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Former Admin
09-03-2002, 20:43
Do bears concern you, have you had contact or a bear sighting while on the trail

Raccoon
09-04-2002, 15:05
Saw a bear on Walnut Mountain, near Hot Springs NC, about
three weeks ago. It heard me coming (I had a bear bell), and
lit off uphill without looking back.

EarlyRiser
09-05-2002, 19:31
No bears dont really concern me much anymore, for a while i was quite paranoid, especialy after a particularly vivid dream in which a bear was licking my neck while i slept under the stars (i woke up and my neck was wet, but i atribute it to sweat, i hope) but i had my first experiances with a bear this past trip. i was up ahead of the rest of the group after a breakfast break and i was looking up an incline when i heard a noise downhill and looked over to see a mother and two cubs about twentyfive feet away. my mind imediately said "oh crud" and i slowly started backing up banging my hiking sticks together and keeping an eye on mamma as the two cubs scurried up a tree. i got far enough away that i felt safe so i just stayed my ground untill the rest of the group showed up about ten minutes latter. by then i had gotten my camera but i was sure the bears were long gone. latter that day we ran into what i believe was a juvinile male along the trail it was only four of us but he ran pretty quick. i got a shot of its backside but unfortunately i lost my camera shortly afterward. black bears arnt much to worry about, they seem to be easily scared off, not that anyone should take them lightly, i just dont see any need to wet yourself over a bear sighting.

Kerosene
09-06-2002, 01:33
Sure they concern me, especially in areas that are known to have heavy bear population densities (e.g., Shenendoah or Great Smokies National Parks). They concern my wife and family a whole lot more, though! However, I haven't heard of any reasonably careful hiker being injured, so it's not worth getting too uptight about.

My only encounter was in Shenendoah National Park in 1986. We were camping next to a woods road and had hung up our food about 30 yards up the Trail. Around two in the morning I could swear I heard something padding up and down the Trail. I listened closely for about 20 minutes before I heard the distinct sound of a rock being flipped. I woke up my brother and told him I thought there was a bear on the Trail, perhaps 20 yards away. The blaggert said, "Okay" and promptly went back to sleep. I tried to empty my mind and get back to sleep, but finally I lost it. I grabbed my trusty Swiss Army knife, my fork, and my penlight. Jumping out of the tent I yelled and tried to bang the knife and fork together. I caught the smallish bear in my weak flashlight beam, but I don't think the 'tink, tink, tink' of the metal really scared him(?) much. S/he looked at me a few seconds, then turned and slowly ambled into the woods on the other side of the Trail. What was I thinking????

Hammock Hanger
09-10-2002, 06:57
Bears were not (are not) a major concern for me. I had many encounters as I hiked in the dark of the early morning and some middle of the night roaming of the bears thru my campsites. If you use common sense black bears will usually run. I found my encounters to be memorable. HH

SGT Rock
09-10-2002, 09:19
I think my biggest concern is I'll never get a picture of one in the wild.

Peaks
09-10-2002, 16:37
Bears, like other large mamaels, seen to appear when you least expect them. So, keep your camera handy, because you never seem to know when one will appear on the trail ahead of you.

The Hog
09-27-2002, 06:12
I was lucky enough to encounter seven bears on my thru hike, including a mother and two cubs in Virginia. At Sand Spring in PA, I was filling my water bottle when I heard some leaves rustling directly behind me, but I thought the sound was a squirrel or something and I ignored it. Then the hairs stood up on the back of my neck. I wheeled around, and a bear 15 paces away stood up on his hind legs. He/she immediately went down on all fours, turned around and accelerated away. I caught none of these bears on film because the movie camera was stowed in the pack. This taught me a good lesson - if you want wildlife photos, carry the camera in your hands.
I took this lesson to the CDT in Montana, where I saw six bears in 19 days. All of them were caught on digital video (two at close range, including a grizzly) because I carried the camera, ready to shoot, in my hand. The resulting footage is, well, memorable (the griz is snapping her jaws at me).

M.O.P.
10-27-2002, 01:18
While hiking northbound from Pass Mountain Hut in the Shenandoah
National Park we heard something falling out of a tree to the left of
us. When we looked over to see what it was, we saw a bear cub falling out of the tree. We thought the cub was cute. But right away, we were looking for Mama Bear. We didn't see Mama Bear. The cub caught him/herself and scrambled off.:)

tioneon
11-03-2002, 12:30
I've seen a number of bears on the AT. I have seen more southern hunting dogs intent on chasing one up a tree, however. As I understand it this allows the hunters not only the oportunity to enjoy the bear's magnificance at close range before killing it, but it also allows them to drop the animal with a single humane shot.

On another occasion in VA a bow hunter asked me about the bear I had seen along the Trail earlier in the day. I wasn't sure if he was talking about the same one, as he explained the animal he was looking for had his arrow in it. I wished him well and continued my hike.

Perkolady
11-03-2002, 20:35
Anyone planning on staying at Stover Creek Shelter area-
My family and I stayed in that area one night this past week and there is indeed still a bear hanging around.

I am very grateful for the bear cables there!:)

We didn't cook or eat near the area, and we hung all our food,toiletries,cookware;etc.

The bear came right near our tent that night investigating~!
It did leave <slowly> after we got up and made some noise though.

The next morning, after investigating the area, we found that there had been some careless campers before us - there were food scraps and wrappers (AND LANDMINES! YUK!!)

Please, take precautions.

Bear hugs,
Perkolady :)

Peaks
11-03-2002, 21:47
There were a lot of bear problems at Stover Creek last summer & spring. Now, I didn't find the bear cables there, so I rigged up a good bear line, and didn't have problems.

It appears that most of the problem bears have been relocated from the Smokies to Georgia. (Or the Adirondacks, but that's anther story)

Perkolady
11-04-2002, 15:21
Just for anyone-
The bear cables at Stover Creek are located just a little ways
behind the shelter, to the right -maybe 30 ft or so (with the leaves coming down,
you can see the cables if you're standing near the front of the shelter and look back and to the right some- and look UP of course.)

Maybe they need to put up a sign or something. There is a notice on the shelter wall about the cables, but no hint as to their location.

I will say,,, they are really nice and easy to use!


:) Perkolady

Perkolady
11-04-2002, 15:40
Back in the late 80's, there was a problem bear (one among several)
in the Pemigiwasset Wilderness Area in the Whites.

It was relocated once to northern NH , and it came BACK !
Then, it was relocated AGAIN up to Canada- and it CAME BACK AGAIN!!

Well, it ended up being destroyed.

Now, I knew this bear personally. He hung around where I used to station myself while volunteering as a park ranger.
He would come near my campsite often (there were a number of natural food sources nearby)
He never actually came INTO the site though (always stayed at least 30 feet out)But, I was VERY careful about NOT cooking or eating or hanging food in my site.

Unfortunately, the year after I moved, there was a woman camped at this site, and she had her food in the tent with her and of course, the bear made an attempt at getting to it and she was injured in the process, causing him to be relocated and eventually, destroyed.

What a real shame , for her, for the bear, and for taxpayers !

This area WAS posted for bear activity- and the warning wasn't heeded.

PLEASE ! To anyone who's new to backpacking--- or even to the too lazy to hang the food bags-
Don't take chances!!
Especially if the area is posted and you've been warned.

And don't think a BONFIRE will keep them away either- the bear I knew came by anyway !(although mine was far from a 'bonfire')

.... oh I could tell ya some stories from my ranger days in the whites....(but now isnt the time)

Anyway,,, there was an article written in BACKPACKER MAG about this
incident (maybe in '90? '91?)

and one other soapbox comment-
If there's cables, there must be a good reason to use 'em. So DO !

Safe camping to all,
Perkolady

:eek:

Jeff
11-04-2002, 15:43
Are there bear cables at any other Georgia shelters besides Stover Creek??

EarlyRiser
11-04-2002, 16:18
In the Shanendoah area i know that theyve placed metal "trees" rather than cables. they are usualy within sight of the shelter, however somtimes its a small walk to them. ive never had a problem with a bear at a shelter but have experianced them wandering through other camp sites. usualy you can tell an area a bear frequents, if there is obvious destruction of fallen logs or large rocks being moved or upended, rocks too big for a smaller animal than a bear to have done. then chances are there is a bear in the area. its always good practice to hang a bear bag. even if the risk is low. the cables and metal trees were put up for your convenience, if anything you should reward the labor of those who took time to ensure your safty.

Peaks
11-04-2002, 17:02
As I recall, all of the shelters in Georgia have bear cables.

Most of the shelters in the Smokies have bear cables. One or two here still keep food inside the shelter, and the cage is still up on these.

Shenandoah, as posted, has the bear poles.

New Jersey has bear boxes

Some established campsites in the Whites have either a bear cable or a bear box. This includes 13 Falls in the Pemi and off the AT.

Generally speaking, if there is a problem bear in the area, you will find either a box, pole, or cable.

And, when there is not, notes in the register will advise you appropriately.

tioneon
11-04-2002, 17:52
Brutus, may he RIP.

PushingDaisies
12-13-2002, 13:03
Not all the shelters in GA have bear cables, just the newer ones and a few of the older ones. Although I remember hearing that the plans were to add bear cables to each GA shelter. Don't know how true that is though.

As for my bear encounters:

In 850 miles of hiking on the trail this season, I saw 7 bears.

1. Just outside of the Smokies. Coming up to the trail while I was trying to find my designated peeing spot. I decided I didn't have to go so badly after all.
2. A day after Kincora in TN. Back end fleeing into the brush.
3. A mile or so outside of Parisburg. Back end fleeing into the brush.
4,5,6,7. 3 cubs and moma bear. Seen playing in the trail going up to Dragon's Tooth.

I wonder how many more I would have seen if I would have contiuned. :)
Guess I'll find out in 2003!

Easyhiker
12-13-2002, 20:56
Bear cables don't nesacerally keep your food safe. Ask Bluebearee about this or read the beginning of her 2002 journal at Trail Journals http://trailjournals.com

Peaks
12-14-2002, 09:54
Bluebeary must have had all the encounters that I didn't.

On Springer, I don't know how the bear got her food bag off the cable. It does happen occassionally. Make sure that your food bag is tied onto the hooks, not just set over them. Myself I now carry a caribiner so I can better fasten my food bag to cables.

In the Adirondacks the bear cables are up in spruce trees which bend when a bear gets up on the line. That typically brings the food bags down within reach of a second bear who swips at it like a pinata. At least at Lake Coldin, they have now tied the trees back and braced them so they don't bend anymore. By the way, some poor fellow put his pack up on the line one night. The only thing hanging up there in the morning was the two internal stays.

Hammock Hanger
12-14-2002, 10:25
Those bears are a riot, and smart. We once watched as a cub crawled up on his mom to try and reach a bag. If you camp near the Mt Marcy basecamp area they have a cabel over the water/bridge. -- I only hung my food about 1% of the whole AT hike w/o a problem. Now in the ADKS, I always hang my food. Hammock Hanger

Lone Wolf
12-14-2002, 11:35
Bear problems? None. I never hang my food. I Always sleep with it in my tent. 16 years no problem.

Hammock Hanger
12-14-2002, 21:22
I know a hiker that used his food bag as a pillow. HH

Rocky
12-15-2002, 04:31
When I was 10 years old, on my way back from a kayak camping trip with a couple of my buddys, we ran into a neighbor dragging out a bear he had shot. It was a sow and the cub was following behind. I asked him what he was going to do wiht him, he said when he got to his truck he would shot him so he wouldn't starve. I asked if I could have the cub, and he said sure if you help drag out the mother. We helped with the draggin and when we got to the truck he even gave us a ride home. Luckyly for me my buddy's moms wouldn't alow a bear around the house, so Smokey was mine (what can I say we were kids and thought that was the perfect name). Not long after, Smokey and I found a baby crow that we named Charlie.
The next year we started hiking alot on the AT. We always thought it was strange that when Smokey, Charlie, my buddys and I hiked into a shelter everyone else left. Guess it was because like today hikers don't like Boy Scouts. Charlie passed in 1965 at the age of 7 years, Smokey left for his last mating season romp in 1972 at the age of 14 years.
When it comes to bears it all depends on where you are on the food chain. With park and city bears you are at thje bottom. You are easier to catch than a shelter mouse. So with the tame bears you can be supper or a mouse with an attitude (like the mouse in the poster giving the finger to the eagle). When it comes to wild bears you are the top of the food chain, if you act like it and give brother briun half a chance he will scury away like a shelter mouse.

illininagel
01-05-2003, 13:52
Last summer, we came across a bear that was standing in the middle of the trail in SNP. We stopped in our tracks, let the bear wander into the woods about 50 yards or so, and walked by as casually as possible (kept a conversation going). I'm not nearly as frightened of the bears as I once was. I think it's most important to keep you cool and not alarm the bear. Sharing the woods with the grizzlies in some of the northwest areas is a lot scarier for me.

Last summer, my brother dropped some spicy Spanish rice mix on the dusty trail near our backcountry site. He was worried about attracting bears, so he treated the area as if it was a nuclear waste site. He scraped up every last piece of rice and sealed it in a zip lock bag. He then went down to the creek, gathered some water and doused the area. Finally, he placed a few large rocks over the "contaminated" area. Obviously, this was overkill and we still have a good laugh over it now.

Another bear story---a large group of us (7 people) camped in the backcountry of Yosemite near Half Dome. It was a warm night, and four of the people slept out on tarps. I was in a tent. At night, I was awakened by the sound of a bear checking out our camp site. After about 10 minutes, the bear left. Fortunately, we hung all of our food and other smelly items. The next morning, one of the guys mentioned that the bear was sniffing around no more than 3 feet from his head as he pretended to sleep. Needless to say, he didn't sleep for several hours after that.

Sorry, but one last bear story, although it's kind of sad. My family and I stopped at a site in Smoky Mountain National Park to eat lunch on our way back to Chicago from Disney World. There were probably 50 to 60 people also eating at picnic tables in the nearby wooded area. As a bear approached our site, we decided not to take any chances and immediately got into the car. The bear helped himself to some of my chocolate chip cookes. Within a few minutes, about 5 teenagers noticed the bear and approached our site. They started screaming at it. More people started coming and eventually a crowd of nearly 25 people started throwing rocks at the bear. It ran for the safety of the woods and the crowd of idiots chased after it, continuing to throw things. Fortunately, a ranger came to end this ugly scene.

illininagel
01-05-2003, 13:54
Originally posted by Lone Wolf
Bear problems? None. I never hang my food. I Always sleep with it in my tent. 16 years no problem.
All good streaks come to an end. Even Joe DiMaggio's consecutive game hitting steak ended at 56...:D

Lone Wolf
01-05-2003, 14:08
I ain't skeered! Got a 9mm backup.

Colter
01-13-2003, 17:05
I always try to ease people's bear concerns. Does anyone know how many people have been killed on the AT by bears in history?

The real dangers are other people, falls, hypothermia, lightning and the like. If someone does come up with the total number of people who have been killed by bears on the AT, compare that to the number of fatalities to hyphthermia on Mt. Washington alone. Kind of puts things in perspective.

Here's a still of a bear that was crossing the river towards us on a fishing trip in Alaska. This was a monster brown bear. When he was about 50 feet away he heard me yell, and slowly turned around and ambled away.

http://www.bucktrack.com/Alaska/Brown_Bear/Brown_Bear_River.jpg

Squirrel
01-17-2003, 23:32
My black bear experience occured in June 2002 near the side trail to the Tray Mountain shelter in GA. I had a rattlesnake experience a few days before, so critters were on my mind. I was heading north and passed by the side trail to the Tray Mountain shelter when I came across a black bear scrounging about 15 feet off the trail. I remember from reading that bears will often bluff you if they do not run away immediately, so you need to stand your ground. I thought about slowly walking backwards, but it looked right at me so I stopped and shouted "Hey you!" My heart was racing. I am in excellent shape from running and hiking and I have never had it pound like that, even after running a half marathon. The bear took off over the ridge and all I heard were sticks snaping and leaves being turned up and the bear fled.

I passed by a boy scout troup heading southbound to the shelter. I did not tell them about the bear-as to not worry them.

-Squirrel

Lil Rebel
01-30-2003, 12:13
My dad encountered a bear at Rock Gap Shelter. Here is the link to pictures and the whole story.

http://www.trailjournals.com/entry.cfm?id=13772

Companion
07-09-2003, 08:52
This, in all probability,must make me look less than clever...but what exactly is a bear cable?

