PDA

View Full Version : Pack Weight.



SGT Rock
09-27-2002, 22:00
OK, this is my third time trying this. After the first two, lets refine the rules:
1. Three season. Weather about 30 derees F and up.

2. From skin out. Everything you carry, wear, and is in your pack.

3. Dry weight. No water, food, or fuel (optional).

This isn't a contest BTW.

stranger
12-17-2002, 00:34
Who cares...seriously, what the hell is the difference.

hauptman
03-02-2006, 14:32
:banana10 pounds(inclu ding food and water for three days)(no cooking) :banana

Amigi'sLastStand
06-04-2006, 20:19
Need to re-enliven Sarge's thread. I wanna hear the answers too.

As for me, in the military I could do 30km ( 20 miles or so ) over semieven terrain with 80lbs carrying an M40 and M4 and hardly break a sweat! ( little exaggeration on the sweat part ). I was 20 then.

Now, I'm old and broken down and carry a dry weight of 31 lbs with my used and homemade gear setup. This includes water and fuel, no food. Wish I could afford Ti and real silnylon, but oh well.

Just Jeff
06-05-2006, 00:19
Who cares...seriously, what the hell is the difference.

If you don't care, why take the time to respond and piss on someone else's interests? Obviously, the people who post their weights here are interested.

The last time I figured it up, I was 19 lb 15 oz FSO including fuel, camera, tripod, journal, etc. Since then I've reduce my hammock+underquilt weight by about from 42oz to 27 (no bug protection), my raingear from 19 to 10, and my kitchen stuff from 15 to 2. With a few other changes, that's about 2.5 lbs lighter...so if I keep this setup, my FSO w/o food, fuel or water is about 17.5 lbs.

SGT Rock
06-05-2006, 01:49
Base Weight is now about 15.5 pounds.

Amigi'sLastStand
06-05-2006, 01:54
Base Weight is now about 15.5 pounds.
Is that in the pack you have on your website?

SGT Rock
06-05-2006, 02:00
That list on my website hasn't been updated in a while. Hard to do it from here in Iraq LOL. If you would like, I can send you an excel document with my latest gear list to look at. Contact me by PM on the site and we can work it out. If you don't have excel, let me know what you do have and I can try to import it over.

Mr. Clean
06-05-2006, 06:02
I'm always at about 29 lbs for a weekend hike here in the Whites. That includes such "essentials" as my ultrapod tripod, scotch, and binoculars. Also includes 2 liters of water.

Gregory Forester
20* synthetic bag from Beans
prolite 3 pad
Hennessey
change of camp clothes
packa
sandals - need to get Crocs...

Thats the major stuff, anyway

MedicineMan
06-05-2006, 06:08
but it was with food.....
19.5 pounds
I'll re-weigh without the 4 day food back when I get a chance...

Big Dawg
06-05-2006, 07:03
base weight = 17.98 lbs

much better than my 1st outing on the AT,,, base weight then was somewhere around,, uhhh,, 65 lbs,,,, seriously!! LOL

CT-Sailor
06-13-2006, 19:40
I'm revamping me gear so my new lineup will have a baseweight of no more than 20 lbs with a total weight of no more than 30 lbs. I'm getting older and it's not nearly as much fun as it used to be humping a 45+ lbs pack up and down the hills. I find I enjoy the trail a whole lot more when I carry less on my back. I've also found that while I'm no where near ultra-lightweight I can be just as comfortable with 1/3 less weight.

MtnTopThinker
06-13-2006, 20:47
Pack with gear = 15 lbs..... 8lbs of that consists of my hammock, poncho liner underquilt, and home made synthetic sleeping quilt.

Wear/Carry = 5lbs

Hana_Hanger
06-13-2006, 20:59
I just gotta come and do the AT

Here on the island I am at (FINALLY)

IN Pack= 11 lbs 10.5 oz

Wearing and Carrying including hiking poles= 5 lbs 14.7 oz

now for just 3 days in the HOT summer add the food, fuel and water
and my pack is back up to 38 to 40 lbs....I am giving up this ultra light stuff till I can be wear water is available to me to treat or filter it.

