crazy Larry #1
12-20-2007, 08:14
I usually build a campfire. I only use the alcohol stove when I'm too tired or it is too dry......................

oldfivetango
12-20-2007, 08:56
I retired my beloved SVEA for a Brasslite Turbo 2 D.I miss the noise
but not the hassle.Plus I think alcohol is a little safer and a whole lot
lighter.
Oldfivetango

rafe
12-20-2007, 09:59
Plus I think alcohol is a little safer and a whole lot lighter.

No, per unit weight, you get a lot more energy from more complex hydrocarbons. 8 oz. of canister fuel will boil 15+ liters of water. 8 oz of alcohol will boil 16 cups -- about 4 liters. Alcohol may be easier to carry but can burn you just the same.

Javasanctum
12-20-2007, 10:17
I have never cooked on dingle berries - does anyone have any specs on fuel consumption, stove types, and availability. Oh yeah -- and fuel storage.

The only advise I can give is make sure you pick them first or it could be painful!! Great entertainment for others at the shelter, but painful.:p

SunnyWalker
12-27-2007, 01:05
I never build an actual fire anymore. It is too difficult to walk away from it being assured in my mind that it is REALLY out, and I mean out. So I use an Esbitt stove. I tried MSR, alcohol, and canister and ended up with the Esbitt. I like it, you might review it. Do a google search and you'll find their site or go to Campmoor. -SunnyWalker

highway
12-27-2007, 07:08
No, per unit weight, you get a lot more energy from more complex hydrocarbons. 8 oz. of canister fuel will boil 15+ liters of water. 8 oz of alcohol will boil 16 cups -- about 4 liters. Alcohol may be easier to carry but can burn you just the same.

I have never used a cannister stove but a good alcohol stove 'boils' (~180F, when we all hear the bubbles reverberating loudly in the pot and believe it is boiling fiercely) 2 cups, or 16 ounces with .5 fl oz of ethyl alcohol. So, 8 fl oz boils 32 cups. A few stoves will even surpass that. Don't short the alcohol stove so:-?

tomsawyer222
12-27-2007, 07:20
Mostly the only advantage to alcohol is that the stove its self is normally much lighter than any white gas stove. But the light weight has disadvantages, it is not as quick to boil water,not as wind proof as most white gas or canister stoves and just is not suited for use in winter or more extreme conditions. personally i think that your stove should be a reliable go to piece of gear that wont fail you of course no one wants to carry a brick with them but there are some good light weight gas,canister stoves out there now that are quite good and pretty efficent. Even if alcohol is available most places most white gas stoves now are multi if not omni fuel capable allowing you to never run out of fuel.

highway
12-27-2007, 07:31
Mostly the only advantage to alcohol is that the stove its self is normally much lighter than any white gas stove. But the light weight has disadvantages, it is not as quick to boil water,not as wind proof as most white gas or canister stoves and just is not suited for use in winter or more extreme conditions. personally i think that your stove should be a reliable go to piece of gear that wont fail you of course no one wants to carry a brick with them but there are some good light weight gas,canister stoves out there now that are quite good and pretty efficent. Even if alcohol is available most places most white gas stoves now are multi if not omni fuel capable allowing you to never run out of fuel.

Why do you say that an alcohol stove is not suited for winter?? They still function so quite nicely. In fact, the venerable Trangia is Swedish and their latitude is considerably higher than yours and then stretches way beyond even, on up higher than the Arctic Circle.

highway
12-27-2007, 07:40
Why do you say that an alcohol stove is not suited for winter?? They still function so quite nicely. In fact, the venerable Trangia is Swedish and their latitude is considerably higher than yours and then stretches way beyond even, on up higher than the Arctic Circle.

Well, the Swedish Arctic Circle is considerably more balmy than the Canadian one, but it is still cold. I wonder why there seems to be so much 'alcohol stove bashing':) ?

BackTrack1
12-27-2007, 08:11
has anyone here used alcohol stoves in the winter? if so, do they work good? or do they take longer to cook than a canister stove.

thanks for the info.