DebW
07-09-2003, 09:14
A bear cable is a permanently-affixed cable setup with pulley to hang food from. They have them at shelters and campsite with bear problems so that even lazy people will hang their food properly.

Lugnut
07-10-2003, 00:13
Here's an interesting article. Not on the AT but it was a black bear, not a grizzly.
I'm still not a'scared of 'em. :banana

http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/breaking_news/6266756.htm

Blue Jay
07-10-2003, 07:22
You're not afraid of them, you just like getting other people to be scared of them.

Uncle Wayne
11-20-2003, 08:48
Here's a list I made for my scout troop several years ago while we were preparing for a section hike on the AT. The scouts enjoyed it and actually learned something from it. Some of the moms wanted to know who this Pink Floyd fellow was.
Bears on the trail:

We’ll be hiking in bear country. We’ll be visitors in his home and most of the time he doesn’t like to have visitors. This doesn’t mean we’ll see any bears but we will have to be a little more cautious than we are when we hike in Sipsey. This information is not intended to frighten anyone, we just don’t hike in bear country very much so it is important we all know what to do if a bear encounter happens. Here are some things to remember:

1.) Nothing with any type of odor can be stored in our tents. Bears are not attracted to humans but to what humans bring with them.
2.) We will bear bag all smellables each night. This includes tooth paste, medicines, food, garbage and even Nalgene Bottles that have had anything besides water in them. Be sure to clean your pockets out also. Don’t sleep in the clothes you wore while eating or cooking.
3.) Never cook or eat in front of your tent.
4.) We’ll have to pack out all uneaten food. No food can be thrown away or buried in the forest.
5.) We will not use our campfire for cooking.
6.) Be sure and pack 50 feet of cord or small rope to tie your bear bag up in the tree.
7.) There is safety in numbers, we must hike together. No one far ahead or far behind.
8.) Never leave camp without your whistle or without telling me where you’re going.
9.) Several weeks before our trek, stop using fabric softeners when washing your trail clothes.

The next scenarios are to help us know what to do in different situations if we see a bear. Select the right answer or answers.

Situation 1.) A bear is seen in the distance, 100 yards away, but has not seen you;
A. Move away and give the bear plenty of space to move on.
B. If a detour is not possible, wait for the bear to leave or leave yourself.
C. Don’t make abrupt noises or moves that would startle the bear.

Situation 2.) A bear is seen in the distance, 100 yards away, but has already seen you. The bear is standing on its hind legs, looking at and smelling of you.
A. Remain calm.
B. Approach the bear slowly.
C. Wave your arms and talk in a normal, firm tone.
D. Do like the Pink Floyd song and Run Like Hell.
E. Look for a climbable tree.

Situation 3.) The bear starts approaching you on all fours.
A. Turn your back on the bear and take Pink Floyd's advice.
B. Avoid direct eye contact.
C. Back away as long as it doesn’t agitate the bear.
D. Look for a climbable tree.
E. Back away till you’re out of sight and leave the area at a fast walk.
F. Stay together as a group. Remain calm.

Situation 4.) If the bear that is approaching you is not a sow bear with cubs;
A. Yell or shout.
B. Scream.
C. Attempt to chase it off by throwing rocks, blowing a whistle or bang camp gear together.
D. Back out of sight and leave the area.
E. Throw down some object to attract / divert the bears attention. Do not throw down food.

Situation 5.) If the bear in any of the above situations was a sow bear with cubs, you should;
A. Leave the area.

Situation 6.) If you are attacked by a bear.
A. Keep your pack on for protection.
B. Drop to the ground and play dead.
C. Make as small a target as possible.
D. Do not struggle, remain motionless.
E. Remain silent.
F. If the bear swats you, roll with the blow.
G. Fight back as hard as possible.

I honestly don’t think we’ll see any bears. As a group we'll be making so much noise they'll be long gone before we are that close. But since the possibilities exist, I have typed these notes for the boys to study. The Scout motto is “Be Prepared.”

Lumberjack
11-21-2003, 04:41
Uncle Wayne - Never Ever run in front of a bear or any other predator.... running will only get you chased and most predators including bears are faster then us.

Tree climbing is equally useless where black bears are concerned - they are very skilled climbers.

Youngblood
11-21-2003, 06:22
Uncle Wayne - Never Ever run in front of a bear or any other predator.... running will only get you chased and most predators including bears are faster then us.

Tree climbing is equally useless where black bears are concerned - they are very skilled climbers.

Lumberjack,

I think you missed the part where he said "Select the right answer or answers."

Youngblood

Lumberjack
11-22-2003, 07:55
Lumberjack,

I think you missed the part where he said "Select the right answer or answers."

Youngblood

:o so I did - me bad....

Lone Wolf
11-22-2003, 08:46
Black bears aren't predators.

Lumberjack
11-22-2003, 09:35
Black bears aren't predators.

Hate to tell you this but black bears do hunt and kill other animals which makes them predators.

Lone Wolf
11-22-2003, 09:46
For example?
I'll answer my own question. They will prey on rodents , birds, fish and sometimes newborn deer if their primary food sources aren't available. They pose no threat to us big-ass humans.

Lumberjack
11-22-2003, 11:00
For example?
I'll answer my own question. They will prey on rodents , birds, fish and sometimes newborn deer if their primary food sources aren't available. They pose no threat to us big-ass humans.

Black bears are basicly opportunists.....
And yes young male black bears have stalked and killed humans on very rare occasions.

Considering a black can weigh upwards of 500 lbs I wouldnt consider us to be that big.... or do we need to widen the trail for you? :D

Lone Wolf
11-22-2003, 11:31
Bottom line. Bears ain't a problem on the AT. I still sleep in a tent with my food bag. I sleep with a .45 too so if Yogi goes for the bag, I blow his s**t away. :D

Lumberjack
11-22-2003, 12:11
Bottom line. Bears ain't a problem on the AT. I still sleep in a tent with my food bag. I sleep with a .45 too so if Yogi goes for the bag, I blow his s**t away. :D

.45 huh? hope your carrying several magazines with you......

:rolleyes:

While its true bears on the AT arent a big problem "yet" I for one dont want them to get to the point where we have to carry a can.

Lone Wolf
11-22-2003, 12:13
You don't think a .45 in the head of a bear will stop it? :rolleyes:

Lumberjack
11-23-2003, 04:54
You don't think a .45 in the head of a bear will stop it? :rolleyes:

If your that close to the bear then its too late....

Lone Wolf
11-23-2003, 08:26
Wow. You must be a bonafide expert in weapons, bears and hiking. Wish I was as cool as you. :cool:

smokymtnsteve
11-23-2003, 11:17
Black bears are basicly opportunists.....
And yes young male black bears have stalked and killed humans on very rare occasions.

Considering a black can weigh upwards of 500 lbs I wouldnt consider us to be that big.... or do we need to widen the trail for you? :D


the only fatal black bear attack in the smokies was a FEMALE black bear and cubs... all black bears are usually very shy and secretive... they are not predators they are basically veggie-tarins...there main foods are berries and the Mast..acorns and nuts ....they depend so heavily on acorns and nut that if the mast crop fails the number of cub births the following year plummets...the quality of the mast crop is a good population indicator foor the black bears..it what they eat..not humans...

steve hiker
11-23-2003, 13:30
... all black bears are usually very shy and secretive... they are not predators they are basically veggie-tarins... what they eat...not humans...

No no no Smoky that is not true some blackies will STALK and KILL and EAT a human being. Read this article on predatory black bears, its long but could save your life.

"One of the most striking things about black bears is the great divergence they show in behavior in different geographical areas, despite a basically similar appearance and size. In most places, black bears are the least dangerous of all bears, but in some areas they are the most dangerous--comparable to a jaguar or tiger. Black bears are virtual harmless along the Eastern Seaboard of the U.S.

When you get to the great north woods of Canada, you would think you were dealing with a totally different species. From Northern Quebec to the Pacific Coast in British Columbia, and up to Alaska, black bears are a significant danger to the unwary and unarmed. The risk rises dramatically as you cross Canada from east to west, though deadly predatory incidents have occured in every province in this area. There are at least ten times as many fatalities and serious maulings in Alaska and Canada as there have ever been in the U.S. in modern times.

In recent years, virtually all such incidents have taken place north of the U.S. border. In Alberta, there is a death or serious mauling every year from black bears (about the same rate as for grizzlies). In British Columbia, the viciousness of the northern black bear reaches a grim crescendo with 5 serious maulings and deaths from black bears for every one from the grizzlies.

The black bears are primarily active in the northern inland areas and grizzlies mostly cause trouble in the coastal areas. Black bear attacks are rare on the coast and virtual non-existant on the offshore islands. Although the island bears are just as wild as their inland brethern, they are remarkably tolerant towards humans and are sometimes even friendly. Again, in terms of behavior, they seem like different species.

The worst area seem to be in the northeast of B.C., especially in that part near the Alaska Highway. Predatory behavior and attacks are quite common, and all black bears in this area should be regarded as potentially extremely dangerous. I am writing this lengthy message as a warning to readers on here who plan to drive up the Alaskan Highway. Under no circumstances should you ever approach a black bear (or grizzly, for that matter, though in B.C. black bears are the more dangerous species) or allow a bear to approach you. If you go camping or hiking even in designated parks along the Highway, get advice from the rangers (in Canada called Conservation Officers) and do not go for even short walks without being armed in some way, and DO NOT GO ALONE!

Just last year, a black bear killed two people and injured five others in Laird Park near the Highway in B.C. just south of the Yukon border. At the least, you should have a large-sized can of bear spray, a strong and heavy walking stick and a big Crocodile-Dundee type hunting knife on your person. I have read numerous reports on recent incidents in this area, and they are chilling. People used to the mellow and gentle U.S. bears have commented on how similar the physical appearance of these bears is, but how different it is what you see in their eyes.

The U.S. bears have a warm, shy, gentle and friendly look in their eyes, but these Canadian northern wilderness bears have a cold, calculating look of determined ferocity in their eyes that freezes the blood of those who see it. These bears may try to silently sneak up behind you, charge suddenly from ambush, or just circle in the woods around you like a shark. When they decide that you are prey and they are going to take you, they often approach with a slow but relentless pursuit that can be extremely difficult to turn away. Even bear spray often works only temporarily, which is why you need something else for backup.

I read one incident where a man threw his hat at the bear to temporarily distract it. It worked, the bear wasted precious time in savagely and viciously tearing the hat to shreds. The man had sprayed the bear twice with bear-spray, yet it still came back to try and get him. Fortunately, he reached his truck before the bear closed in again. Please keep in mind that even a small black bear can easily overpower a man weighing twice as much. Some tourists at a resort once saw a big blackie lift up a metal cover on a garbage dump weighing over a ton and toss it six feet to one side with just a shove of one paw.

A battle was once observed long ago in Alaska between a female black bear weighing 350 pounds and a male grizzly weighing 700 pounds. She won the fight, although she was mortally wounded in the process. It is hard to verify such stories, but Yellowstone rangers once put some black bear carcasses on a feeding platform for grizzlies, and the grizzlies would not go near them until they smelled noticeably of decay and the grizzlies could be sure they were dead.

Grizzlies have an aristocratic contempt for black bears, and love to bully them and even prey on them at times, but they always do their attack by surprise from ambush---grizzlies seem reluctant to try to take on a black bear in a fair fight.
All the more reason humans should take a black bear seriously!

All is not hopeless, predatory black bears often underestimate humans and have been killed with knife-slashes to the throat or even a large rock or heavy stick to the skull. If this is not the case though, you could be killed very quickly unless you have a gun. The more prudent bear planning to eat a man will get him down and grab him in iron jaws by the back of the neck and shake hard, that usually does it right then. A less skilled predator will just start eating the human alive without bothering to kill him---horrible as it sounds, you can let the beast chew on one arm while you slash his throat with a knife in the other, lives have been saved this way.

If a bear is seriously after you, you can expect to fight to the death, yours or his. It is very difficult to dissuade or shake off a predatory black bear, but it has been possible to temporarily make him back off by threatening him with a stick or spraying him at close range--thus buying precious time. One man, before he used the spray, had such a bear rise up and look him directly in the eyes at close range. He could see in the bear's eyes what it intended to do to him, and it made his soul quake--he never had experienced such terror before (or since) in a long adventurous life! Fortunately, the overconfident bear had positioned himself perfectly for a snoot-full of hot-pepper spray and the man drove off the creature long enough to get away.

Please take SERIOUSLY the threat posed by a predatory black bear of the great northern wilderness! A man-eating tiger is no more determined or deadly. Once such a bear has tasted human flesh, he will often try to stalk and kill every human he can find in the vicinity and cache the bodies for his food supply. In one horrible incident a few years ago, a black bear overpowered and killed (the evidence indicated the victim tried fighting back) a teenager who was fishing along a stream. He then killed two more young men who were looking for the first one. Apparently, he snuck up behind them by stealth and knocked them down, then broke their necks in his jaws. The fourth teenager who was waiting in his car, realised something had gone terribly wrong when none of the others showed up and went for help. Almost certainly he would have been the fourth fatality if he had tried looking for the others. They found the bear standing guard over the three bodies and shot when he started to charge.

A point that should be obvious from all this is that if you have to work or travel for extended periods of time in northern B.C. or Alberta in deep forested wilderness, you had damn well better take along adequate firearms and be prepared to use them anytime. You will sleep in your tent with that gun beside you and loaded, and with your knife under your pillow and spay next to your sleeping bag. These black bears have taken oil exporation workers from stations in deep wilderness areas just as polar bears have from remote Arctic stations. People having to go into these areas for significant periods of time must take as great precautions as Arctic explorers do with polar bears.

The most important precautions are: Never be alone at any time, and never be unarmed. In fact, if you were ever ordered to go into these areas without firearms or by yourself, you would be absolutely justified in refusing. The danger is terribly real and significant. Use as much caution as a diver would use with tiger sharks. The only other North American animal that is as dangerous as a fully predatory black bear is a confirmed, man-eating jaguar (or maybe a starving polar bear). It goes without saying that it is sheer madness to feed a bear along the Alaskan Highway, these animals are nothing like U.S. National Park bears; travellers have been horribly wounded for making that mistake and the bear almost always has to be quickly killed as it becomes uncontrollably aggressive.

Rain Man
11-23-2003, 15:35
... Black bears are virtual harmless along the Eastern Seaboard of the U.S....

If he doesn't know where the AT is located, let's ignore him.

kaytee
11-23-2003, 22:54
The bears in Canada aren't crazy and dangerous; they're the same ones as in the US. The only bear attacks (and not deaths) around where I live (North Eastern Ontario) were rabbid/sick bears.

Lumberjack
11-24-2003, 07:16
Wow. You must be a bonafide expert in weapons, bears and hiking. Wish I was as cool as you. :cool:

Smarter then the average bear? :sun

It doesnt take an expert to take a safety course or do a little research, maybe you should try it sometime. A .45 has poor accuracy and doesnt have enough stopping power to reliably take a bear down at any kind of reasonable distance.

Oh for the record, If you feel the need to lug around a big heavy and completely useless hunk of metal so you can feel secure thats fine but if I see you on the AT with it, I am the sort who would rat you out to the authorities and Im not alone. Since I consider you to be a bigger threat then any bear I wouldnt have a problem ruining your hike.

Lone Wolf
11-24-2003, 08:14
heh heh heh. Hook, line and sinker. You ain't smart enough to know someone is messin with ya. Don't take things so seriously. BTW a Glock G30 weighs only 1.5 lbs. Not much metal in it either. :cool:

Blue Jay
11-24-2003, 09:48
You guys may want to read the Actual Face to Face Bear Encounters Thread then you may not have to be soooo afraid.

CeeJay
11-24-2003, 10:48
We saw several black bears and one grizzly bear while hiking in Canada. The black bears were some distance away and not at all inclined to come closer. I heard the grizzly in the bushes about 300 yards from the trail. We stopped and watched him as he sped up the mountain when he realized we were there.