DawnTreader
06-13-2006, 22:41
I had my base weight down to 10 lbs, but then I went on a few hikes and decided to add a few things, so now, with 2 quilts a hammock and a few other luxuries :) I'm at an even 15

Just Jeff
06-14-2006, 03:19
Same with me, DawnTreader - I could go lower, but once I got to a comfortable weight I see no reason to leave more luxuries at home. I've found my personal sweet spot to hike well and camp well.

Seeker
06-14-2006, 10:02
I've found my personal sweet spot to hike well and camp well.

and that, to me, is the essence of "Hike your own hike".

ANHINGA
06-14-2006, 10:38
I'm deeply appreciative of Sgt. Rock's willingness to share his practical experience and to keep this thread on task, for the most part. However, this topic runs the risk of sounding like "bulimic camping"--how much weight can I lose by regurgitating gear or starving my pack until it looks thin in the backpacking mirror? Considering a couple of liters of water plus container are approaching 4 pounds, I'm really skeptical of any claim to be hiking with less than 10 pounds of clothing, food, and gear. What are you doing, drinking from puddles the whole way?
I think I've worked out the equation that works best for me: keep paring down 10% of the weight decade by decade to match the 10% loss of muscle mass that slips with it. Perhaps that's why 25 lbs feels close to what 45 lbs did 30 years ago--the upper limit of the fun factor.

Mags
06-14-2006, 10:51
I've learned that boxed wine is more weight efficient than bottles. ;)

Mags
06-14-2006, 10:54
Same with me, DawnTreader - I could go lower, but once I got to a comfortable weight I see no reason to leave more luxuries at home. I've found my personal sweet spot to hike well and camp well.

I find it all depends on what I am doing.

In all seriousness (me? Serious??!?!?), my BPW for the CDT is less than 10 lbs. (Maps add up!), my FSO is probably about 14 lbs with shoes, pocket knife, camera, etc. on me.

But, when I do a casual backpacking trip (like this past weekend), I bring the luxuries. Yummy food to share, wine, etc.

Now, you should see what I bring on ski hut trips! :D

Jaybird
06-14-2006, 11:00
3. Dry weight. No water, food, or fuel (optional).



C'mon, Rock:

why not just ask how much does that heavy pack, weigh?????????

If you're carrying it....WEIGH IT!

SGT Rock
06-14-2006, 11:06
Well those things change based on length of trip.

My high pack weight now is about 30 pounds for a winter trip that is 5 days or less. FSO weight is about 35 pounds. That includes booze, toilet paper, and toothpaste LOL.

Just Jeff
06-14-2006, 11:16
Hey Rock - you can save some weight by leaving your toothpaste at home if your booze is strong enough...

Footslogger
06-14-2006, 11:21
Hey Rock - you can save some weight by leaving your toothpaste at home if your booze is strong enough...
============================
Beat me too that one Jeff ...was gonna tell rock that a mouthful of good high octane booze will kill just about any bug. Might not give you that "minty fresh breath" like Aquafresh, but HEY !!

'Slogger

LostInSpace
06-14-2006, 15:46
Non-wilderness, non-winter, solo backpacking trip with lower weight a reasoned priority (sometimes comfort and convenience superceed weight as a priority):

I am a tent camper.

In pack, excluding food, water, and fuel: 19.0 lbs
Worn or carried, including treking poles: 6.2 lbs
-----
25.2 lbs

Most likely change: switching out the Z-Rest for a more comfortable, but heavier pad.

Additional options depending on destination and length of trip:

Camera - 3.5 to 13 oz
Moro knife - 4 oz
Maps and guidebook - 0.1 to 5 oz
Wine, margaritas, etc. - usually omitted on solo trips.

SteveJ
06-14-2006, 22:37
OK, this is my third time trying this. After the first two, lets refine the rules:
1. Three season. Weather about 30 derees F and up.

3. Dry weight. No water, food, or fuel (optional).

This isn't a contest BTW.

Hi, Sarge. Hope all is well with you! Continue to think about you and the others representing us over there - be safe!

My 30 deg wt, w/o food, water (or liquor!), or fuel, is 16 lbs. This does include my 'heavy' 2 lb goretex jacket that I'll replace if I ever decide to spend the funds!