CoyoteWhips
12-27-2007, 08:24
I have never used a cannister stove but a good alcohol stove 'boils' (~180F, when we all hear the bubbles reverberating loudly in the pot and believe it is boiling fiercely) 2 cups, or 16 ounces with .5 fl oz of ethyl alcohol. So, 8 fl oz boils 32 cups. A few stoves will even surpass that. Don't short the alcohol stove so:-?

Said as an alcohol stove fan; boiling water with less than an ounce is possible, but I don't think I'd plan a trip around it. This may be one of the Trangia's benefits -- when you get a rolling boil, you're finished. After metering my fuel in a supercat, I'll typcially expect three minutes of boiling before the stove is done.

I may not be ultralight enough. I think I'd rather finish my trip with two or three ounces of fuel left, rather than finish my fuel with two or thee days left.

Not having hot tea every day makes me sad.

tomsawyer222
12-27-2007, 18:15
Why do you say that an alcohol stove is not suited for winter?? They still function so quite nicely. In fact, the venerable Trangia is Swedish and their latitude is considerably higher than yours and then stretches way beyond even, on up higher than the Arctic Circle.


What i am saying is that an alcohol stoves puts out how many BTU's? around 3500? so it takes longer and longer to boil water when you get into colder weather. Also i looked into the trangia stoves and the lightest stove set they have weighs 1.5 lbs (720 grams) and i am sure that it functions well in cold weather because of all the stuff they have built into it. My white gas set with pot and fuel bottle weighs around the same but is more functional at 0 degrees or lower than even the trangia because it has a much higher BTU output. Not trying to say alcohol stove dont work or that they suck i was just saying that the alcohol stoves started to be used more and more because of their light weight and the availability of fuel but with the multi fuel stoves now that only leaves them as a light weight option

tomsawyer222
12-27-2007, 18:17
Also just cause a stove is made by a company based in a cold weather country is not a basis for it being better in the cold.... highway

turtle fast
12-27-2007, 18:32
I am going to check out the Coleman Fyrestorm when it gets to my local REI....it can burn whitegas/ auto fuel......AND any propane or butane canisters. A version is titanium-magnesium alloy...light with an ingenious canister stove system that is inverted to suck dry the cartridge!

tomsawyer222
12-27-2007, 18:47
watch out for the fyre storm it uses canisters like it does white gas in liquid withdrawl not as a gas so the canister will have a much shorter life..... also pretty expensive.. try either a primus omni fuel or multi fuel both use canisters and every other fuel. or check out bruntons two new stoves the vapor AF whice is pricey and the new lander stove. primus also makes multi fuel gravity stoves whice sit very low to the ground and burn canisters and all fuel. The fyrestorm also has been reviewed here

http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/Cook%20Gear/Stoves/Coleman%20Fyrestorm%20Ti%20Stove/

Brunton is really making some nice stuff of their own now instead of marketing others stoves in the us like they did for optimus for awhile.

tomsawyer222
12-27-2007, 18:50
they also make a titanium verison of the primus omni fuel 11 oz i think but 200 dollars... here

http://www.moontrail.com/primus-omnifuel-titanium.php

shelterbuilder
12-27-2007, 19:23
I got an alcohol stove for Christmas, and I intend to learn how to use it, but my workhorse stove for over 30 years has been an Optimus 99, although I've also used canister stoves. Having used white gas stoves for soooo long, I've grown comfortable with them. But I have some new issues and need to substantially cut the weight of my pack (as well as some of the bulk), and alcohol seems to be the way to go.

CoyoteWhips
12-27-2007, 19:39
Also i looked into the trangia stoves and the lightest stove set they have weighs 1.5 lbs (720 grams) and i am sure that it functions well in cold weather because of all the stuff they have built into it.

Trangia mini stove system (http://www.gearzone.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=209-12801-1&click=5096), 12-ounces; stove, pot, stand, lid.