While on the AT this summer we saw and heard several bears. I saw one across the stream from me just after Bluff Mountain, but that one took off up the hill as fast as he could run when he saw me. We also had one rooting around in our camp the night before, but had our food bag hung a distance from our campsite. It was probably a bad place to pitch camp because there were a lot of stumps over turned there and digging around them had obviously taken place. It was also the best campsite we had seen, it had a fire ring, it was getting late and we were tired of hiking so we took a chance. The bear made a lot of digging noises but never bothered us or our food.
Then when we were hiking in the fog in SNP we passed a mother and two cubs about 300 yards from the trail. She and one of the cubs rose up and sniffed the air while we froze in our tracks, then she kept on rooting around looking for food as we passed by.
Then we had a really unique experience in SNP. About a mile before the Skyland lodge, I saw a bear walking down the trail in front of me. It paid no attention to me, so I followed it at a distance and took some pictures. My husband came up the trail behind me and we stood watching it for a couple of minutes as it went from one side of the trail to the other. Then it laid down on the side of the trail, put its paw on the trail and went to sleep. There was really no good way to get around it because of brush and rocks, so I decided to walk towards the bear and see if it would get up and go up the trail . It got up alright, but stared at me as if to say, " How dare you disturb my nap!" At that point, I backed slowly down the trail the way I had come and then took an alternate route to the Skyland lodge via the paved road. I have pictures on my website if anyone wants to see them.
http://wwww.trailjournals.com/photos.cfm?id=30124
http://wwww.trailjournals.com/photos.cfm?id=30128
http://www.trailjournals.com/photos.cfm?id=30129
I have a lot of respect for the bears, but I don't fear them. The big problem is the people who feed the bears either because they are just plain stupid or too lazy to take care of their trash. According to some of the locals who know the details of that bear attack a few years ago where a woman was killed, the lady was feeding the bear candy, then when the candy ran out, the bear attacked her.

Rain Man
11-24-2003, 11:15
While on the AT this summer we saw and heard several bears.
http://wwww.trailjournals.com/photos.cfm?id=30124
http://wwww.trailjournals.com/photos.cfm?id=30128
http://www.trailjournals.com/photos.cfm?id=30129
I have a lot of respect for the bears, but I don't fear them. The big problem is the people who feed the bears either because they are just plain stupid or too lazy to take care of their trash. According to some of the locals who know the details of that bear attack a few years ago where a woman was killed, the lady was feeding the bear candy, then when the candy ran out, the bear attacked her.

GREAT photos, CeeJay!

As to the woman killed, was this the one in the Great Smoky Mtns National Park? My wife and I hiked that trail a year or two afterwards and ran into two guys hiking together. We were told by someone else down the trail that it was her husband and a friend, and it was the first time her husband had been back on that trail. Of course, I can't know for sure.

I wonder, since she was alone, how did any "locals" know any "details" of the attack? Just hypothesis, I suppose? I wonder why they thought she'd feed a bear candy.

Anyway... I love your bear story and that pic of the bear snoozing with one paw on the trail. :)

Rain Man

CeeJay
11-24-2003, 11:33
GREAT photos, CeeJay!

As to the woman killed, was this the one in the Great Smoky Mtns National Park? I wonder, since she was alone, how did any "locals" know any "details" of the attack? Just hypothesis, I suppose? I wonder why they thought she'd feed a bear candy.
Anyway... I love your bear story and that pic of the bear snoozing with one paw on the trail. :)
Thanks :)
Rain Man

Yes it was the attack in GSMNP.
Maybe they found the empty candy bag?? We were told that she was feeding it candy by the people who run the Hike Inn near Fontana Dam. Glad you enjoyed the pictures. :)
CeeJay aka-Beesknees

steve hiker
11-24-2003, 12:13
We were told that she was feeding it candy by the people who run the Hike Inn near Fontana Dam.
Feeding it candy? LOL! Them folks at the Hike Inn sure came up with a good one.

I read the reports after the incident happened, and the woman was an experienced hiker from nearby in North Carolina who presumably would have known better than to feed a bear. Much less feed it candy which woulda made the bar hyper and demand S'MORES!

I also read the park service report on the attack, and there was no mention of feeding. There also was no mention of foul play. Park officials concluded it was a predatory attack.

sleepy
11-24-2003, 13:36
Feeding it candy? LOL! Them folks at the Hike Inn sure came up with a good one.

I read the reports after the incident happened, and the woman was an experienced hiker from nearby in North Carolina who presumably would have known better than to feed a bear. Much less feed it candy which woulda made the bar hyper and demand S'MORES!

I also read the park service report on the attack, and there was no mention of feeding. There also was no mention of foul play. Park officials concluded it was a predatory attack.

I doubt if it was in the park service report, but I recall reading some of the news articles concerning that attack which quoted unnamed park service maintenance people in Cades Cove as saying that they had seen bears swat down deer--not fawns--and had no doubt it was predatory regarding the hiker.

steve hiker
11-24-2003, 14:16
I doubt if it was in the park service report.After the attack, the park service conducted an investigation that lasted several months. I remember that at the time the report was released, I read from several sources that the park service concluded it was a predatory attack. One source was KnoxNews.com, another was GoSmokies.com (a division of KnoxNews), and another was the Griztrax website. It probably wouldn't be too hard to get the report, perhaps online.

smokymtnsteve
11-24-2003, 18:04
Feeding it candy? LOL! Them folks at the Hike Inn sure came up with a good one.

I read the reports after the incident happened, and the woman was an experienced hiker from nearby in North Carolina who presumably would have known better than to feed a bear. Much less feed it candy which woulda made the bar hyper and demand S'MORES!

I also read the park service report on the attack, and there was no mention of feeding. There also was no mention of foul play. Park officials concluded it was a predatory attack.


actually the lady was from nearby cosby Tn...no reports of her feeding the bear ..the day pack she was carrying was left in the trail and not bothered...
and the bear was also female...

her ex-husband was fishing nearby...

Blue Jay
11-25-2003, 08:47
her ex-husband was fishing nearby...

Her ex-husband CLAIMED to be fishing nearby.

Lumberjack
11-25-2003, 11:44
Her ex-husband CLAIMED to be fishing nearby.

Still havent figured out what the rope and jar of honey were doing there.... :D

Rain Man
11-25-2003, 13:41
Still havent figured out what the rope and jar of honey were doing there.... :D

Ouch. Joking about a woman's recent death from a bear mauling just doesn't quite do it for my sense of humor. Sorry if I sound sour. Don't mean to.

Rain Man

RagingHampster
11-25-2003, 15:24
This April I will be taking an "extended roadtrip" out west, and hope to take the Alaskan Highway up north. On the east coast all I carry for self defense is a couple hiking poles to clack together. When I go out west I will most certainly be bringing some other form of protection. I plan to do some solo hikes in Glacier NP, Yellowstone NP, and hopefully some trails in Denali NP, and on Kodiak island. Haven't really decided what I want/should to bring, but it will be more than just pepper spray!

Colter
11-28-2003, 06:51
I really think people need to get a grip on reality.

So you can't have any drinking water in your tent if your Nalgene bottle has ever had anything else in it? Folks who hike in the real world will soon blow that rule off. Dehydration is more dangerous than bears.

Don't sleep in the clothes you cooked in? How many sets of clothes to you plan to carry? How about cookie crumbs on your second set of clothes?

Never cook or eat in front of your tent? Sounds great. Again, if you spend any time in the woods that rule is going to last about three days.

Don't cook in your campfire? I don't use campfires a whole lot anymore, but not ever using your campfire for cooking is flat out silly.

Safety in numbers? Relatively, perhaps. But you've just spent all that time scaring the hell out of your young campers by telling them what to do if they're attacked, etc. So now what are they going to do at NIGHT in BEAR COUNTRY when they have to pee?

Stop using fabric softener weeks before the trip? Oh for heaven's sake. How many folks in the history of planet earth have been mauled by bears because they had on clothes that had been washed in fabric softener.

Let me say it again: Paranoia of bears on the AT can waste a lot of time and reduce your enjoyment of the trail. Most folks who've spent more than a few days on the trail will soon blow off nearly every single one of your rules except, perhaps, actually sleeping with their food in the tent.

In the White's one time, I saw a boy scout troop hiking in driving wind and rain and most had NO RAIN GEAR. My guess is they had been thoroughly warned about bears, while they were in infinitely more danger from freezing to death.

Bears are a very low potential risk. Use a little common sense, and then TO HECK WITH THE BEARS! You'll be lucky if you see one.



2.) We will bear bag all smellables each night. This includes tooth paste, medicines, food, garbage and even Nalgene Bottles that have had anything besides water in them. Be sure to clean your pockets out also. Don’t sleep in the clothes you wore while eating or cooking.
3.) Never cook or eat in front of your tent.
5.) We will not use our campfire for cooking.
6.) Be sure and pack 50 feet of cord or small rope to tie your bear bag up in the tree.
7.) There is safety in numbers, we must hike together. No one far ahead or far behind.
9.) Several weeks before our trek, stop using fabric softeners when washing your trail clothes.

Peaks
11-28-2003, 08:57
Coulter,

Different bears, different precautions. By in large, there are no real problem bears along the AT. I'll agree with you on that. The precautions cited by Uncle Wayne sound like Philmont Scout Ranch's precautions. They may be applicable for Philmont and 14 year old boys, but not for the AT.

When in bear country on the AT, about the only precaution is to be sure and hang your food at night. Bear country generally includes Georgia, Smokies, Shenandoah, and New Jersey.

If I was at a popular campsite in the Adirondacks, then I would probably use a canister. Elsewhere in the Adirondacks, just hand food.

sleepy
11-29-2003, 02:06
I plan to do some solo hikes in Glacier NP, Yellowstone NP, and hopefully some trails in Denali NP, and on Kodiak island. Haven't really decided what I want/should to bring, but it will be more than just pepper spray!

For what it's worth, the Park Service revised its bear precaution advice for Yellowstone after a solo hiker/camper was killed by a grizzlie a few years ago. The new advisory recommended against any solo backcountry hiking/camping.

Lilred
11-29-2003, 12:37
This may a good time to repeat precautions one can take in bear country. With black bears one should make themselves appear as large as possible when confronted. If charged, one is to stand there ground as most charges are false.

With grizzlies, it's a different story. Be as still as possible, and if charged, drop to the ground and play dead. DO NOT run in either case.

Some rangers advice wearing those little silver bells and carrying bear mace in an easily accessible place.

One should familiarize theirselves with bear scat also. Black bear scat has berries and bear fur mixed in it.

Grizzly scat is recognizable by it's overpowering smell of mace and the little silver bells throughout it........ :bse

Kozmic Zian
02-15-2004, 18:00
Coulter,

Different bears, different precautions. By in large, there are no real problem bears along the AT. I'll agree with you on that. The precautions cited by Uncle Wayne sound like Philmont Scout Ranch's precautions. They may be applicable for Philmont and 14 year old boys, but not for the AT.

When in bear country on the AT, about the only precaution is to be sure and hang your food at night. Bear country generally includes Georgia, Smokies, Shenandoah, and New Jersey.

If I was at a popular campsite in the Adirondacks, then I would probably use a canister. Elsewhere in the Adirondacks, just hand food.
Yea.....Bears. I was coming up outa' this long Blue Blaze in the Shenandoah's in '96. Went down off The Trail to seek out these Falls I saw on a map. Well, I'll tell it was a mile down and a mile up. Beautiful falls though. Two sets of them outa' Big Meadows. On the way out, I rounded this big rock, and there ahead, off to the right in the brush, was a yearling blackie, sitting there with a paw raised, looking right at me, not more that 20' away. I said,"Hello, handsome, what are you doin' here?" Well, you'd a thunk I stuck a needle in his butt, cause he turned and took off so quickly, I could'nt believe it! He was gone in a flash....left me wonderin' if I really saw him at all. But, I know I did. One of those 'Trail Dreams', ya'll. Ha...Ha.[/QUOTE][email protected]

1234
02-15-2004, 21:15
Last year on Springer Mt. the shelter was full and there were tents I think on every tent spot. We had a good fire going and about 4 people were still up and talking softly. Someone noticed movement toward the cable system and there was a HUGE bear shaking the cables. We watched hem and he just walked away. He knew what he was after. an ez meal of hiker food. The next night at Hawk Mt. shelter same situation, full shelter and 2 tents at all sites and wall to wall behind the shelter. Someone came in later and set up right under the hanging food bags. About midnight the bear came and as he was walking around the hanging food he pulled out all the ropes to the tent. Well the folks in the tent had a story to tell, and everyone got awakened. The next day Army Rangers were all over shooting guns, I hope blanks and firing rockets. This is a daily thing and the bears just get accustomed to people and noise. Lucky for hikers the bear does not get to hungry, I assume they get a fair share of hiker food.

Dan Morris
02-15-2004, 21:43
This is what I follow where I live.
Most bear attacks happen when 1) People surprise the bear (not being loud enough) 2) People get between a mom and cubs. 3) People leave food out or cook in front of their sleeping area. Sometimes bears attack just because they are pissed off. I always tie my food up in trees I’ve seen to many bears come into camp because some moron left food out.
Black bears are unpredictable! You don't know if they are stalking you or are going to run off. Fight like hell if they attack. Don't bother climbing a tree they will come up after you.
Brown Bears- They attack the most often. But they are easy to predict. If you leave food out startle them or get near there cubs they will eat you. Some people say to act like a rock I personally would rather fight them off. If you are going to clime a tree make it a big one they have been known to push trees over.
Polar Bear- Very predictable. You are dead if they are close, they will attack shoot as fast as you can.

I always carry a shotgun with slugs when in the backcountry I don't trust handguns they don't pack enough punch. I would also like to say that in 22 yrs I have never had to fight/run/or pull a gun because of a bear. I would not like to be outdoors without a gun in case it did happen though. I’ve seen a LOT of bears in camp black and brown because of food TIE IT IN A TREE!!!! These are my personal opinions and experiences from Alaska don't know if I would carry a gun elsewhere even though I was raised to carry one. I know my thoughts are scattered sorry.

loonyhiker
02-15-2004, 21:50
Last summer we camped at Bryson City campground in the Smokies. Hubby was sitting around the fire drinking a beer when I got in the tent and went to bed. About 30 min. later I was scared awake by this awful growling sound and my hubby screaming. By the time I got out of my bag, and unzipped the tent, I my hubby was standing there staring at the nearby woods. I looked toward the woods and saw the back end of a bear running into the woods. Apparently my hubby was asleep in the lawn chair and the beer was in the cup holder. Seeing no movement, the bear decided to check out the beer. About that time, hubby decided to snore loudly which scared the bear. The scared bear growled and scared the hubby. Hubby ran one way, bear ran the other. Now it's pretty funny but at the time, neither one of us slept real well that night. :D

JLB
05-29-2004, 17:38
Black Bear Attacks in the News

Black bears are dangerous. They can and do kill people.

Black bears are curious and adaptable. They quickly become accustomed to human activity, which leads to aggressive food gathering habits. Black bear have also been known to stalk people – following them or circling to approach from ahead. Bears will defend their territory – especially if it is a food source. Finally, females (known as sows) are very aggressive in attacking real or perceived threats to their cubs.

These news articles represent only a few of the many recent black bear attacks, but they will give you a pretty good representation of what these animals can do.





Bear Mauls and Kills Infant in New York State
Associated Press
August 19, 2002

A bear killed an infant Monday afternoon as it tried to drag the girl into the woods, officials said. The baby, Ester Schwimmer of Brooklyn, was snatched out of her stroller by the bear at the bungalow colony, police said. Fallsburg is about 70 miles northwest of New York City.

Isaac Abraham, a community leader from Williamsburg in Brooklyn, said witnesses told him the 5-month-old girl was pronounced dead at a nearby hospital upon arrival.

The baby was in a stroller in front of the porch with members of her family, said Mike Fraser, a state Department of Environmental Conservation spokesman. The bear grabbed the stroller and the child, Fraser said. The child was knocked out of the stroller and the bear tried to drag her into the woods, Fraser said.…Read Full Article (http://www.maineguides.org/referendum/bear_attacks01.shtml)





Bear Kills 93 Year-Old New Mexico Woman
By Joe Garner
Scripps Howard News Service
August 21, 2001

The 100-pound elderly woman didn't have a chance against a 275-pound bear in the kitchen of her home, wildlife officials point to bears desperate for food as the continuing cause of people-bear incidents

A 93-year-old New Mexico woman was mauled to death by a black bear that broke into her home over the weekend, stunned wildlife officials have confirmed. Adelia Maestas Trujillo of Cleveland, in north-central New Mexico, was killed "by multiple bite injuries," said Scott Wilson, associate director of the Office of Medical Investigator.…Read Full Article (http://www.maineguides.org/referendum/bear_attacks02.shtml)





Fatal Bear Attack Shows Need for Vigilance
April 17, 2003
Ontario Forestry Safe Workplace Association (OFSWA)

A fatal encounter between a forestry worker and a black bear in northern Quebec this past spring underlines in the worst possible way the need for workers to be aware of the risk of bear encounters and of how to deal with such encounters.