My 'base weight' (I've always defined that as everything but variable items - clothes, food, water, fuel, pack cover, etc.) for 30 deg is 10.4 lbs. Includes HHBPAsym, target pad and TR guidelite, GG Vapor Trail, homemade thru-hiker down quilt (22 ozs!), brasslite stove, etc. If I'm not alone, I might also throw in my TR chair kit - another 10.5 ozs. that I'll bring along to hang out with my hiking buddies....

MedicineMan
06-14-2006, 22:48
We just did Pen-Mar to Harpers..me testing a SixMoon Design Essence...it weight 19.5 pounds with food but no water....each time I filled up a 100ounce Camelbak the six pounds was not only very noticeable but uncomfortable as well....so my challenge in the future will be to not carry so much water its just i've been burned too many times in the past, even on this hike i was out by Ed Garvey and did the major hike down to the spring from that shelter. I did find the panel system a wonderful feature on this pack compared to top loaders.

hikerjohnd
06-14-2006, 22:50
Base weight - no consumables (no food, water, or fuel - but empty containers included for all three) I come in at 10.1 pounds. If I go to a lighter tent (I have the Europa now, I may get a Lunar Solo (or something similar) to knock off 10oz. I am pleased that I can go for 5 days for 30lbs or less.

Erro
06-14-2006, 23:27
I'm at 14 lbs w/o food, water, or fuel. All my stuff is new, as I've been preparing for my first extended AT hike. My next step is to take all the new gear and "trim it." Tags from clothes, packaging from medicine, extra strap length from back pack straps, drill holes in travel tooth brush... etc... I'm going to save all this "shaved off" material and weigh it. I know it will only be a matter of ounces, but it will be interesting to see how much can be shaved without changing functionality at all. I'll report back here with pics and specs.


-Erro

latte
06-14-2006, 23:46
I'm just happy that I got my sleeping bag, sleeping pad, hammock, and backpack down to 11 lbs! That 6 lb backpack really kills the numbers. I haven't found a light weight or for that matter an internal frame back pack that is comfortable. So if you see a Kelty Tioga external frame traveling through Maine this July, its me!:banana

Ridge
06-14-2006, 23:47
Remember, what you do is start off naked and add to that until you are at a level you are safe and reasonably comfortable on the hike you are doing. Every time I do any kind of multi-day jaunt I match the gear to the predictable weather conditions, terrain and duration of said trip, I do the same with food and water. I weigh all my equipment with a digital fish scale before a trip, I don't worry about food/water stuff, I've got that worked out to a tee. I have a feeling that the late John Donovan, an experienced hiker, sacrificed safety carrying light weight gear in the CA mountains last year. All, I can say is don't sacrifice safety trying to prove you can long distance hike with a tarp and a prayer.

Footslogger
06-15-2006, 08:57
Just about to catch our flights to hike the Gorham to Rangeley section. Pack, minus food/water, weighs between 13 - 14 lbs. That should put my total carrying weight at 24 - 25 lbs. I can live with that.

If I modified the above for cooler weather (non-winter) hiking I would expect to add approximately 2 - 3 lbs.

'Slogger

Seeker
06-15-2006, 11:10
Considering a couple of liters of water plus container are approaching 4 pounds, I'm really skeptical of any claim to be hiking with less than 10 pounds of clothing, food, and gear. What are you doing, drinking from puddles the whole way?

i think you missed the part about NOT adding food and water weight... everyone has to have food and water... that's why we don't count it... it's the other stuff we're interested in.

Just Jeff
06-15-2006, 11:33
And food and water change based on trip length - base weight generally doesn't.

idroptapul
06-15-2006, 19:22
I'm down to 11.5 these days.

The fact that, IMO, I'm able to safely backpack at this weight is almost entirely due the information shared on this and other LW backpacking sites.

Reading alot these days about how I.T. is flattening world culture and business, but in our case it's lightening the world. It's pretty remarkable that people in U.S., Australia, Japan, China, etc. can safely travel very lightly because of this free information dispersement. It may be easier to find someone in China who knows Michael Jordan, but there are those in this country who recognize names like Brian Frankle, Henry Shires, or Glenn Van Pleski.

Wolf - 23000
06-16-2006, 09:20
i think you missed the part about NOT adding food and water weight... everyone has to have food and water... that's why we don't count it... it's the other stuff we're interested in.