My supercat, Imusa cup, aluminum flashing lid with cabinet door knob, silicone cold surface coaster; 3.5 ounces.

tomsawyer222
12-27-2007, 19:59
The mini trangia set is no where near as wind proof as the regular larger sets. Like i said the main advantage to alcohol is the stove weight. the price of the alcohol stoves is also a factor in the popularity of them. Also to cook for more than one person would require either two stoves or a larger alcohol stove

Chache
12-27-2007, 20:05
How much weight is involved in going alcohol only? Stove, fuel, fuel container, pot, cup, etc. Weigh what total?

Tinker
12-27-2007, 20:17
has anyone here used alcohol stoves in the winter? if so, do they work good? or do they take longer to cook than a canister stove.

thanks for the info.

Yes, not really, definitely!

The colder it gets, the faster your cookpot and its contents lose heat. To offset that, and get a reasonably quick boil time, you need to put more heat to the pot. Alcohol does not burn as hot as pressurized gas (cannisters), so in extremely cold conditions may not be able to boil your water at all. I've noticed that it takes way longer, and takes much more alcohol, to boil 2 cups of water at 20f than it does at 60f. True, it takes more of any fuel, but the hotter the fuel, the smaller the difference. I hope I'm conveying this concept well.

tomsawyer222
12-27-2007, 20:22
Yes, not really, definitely!

The colder it gets, the faster your cookpot and its contents lose heat. To offset that, and get a reasonably quick boil time, you need to put more heat to the pot. Alcohol does not burn as hot as pressurized gas (cannisters), so in extremely cold conditions may not be able to boil your water at all. I've noticed that it takes way longer, and takes much more alcohol, to boil 2 cups of water at 20f than it does at 60f. True, it takes more of any fuel, but the hotter the fuel, the smaller the difference. I hope I'm conveying this concept well.


That is what i have been trying to say.. thank you tinker There may actually be a point at whice alcohol will not boil the water at all because it just does not burn hot enough so its applications for winter use are limited no matter who made the stove. Even white gas would have this probablem but at much colder temps.

karo
12-27-2007, 20:34
Yes, not really, definitely!

The colder it gets, the faster your cookpot and its contents lose heat. To offset that, and get a reasonably quick boil time, you need to put more heat to the pot. Alcohol does not burn as hot as pressurized gas (cannisters), so in extremely cold conditions may not be able to boil your water at all. I've noticed that it takes way longer, and takes much more alcohol, to boil 2 cups of water at 20f than it does at 60f. True, it takes more of any fuel, but the hotter the fuel, the smaller the difference. I hope I'm conveying this concept well.
But then my canister stove will not even burn at all at colder temps. And you can even warm it in your clothes, but if the outside temp is below freezing the cold air will not help any with combustion at those temps.

shelterbuilder
12-27-2007, 21:13
But then my canister stove will not even burn at all at colder temps. And you can even warm it in your clothes, but if the outside temp is below freezing the cold air will not help any with combustion at those temps.

The original canister stoves (in the 70's) were fueled by pure butane, and they were horrible in cold weather - even if you slept with the canisters at night! (They do work better in the cold at higher altitudes because of the lower air pressure at altitude, though.) To try to solve the problem of the butane not pressurizing in the cold, they started mixing some propane in with the butane - it's better, but it's still not perfect.

For working "first time, every time", nothing beats a white gas stove. (But then, I'm prejudiced.)

CoyoteWhips
12-27-2007, 22:06
Yes, not really, definitely!

The colder it gets, the faster your cookpot and its contents lose heat. To offset that, and get a reasonably quick boil time, you need to put more heat to the pot. Alcohol does not burn as hot as pressurized gas (cannisters), so in extremely cold conditions may not be able to boil your water at all. I've noticed that it takes way longer, and takes much more alcohol, to boil 2 cups of water at 20f than it does at 60f. True, it takes more of any fuel, but the hotter the fuel, the smaller the difference. I hope I'm conveying this concept well.