The incident occurred on April 17, near Waswanipi, a village 154 kilometers west of Chibougamau. A logging foreman with Norbord Industries in Senneterre, QC had gone out alone to survey cut sites for the coming summer. Investigators concluded from tracks in the snow and other evidence that while the foreman was surveying a site, the bear left its den and walked parallel to him for about 50 meters. The bear then moved ahead of him, eventually confronted him and charged. Judging from the pattern of tracks, the worker turned and ran from the bear for about 15 meters before he was struck down and mauled. It’s believed that death was instantaneous. The bear then dragged the worker into its den. …Read Full Article (http://www.maineguides.org/referendum/bear_attacks03.shtml)





Bear Attack Leaves Two Campers Injured
- Episode a First at National Park Since Early 1970s
By Tillie Fong
Rocky Mountain News July 15, 2003

ROCKY MOUNTAIN NATIONAL PARK - Two men were mauled by a black bear while they were camping near Fern Lake, and one said Monday "it was extreme pain and a whole lot of blood," yet he vowed not to be deterred from future outings.

"I just woke up, and it was a blur in my head, then the blood was going everywhere," said Boulder resident Patrick Finan, 22, of the attack early Sunday. "The bear was standing outside my tent, staring in."…Read Full Article (http://www.maineguides.org/referendum/bear_attacks04.shtml)





Camper Attacked by Bear
By Matthew Baker
The Salt Lake Tribune July 10, 2003

A black bear attacked a sleeping camper on the Green River early Monday morning, leaving him with bites and puncture wounds on the back of his neck and a laceration across the side of his head.

Nick Greeve, 18, was camping with 14 students and five instructors from the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) at Fret Falls in Desolation Canyon when the bear attacked. Five of the students were sleeping in a circle with their feet in the middle of the circle when the bear grabbed Greeve by the head and neck and tried to pull him from his sleeping bag. …Read Full Article (http://www.maineguides.org/referendum/bear_attacks05.shtml)





Black Bear Attacks Hiker
By Kevin O'Donnell
Environmental News
Script September 10, 2000

This past May, a hiker in the Great Smoky Mountains National park -- along Little river trail, near Elkmont campground -- was apparently attacked and killed by a 111-pound female black bear and her 40 pound yearling.

The tragic incident was widely reported in the news media, along with the disturbing detail that the bears had, indeed, eaten parts of the hiker's body.…Read Full Article (http://www.maineguides.org/referendum/bear_attacks06.shtml)





Camper Leaps off Cliff to Escape Bear Attack
By Bruce Hickey
The Toronto Star
June 29, 2002

A Toronto woman slipped free from a black bear’s grasp, ran for her life and made good her escape by leaping off a rock into a lake at Algonquin Park.

"I just kept running to the edge of a cliff and jumped into the water," 25-year-old Sylvie Haert, a High Park area resident, said yesterday. "The bear followed me on to the cliff. I swam just a little further away and saw the bear looking at me."…Read Full Article (http://www.maineguides.org/referendum/bear_attacks07.shtml)





Bear Attacks, Bites Two Hunters; State to Track, Destroy Animal
By Gary Gerhardt, News Staff Writer
Rocky Mountain News
September 14, 2000

A large black bear bit two Missouri archers Wednesday while the men hunted on the eastern slope of Grand Mesa, the state Division of Wildlife reported. "We aren't releasing their names yet, but believe they went to a hospital in Glenwood Springs, where they should be treated and released," wildlife division spokesman Todd Malmsbury said.

He said the pair, a father, 46, and his son 25, were hunting with a third man from Arkansas. "The bear came out of the bushes and attacked the younger man, biting him…"…Read Full Article (http://www.maineguides.org/referendum/bear_attacks08.shtml)





Manitoulin Senior Fends Off Bear Attack
By Margo Little
The Sudbury Star
September 26, 2003
Posted by Ontario Federation of Anglers & Hunters:

A marauding black bear met its match Wednesday night during an encounter with a Manitoulin grandmother who was ready for a fight. The animal was driven off an Ice Lake farm by the protective pet owner wielding a garden hoe. The incident happened just after 10 p.m., said Const. Al Boyd, Little Current OPP community services officer.

Margaret Montgomery, 81, the owner of a farm on Highway 540 near Gore Bay, had released her dog for a run just before bedtime. The dog surprised a bear eating apples from a nearby tree. The bear chased the dog back into the garage, where Montgomery was waiting. She attempted to protect her pet by holding on to the bear and punching it.…Read Full Article (http://www.maineguides.org/referendum/bear_attacks09.shtml)





"It had to count" - Bowhunter Saves Son

Nolan Koller had one opportunity to take down the charging black bear that had just mauled his son, Jason — and he pulled it off


By Lynn Burkhead, Associate Editor
ESPNOutdoors.com
September 29, 2002

POCATELLO, Idaho — Many bowhunters know what it's like to be at full draw, aiming at a big-game animal with butterflies dancing in their stomachs. That's called buck fever. But few, if any archers have ever faced the intense pressure Nolan Koller did recently when he made a life-or-death shot with his bow and arrow.

Early on Saturday, Sept. 28, Koller shot and killed a charging black bear sow that had just mauled his 29-year-old son Jason. The sudden attack happened as the Soda Springs, Idaho, pair bowhunted for elk in southeastern Idaho's Caribou National Forest, located not far from the Wyoming border and the Teton Mountains.…Read Full Article (http://www.maineguides.org/referendum/bear_attacks10.shtml)





Black Bear Kills Teen Near Yellowknife
CBC News
June 3, 2001

YELLOWKNIFE - A weekend camping trip in the Northwest Territories turned to tragedy Saturday when an 18-year-old man was mauled to death by a black bear.

Kyle Harry of Yellowknife was camping with a 14-year-old female friend about 25 kilometers east of the city when the bear approached them, the RCMP said. The bear caught Harry and mauled him to death.…Read Full Article (http://www.maineguides.org/referendum/bear_attacks11.shtml)





Man Injured in Black Bear Attack


Wildlife Worker was Studying Woodcocks near Milaca
By Kavita Kumar
Minneapolis Star Tribune
September 16, 2002

Miles Becker was tracking woodcocks he and colleagues had tagged when a black bear attacked him Sunday in a central Minnesota wildlife management area.

Becker, 24, was listed in fair condition Sunday night at St. Cloud Hospital after surgery. He suffered broken facial bones, puncture wounds to his head and left leg, and a broken fibula.…Read Full Article (http://www.maineguides.org/referendum/bear_attacks12.shtml)





Predatory Black Bear Attack
By Jim Lockwood
Newark Star Ledger
August 12, 2003

She was a 5-foot-3, 105-pound hiker, out for a Sunday walk. He was a 400-pound hulking young bruin officials described as "predatory," looking for a meal. She said he came up behind her on a trail in Wawayanda State Park in Sussex County, chased her down and tackled her. She said she did the only thing she could. She threw a hard elbow at his snout, and caught him flush, stunning the bear and giving her time to escape.

"This bear was in predatory mode," said Jack Kaskey, a state Department of Environmental Protection spokesman. "This was classic predatory behavior. The bear was out to eat her. She had to fight for her life." …Read Full Article (http://www.maineguides.org/referendum/bear_attacks13.shtml)





Canadian Biathlete Killed in Apparent Bear Attack
WebPosted July 4, 2000

CBC SPORTS ONLINE - A national biathlon team member died while training Sunday, apparently the victim of a bear attack. Canadian biathlete Mary-Beth Miller is dead after an apparent black bear attack while training near Val Cartier. Members of the team identified the athlete as 24-year-old Mary-Beth Miller of Yellowknife, N.W.T.…Read Full Article (http://www.maineguides.org/referendum/bear_attacks14.shtml)





Bear Swats Sparta Toddler
By Rob Jennings
Daily Record
May 21, 2003

SPARTA - A black bear swatted a 2-year-old boy outside his family’s home Tuesday afternoon, police said...The 150-pound, 4-year-old female bruin was shot and killed by police shortly afterward.

The bear batted at the boy with the pad of her paw, and not the claws, state Division of Environmental Protection spokesman Jack Kaskey said. Tregidgo’s mother, Amy, watched in horror from inside her Deer Field Road house as the bear approached her young son on the porch steps. She raced outside, picked up her wounded son and called 911.…Read Full Article (http://www.maineguides.org/referendum/bear_attacks15.shtml)





Bear Mauls W. Milford Man
By Rob Jennings
Daily Record
May 24, 2003

A West Milford man was mauled by a 150-pound female bear in his backyard Friday as he attempted to rescue the family dog, in one of the most harrowing encounters yet between a person and bear in New Jersey. Rob Skrypek, 35, of 21 Alvin Road, bled profusely after suffering "significant puncture wounds" in the hand, shoulder and head during the 2 p.m. attack, state Department of Environmental Commissioner Bradley Campbell said.

He was unarmed as he confronted the bear, which scaled a 4-foot-high cyclone fence, apparently attracted by garbage on the property. The bruin’s yearling cub was also in the yard, but did not attack Skrypek or his dog, Campbell said. Skrypek was taken to Morristown Memorial Hospital, where he was listed in good condition Friday evening. His dog was clinging to life, Campbell said.…Read Full Article (http://www.maineguides.org/referendum/bear_attacks16.shtml)





Woman Fends Off Bear Attack in Her Own Garage
By Clint Austin
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Knight Ridder Newspapers
September 24, 2003

DULUTH, Minn. -- Kim Heil-Smith walked into her garage outside Grand Marais, Minn., one night last week expecting to pull something out of her car. Instead, she ended up wrestling a large black bear.

Heil-Smith, who was talking on a cordless phone at the time, opened the door from her home’s entryway into the attached garage about 9:30 p.m. and found herself face-to-face with a sow and her cub.

"I opened the door and she was right there, between the car and the side of the house. She didn't have anywhere to go, so she came at me," said Heil-Smith, who lives on Devil Track Lake Road north of town. "I tried to shut the door on her, but she was too strong. She wrapped her arms around me and I fell back."

The big bear bit her head, shoulder and both thighs. …Read Full Article (http://www.maineguides.org/referendum/bear_attacks17.shtml)





Bear Invades Home - Ordeal for Terrified Mom & Her 2 Children
Vernon (New Jersey) Web News
June 12, 2003

Yesterday morning a black bear bashed through the screen door of a Highland Lakes residence and feasted in the kitchen while a mother and her two children, ages 2 and 7, barricaded themselves in a bedroom.

Lisa Spirko and her children finally got out the bedroom window to safety when police and a biologist from Fish & Wildlife , responding to the frantic call made at 8:30 a.m., arrived at the home on Agawa Road.…Read Full Article (http://www.maineguides.org/referendum/bear_attacks18.shtml)





Bear Attack First In California Since 2001

August 18, 2003 (Associated Press) — A bear was killed after it knocked down a hiker in the Angeles National Forest, marking the first such attack in California since 2001, Department of Fish and Game officials said Monday.

The black bear was killed July 31 at Little Jimmy Campground, where the attack occurred several weeks earlier, department spokeswoman Lorna Bernard said. In the July 3 attack, the bear knocked down an unidentified male hiker at the campground,…Read Full Article (http://www.maineguides.org/referendum/bear_attacks19.shtml)





Update on Black Bear Attack in Two Medicine Valley…Park Officials to Destroy Bear
June 28, 2000

WEST GLACIER, MONT -- Glacier National Park rangers continue to search for the black bear that attacked and injured a hiker in the Two Medicine Valley on Monday, June 26, 2000. Because of the bear's aggressive behavior towards humans, it will be destroyed when located, in accordance with the guidelines of the park's Bear Management Plan.

Jason Sansom, 24, of Malstrom Air Force Base in Great Falls, Montana suffered puncture wounds to both arms after an unprovoked attack by a brown-colored black bear on the south shore trail of Two Medicine Lake on Monday afternoon. Sansom and his wife had been on a day hike when the incident occurred. His wife was not injured.…Read Full Article (http://www.maineguides.org/referendum/bear_attacks20.shtml)





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Site Updated January 26, 2004

Jack Tarlin
05-29-2004, 17:53
Interesting stuff, there, JLB, tho for a moment there I thought it was gonna be more takes on the Second Amendment.... I'm sure someone here is gonna post 97 times about our inalienable God-given right to arm bears, but I guess it ain't gonna be JLB who suggests it.

JLB
05-29-2004, 18:03
Interesting stuff, there, JLB, tho for a moment there I thought it was gonna be more takes on the Second Amendment.... I'm sure someone here is gonna post 97 times about our inalienable God-given right to arm bears, but I guess it ain't gonna be JLB who suggests it.
No Jack, I am not a one trick pony. This thread is about bears, so I thought I would add my research to the pile.

It would seem that bears are dangerous animals, and do kill lots of people across the continent.

Colter
05-29-2004, 18:09
Approximate number of people killed by black bears in North America in RECORDED HISTORY: 66

Approximate number of people killed in traffic accidents in the U.S. alone EVERY SINGLE DAY: 137

smokymtnsteve
05-29-2004, 18:12
Number of hikers killed on the AT by black bears?

JLB
05-29-2004, 18:20
Approximate number of people killed by black bears in North America in RECORDED HISTORY: 66

Approximate number of people killed in traffic accidents in the U.S. alone EVERY SINGLE DAY: 137

Far more people drive than hike, so that is apples and oranges.

JLB
05-29-2004, 18:21
Number of hikers killed on the AT by black bears?

Are you suggesting that the AT black bears somehow know that they are on the AT, and thus are on their best behavior?

Colter
05-29-2004, 18:32
There is often no statistic or logic that will deal with paranoia.

Your odds of being killed by a bear along the AT are far less than dying by hypothermia, dehydration, murder, lightning, dog bite, bee sting, wasp sting, falls, heart attack, seizures etc, etc.

Life is short no matter how you live it. Worrying about bears along the AT is a waste of time. Sort of like this post, probably.

JLB
05-29-2004, 18:39
There is often no statistic or logic that will deal with paranoia.

Your odds of being killed by a bear along the AT are far less than dying by hypothermia, dehydration, murder, lightning, dog bite, bee sting, wasp sting, falls, heart attack, seizures etc, etc.

Life is short no matter how you live it. Worrying about bears along the AT is a waste of time. Sort of like this post, probably.

I worry about those things too.

Kozmic Zian
05-29-2004, 20:47
Yea.....Bears. Man, this guy will do anything to further his gun agenda. Black Bears will not hurt you. You are the one who's scared, and it ain't of 'inanimate objects'....You got Bear Phobia.....Animal Phobia.....You'll never be a hiker. Anyone that scared of Black Bears to have to save up and look up all that information about Bear attacks (notice that most of them are West of the Mississippi). Considering that the East Coast of N. America is so heavily populated, and so many naieve people can just drive up to the Appalachian Mts in their cars, pull out a lunch, and feed a bear out of curiosity, it's (your stupid list is) still a very small percentage of attacks. Certainly not worth all of the gun fal-de-ral and "shoot anything that walks" mentality that you seem so vent on perveying. Why don't you just get bored of all the weak, mindless, gunless, Democratic, liberal, hippie, hikers and find another forum to spew your violent venom in. Or did you already get kicked out of all of them? [email protected]

P.S. Can't post to 'Gun Freak's' entrys anymore....he's on the ignore list.

JLB
05-29-2004, 21:07
Yea.....Bears. Man, this guy will do anything to further his gun agenda. Black Bears will not hurt you. You are the one who's scared, and it ain't of 'inanimate objects'....You got Bear Phobia.....Animal Phobia.....You'll never be a hiker. Anyone that scared of Black Bears to have to save up and look up all that information about Bear attacks (notice that most of them are West of the Mississippi). Considering that the East Coast of N. America is so heavily populated, and so many naieve people can just drive up to the Appalachian Mts in their cars, pull out a lunch, and feed a bear out of curiosity, it's (your stupid list is) still a very small percentage of attacks. Certainly not worth all of the gun fal-de-ral and "shoot anything that walks" mentality that you seem so vent on perveying. Why don't you just get bored of all the weak, mindless, gunless, Democratic, liberal, hippie, hikers and find another forum to spew your violent venom in. Or did you already get kicked out of all of them? [email protected]

P.S. Can't post to 'Gun Freak's' entrys anymore....he's on the ignore list.