Seeker,

You are right that everyone has to carry food and water but it is still all part of your pack weight. A responsible hiker needs to carry some sort of shelter, sleeping gear, a pack, too. Your still carrying extra weight.

The whole issue of pack weight is silly because it doesnít take in consideration where your hiking or what time of year. It not hard hiking with under 10 pounds of gear on established trails such as the AT, PCT, LT, etc. Hiking Hot Spring, NC to Springer Mt, GA in March, I was leaving town with 10 pounds including food, and gear. Go off trail or go off-season, it changes things a lot. There a lot of ďultra-lightĒ hikers who hike only in good weather and head for the nearest town when thing get a little rough. The key to backpacking is being prepared for both good and bad weather without relying on others or good weather.

Wolf

SGT Rock
06-16-2006, 09:45
Seeker,

You are right that everyone has to carry food and water but it is still all part of your pack weight. A responsible hiker needs to carry some sort of shelter, sleeping gear, a pack, too. Your still carrying extra weight.

Yes, but this is like rocket fuel, you have it no matter what. It is expended as you go along as well. So if you are trying to cut weight, you do not want to cut the fuel because a) you need it and b) it goes away as you are out anyway.



The whole issue of pack weight is silly because it doesnít take in consideration where your hiking or what time of year.

Actually it does. The original post did mention all that:
1. Three season. Weather about 30 derees F and up.

2. From skin out. Everything you carry, wear, and is in your pack.

3. Dry weight. No water, food, or fuel (optional).

This isn't a contest BTW.



It not hard hiking with under 10 pounds of gear on established trails such as the AT, PCT, LT, etc. Hiking Hot Spring, NC to Springer Mt, GA in March, I was leaving town with 10 pounds including food, and gear.

If it isn't, then why do so many people start with a lot more? That is the point. Maybe people leaving with too much weight can learn a thing or two if it is discussed. Think maybe?



Go off trail or go off-season, it changes things a lot. There a lot of ďultra-lightĒ hikers who hike only in good weather and head for the nearest town when thing get a little rough. The key to backpacking is being prepared for both good and bad weather without relying on others or good weather.

Wolf
Well yes you are right on that. But generally we talk about TRAIL HIKING on the AT here. And to take exception, I do hike whenever I can get the chance since I do have limited time for backpacking. I've been out in snow, ice, floods, tornados, etc.

But how prepared do you need to be and still be safe and carry reasonable weight? Do you need a 4 season mountain tent? A gas stove with heat exchanger? A can of bear spray? A change of town clothes and your own soap powder? Do you need fuel for 30 days? All these things can fall under being prepared? How is the line drawn?

See, in the end it isn't silly, the silly thing is to either take it too far, or not do it at all. Because in the end, you have to carry everything, and not everyone can or needs to carry 50 pounds of stuff.

Mags
06-16-2006, 10:36
A responsible hiker needs to carry some sort of shelter, sleeping gear, a pack, too. Your still carrying extra weight.[/COLOR]


Wine! Don't forget the wine! Did you know wine is sold in 1 liter boxes now?

True lightweight backpacking is here!

Wolf - 23000
06-20-2006, 13:35
Yes, but this is like rocket fuel, you have it no matter what. It is expended as you go along as well. So if you are trying to cut weight, you do not want to cut the fuel because a) you need it and b) it goes away as you are out anyway.




SGT Rock, I agree with you that you should not cut weight on food but to many hikers do.
Quote:
The whole issue of pack weight is silly because it doesnít take in consideration where your hiking or what time of year.

Reply: Actually it does. The original post did mention all that:
1. Three season. Weather about 30 derees F and up.

2. From skin out. Everything you carry, wear, and is in your pack.

3. Dry weight. No water, food, or fuel (optional).

This isn't a contest BTW.


It does tell three season: weather about 30 degrees Ö but it doesnít tell you were. Iím going to pack different if Iím heading out on the East Coast where Iím more likely to get rain on compare to say sunny California on the West Coast.


Quote:
It not hard hiking with under 10 pounds of gear on established trails such as the AT, PCT, LT, etc. Hiking Hot Spring, NC to Springer Mt, GA in March, I was leaving town with 10 pounds including food, and gear.

