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View Full Version : Most essential 5-7day gear?????



The Doctor
07-17-2007, 09:26
I am doing 3 X 5-7 day trips with a buddy in the smokies and need an idea of what kind of gear(aside from the usual for a short 2 day hike) that I might need to get before we go. I have done 4 days before but never exceeded that. I am not a minimalist(yet), but I need a good idea for cheap, lightweight food.

hopefulhiker
07-17-2007, 09:47
carry a water filter or some sort of water treatment. You can dehydrate your own food in the oven.. Fresh fruit is good.. Just dehydrate your left overs..

Alligator
07-17-2007, 11:13
More food and fuel, maybe a few extra clothes--clean socks and an extra shirt. Extra bandana. Check the long range forecast and be a little conservative on clothes. Maybe a leisure item a game or something. If you bring a large ziplock, you can do a little washing of clothes if you think you have some extra camp time. Most LED lights can go that length of time with a fresh set of batteries in warmer months. Not a winter trip is it?

The Doctor
07-17-2007, 20:28
Thanks, but what about food essentials? Will peanut butter, packaged tuna, packaged chicken, pasta sides and lots of granola bars be enough?

Alligator
07-17-2007, 20:38
Thanks, but what about food essentials? Will peanut butter, packaged tuna, packaged chicken, pasta sides and lots of granola bars be enough?It's entirely possible to pack a reasonably balanced diet of non-perishable foods. The above sounds bland IMHO. Work in some dried veggies and dried fruits. The veggies can go into your pasta dishes, soups, other meals. I like dried apricots and pineapple myself. An occasional energy bar--Clif Bars for example--can also get some needed vitamins. Some of the powdered drinks can get you these too.

I dehydrate my own meals.

7Sisters
07-17-2007, 20:51
If you've camped overnight or for two nights, there is nothing extra (in the way of gear), that you need to bring for 4 or 5 nights.

The only additional stuff are consumables - food and fuel. You'll get water along the way, so you just need a way to filter it.

dixicritter
07-17-2007, 21:09
Here's what SGT Rock has to say in his "What to Carry" Article Located here... http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/article.php?p=198663&postcount=1



The big three things that most people count as consumables are food, water, and fuel.

Food. While not foolproof, a good general rule is to plan for about 2 pounds of food per day. Another good rule is to carry a little extra. So if you are going for 4 days between re-supply, carry 5 days food.
Water. This was mentioned earlier, but I bring it up again. Water weighs more than one ounce for every fluid ounce you carry. So if you carry a lot of water, you carry a lot of weight. Think of how often you can re-supply with water and determine how much you really need to carry.
Fuel. It is a good idea to practice with your stove before you hike so you know how too cook on it and how it works in a given situation. When you do this, you can also figure out how much fuel it uses to cook a standard meal, this way you can plan how much fuel is realistic to carry. No need to carry 3 fuel canisters when you only need one every two weeks and you can re-supply every 4 days.


Hope this helps some. He's much better at this than I am, but he's "out of the loop" right now. :)

Outlaw
07-18-2007, 12:26
Thanks, but what about food essentials? Will peanut butter, packaged tuna, packaged chicken, pasta sides and lots of granola bars be enough?

Some days I don't want to stop for lunch and I may just want a little snack to hold me over. My suggestion is GORP. I usually add different things at different times, but generally, mine consists of peanuts, M&Ms, cashews, dried pineapple, dried papaya, dried :banana chips, raisins, craisins, etc. The sky is the limit on varying recipies and it adds crunch, salt, sweetness, protein & carbs all in one. Just remember to pour it into your hands or your buddies rather than reaching dirty hands into the bag.:rolleyes:

I also make my own jerky; sometimes beef, sometimes buffalo, venison, turkey or whatever road kill I can find. :eek: LOL. Gnawing on a hunk of jerky is a good source of protein and keeps your jaw pretty active to boot.

Monkeyboy
07-18-2007, 12:34
Foil packaged tuna and chicken are lighter than the canned versions. No metal container and less liquid inside.

Lipton noodle dishes are also very light and accompany the chicken or tuna nicely. Plus they cook in just a few minutes with boiling water.

Peanut butter is heavy....so maybe look at the squeeze tubes versus a bottle of it.

Instant oatmeal and grits are nice for breakfast. Very light, plus you can add the hot water directly to the little package and eat it right from the envelope. Saves time from having to clean dishes.

Instant mashed potatoes and powdered gravy go well with foiled meats.
Also Stove Top stuffing is good.

And of course you can rely on the standard Ramen Noodles. $5.00 for a box of 36 at most warehouse stores.

xunitedbychristx
07-18-2007, 16:51
Can someone point me to the place that tells how to dehydrate you own food. Thanks

SteveJ
07-18-2007, 17:04
I am doing 3 X 5-7 day trips with a buddy in the smokies and need an idea of what kind of gear(aside from the usual for a short 2 day hike) that I might need to get before we go. I have done 4 days before but never exceeded that. I am not a minimalist(yet), but I need a good idea for cheap, lightweight food.

When/what season are you hiking? How many miles / day are you planning versus hours in camp?

I just got back from 4 days on the AT in GA. What I found to be "non-essential" essentials were:

* Gold Bond medicated powder. Hiking in GA in the middle of the summer, with frequent and daily thunderstorms. Need I say more? (as my son says, "you need to feel the tingle!")
* 2 sets of clothes (t-shirt, shorts, u-wear, socks). 1 to hike in, 1 you keep dry for in camp / sleeping. I found that having a 3rd set of socks helped a lot...
* Crocs / croc knockoff for when you get in camp and get out of the wet boots / socks and don't want to put your dry socks on before bedtime
* a good book (maybe 2 if you're a fast reader or plan on quite a few hours in camp)
* a flask of scotch (ymmv)
* a hammock :D - but I guess that's debatable!

The list doesn't vary that much for only 2-night camping... After 4 days of hiking in humidity, rain and sweat I was really ready to get out of that stinky hiking shirt - and it was rinsed in the rain one night, and in a baggy w/ camp soap on another night....

Monkeyboy
07-18-2007, 19:43
Can someone point me to the place that tells how to dehydrate you own food. Thanks


Go to the cooking section of the forums.....lots of good pointers and links to outside sources.

Monkeyboy
07-18-2007, 19:45
And ohmygod yes, gotta have Gold Bond........and baby wipes in the little travel packs. Put those with your toilet paper, and definately don't leave home without 'em.

Even the MonkeyBoy doesn't like MonkeyButt.

OldStormcrow
07-19-2007, 14:00
Slim Jims....ya gotta have lotsa Slim Jims! Nature's chapstick!

Jim Adams
07-19-2007, 14:20
a lot of hikers over look the need for good fitting, broken in shoes. You may get thru a 2 day trip without blisters or foot problems every trip but longer trips can bring out the evil in your shoes. On the A.T. you can virtually do without everything else as long as you can walk out!

geek