So are you trying to say that the AT black bears are not the same type of black bears that keep killing people, all over North America?

Ps, I did not mention guns, you did. Give up your obsession with them.

MOWGLI
05-29-2004, 21:24
3-4 million people use the Appalachian Trail annually. No one has been killed by a Black Bear on the Appalachian Trail since it was built. Two people have been killed by Black Bears on the east coast since 2000. A woman in Great Smoky Mountains NP, and an infant in Sullivan County, NY. I don't believe that anyone was killed in the preceeding 100 years on the East Coast.

Black Bears on the densely populated East Coast indeed behave differently than Black Bears in less populated areas of the West. In most areas on the East Coast, bears are widely hunted, so they will run at the first sign of humans. In the Smokys and Shenandoah, bears are less fearful of humans, primarily because some knuckleheads will feed them from time to time. If you are scared of bears, I would suggest you skip the Smokys and Shenandoah.

smokymtnsteve
05-29-2004, 21:27
right the bears on the AT are "smarter than the average bear" they already know how hungry Long distance hikers are and they don't want to challenge a hiker over his food...the bears are scared of hungry hikers. plus there is no extra food for them.

JLB
05-29-2004, 21:35
Black bear attacks are on the rise.






There were 128 deaths from grizzly and black bears in North America during the 20th century, with 56 deaths—nearly half—occurring in the last two decades, according to Stephen Herrero, an environmental science professor at the University of Calgary.

By comparison, there were six fatal bear attacks in all of the 1940s and only one in the 1930s, said Herrero, an expert on bear attacks. "There is a definite upward trend in bear-inflicted injuries,'' Herrero said. "It really began taking off in the 1980s.''

Last year, a woman hiking in Great Smoky Mountains National Park was killed by a black bear, the first fatal attack in the southeastern United States.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2001/08/0827_wirepredators.html

MOWGLI
05-29-2004, 21:39
Yea.....Bears. Man, this guy will do anything to further his gun agenda. Black Bears will not hurt you. You are the one who's scared, and it ain't of 'inanimate objects'....You got Bear Phobia.....Animal Phobia.....You'll never be a hiker.

KZ, the individual you're talking to is not a hiker or backpacker. He lives in Florida and recently asked how to deal with bugs on the trail. That's like a farmer from Florida asking you to describe what citrus is.

JLB
05-29-2004, 21:44
KZ, the individual you're talking to is not a hiker or backpacker. He lives in Florida and recently asked how to deal with bugs on the trail. That's like a farmer from Florida asking you to describe what citrus is.
I never said I was a hiker. I know all about Florida bugs, and citrus, btw, but since I am not going to be hiking in Florida, I asked the question.

JLB
05-29-2004, 21:46
SCOUT LEADER MAULED BY BLACK BEAR

A Richardson, Texas scout leader was treated and released at Salida Hospital this morning after being bitten by a bear and dragged from her tent. The incident occurred at the Packerd High Adventure Boy Scout camp about 1:30 a.m., July 24.

According to Colorado Division of Wildlife District Manager Ron Dobson, the woman left the flaps open on her tent when she retired. She awoke when a black bear bite her on the hand and arm. The woman screamed, jerked her hand back and pulled her sleeping bag over her head.

Other campers were aroused when she screamed as the bear dragged the sleeping bag — with the woman still in it — out of the tent.

Several scout leaders drove the bear off by yelling and throwing stones at the bear.

The victim suffered deep puncture wounds on her hand and arms. Her injuries were treated at the emergency room at the regional medical center in Salida.

The scout camp is located about two miles south of Poncha Springs just off of Highway 285. There were about 125 scouts and scout leaders in the camp at the time of the attack. The facility hosts scouts between the ages of 13 and 20.

The woman plans to remain at the camp with her two sons for the remainder of the week.

Dobson said there is a history of bear problems over the past several years in the Poncha Springs area because of people feeding wildlife and not properly securing trash in the vicinity of the camp.

“We have at least two bears in this area that have lost their fear of humans,” said Dobson. “People should understand that if they don’t secure their trash or if they leave food out for the wildlife, they are contributing to the problem. We have a saying at the Division that a fed bear is a dead bear.”

Division of Wildlife officers will set traps for the bear and patrol the area tonight. Once they locate the bear, it will be destroyed and tested for rabies.

Less than a week earlier wildlife officers destroyed a bear at the Spanish Peaks Scout Ranch in south-central Colorado. That camp is visited by about 250 scouts each week. It also has had a recent history of visits from black bears.

This is the second time a person was injured by a bear this summer. On July 8, a 16-year-old Colorado Springs boy was injured at a campsite west of Gardner when a bear bit him as he slept outside near a campfire. The bear, which returned several times, was shot and killed by the boy’s uncle. The boy suffered minor injuries and was treated and released at a Colorado Springs hospital.

Wildlife officials are warning people who camp in Colorado to take precautions to avoid encounters with black bears.






http://www.dnr.state.co.us/cdnr_news/wildlife/200172417514.html




Those black bears sure sound harmless, except when they are mauling people.

MOWGLI
05-29-2004, 21:47
I never said I was a hiker. I know all about Florida bugs, and citrus, btw, but since I am not going to be hiking in Florida, I asked the question.

Are you saying that bugs know when they are on the Appalachian Trail, and thus behave differently? he he

Deja vu.

JLB
05-29-2004, 21:51
Are you saying that bugs know when they are on the Appalachian Trail, and thus behave differently? he he

Deja vu.No, I don't spend days at a time outdoors, so I am wondering how you cope with it, what is best to use, etc.

Plus I am not familiar with black flies, and the other types of non-Florida insects.

But that's a different thread.



Bear Attacks Another Scout

Scout Camp Closes After Second Bear Attack

SALIDA, Colo. -- A black bear attack at a camp just south of Poncho Springs, Colo., has forced the closure of the camp because it is the second such attack in nine days.



http://images.ibsys.com/2001/0803/902933_200X150.jpg

A black bear clawed through a tent at the Packard High Adventure Base and attacked a 17-year-old Paul Marusak (pictured, right) Thursday morning, authorities said. On July 24, Scout leader Vicki Myhnier, 44, was pulled from her tent by a bear that bit her hand and arm.

Marusak suffered a bruised back and minor injuries. He was sleeping in the same tent where Myhnier was attacked, camp director John Sallie said.

In both instances, the bear entered the tent in the early morning hours and was chased off by Boy Scout leaders who responded when the victims screamed for help, wildlife officials said.



Wildlife officials on Wednesday shot and killed a bear that they believed attacked Myhnier but said Thursday that they were no longer certain they got the right animal.



"It was captured right in the middle of the campground. We felt it was likely this bear," Division of Wildlife spokesman Todd Malmsbury said. "Given the attack last night, we can no longer be sure it was the bear."



The decision to close the camp was made by the Chaffee County Sheriff's Office and the Division of Wildlife. Sallie said that the camp closed after the first attack but reopened immediately because authorities said it was safe.

http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/902466/detail.html

MOWGLI
05-29-2004, 21:55
No, I don't spend days at a time outdoors, so I am wondering how you cope with it, what is best to use, etc.



The best way to "cope" with it is to bring a gun. When a bug lands on your head, shoot it. You should have no further problems with bugs or bears.

JLB
05-29-2004, 21:57
Bear Attack in
Great Smoky Mountains National Park
Great Smoky Mountains National Park officials report that the victim of the black bear attack on Sunday afternoon was Glenda Ann Bradley, 50, from Cosby, TN. Bradley was an elementary school teacher at Jones Cove Elementary. Her companion is her former husband, Ralph Hill, 52, also a resident of Cosby. The attack occurred between 2 p.m.-3 p.m. in the backcountry at the intersection of Little River and Goshen Prong Trails about 2.5 miles from the Little River trailhead where the couple parked their car. The couple entered the Park around noon. Hill left Bradley to fish on an island on the Little River. A short while later he went to look for Bradley and located her day pack. He discovered her body about 40-50 yards off trail. He noticed two bears, an adult female weighing 112 pounds and a yearling female weighing about 40 pounds, guarding the body. He tried to run off the bears, but the adult female showed aggressive behavior towards Hill. He went to seek additional assistance and a hiker ran to get help at the Elkmont campground arriving at 5 p.m.

A Park Ranger was immediately dispatched to the scene and arrived at 6:05 p.m. Fifteen minutes later two other Park Rangers arrived. The Park Rangers observed the bears still near the body and shot the bears with their service weapons. A total of 17 Park personnel responded to the incident. The bears were sent to the University of Tennessee of Veterinary Medicine Department for a necropsy. The woman's body has been transported to East Tennessee State University for an autopsy. Park officials are almost 100 percent certain that the two bears were involved in the attack but the necropsy will confirm this fact. It appears that this was an unprovoked attack. According to the victim's family Bradley was an experienced day hiker who was familiar with the Park. Bradley's day pack which contained food was not disturbed. The adult female bear had been tagged in 1998 by University of Tennessee wildlife biologists for research purposes but never had shown any aggressive tendencies towards people before. By all indications this bear was truly a wild bear. But most past human/bear conflicts in the Smokies have been as a result of bear's either being fed human food and becoming habituated to human food. In the past decade, the Park has become increasingly proactive in both reducing available garbage in front country areas and providing effective food storage alternatives in the backcountry. Managers have also stepped up education programs to teach people about responsible food storage and to avoid conflicts with bears.

Acting Superintendent Philip A. Francis, Jr., said that " We want to stress that there is no indication whatsoever that Bradley did anything to provoke this attack. The fact remains that bears in the Smokies are wild and unpredictable animals. We will continue to reinforce the message that human food obtained by bears can lead to injuries." Four adjacent backcountry campsites 21, 23, 24, and 30 are still closed pending confirmation that the bears were the cause of Bradley's death.

http://www.imagesbuilder.com/gsmnp/bear-attack-in-smokies.html

JLB
05-29-2004, 21:58
The best way to "cope" with it is to bring a gun. When a bug lands on your head, shoot it. You should have no further problems with bugs or bears.

That sounds rather foolish. I plan on using deet for bugs.

The proper tool for proper predator.

JLB
05-29-2004, 22:03
What Prompted Deadly Bear Attack?


Bear kills 5 month old girl

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2002/08/19/national/main519186.shtml

(AP) A black bear that killed a 5-month-old girl in the Catskills may have mistaken the infant for food, not recognizing her smell as human, a state wildlife pathologist said Tuesday.

Various tests on the 155-pound male bear continued one day after he knocked Esther Schwimmer out of her stroller and carried her into nearby woods, as her mother shuttled her 4- and 2-year-old siblings inside.

The 3-year-old bear dropped the infant after witnesses began throwing rocks at it, but the baby died shortly afterward of severe head and neck injuries.

"Babies smell different. They have powders on them, milk on their clothes that may have been spilled," said Ward Stone, wildlife pathologist for the state Department of Environmental Conservation. "Maybe something was in the baby's diaper that smelled like milk."

Lou Berchielli, a DEC black bear specialist, speculated that the bear merely grabbed Esther because he was curious.

"We could come up with any individual quirky explanation that we want," said Lynn Rogers, director of both the Wildlife Research Institute and North American Bear Center in Ely, Minn. "It's possible, but unprovable."

The untagged bear tested negative for rabies, Stone said. He said he will continue to test for other illness, such as West Nile virus. Stone hopes to examine the bear's brain, though gunshots to his head — two of five bullets fired by police — make that difficult, he said.

Wildlife experts said residents should not fear a repeat of the rare tragedy. Throughout North America, the normally timid bears have attacked humans just 50 times in the last century, said Rogers, who holds a doctorate in animal behavior.

The attack on the infant represented only the second killing of a human by a bear in an eastern U.S. forest. In May 2000, an adult female bear mauled a teacher to death near Gatlinburg, Tenn., in Great Smoky Mountain National Park.

There were no witnesses, and no cause was determined. The remaining attacks occurred in remote parts of Canada and Alaska, where bears aren't accustomed to seeing people, Rogers said.

The bear that killed Esther had a mixture of wild vegetation and people food — even aluminum foil and fruit labels — in his stomach, showing it was familiar with people and their garbage, Stone said.

Past problems with bears in New York include basic nuisance complaints, such as bears going through garbage cans, tents or bird feeders, he said. Last August, a bear jumped through a screen door after smelling chocolate chip cookie ingredients in an Adirondack cabin, then knocked down the woman inside while trying to escape, Berchielli said.

"Bears are just big chickens," Rogers said. "They've survived by running without question. The littlest hound can chase the biggest bear up a tree."

smokymtnsteve
05-29-2004, 22:03
That sounds rather foolish. I plan on using deet for bugs.

The proper tool for proper predator.

I not sure JBL..don't knock it until you have tried it....give mowgil16's idea a try what could it hurt?

JLB
05-29-2004, 22:08
I not sure JBL..don't knock it until you have tried it....give mowgil16's idea a try what could it hurt?

I'll try it on you first, ok?

smokymtnsteve
05-29-2004, 22:18
sorry JBL but hiking is a very individual sport different methods work better or worse for different people. I don't have a problem with bugs..but until you decided the best method for yourself you should try all Ideas out.

AIN'T NO BUGS ON ME
Naw... THAR AIN'T NO BUGS ON ME
MITE BE SOME BUGS
ON SOME OF YOU THUGS
BUT THAR AIN'T NO BUGS ON ME!

JLB
05-29-2004, 22:30
sorry JBL but hiking is a very individual sport different methods work better or worse for different people. I don't have a problem with bugs..but until you decided the best method for yourself you should try all Ideas out.

AIN'T NO BUGS ON ME
Naw... THAR AIN'T NO BUGS ON ME
MITE BE SOME BUGS
ON SOME OF YOU THUGS
BUT THAR AIN'T NO BUGS ON ME!

That's great that you won't have any problems with my solution for bears then.

Thanks.

smokymtnsteve
05-29-2004, 22:33
no..cause mowgli16 solution was good for both your bug and bear problem.

in backpacking mutli-use methods are usually the best :D

Rocalousas
05-29-2004, 22:49
According to Colorado Division of Wildlife District Manager Ron Dobson, the woman left the flaps open on her tent when she retired. She awoke when a black bear bite her on the hand and arm. The woman screamed, jerked her hand back and pulled her sleeping bag over her head.

Other campers were aroused when she screamed as the bear dragged the sleeping bag — with the woman still in it — out of the tent.
Now that is perverted. Ted Bundy and Jeffrey Dahmer types, no doubt.

Rocalousas
05-29-2004, 22:58
No no no Smoky that is not true some blackies will STALK and KILL and EAT a human being. Read this article on predatory black bears, its long but could save your life.

"One of the most striking things about black bears is the great divergence they show in behavior in different geographical areas, despite a basically similar appearance and size. In most places, black bears are the least dangerous of all bears, but in some areas they are the most dangerous--comparable to a jaguar or tiger. Black bears are virtual harmless along the Eastern Seaboard of the U.S.

When you get to the great north woods of Canada, you would think you were dealing with a totally different species. From Northern Quebec to the Pacific Coast in British Columbia, and up to Alaska, black bears are a significant danger to the unwary and unarmed. The risk rises dramatically as you cross Canada from east to west, though deadly predatory incidents have occured in every province in this area. There are at least ten times as many fatalities and serious maulings in Alaska and Canada as there have ever been in the U.S. in modern times.

In recent years, virtually all such incidents have taken place north of the U.S. border. In Alberta, there is a death or serious mauling every year from black bears (about the same rate as for grizzlies). In British Columbia, the viciousness of the northern black bear reaches a grim crescendo with 5 serious maulings and deaths from black bears for every one from the grizzlies.

The black bears are primarily active in the northern inland areas and grizzlies mostly cause trouble in the coastal areas. Black bear attacks are rare on the coast and virtual non-existant on the offshore islands. Although the island bears are just as wild as their inland brethern, they are remarkably tolerant towards humans and are sometimes even friendly. Again, in terms of behavior, they seem like different species.