Reply: If it isn't, then why do so many people start with a lot more? That is the point. Maybe people leaving with too much weight can learn a thing or two if it is discussed. Think maybe?


Most people start off with a lot more because they donít have the experience that some of us have developed. Take any piece of equipment; a stove for example. Ask a beginner hiker and a well seasonal hiker what purpose can a stove be used for. The beginner hiker may think it can be use to cook food, while a well seasonal hiker will know it can be used to cook food, a source of heat when needed, used for first aid.


Quote:
But how prepared do you need to be and still be safe and carry reasonable weight? Do you need a 4 season mountain tent? A gas stove with heat exchanger? A can of bear spray? A change of town clothes and your own soap powder? Do you need fuel for 30 days? All these things can fall under being prepared? How is the line drawn?

See, in the end it isn't silly, the silly thing is to either take it too far, or not do it at all. Because in the end, you have to carry everything, and not everyone can or needs to carry 50 pounds of stuff.





How prepared you are should depend on your skill level. I have no drought you can handle yourself in a snowstorm, ice, flood, etc. but many backpackers havenít develop those skills yet. An Army poncho can be used as a tarp to give soldiers a dry place for the night if it prepared properly. How many basic training soldiers donít know how to set it up properly or what to look out for when setting up camp?

Skill is the most important piece of equipment a person can have.

Wolf

SGT Rock
06-20-2006, 14:05
It does tell three season: weather about 30 degrees Ö but it doesnít tell you were. Iím going to pack different if Iím heading out on the East Coast where Iím more likely to get rain on compare to say sunny California on the West Coast.

The forum is about the AT. :D

[/quote]Most people start off with a lot more because they donít have the experience that some of us have developed. Take any piece of equipment; a stove for example. Ask a beginner hiker and a well seasonal hiker what purpose can a stove be used for. The beginner hiker may think it can be use to cook food, while a well seasonal hiker will know it can be used to cook food, a source of heat when needed, used for first aid.[/quote]

Yes, but the other thing that can happen is a lack of skill can also cause someone to carry more of something than they need. It can also cause them to overprepare a piece of gear by buying that dome tent with liner built for mountain climbing and boots for mountain climbing because they don't know what they don't know. The purpose of the forum is to share info. And if a person can see that it can be done for less than 20 pounds base and people still survive it, then that is a good thing. Gets them to realize this isn't preparing for a winter survival trip to Alaska.


How prepared you are should depend on your skill level. I have no drought you can handle yourself in a snowstorm, ice, flood, etc. but many backpackers havenít develop those skills yet. An Army poncho can be used as a tarp to give soldiers a dry place for the night if it prepared properly. How many basic training soldiers donít know how to set it up properly or what to look out for when setting up camp?
Somewhat agree with you. If you wanted to prepare for everything, you would need a flare gun, rifle, CPR device, combat lifesaver bag, signal smoke, trip flares (it has been asked, don't think I am making this up) and all sorts of other things. The fact is we can discuss with newbies exactly what it takes to be prepared on this site. Saying you need to be prepared for anything is so undefined it isn't even advise.



Skill is the most important piece of equipment a person can have.

Wolf

Actually I think attitude is more important than skill, but that is my opinion. With a good attitude you can stay calm and keep going even when skill or gear can let you down. Skill would be number two. Skill can save you a lot of gear. Or, depending on what your skill is, it can cause you to take more crap than you need because you think you need something you don't. We have had people with lots of EMT skills post in the past about their 2 pound first aid kits. Think about it.

Time To Fly 97
06-20-2006, 14:07
35 lbs with water and 5 days food - Spring, Fall
30 lbs in the Summer

rumbler
06-20-2006, 23:11
Most people start off with a lot more because they donít have the experience that some of us have developed.

Quote:

Also included in experience is the various equipment that long-term hikers tend to accumulate. Unless one has an unlimited budget to buy - and try - the best equipment, it is difficult to start from scratch and come up with a lightweight assemblage of equipment that fits your needs and comforts at a reasonable cost.