It's currently 32f outside. Needed 1.5 ounces in my supercat to boil two cups in an Imusa mug with a close fitting windshield. Rolling boil at 11:30 minutes, remained boiling for one minutes before the fuel was spent.

Yes, more fuel, more time than my room temperature tests; about double.

tomsawyer222
12-27-2007, 22:10
11 mins to get a boil? about 4 mins at 20 degrees with my omni and it uses about .5 oz of white gas to acheive that..

oops56
12-27-2007, 22:36
Well this my be hard to believe.But yesterday i made 3 alcohol stoves side burners i need one that would work on a 6 in. wok that i got.So out to the shop to test it was 30F out and 30F in shop .Fist stove that i tested had a prime wick a round it 1/2 oz. fuel lit it fired right up good gee i not got a pot quick grab the fist one near by it was alum. and it had ice in it. Well thats ok i just was testing the flame spread only. the pot was 4 in. o. d. the fuel 1/2 oz burn for 4 min. not a good long burn but that was the type of flame i was looking for the wok.So i took off pot cover and the ice was almost gone some floating on top the pot had 16 oz. of ice in it.That all i got to say it works for me i know it was not outside in the real cold.I know its not a very long burn time but tryed 17 ml later got a 7 min burn. That mens if i put 1 oz. i can do a wok cooking .:D :D

Terry7
12-28-2007, 11:38
I used a Pepsi can stove for 5 months on the AT.

Sour
12-28-2007, 11:59
I use soda can alky stove. Since I am a section hiker - 2 weeks a year, I splurge and use everclear for fuel. It is a little expensive, but have you ever had a hot chocolate toddy?

Sour

Skidsteer
12-28-2007, 12:45
How much weight is involved in going alcohol only? Stove, fuel, fuel container, pot, cup, etc. Weigh what total?

My kit for about six days weighs right at 12 ounces. It includes:

-Stove
-Stand
-Pot/lid
-Windscreen
-Reflector
-Fuel bottle with 8 fluid ounces denatured
-Freezer bag cozy/Coffee maker/cup/carrying container

Eight fluid ounces gives me enough for 2 boils per day/6 days with a couple ounces 'cushion'.

NorthCountryWoods
12-29-2007, 17:13
Always used white gas. When starting out was in AK, I was told to avoid anything else for use in the cold or at higher altitudes so that's what I went with. I don't even know how many hours are on my whisperlite, but it just recently broke.

Tried alcohol this year and like the weight savings, but am thinking of trying out a little woodburner. Like the simplicity of it and the mini campfire idea, but not sold on it yet.

xnav
01-26-2008, 21:41
I've only done two section hikes, Dicks Creek Gap to Springer last spring and Davenport Gap to Fontana over New Year break this year. My Raptor has never failed to light on the first click and I've never had to use a match. I've used several different type canisters and the coldest morning was 2 degrees. I keep the canister I'm using next to my body for about 15 minutes before I use it when its cold. I only used one 8oz. canister for both 6 day trips. I like my Raptor because its fast, easy, adjustable, and so far reliable.

excuses
01-26-2008, 23:03
I've used the coleman peak for decades. Last year on my section I used esbit and liked the weight and simplicity. I just made my first pepsi stove last weekend and thought to try it out in March on a 3 day Georgia/NC hike.

88BlueGT
02-08-2008, 14:44
If made properly the pepsi stoves work nicely. I have never taken mine out (I just got a brand new Optimus Nova +) but it seems to light very well.

calculating infinity
02-02-2009, 20:15
woodburner with an alcohol stove as a backup

Tinker
02-02-2009, 20:21
Depending upon season, size of group, etc. I won't get into that now, but I also won't participate in the survey, since there's not an appropriate answer for me.