The worst area seem to be in the northeast of B.C., especially in that part near the Alaska Highway. Predatory behavior and attacks are quite common, and all black bears in this area should be regarded as potentially extremely dangerous. I am writing this lengthy message as a warning to readers on here who plan to drive up the Alaskan Highway. Under no circumstances should you ever approach a black bear (or grizzly, for that matter, though in B.C. black bears are the more dangerous species) or allow a bear to approach you. If you go camping or hiking even in designated parks along the Highway, get advice from the rangers (in Canada called Conservation Officers) and do not go for even short walks without being armed in some way, and DO NOT GO ALONE!

Just last year, a black bear killed two people and injured five others in Laird Park near the Highway in B.C. just south of the Yukon border. At the least, you should have a large-sized can of bear spray, a strong and heavy walking stick and a big Crocodile-Dundee type hunting knife on your person. I have read numerous reports on recent incidents in this area, and they are chilling. People used to the mellow and gentle U.S. bears have commented on how similar the physical appearance of these bears is, but how different it is what you see in their eyes.

The U.S. bears have a warm, shy, gentle and friendly look in their eyes, but these Canadian northern wilderness bears have a cold, calculating look of determined ferocity in their eyes that freezes the blood of those who see it. These bears may try to silently sneak up behind you, charge suddenly from ambush, or just circle in the woods around you like a shark. When they decide that you are prey and they are going to take you, they often approach with a slow but relentless pursuit that can be extremely difficult to turn away. Even bear spray often works only temporarily, which is why you need something else for backup.

I read one incident where a man threw his hat at the bear to temporarily distract it. It worked, the bear wasted precious time in savagely and viciously tearing the hat to shreds. The man had sprayed the bear twice with bear-spray, yet it still came back to try and get him. Fortunately, he reached his truck before the bear closed in again. Please keep in mind that even a small black bear can easily overpower a man weighing twice as much. Some tourists at a resort once saw a big blackie lift up a metal cover on a garbage dump weighing over a ton and toss it six feet to one side with just a shove of one paw.

A battle was once observed long ago in Alaska between a female black bear weighing 350 pounds and a male grizzly weighing 700 pounds. She won the fight, although she was mortally wounded in the process. It is hard to verify such stories, but Yellowstone rangers once put some black bear carcasses on a feeding platform for grizzlies, and the grizzlies would not go near them until they smelled noticeably of decay and the grizzlies could be sure they were dead.

Grizzlies have an aristocratic contempt for black bears, and love to bully them and even prey on them at times, but they always do their attack by surprise from ambush---grizzlies seem reluctant to try to take on a black bear in a fair fight.
All the more reason humans should take a black bear seriously!

All is not hopeless, predatory black bears often underestimate humans and have been killed with knife-slashes to the throat or even a large rock or heavy stick to the skull. If this is not the case though, you could be killed very quickly unless you have a gun. The more prudent bear planning to eat a man will get him down and grab him in iron jaws by the back of the neck and shake hard, that usually does it right then. A less skilled predator will just start eating the human alive without bothering to kill him---horrible as it sounds, you can let the beast chew on one arm while you slash his throat with a knife in the other, lives have been saved this way.

If a bear is seriously after you, you can expect to fight to the death, yours or his. It is very difficult to dissuade or shake off a predatory black bear, but it has been possible to temporarily make him back off by threatening him with a stick or spraying him at close range--thus buying precious time. One man, before he used the spray, had such a bear rise up and look him directly in the eyes at close range. He could see in the bear's eyes what it intended to do to him, and it made his soul quake--he never had experienced such terror before (or since) in a long adventurous life! Fortunately, the overconfident bear had positioned himself perfectly for a snoot-full of hot-pepper spray and the man drove off the creature long enough to get away.

Please take SERIOUSLY the threat posed by a predatory black bear of the great northern wilderness! A man-eating tiger is no more determined or deadly. Once such a bear has tasted human flesh, he will often try to stalk and kill every human he can find in the vicinity and cache the bodies for his food supply. In one horrible incident a few years ago, a black bear overpowered and killed (the evidence indicated the victim tried fighting back) a teenager who was fishing along a stream. He then killed two more young men who were looking for the first one. Apparently, he snuck up behind them by stealth and knocked them down, then broke their necks in his jaws. The fourth teenager who was waiting in his car, realised something had gone terribly wrong when none of the others showed up and went for help. Almost certainly he would have been the fourth fatality if he had tried looking for the others. They found the bear standing guard over the three bodies and shot when he started to charge.

A point that should be obvious from all this is that if you have to work or travel for extended periods of time in northern B.C. or Alberta in deep forested wilderness, you had damn well better take along adequate firearms and be prepared to use them anytime. You will sleep in your tent with that gun beside you and loaded, and with your knife under your pillow and spay next to your sleeping bag. These black bears have taken oil exporation workers from stations in deep wilderness areas just as polar bears have from remote Arctic stations. People having to go into these areas for significant periods of time must take as great precautions as Arctic explorers do with polar bears.

The most important precautions are: Never be alone at any time, and never be unarmed. In fact, if you were ever ordered to go into these areas without firearms or by yourself, you would be absolutely justified in refusing. The danger is terribly real and significant. Use as much caution as a diver would use with tiger sharks. The only other North American animal that is as dangerous as a fully predatory black bear is a confirmed, man-eating jaguar (or maybe a starving polar bear). It goes without saying that it is sheer madness to feed a bear along the Alaskan Highway, these animals are nothing like U.S. National Park bears; travellers have been horribly wounded for making that mistake and the bear almost always has to be quickly killed as it becomes uncontrollably aggressive.
Creepy.....

Kozmic Zian
05-29-2004, 23:04
So are you trying to say that the AT black bears are not the same type of black bears that keep killing people, all over North America?

Ps, I did not mention guns, you did. Give up your obsession with them.Yea.....Look, whoever you are....The implication is that you want to shoot all the bears, because of your obsession with guns, not mine. I wouldn't own one, period. I personally, think anyone who does is a fool. Any one who would use the very rare occurance of a Black Bear attack to build some kind of base for carrying a concealed weapon on the Trail is a fool. You're a fool for coming on this Whiteblaze.net, without even knowing anyone here, and disrespectfully contributing your agenda to our hiking net. And, not only contributing to it, but blowing it out there, like everybody else is supposed to jump and think you're somekind of 'Gun Guru' , or somekind of 'Badass' or something. Man, I wanted to stay out of this thing, but when you decided to use the Beautiful Black Bear as a tool to further your ignorant agenda, I decided to say what I have to say. Do us all a favor and take your stupid, blasphemous, anti-nature and anti-hiking message somewhere else. If you don't do that of your own accord, you're gonna find yourself without a forum to pick on any more.....because you're going to get 'blackballed', and shut off from this one, too. All it's gonna' take is a few more insults, to a few more hikers, and the owners will shut you down, Big Boy. [email protected]:clap :clap :clap

p.s. That was my last post to this ignoramus......................................... ...

Alligator
05-29-2004, 23:13
This guy I know has a bow-legged trail dog that is afraid of bears. What should he do?

MOWGLI
05-30-2004, 09:01
Am I the only person who thinks that MeBrad has moved south and taken on a new screen name?

Kozmic Zian
05-30-2004, 10:00
Yea......45? Now, which is it LW? The .45 or the .9mm? I mean, you'd be packing more guns & ammo than food, now would't ya?:D

Kozmic Zian
05-30-2004, 10:10
Yea.......MOGLI16....Yo, Ho, Ho......That's a good one! L0L.:clap :clap :clap

JLB
05-30-2004, 13:37
Yea.....Look, whoever you are....The implication is that you want to shoot all the bears, because of your obsession with guns, not mine. I wouldn't own one, period. I personally, think anyone who does is a fool. Any one who would use the very rare occurance of a Black Bear attack to build some kind of base for carrying a concealed weapon on the Trail is a fool. You're a fool for coming on this Whiteblaze.net, without even knowing anyone here, and disrespectfully contributing your agenda to our hiking net. And, not only contributing to it, but blowing it out there, like everybody else is supposed to jump and think you're somekind of 'Gun Guru' , or somekind of 'Badass' or something. Man, I wanted to stay out of this thing, but when you decided to use the Beautiful Black Bear as a tool to further your ignorant agenda, I decided to say what I have to say. Do us all a favor and take your stupid, blasphemous, anti-nature and anti-hiking message somewhere else. If you don't do that of your own accord, you're gonna find yourself without a forum to pick on any more.....because you're going to get 'blackballed', and shut off from this one, too. All it's gonna' take is a few more insults, to a few more hikers, and the owners will shut you down, Big Boy. [email protected]:clap :clap :clap

p.s. That was my last post to this ignoramus......................................... ...

Denial aint just a river in Egypt.

Bears attack people all over this country, no matter how much you want to hide your head in the sand.

Colter
05-30-2004, 13:59
The "informational quote" from Jumble Jowls shouldn't be taken seriously. (What is the source of that quote, anyway?)

One passage of many possible ridiculous examples is this...

"All is not hopeless, predatory black bears often underestimate humans and have been killed with knife-slashes to the throat or even a large rock or heavy stick to the skull."

I challenge anyone to give me documented proof of attacked humans killing black bears with each of the above weapons.

Another is:

"Once such a (black) bear has tasted human flesh, he will often try to stalk and kill every human he can find in the vicinity and cache the bodies for his food supply."

Again, a challenge to anyone to give me one documented example of a black bear killing every human he can find and then stockpiling the bodies.

Please people, if you truly believe black bears are that dangerous, stay home.

Dances with Mice
05-30-2004, 14:53
Please people, if you truly believe black bears are that dangerous, stay home.

Excellent advice. This is my last post before I head out to an area of known heavy bear activity to try out my new HH. I'm looking forward to swinging in it and sipping some of Lynchburg TN's finest tonight.

And if anyone needs protection from bears, then carry one of these:

http://www.rei.com/online/store/ProductDisplay?storeId=8000&catalogId=40000008000&productId=4710&parent_category_rn=4500520

There's been a time or two I wished I had one. For dogs.

And to all those who served in the Armed Forces so I could do this today, I'll raise a big, heartfelt toast. .

Alligator
05-30-2004, 15:56
He called that bow-legged dog "Mother".

steve hiker
05-30-2004, 16:02
And if anyone needs protection from bears, then carry one of these:

http://www.rei.com/online/store/ProductDisplay?storeId=8000&catalogId=40000008000&productId=4710&parent_category_rn=4500520

There's been a time or two I wished I had one. For dogs.
I have carried and used bear spray, on dogs. IMHO, dogs are much more of a threat than the eastern black bear.

smokymtnsteve
05-30-2004, 16:04
maybe we should have desoto march back thru the area

SGT Rock
05-31-2004, 18:16
I tend to agree with the dog thing. I have had more run in with dogs in all these years than with bears (zero bear incidents). I think the main concern I ever have with bears is them trying to get my food when I sleep and not me. I would hate to have to hike out hungry and repace my food bag just to have to hike in again. Take care with your food.

SGT Rock
05-31-2004, 19:03
Oh, and GEEZE, y'all give JLB a rest about the guns. He was a gentelman and never mentioned guns, although he has a healthy RESPECT for bears.

Kozmic Zian
05-31-2004, 19:25
Yea.......Jumble. Phew....what a dissertation. You must live up there or something, right? Damn, I better get my M-16 outa' da closet. Sounds pretty rough in the 'Real Woods'. Naaawww. I always figured for the badest bear spray and a handgun up in the Canadian North West. Which I'd never do up East, by the way. Big dif between these bears here, although, there have been a few attacks (not impossible, but rather improbable). Anyway, I guess you spelled it out. [email protected]

JLB
05-31-2004, 21:17
Oh, and GEEZE, y'all give JLB a rest about the guns. He was a gentelman and never mentioned guns, although he has a healthy RESPECT for bears.
You are wrong, he brought up guns, not me.


Yea.....Bears. Man, this guy will do anything to further his gun agenda. Black Bears will not hurt you. You are the one who's scared, and it ain't of 'inanimate objects'....You got Bear Phobia.....Animal Phobia.....You'll never be a hiker. Anyone that scared of Black Bears to have to save up and look up all that information about Bear attacks (notice that most of them are West of the Mississippi). Considering that the East Coast of N. America is so heavily populated, and so many naieve people can just drive up to the Appalachian Mts in their cars, pull out a lunch, and feed a bear out of curiosity, it's (your stupid list is) still a very small percentage of attacks. Certainly not worth all of the gun fal-de-ral and "shoot anything that walks" mentality that you seem so vent on perveying. Why don't you just get bored of all the weak, mindless, gunless, Democratic, liberal, hippie, hikers and find another forum to spew your violent venom in. Or did you already get kicked out of all of them? [email protected]

P.S. Can't post to 'Gun Freak's' entrys anymore....he's on the ignore list.

So, as you can see, this guy only has one thing on his mind...guns.

He brings it up on every thread. :bse

Dances with Mice
05-31-2004, 22:08
You are wrong, he brought up guns, not me.

Uhm, JLB? Read Rock's post again.

SGT Rock
05-31-2004, 22:08
JLB, re-read man. I said you never brought up guns.

smokymtnsteve
05-31-2004, 22:14
ROCK as I have done many times in life we are trying to use logic to deal with an illogical situation.....

JLB
05-31-2004, 23:43
JLB, re-read man. I said you never brought up guns.

Doh!!

My bad.


Carry on. ;)

Dances with Mice
05-31-2004, 23:43
Come on now, SMS, give JLB the benefit of the doubt.

He was just a little quick on the trigger. Missed his target by a mile, though. You could say he shot himself in the foot.

Ok, Ok, Ok, I'll quit. I'm sure everyone finds this to be a large bore.

But you don't often see mistakes of that caliber...

steve hiker
08-01-2004, 00:28
Here's how bears BREAK INTO CARS:

http://www.yosemitefun.com/bears.htm

ripple
08-04-2004, 12:52
Bear scared here is another one for you.

http://apnews.excite.com/article/20040804/D848GMDO0.html


It seems they don't even have to attack you, to kill you.

grrickar
08-04-2004, 17:17
I've seen bears in the Smokies, and was not at all concerned about them. We gave them a wide berth, but they ignored us for the most part. I think unless you got close to one of their young, or came between them and a meal you would not have anything to worry about.


I'm more worried about West Nile and Lyme Disease than bears. Heck of a lot more mosquitoes and ticks than bears out there...

steve hiker
08-05-2004, 00:32
If it could happen to him, it'll almost certain happen to me one day. I'm scard enough every day just THINKING about those bears tearing hikers to pieces. Next time i see a real b-b-bear in the woods i'll probably end up like this kid. Then you'll have to change my name to Bear Scared To Death.


Aug 4, 12:13 PM (ET)

SANDWICH, N.H. (AP) - A 13-year-old boy attending a camp for underprivileged children collapsed and died after being scared by a bear on a hike, authorities said Wednesday.
Fish and Game Sgt. James Goss said that as the boy ran he went into respiratory distress and collapsed. Authorities reached him about two hours later. He was pronounced dead at a hospital in Plymouth.

ffstenger
08-05-2004, 03:11
I was a little nervous about bears untill, after 3 years of section hiking, I saw a sow and 2 cubs come down from a tree 30 feet from the trail as they heard us comming up the trail. Some came through our camp that night... it was a bit spooky at first. but not any more. My biggest problem with bears is, and has been for years now, is I always manage to find fresh scat..... by stepping in it !!
Almost got me a new trail name :p
Showme

Alligator
08-18-2004, 11:21
Seems those bears have beer preferences! Maybe its political;) .
http://abcnews.go.com/wire/US/ap20040817_2517.html


Bear Drinks 36 Cans of Favorite Beer</B>
Black Bear Found Passed Out at Campground Apparently Consumed 36 Cans of His Favorite Beer

The Associated Press


BAKER LAKE, Wash. Aug. 17, 2004 — Rain-eeeeer .... Bear? When state Fish and Wildlife agents recently found a black bear passed out on the lawn of Baker Lake Resort, there were some clues scattered nearby dozens of empty cans of Rainier Beer. The bear apparently got into campers' coolers and used his claws and teeth to puncture the cans. And not just any cans.

"He drank the Rainier and wouldn't drink the Busch beer," said Lisa Broxson, bookkeeper at the campground and cabins resort east of Mount Baker.
Fish and Wildlife enforcement Sgt. Bill Heinck said the bear did try one can of Busch, but ignored the rest.