Fast forward a few outings, toss in some ambitious hikes, a few storms. Spend a few seasons buying lightweight packs, tents and bags. Read all of Campmor's mail literature, lurk at REI's outlet website, scour Ebay for coveted items. Low and behold, that proudly-borne 20 pound baseweight that you thought was expensive after dropping hundreds of dollars at your local outfitter preparing for your first outing has become - several thousands of dollars of purchases later - a ten pound load that you have cobbled together from sale items, castaways and homemade gear that, starting from scratch, you could probably put together for $200. Except of course for the Western Mountaineering bag (if you're in it this much, might as well get the best!), the jetboil stove to replace one of the 15 pepsi can stoves you've made in the past (convenience!), the new Petzle headlamp (Great reviews in Backpacker!) and so on and so on.

I did a small section of the Pinhoti recently, and managed to outfit not only myself but, embarrasingly enough, two friends who were new to hiking. If I was being honest, I have probably over the last decade purchased, swindled, traded for or somehow otherwise procured somewhere around seven or eight packs, four sleeping bags, three differing bag liners, four tents, several stoves, about 30 sporks (29 are currently stored with a bunch of lost socks somewhere that I can't find), and God knows what else. Well, a closet full of advanced fabric hiking clothes, for one. When I can't hike I shop, which means that I ought to be able to put together a reasonable base weight for just about any outing short of a Himilayian expedition. And even then I bet I could be comfortable at base camp. Hell, Kilimanjaro even got me to grab prescription summit glasses. (Note to the Wise: Summit glasses are not needed on Kilimanjaro, if anyone is planning the trip).

Base weight is going to be dictated by the planned trip, the equipment budget, and the experience of the hiker, as well as how much Maker's Mark - THE essential gear of any hike longer than a short walk to the car - one decides one must prudently carry.

Color me for about 15 pounds for 3 seasons, 10 pounds for two. And I will be flopping around the "For Sale" forums consistently to see if I can change these numbers. :D

Wolf - 23000
06-21-2006, 19:37
The forum is about the AT.


You placed this thread in the Gear Polls not specifying any place but anyway. Thank you for clarifying it’s on the AT but there still a different between where on the trail you are. My base weight is just under 4 pounds for 3 seasonal hiking and less for 2 season. I take a little extra precaution when hiking in places like the Smokies or the White Mountains when compare to other places on the trail. I left Hot Springs heading through the Smokies this March with 10 lbs 13 oz including 5 days food.

Yes, but the other thing that can happen is a lack of skill can also cause someone to carry more of something than they need. It can also cause them to overprepare a piece of gear by buying that dome tent with liner built for mountain climbing and boots for mountain climbing because they don't know what they don't know. The purpose of the forum is to share info. And if a person can see that it can be done for less than 20 pounds base and people still survive it, then that is a good thing. Gets them to realize this isn't preparing for a winter survival trip to Alaska.

I’ve been hiking around with a 5 pound or less base weight for the past 17 years. You can sit there and tell someone they don’t need something all day long but bottom line is they are going to do what ever they please. They give excuse after excuse why it is so important to carry everything. In time, if someone really wants to lighten up their pack, they know better what they need and what they don’t better than anyone.

Somewhat agree with you. If you wanted to prepare for everything, you would need a flare gun, rifle, CPR device, combat lifesaver bag, signal smoke, trip flares (it has been asked, don't think I am making this up) and all sorts of other things. The fact is we can discuss with newbies exactly what it takes to be prepared on this site. Saying you need to be prepared for anything is so undefined it isn't even advise.
I agree with you that you can’t prepare for everything but you can be prepared for the basic; cold weather, rain/snow, food/water, etc. I know you are not making this stuff up. I deal with it every time I go on leave. “What happen if xyz happens?” is a question I get asked all the time. My philosophy is this, “If you find yourself in a bad spot look at the things you have and don’t worry about the things you down.” It’s gotten me out of some very dangerous places.
Actually I think attitude is more important than skill, but that is my opinion. With a good attitude you can stay calm and keep going even when skill or gear can let you down. Skill would be number two. Skill can save you a lot of gear. Or, depending on what your skill is, it can cause you to take more crap than you need because you think you need something you don't. We have had people with lots of EMT skills post in the past about their 2 pound first aid kits. Think about it.

Attitude is extremely important but you also need the skill to know where to focus your efforts. You can have a positive attitude while freezing to death but at some point you need to know how to get yourself warm. In 30 degree weather you have some time to figure that stuff out but when it’s below 0 you need to know now rather then later. Just my opinion but both Skill and Attitude do go hand and hand.