People need to be more flexible.:cool:

Tinker
02-02-2009, 20:23
Try rubbing your tired, sore, burning feet, at the end of a long, hard, hot, high mileage day with any of the other fuels and you will see why...Alcohol is king!
Plus it is the lightest and most versatile cooking setup for gourmet trail fare:cool:

Unless it is straight grain alcohol or rubbing alcohol, it has poison added to prevent human consumption.
Rubbing alcohol is next to useless for cooking.
Heet is poisonous as is denatured alcohol. Happy foot rubbing.:eek:

Rockhound
02-03-2009, 17:42
Dutch Treat gave me the tip to carry Everclear for fuel. Fairly pure alcohol, plus you can have afternoon cocktails at a scenic overlook. I haven't actually tried it, prefering a bit of bourbon or rum to Iced Tea and grain, but it sounds like a good idea.
and if you go to trail days you can always tell the feds, "that's not untaxed liquor. That's my stove fuel."

Crazy Larry #1
02-03-2009, 17:47
I cook with my body heat because I am so hot!

fiddlehead
02-03-2009, 22:29
The more i read, the more i think about going back to my Zip Stove next hike.
I like having LOTS and lots of hot water for tea, drinks, making lentil soup (the real thing)

Anyway, i usually use the pocket rocket and have tried the alcohol stove but if it's more than 3 days, it's heavier than the PR and takes twice as long. no thanks. (i never seen to agree with the consensus anyway)

I've tried most everything. Check out my collection of old stoves here (http://fiddlehead.wordpress.com/2008/02/05/my-backpacking-stove-collection/)

summitnh
04-04-2009, 18:54
heet or denatured alcohol

brooklynkayak
05-15-2009, 19:47
I usually build a campfire. I only use the alcohol stove when I'm too tired or it is too dry......................

Me too. I usually use a portable wood stove, unless a campfire is OK. I tend to hike lots of places where open fires are a no-no, so the portable stove fits the bill.

brooklynkayak
05-15-2009, 19:51
I never build an actual fire anymore. It is too difficult to walk away from it being assured in my mind that it is REALLY out, and I mean out. -SunnyWalker

If you use a wood backpack stove, you don't have to worry about that. A big old campfire is another matter. If you keep the fire small and contained it is easy to assure the fire is out.

brooklynkayak
05-15-2009, 19:57
I use soda can alky stove. Since I am a section hiker - 2 weeks a year, I splurge and use everclear for fuel. It is a little expensive, but have you ever had a hot chocolate toddy?
Sour

I primarily use found fuel, maybe even dingle berries when available:-)

I do carry Everclear for drinking, but also carry a little denatured alcohol(well labeled) for fuel. Booze is way to expensive to use as fuel in the US, but would be fine in most countries that don't have the high alcohol tax.

mkmangold
05-16-2009, 01:24
I cook with my body heat because I am so hot!

Mebbe, but people get colder when they get as old as you. That's what hats are for: to keep old heads warm.
This thread's been around for 6 1/2 years!
Personally, if you have the patience, use alcohol. Wood burning is a good back-up and better for longer hikes.

Dr O
05-16-2009, 17:46
If they'd just invent a methane trail stove I know a few hikers who would never need to resupply

JuiceBox
05-31-2009, 11:24
I'm surprised at how many people use alcohol. I mean, I wouldn't dream of using anything other than my soda can stove, but I haven't seen many people on the AT with them aside from people I know and have showed how to make them :P. That's quite interesting.

Ranc0r
05-31-2009, 11:46
I use what makes sense for the trip. For a weekend trip, I can spare the extra load for fresh food and a canister stove that simmers well. For a quick overnighter, a dash of alcohol and a soda can stove work just fine, since I'm carrying a smaller pack. If it's going to be a while between resupplies, my white gas stove and fuel bottle give me piece of mind that I'll never run out of fuel. Same for the cold, or if melting snow for water is likely.

For a thru, alcohol makes most sense. For the weight penalty of a 4 oz. canister (4 oz of fuel plus 4 oz of canister) I can bring my stove AND fuel bottle AND almost 8 oz of fuel. When you're just boiling water and never more than 5 days from a store, alcohol makes the most sense.

Plus, alcohol has quite a vocal following among DIY types. You can't beat good press.:eek:

Ranc0r
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