"He didn't like that (Busch) and consumed, as near as we can tell, about 36 cans of Rainier."

A wildlife agent tried to chase the bear from the campground but the animal just climbed a tree to sleep it off for another four hours. Agents finally herded the bear away, but it returned the next morning.

Agents then used a large, humane trap to capture it for relocation, baiting the trap with the usual: doughnuts, honey and, in this case, two open cans of Rainier. That did the trick.

"This is a new one on me," Heinck said. "I've known them to get into cans, but nothing like this. And it definitely had a preference."

Percival
08-18-2004, 11:44
That'd make one helluva commercial for the Ranier Beer people. The Beer of Bears.

grrickar
08-18-2004, 12:37
Agents then used a large, humane trap to capture it for relocation, baiting the trap with the usual: doughnuts, honey and, in this case, two open cans of Rainier. That did the trick.
Beer and doughnuts? I'm surprised they didn't catch a hungry hiker in that trap!

Jack Tarlin
08-18-2004, 18:25
You might want to check out http://news.bostonherald.com/localRegional/view.bg?articleid=40343

Re. this article.....the only thing scarier than a 300-lb bear trying to get thru your screen door in order to eat your dog is the maniacal grin on the guy who objected (see attached photo).

P.S. This story is also a pretty good argument for gun ownership, too. In the hands of the right person, a gun is merely a tool, and often the right one for the job at hand.

steve hiker
08-18-2004, 18:59
That is one scarey story. And it didn't happen in Montana and it wasn't a grizz, it was a blackie in Massachussets. I'm telling you them bears have had enough and are going on the ATTACK coming right after us in our OWN HOMES.


... the 300-pound black bear had murder in his eyes when he ambled out of the night and onto his front porch.



Jurkowski, a 56-year-old carpenter, said the bear had been stalking his family for a week. ... :eek: Ready to eat a human like a hot steamy Big Beef Burrito Supreme.

But less than an hour later, Jurkowski saw the hulking animal heading for his doorway, which was guarded only by a flimsy screen and his three yapping Chihuahuas.



He gave a humongous roar, and I ran into the house.

I'm ready to bolt the door NOW and hide under the covers its one thing when them b-b-b-ears come after you in the woods but when they come to your door and want to eat you there's no place left to run or hide its all over

Jack Tarlin
08-18-2004, 19:04
Then again, he couldja just forked over the damned chihuauas and that woulda concluded matters right there.

Just one more reason I prefer cats......

Lobo
08-18-2004, 19:13
Pennsylvania male black bears fairly consistently reach the weight of 800+ pounds.

steve hiker
08-18-2004, 19:15
No them chihuauas wouldn't have filled him up it'd be like giving him a couple little chicken nuggets when you're holding a big old 15-piece box of hot fried breasts and wings and legs and biscuits topped with gravey that you can smell 100 feet away and that's you he's smelling he woulda wanted SMORE!

Mountain Dew
08-19-2004, 02:42
I've often said that if a bear approached a shelter I was in and acted like he was uh hungry that somebody was going to be pushed out there to take one for the team. :D

Snakes worry me much more than bears do on the trail. Bears atleast make sounds and you would see/hear them coming most likely. Just imagine a snake bit in a semi-remote area of the trail and no other hiker coming along within a few hours. If you didn't lose the limb you'd most likely die.

Jersey Bob
08-19-2004, 08:30
at least 10 characters

Dances with Mice
08-19-2004, 09:02
You might want to check out http://news.bostonherald.com/localRegional/view.bg?articleid=40343

Re. this article.....the only thing scarier than a 300-lb bear trying to get thru your screen door in order to eat your dog is the maniacal grin on the guy who objected (see attached photo).


"The bear, a 3- to 5-year-old male, died on Jurkowski's lawn as his wife prayed in a locked bedroom."

The way I read it, the poor bear's wife was praying for his life in a locked bedroom. The article didn't say whether or not Jurkowski shot the bear in his pajamas.

beancounter
08-26-2004, 12:41
This is not a lie. I did 500 mile of the AT in 2003 and spent my younger days on a ranch in Montana so I’m somewhat of an outdoorsman. I work at a Family clinic which is part of a medical school and last week I attended a “Faculty forum” (bitch session for the Doc’s). One of the Doc’s is going to Backpack in Wyoming this week (a whole 14 miles) and the conversation turned to bears. All of the city people are scared of bears.
One Doc’s solution to the bear problem was to put a bottle of Honey in your backpack and if you see a bear, remove the lid from the honey bottle and spread the honey around, then make a getaway.
I assured him the bear would wait patiently while they went through this process!!!!!!!

While I was climbing Priest going south I met a Doc from Virginia Medical College and he said “they could not find on instance where anyone was ever treated for a bear attack”.

:jump

bailyrosco
08-26-2004, 12:59
That makes perfect sense...They should of checked the morgue!!!!:-?

The Hog
08-26-2004, 15:08
There was an incident several years ago in which a black bear attacked a man in Baxter State Park. The man apparently took refuge in a pond, but the bear swam out and bit him on the shoulder. Having noted that incident, I have to admit that none of the 15 or so black bears I've seen in the wild have attacked me. A mother bear with two cubs (on the A.T. in VA) gave me a long menacing look, but followed her cubs into the woods. Most of the other bears I've seen just turned around and ran away. I did encounter a grizzly in Glacier Nat. Park on the CDT that snapped its jaws at me. Foolishly, I got out the video camera instead of the pepper spray!

beancounter
08-26-2004, 15:22
The only thing a Grizzly has in common with a black or brown (lower 48) bear is the name. They should be treated as two distinctly different animals which they are.
When I was about 6 years old I saw a Grizzly in Yellowstone Park. Also, that year I was on government range about 10 to 15 miles north of the park in Montana when I spotted a black bear. I was on my horse “Lulu Belle” and tried to chase the Black bear so I could lasso it. Lucky for me the bear could outrun my horse who being smart than me didn’t want to chase the bear anyway. This shows how stupid I as at that age, but had it been a Grizzly I would of been smart enough to head in the opposite direction.

Tractor
08-26-2004, 19:10
I had a momma bear about 10 feet from me, after 3 short charges, last year just up from Shuckstack tower/south of Mollies Ridge. She was simply wanting me the hell out of her, and cubs, space (which i walked into & out of rather quickly). A hundred & 1 thoughts went thru my mind in a matter of a few seconds. I had the vulcan death grip on my hiking stick (ready to wack her in the nose if she came one more time). Each step I took took me farther from the cubs, though, and i was betting the farm this was a good thing! Since then, I think of "eastern bear" more like fellow hikers. Everyone has to pee, poop, eat, sleep and have some space. Ocassionally one will take an attitiude and showoff. Occasionally one must protect their stuff.

My biggest scare, 'cept for this, was a grouse in Georgia, but that's a different story.......

eyahiker
08-26-2004, 22:09
Ya gotta watch those Grouse...........I'm with you on that one.;)

Brushy Sage
09-04-2004, 15:00
Our AT bears are gentle in comparison with these guys:

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=573&ncid=573&e=2&u=/nm/20040903/od_nm/romania_bears_dc

Crash! Bang!
10-11-2004, 14:08
bear count = 6

Ridge
11-21-2004, 00:42
I spotted a bear near Standing Indian Mtn, NC on the AT. Was my only sighting along the entire AT. A note of interest, the GSMNP are removing (I heard) the bear fences from all the shelters, I know the Ice Water Spgs shelter is already minus the fence.

Youngblood
11-21-2004, 11:35
Ridge,

I think Mowgli mentioned in another thread that they had to go two years without a reported bear incident before they would take down the fence at a particular shelter. They have also added skylights to the shelters and in some cases, a covered cooking area.

The skylights really improve the shelters by adding some light inside. However, I did seem to notice this summer that during the day, the nats would follow me inside the shelters with the skylights but not the ones without?

Youngblood

MOWGLI
11-21-2004, 11:43
Ridge,

I think Mowgli mentioned in another thread that they had to go two years without a reported bear incident before they would take down the fence at a particular shelter.

I got that info from Gizmo, the Ridgerunner on the AT in the park.

minnesotasmith
11-25-2004, 15:48
(Also posted on Sgt. Rock's site)

One book on bear attacks I've read and recommend highly...
"Mark of the Grizzly", by Scott McMillion. It covers grizzly attacks in both Alaska and the lower 48. Some of his main points are:

1) Dummies are the main ones who get mauled, but it can happen to anyone outdoors in regions grizzlies live.

2) Hunters are at considerably more risk than are everyone else (i.e., hikers). This is probably due to the smell from game hunters down, although there is some belief that some bears learn to associate gunshots with available food.

3) The larger # of people in a group, the lower the probability of a mauling. Five people = very unlikely; nine = basically unheard of.

4) Bears, even grizzlies, generally seek to avoid contact with humans the vast majority of the time.

5) Bears generally hear you long before you hear them. Over 95% of bear encounters occur without the human(s) ever knowing about it.

6) Bears vary in their aggressiveness with the time of the year and whether or not they have health/injury issues that keep them in a bad mood all the time.

7) The vast majority of bear maulings do not result in human death. As the bears could easily have killed the humans had they wanted to, obviously bears do not generally intend to kill, but to chastise, humans they maul.

8) Bear sprays work best on bears that have not yet firmly decided to attack. They can further enrage bears that have decided to attack, possibly increasing the chances of a mauling being fatal. When bear spray has been spilt on the ground, bears have been seen to intentionally roll in it.

9) Grizzly brains go "tilt" at the sight of a human on a horse, and are not known to have EVER attacked one, if I remember correctly.

10) About one person a year is killed by a bear in all of North America. In Alaska, almost twice as many people have been killed by dogs since records started being kept in 1939. Thus, the risk of bear attacks should NOT keep people from enjoying the outdoors.

11) It takes a serious gun to kill a grizzly. In one case in this book, a hunter put a .30-30 rifle round and SIX .44-magnum pistol rounds into a grizzly without killing it (then or subsequently). Good shot placement helps a LOT. A 12-gauge shotgun with rifled slugs is probably the cheapest remotely effective weapon for this purpose. .338 magnum rifles are the weapon of choice to many. When rangers have to kill a bear, the preferred method appears to be for multiple shooters to catch it unawares and fire simultaneously with well-placed shots.

Good link (see right sidebar) on grizzly loads: http://www.huntingmag.com/big_game/fiercest_game/

12) Bears have absolutely incredible pain tolerance. They are known to repeatedly dig up yellow jacket nests to eat the larvae, getting innumerable stings in the process.

13) Grizzlies move so fast in the attack that people often have no time to use bear sprays or guns held at the ready. Sprays MAY be quicker to use. Repeatedly, guys with good guns get off one shot that misses, then the bear is on them. It would be necessary to shoot grizzlies on sight to be halfway sure via the use of firearms to not get mauled.

Also, bear spray would qualify as a multiple-use item (loose dogs, Elwood, unpleasant Route 19E natives, etc.). ;)

Ridge
11-25-2004, 16:20
I have hunting fishing friends in Alaska who are at odds on the type of gun and the ammo to carry for grizzly attacks. One say a 12ga loaded with a combo of slugs and buckshot, guides use this one. Others say a 375mag but never anything smaller than a 30-06. They seem to all agree not to carry or use a pistol unless you are going to use the last bullet on yourself. I guess if one person carrys a 12ga, the other a 375mag, then if things don't work out have a pistol close by.

beancounter
11-29-2004, 12:44
Grizzly, black or brown bears should never be described in the same article. Again, the only thing they have in common is their names. The behavior of these species are totally different. It like trying to describing how a wild buffalo and beef cow respond to human inter action in the same article.

steve hiker
11-29-2004, 15:17
Grizzly, black or brown bears should never be described in the same article. Again, the only thing they have in common is their names. The behavior of these species are totally different. It like trying to describing how a wild buffalo and beef cow respond to human inter action in the same article.
You're almost rite there beancounter. Grizzly and brown bears are basically the same species ursus arctos horribilis but they act different depending on where they live.

The coastal Brown Bears of Alaska and British Columbia have lots of food and get fat from salmon FISH N CHIPS and other good things to eat along the coast, so they're mellower and sleepier from full stomachs and don't eat as much hiker.

But them inland bears are called grizzlers cause they don't have as much to eat and thus are grumpy and feed mostly on BEEF STEAK and never pass up the chance for a hiker shish-k-Bob. So watch out when you're in bear country especially away from the salmon streams or you'll end up in a grizzler bear stomach right away.

Pencil Pusher
12-01-2004, 04:01
I have hunting fishing friends in Alaska who are at odds on the type of gun and the ammo to carry for grizzly attacks. One say a 12ga loaded with a combo of slugs and buckshot, guides use this one. Others say a 375mag but never anything smaller than a 30-06. They seem to all agree not to carry or use a pistol unless you are going to use the last bullet on yourself. I guess if one person carrys a 12ga, the other a 375mag, then if things don't work out have a pistol close by.I guess when it comes down to it, it's better to err on the side of caution. But still I have heard just the sound of a gunshot alone scares the shlt out of the bears. Obviously this can't be too comforting for the gun owner, knowing they're just blowing smoke, so to speak. I think if you're a gun nut it's hard to escape the thoughts on calibers of guns and what-not for bear safety. If I had a pistol, I'd just carry that considering the chance of encounter and whether having something bigger would do me beans for good anyway.

Fiddleback
12-01-2004, 10:47
The sound of gun shots scares bears except when it doesn't.

Here in my beautiful part of the world 'they' are coming to understand that the sound of gun fire attracts some grizzlys. The explanation is that grizzlys have learned to associate hunting (gun fire) with gut piles (the offal left after skinning out an animal). Last year, or maybe the year before, a hunter working on his kill was himself killed by a grizzly which, they are fairly certain, was initially attracted to the hunter by the gun fire. It's easy to imagine that gut piles are a great treat for bears and during the fall hyperphagic stage they can become quite forceful about getting some. Extreme caution is the rule these days when working on a kill -- the grizzlys are not run off by the sound of gun fire.

FB

steve hiker
12-01-2004, 12:34
Here in my beautiful part of the world 'they' are coming to understand that the sound of gun fire attracts some grizzlys. The explanation is that grizzlys have learned to associate hunting (gun fire) with gut piles (the offal left after skinning out an animal).
I've heard the same thing. Also, it seems campfire smoke would attract bears, at least in areas where touron types have been sloppy in the past with their food.

Fiddleback
12-01-2004, 19:17
I've had the same question. I seldom use campfires anymore but I remember being at a developed camp site in AK along side the Eagle River. Since the site had a fire ring and since I was wet from walking through brush and weeds I built a fire to help dry out. This was in Chugach State Park which had one of the most dense grizzly populations in Alaska. I spent much of the night wondering about smoke being associated with food at well used campsites. Every splash in the river (and there were lots of 'em) sounded like a very large footstep...:confused:


FB

minnesotasmith
12-02-2004, 04:29
Gut piles are absolute favorite spots for grizzlies. In fact, with the possible exception of the area between a mother grizzly and her cub, the most dangerous place in Alaska wildlife-wise is between a grizzly and a gut pile it has scented. If you hunt in Alaska, first gut any large game you take ASAP, and get the carcass the heck away from the gut pile immediately after, doing other field dressing (such as quartering a moose) after you have moved it a distance away. Of course, meantime having a companion standing guard (with a large-caliber rifle at the ready) while you do all this would be highly desirable as well, although a tethered dog nearby (to give the hunter field-dressing large game) might be a useful (if inferior) substitute for an armed human guard.

Jigger Johnson
01-01-2005, 14:06
For example?
I'll answer my own question. They will prey on rodents , birds, fish and sometimes newborn deer if their primary food sources aren't available. They pose no threat to us big-ass humans.
I hate to tell you but there have been several human fatalities involving black bears that stalked them. I think this would give them the name "predators".:banana

Bloodroot
01-01-2005, 14:48
I hate to tell you but there have been several human fatalities involving black bears that stalked them. I think this would give them the name "predators".:banana
And I hate to tell you the black bears number one "predator" is man. A bear is nothing more than a opportunistic feeder.