Wolf

SGT Rock
06-22-2006, 08:24
For someone that thinks pack weight isn't worth talkinig about, you are on this thread a lot lately. I beging to think the point is you enjoy the attention of the argument more than you have a problem with the topic.

Footslogger
06-22-2006, 08:30
[quote=rumbler]I did a small section of the Pinhoti recently, and managed to outfit not only myself but, embarrasingly enough, two friends who were new to hiking.
=====================================

...only 2 ??

'Slogger

Wolf - 23000
06-22-2006, 19:42
For someone that thinks pack weight isn't worth talkinig about, you are on this thread a lot lately. I beging to think the point is you enjoy the attention of the argument more than you have a problem with the topic.

Naw, I get enough attention, too much sometimes. I just believe light weight backpacking should be approached differently then a gear list approach. Some of the things I like hikers to look at instead of just gear are:

∑ Are you hiking in a dry climate or a wet climate? Pack for what you going into. Some areas you can use a very light shelter system while others you may want to carry a little more.
∑ Hiking style? Are you hiking 8 hours a day or 12 hours plus. It does make a different in how much you need to keep you warm.
∑ Are you hiking with someone or going sole. Hikers traveling sole will generally carry less then couples.

I also get sick of hikers trying to be ultra light but are irresponsible about it. Unprepared and then preaching to others how light they travel. Ultra light can be done safely of course but it needs to be done responsible

SGT Rock
06-23-2006, 00:19
No disagreement there

Footslogger
06-23-2006, 08:49
[quote=Wolf - 23000]I also get sick of hikers trying to be ultra light but are irresponsible about it.
=====================================
How do you know if you are an irresponsible light hiker ??

'Slogger

Just Jeff
06-23-2006, 13:05
When it's too late...

Footslogger
06-23-2006, 13:05
When it's too late...
============================
Guess I haven't crossed the line yet then ...

'Slogger

rumbler
06-23-2006, 17:19
[quote=rumbler]I did a small section of the Pinhoti recently, and managed to outfit not only myself but, embarrasingly enough, two friends who were new to hiking.
=====================================

...only 2 ??

'Slogger

The shortage was friends, not gear. :)

hopefulhiker
06-23-2006, 17:42
In one of the Backpacker magazines the CEO of Whole Foods (Strider) gives his gear list. It's around $1200 and about 5-8 lbs. He uses the G5 and the gossamer gear shelter and pads, nanutak sleeping bag.......

Programbo
06-24-2006, 13:12
We just did Pen-Mar to Harpers..me testing a SixMoon Design Essence...it weight 19.5 pounds with food but no water....each time I filled up a 100ounce Camelbak the six pounds was not only very noticeable but uncomfortable as well....

I think I did that stretch 15 times way back when..It got to be a 2 day trip after awhile..Pen-Mar-Pine Knob the Pine Knob-Harpers Ferry...The Maryland Mountain Club used to do a marathon every year and would do the Pen-Mar to Harpers Ferry as a one day trip...I wonder if they still do that?

Wolf - 23000
06-24-2006, 14:41
[quote=Wolf - 23000]I also get sick of hikers trying to be ultra light but are irresponsible about it.
=====================================
How do you know if you are an irresponsible light hiker ??

'Slogger

Go on a trail less popular then say the AT or LT; one without shelters. Youíll find out.

If your relying on the shelters being there or prepared either way? Sure it can be nice coming out of the rain into a dry shelters but sometimes you may also need to set up camp else ware. It is suppose to be a wilderness experience after all.

Food. Are you always hungry bumming food off of others? Some hikers donít think nothing of helping themselves to others food even when it not offered. Sometimes hikers will offer others treats and that great once in a while but no hiker should rely on someone else for their needs. Also if your losing large amount of weight, that not good for you at all.

Bottom line is this, if you saw no sign of cavitations; would you still be ok?

Wolf

Footslogger
06-24-2006, 17:19
[quote=Wolf - 23000][quote=Footslogger]

Go on a trail less popular then say the AT or LT; one without shelters. Youíll find out.
======================

That's all we have out here ...

======================
Bottom line is this, if you saw no sign of cavitations; would you still be ok?
======================

Hmmm ...cavitations. I'm OK, are YOU OK ??

'Slogger

dreamhiker
06-24-2006, 17:47
32Lbs with not food yet.

Wolf - 23000
06-25-2006, 14:25
[quote=Wolf - 23000][quote=Footslogger]

Go on a trail less popular then say the AT or LT; one without shelters. Youíll find out.
======================

That's all we have out here ...

======================
Bottom line is this, if you saw no sign of cavitations; would you still be ok?
======================

Hmmm ...cavitations. I'm OK, are YOU OK ??

'Slogger

Footslogger,

Most people don't live out in the sticks like WY and thank you for pointed out my grammer mistake.

Wolf

Footslogger
06-26-2006, 08:32
[quote=Wolf - 23000]Most people don't live out in the sticks like WY and thank you for pointed out my grammer mistake.
=====================================
Well ...we don't consider it the "sticks" but we're glad that most people don't choose to live out here.

'Slogger

Nightwalker
07-18-2006, 23:15
Leaving tonight for 4 days on a "no shelters" trail. bunch-o-food. (duh)

20.5 lbs. pack incl. 1 liter H20
4 lbs. 9.3 oz. Shoes, clothes, Lekis, watch etc.

25 lbs 1.3 oz. skin out weight

For me that's extremely light. I'm still overprepared and will probably be able to lose more. Still learning, so not dead yet.

The pack is 15 lbs. lighter than in the Spring of this year. I just got tired of being so tired and having such sore feet. It was a lot of effort to get those pounds off, but not so much money.

As you might guess, more (and faster) miles are a lot easier now. ;)


Hasta la Pasta,
Nightwalker

Nightwalker
07-18-2006, 23:17
Footslogger,

Most people don't live out in the sticks like WY and thank you for pointed out my grammer mistake.

Wolf
He's got a 'wet brain' from doing a thru in '03. :D

Footslogger
07-19-2006, 08:35
He's got a 'wet brain' from doing a thru in '03. :D
===========================
HEY ...I resemble that statement !!

'Slogger

quicktoez
02-25-2007, 01:17
I got my pack down to 27# with a tent, and a few convenences and am very happy with that. Class of 2007 may your tracks be long=====

Chache
02-25-2007, 10:07
I've learned that boxed wine is more weight efficient than bottles. ;)
JIm Beams even more so

No Belay
02-25-2007, 17:06
Base Weight is now about 15.5 pounds.

That's pretty respectable Sarge considering a year ago we were going to get you an orange hat and paint U-haul on your arse.

26lbs with 5 days food and 4 liters of dehydrated water.

Dazzy001
08-12-2008, 21:50
My base weight is 21lbs, not including fuel, food & water...

ct1974rlw
08-19-2008, 16:40
For anything less than 8 days-tent, sleeping bag, food, water, change of clothes, first aid kit, camera, 1 pair of spare shoes, camp stove and pots, etc I am at 30lbs. Anything more than 8 days, I am at about 50lbs. I'm packin pretty heavy so this spring I am going to explore hammocks....

NICKTHEGREEK
08-19-2008, 16:54
In one of the Backpacker magazines the CEO of Whole Foods (Strider) gives his gear list. It's around $1200 and about 5-8 lbs. He uses the G5 and the gossamer gear shelter and pads, nanutak sleeping bag.......
Where's the issue money or weight?

stickman
08-20-2008, 20:50
On a recent 5 night hike in SW Virginia, my pack weighed exactly 28 pounds counting the pack itself plus every single thing I carried (even the empty water bladder) except water. I took 2 L of water, so make it 32 total. It may not win any competition but I don't care about that and it was my personal best. I used my Kelty external frame pack, which is a good pound heavier than my old style Ether 60, but carries well and is more comfortable for me in the heat. BTW, I figured on 2 pounds of food per day but came back with about 2.5 pounds uneaten. I always forget that Im just not that hungary the first few days of hot weather hiking.

I also think comfort is at least as important as weight. I know the arguments about stress on the body, and I have terrible knees, which is my motivation to get lighter, but I'd still rather carry a more comfortable pack even if it weighs somewhat more. My opinion.

Stickman