Jigger Johnson
01-01-2005, 15:09
And I hate to tell you the black bears number one "predator" is man. A bear is nothing more than a opportunistic feeder.
That may be so, but the argument at the beginning of this thread was that black bears aren't preadators. I was only giving some info on why they may be considered predators. No need to get harsh.:banana

Bloodroot
01-01-2005, 15:16
Not getting harsh, I apologize if you think so? Black bears in general are a strict omnivore species. I can't say I can agree that they are considered a predator to humans. Variation in species. Just like there are variations in humans that make a serial killers committ homicide. Just because there are a few bad apples............

Jigger Johnson
01-01-2005, 15:22
Not getting harsh, I apologize if you think so? Black bears in general are a strict omnivore species. I can't say I can agree that they are considered a predator to humans. Variation in species. Just like there are variations in humans that make a serial killers committ homicide. Just because there are a few bad apples............
I totally agree with you. As a whole, the black bear species may not be as bad as everyone makes it out to be. There are some stories you here about with blacl bears stalking people and they are rare. I also agree with you that man is ther biggest threat to all these animals. Although ominivores, there have been recorded instances when these terrible events have occured. But like you said you can't really blame a whole species of being murderous to humans when the instances have been rare.:)

Bloodroot
01-01-2005, 15:32
I totally agree with you. As a whole, the black bear species may not be as bad as everyone makes it out to be. There are some stories you here about with blacl bears stalking people and they are rare. I also agree with you that man is ther biggest threat to all these animals. Although ominivores, there have been recorded instances when these terrible events have occured. But like you said you can't really blame a whole species of being murderous to humans when the instances have been rare.:)
Absolutely.

I do have one instance back in 2000 like another poster on this thread where a sow charged me when I stumbled upon her cubs. Luckily, she had probably already eaten and let me flee away with my tail tucked.:D

minnesotasmith
01-07-2005, 08:03
http://www.wtopnews.com/index.php?sid=381147&nid=104

Bogus Bear Tracks Found on Alaska Trails
Updated: Wednesday, Jan. 5, 2005 - 9:53 PM


FAIRBANKS, Alaska (AP) - Someone is putting the scare into people walking trails at Creamer's Field in Fairbanks by laying down bogus bear tracks.

"It's either a person or a circus bear with two left front feet walking on its hands," said state wildlife biologist Harry Reynolds. "There are no hind tracks."

The tracks feature a foot pad, toes and claws that stretch out 3 inches from the toes. Reynolds said it's either a boot or some little attachment someone is putting on a boot.

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game has received several reports of grizzly bear tracks on the trails in the past few weeks. The first report came about three weeks ago from Jim Brader, who was skiing on the trails when he noticed what appeared to be bear tracks near the farmhouse visitor center.

"I thought, 'If there's a bear out here now it's a problem,'" said Brader, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service. While he recognized there were no rear tracks, Brader still felt compelled to report the tracks to Fish and Game.

A couple days later, Fish and Game received another report of bear tracks at Creamer's. Reynolds investigated and quickly deduced the tracks were fake, based on the fact there were no tracks from rear feet and there appeared to be the faint imprint of a boot or shoe.

The latest report of the tracks came over the weekend.

The bogus tracks have startled some trail users, said Mark Ross, who works at the Creamer's Field Farmhouse Visitor Center as education coordinator for the department.

"A couple of people have come in and said, 'There's bear tracks out there,'" Ross said.

Even though bears are supposed to be hibernating now, it's not unheard of for a grizzly to be wandering around in the middle of the winter. Just two years ago, there was a grizzly bear shot and killed in late December about 10 miles west of Fairbanks.

"It's not a laughing matter to a lot of people," Reynolds said.

___

Information from: Fairbanks Daily News-Miner, http://www.newsminer.com (http://www.newsminer.com/)


(Copyright 2004 The Associated Press

oldfivetango
01-07-2005, 18:36
I have carried and used bear spray, on dogs. IMHO, dogs are much more of a threat than the eastern black bear.
Yup! I have heard of people being attacked by wild dogs.Dogs attacked
by wild hogs(yeah, i cried when Old Yeller died but i was a kid then-ok?)
Also know of a turkey hunter in SC who got mauled by a cat which ruined
his face and obviously the guy was carrying a gun.And then there is the Ultimate Predator-MAn-he is the ONE that gives me great concern.

That said,even though i am a right-winger and gun owner i don't intend
to carry one for several reasons-weight,legalities in certain areas,respect for other hikers who just don't share my perspective on the gun issue etc.

For protection-Counter Assault Bear Spray(should work on dogs,cats,and
the occasional "Deliverance Dude") a good old one hander Spyderco knife
like the one used in Cliffhanger,and the hiking stick.I seriously doubt my
aluminum pole is of any deterrent to any of the forenamed predators but
then again-weight is foremost on my mind.I am already a few pounds over
my projected trail weight and just won't take anymore mass.So its trusty
old aluminum pole for this boy.

With regard to the attacks JLB listed in Tn area- do we know if the lady
tried to run?Was she prepped with any kind of defense like spray,stick,knife,
etc.Had she been cooking and wearing clothes that reeked of bacon etc-
alot of unknowns here.

Have decided to do my cooking at midday for the hot meal and hike on
away from the spot-hanging my food bag,kitchen kit,toiletries,etc way up
as high as i can get them.The day clothes (ie cooking clothes) will go in the water proof bag the hammock rides in,sleepwear lives inside the sleeping bag so it wont get contaminated with smells other than my own.Figure on a spot of tea and pre-made food at night like bars,jerky,bagels etc-no cooking odors there.And forget sleeping in shelters with snorers,possums,and mice.
I intend to "stealth camp" away from the crowd as much as possible with
the pack stored aways from my bed as well.

Have thought about hanging my socks on the ridgeline of the hammock-
bet that would turn any maneater on his heels in a hurry!

Bottom line is that Fear is the theif of dreams.The bears will have to just
bear with me as i walk amongst them to enjoy the experience of the trail.
PS - If Kozmic reads this i would like for him to know all us gunowners are
neither fools nor idiots,but like hikers who don't properly interact with the
wildlife or take proper precautions-it gives the rest of the community a bad
rap.Cheers to all.
Oldfivetango:jump

NICKTHEGREEK
01-07-2005, 19:10
Several in Shenandoah, there's about 300 in the population or about 1 per sq mile. I've seen more in trees than on the ground. While dayhiking near Snickers Gap I ran across tracks and fresh droppings and decided to play Dan'l Boone. After 10 minutes of tracking there he/she was. That ranked in the top 10 dumb things I've done. Black bears are a bit unpredicatble and I have no desire to test one's temperment.

SGT Rock- if you want to see a real Bear in the wild, I suggest Kodiak Island Alaska. Magnificent beasts who make even a well armed man realize that he's one step down on the food chain.

Incidentally cougars are what truly scares me. If you see one it may very well be too late.

SGT Rock
01-07-2005, 19:11
I rekon if I went up there I would worry about it. Maybe take my .308 to get their attention... and that would be about all it would do.

NICKTHEGREEK
01-07-2005, 19:14
I rekon if I went up there I would worry about it. Maybe take my .308 to get their attention... and that would be about all it would do.
Concur, I felt naked with a 45 ACP, and I was 30 years younger and far too dumb to be scared.

Dudeboard
01-07-2005, 19:25
SGT Rock- if you want to see a real Bear in the wild, I suggest Kodiak Island Alaska. Magnificent beasts who make even a well armed man realize that he's one step down on the food chain.
Some grizzlies weigh in at 1,500 pounds in coastal Alaska. They make Rockies bears look puny.

Newb
04-21-2005, 14:06
I love re-incarnating old threads. Here's a bear attack story from Alaska in the news recently...

Bear-Mauling Victim Survives Rare Second Attack

Thu Apr 21,10:36 AM ET
http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/us/my/addtomyyahoo3.gif (http://us.rd.yahoo.com/dailynews/addtomy/*http://add.my.yahoo.com/content?id=6179&.src=yn&.done=http%3a//news.yahoo.com/news%3ftmpl=story%26cid=573%26ncid=573%26e=6%26u=/nm/20050421/od_nm/odd_bear_dc) Oddly Enough - Reuters (http://us.rd.yahoo.com/dailynews/addtomy/*http://add.my.yahoo.com/content?id=6179&.src=yn&.done=http%3a//news.yahoo.com/news%3ftmpl=story%26cid=573%26ncid=573%26e=6%26u=/nm/20050421/od_nm/odd_bear_dc)




ANCHORAGE, Alaska (Reuters) - Scott MacInnes set an Alaskan record this week, although not one contenders would seek to break, by becoming the state's first person to survive two bear attacks, state officials said on Wednesday.



MacInnes, a 51-year-old biologist, was mauled during his early morning jog on Monday when he met up with a brown bear and one or two cubs near his home in the Kenai Peninsula town of Soldotna.



He had been mauled 38 years earlier on a well-used hiking trail in the Chugach National Forest, according to a government biologist.



"That's the only time in the history of the state that I have a record that anybody's been attacked twice," said Tom Smith, a bear biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey (http://us.rd.yahoo.com/DailyNews/manual/nm/od_nm/odd_bear_dc/14943926/*http://news.search.yahoo.com/search/news?fr=news-storylinks&p=%22U.S.%20Geological%20Survey%22&c=&n=20&yn=c&c=news&cs=nw) who keeps records of Alaska bear attacks dating to the late 1800s.



The presence of a dog and a food source, a freshly killed moose found nearby, made the bear more aggressive, said Bruce Bartley, a spokesman for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.



"There's just hardly any other factors that could make it worse," Bartley said.



MacInnes was one of eight people in Alaska who had been attacked by bears while jogging, according to Smith's records. Including MacInnes' second attack, Smith's records recount 519 bear maulings in Alaska.



MacInnes' first bear attack in 1967 resulted in wounds on his legs and an injured arm, but he was able to walk a few days later.



Monday's attack, which took place about 60 miles southwest of Anchorage, appeared more serious, inflicting wounds on MacInnes' head, neck and abdomen. He is expected to make a full recovery.

Outside of Alaska, a Canadian man claims to have been attacked on two occasions by polar bears, Smith said.

HikerHobo
07-05-2005, 22:11
Here is some good information on bear behavior
and safety while in bear country.

http://www.udap.com/safety.htm

middle to middle
12-02-2005, 11:40
I never saw a bear and never saw a moose. I must be a noisy walker.

atraildreamer
07-04-2006, 22:23
Not getting harsh, I apologize if you think so? Black bears in general are a strict omnivore species. I can't say I can agree that they are considered a predator to humans. Variation in species. Just like there are variations in humans that make a serial killers committ homicide. Just because there are a few bad apples............

STATELINE, Nev. (AP) -- A bear cub drew a crowd of spectators at a Lake Tahoe neighborhood as it munched on barbecue-chicken-and-jalapeno pizza in the back seat of a vintage red Buick convertible.

It also apparently washed it down with a swig of a Jack Daniel's mixer, an Absolut vodka and tonic, and a beer taken from a cooler, the vehicle's owner said.

About 30 people watched the cub lumber around a parking lot in upper Kingbury Grade on Sunday before it homed in on the Buick and the spicy pizza on the floor.

The bruin was unfazed by the car's horn the blew nonstop as the cub pressed the seat into the steering wheel.

"The bear was loping along in the parking lot and then decides to get inside the car," said resident Jerry Patterson.

"People were screaming at him, the horn was going off, but he was completely unaware. He did what he wanted to do and the people didn't matter."

The bear remained inside the 1964 Buick Skylark for about 20 minutes and at times put his paws on the dash as if he were holding on for a ride, Patterson said.

The owner of the car, David Ziello of South Lake Tahoe, said the bruin didn't cause any damage, but slopped cheese and jalapenos on the seats and floor.

Carl Lackey, a biologist with the Nevada Department of Wildlife, said up to two dozen bears live in the Kingsbury region near the south shore of Lake Tahoe.

The residential area sees more of them because the bears have found a primary source from Dumpsters and people who leave their food and trash in the open, said Lackey, who tracks and relocates bears on the Nevada side of the Tahoe basin.

Lackey warned visitors and residents against keeping food inside their vehicles.

"When you are in bear habitat, regardless of the time of year, you cannot leave any kind of food out - whether it's food inside the car, trash inside or outside your car, or pet food," Lackey said.

"Bears will find it and in doing so, it is increasing your chances of serious conflict."
---
Information from: Tahoe Daily Tribune, http://tahoe.com/tribune (http://tahoe.com/tribune)

-----

I would classify this one as an opportunist predator! :D

strnorm
07-06-2006, 20:41
fire crackers work well

Ridge
07-06-2006, 23:12
There should be zero fear or concern about the American Black Bear. Rumors and here-say is rampant about these animals. For instance, mother Black Bears or NOT that protective of her cubs, unless the cubs or physically harmed. However, the Grizzly mother will kill you dead if you even get close. I've read that up to 70 percent of all Grizzly attacks on humans involve cubs, not true with Black Bears. Black Bears outside of NP's rarely die from natural causes. Most are human caused, hunting or vehicles hitting them, Bears in NP's may live to be 30yrs old or so, outside they may live 5 yrs. And, as for hunting, use a bowl of honey and a ball bat, leave the elephant gun and radio-collar dogs at home. Who knows why there have been a few black bear attacks and killings, maybe the bear fell out of a tree on his head, or maybe it had been hurt in some way by a human in the past. I've only seen bears twice in the wild and I loved it. What you need to do is look at them, take their picture and have fond memories. These animals are only trying to survive, which is getting harder to do with the continued encroachment of man.

woodsy
07-21-2006, 20:21
The boy scout was sleeping when he awoke to a burning sensation in his arm. He pulled away and the Bear ran off. The following evening as the scouts were barbecuing ribs in camp the bear returned, cased the site and was dispatched(killed) by the waiting ranger. The boy was not seriously harmed but the bear paid with it's life. This info was retrieved from another website and incident was in Utah. The following link provides professional info on what to do and what not to do in the event of a Bruin encounter

www.wildlife.utah.gov/bear/bear safety.html (http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/www.wildlife.utah.gov/bear/bear safety.html)

woodsy
07-21-2006, 20:27
http://www.wildlife.utah.gov/bear/bear safety.html

woodsy
07-21-2006, 20:54
No luck with that URL but this works . Story of bitten boy under latest news........
http://wildlife.utah.gov/index.php

professional info also there

jlb2012
07-22-2006, 07:26
using the copy link location feature:

http://www.wildlife.utah.gov/bear/bear_safety.html

hopefully that one works

njmtnbikr
07-24-2006, 13:54
Saw a 500 pounder about 30 yards away ... it was wading into Sunfish Pond at the far north end. Didn't see me but I managed to snap a few pics before I turned about at a brisk pace. The bear seemed to be just eating some berries on a low-hanging branch and was totally oblivious to me. I'll have a full report and pics up shortly ...

atraildreamer
07-26-2006, 22:03
http://www.ananova.com/news/story/sm_1929127.html?menu=news.quirkies

Squirrels force couple to flee home :eek:

An elderly German couple were forced out of their home when a family of squirrels moved in and chased them off.

Heinz Steinhaeuser and his wife Brunhilde, from Verden in Lower Saxony, were kept out of their house for almost two hours.

They eventually had to call the fire brigade to reclaim their home from the squirrel pair and their three offsrping.

Steinhaeuser said the family of squirrels had slipped into the house when he went outside to pick up his newspaper and had chased his wife out.

When firemen arrived the squirrels hid in the bed and other furniture before the five officers were able to catch them one-by-one, often by dismantling much of the furniture to corner the animals individually. :p

Newb
07-27-2006, 14:18
http://www.ananova.com/news/story/sm_1929127.html?menu=news.quirkies

Squirrels force couple to flee home :eek:
:p


At least is wasn't the insidious, the feared, the horrendous...

Squirrel-Bear! www.squirrelbear.com (http://www.squirrelbear.com)

Newb
07-27-2006, 14:25
Oh...and this nifty comparison of Bears and Squirrels..

http://www.blackstone.ca/zoologyzone/bears/interactive/BearSquirrel.htm

mingo
07-27-2006, 14:37
believe it or not, i once saw two bears having sex in the morning right on the trail just up from the rock spring hut in the shenandoah. i walked right up to them. they were so engrossed in their passion that they didn't see me until i accidentally kicked a rock. then the female broke free and dashed over a hill. the male just stood there staring at me and scuffing around with his paws on the trail. he was upset. can't imagine why. he'd probably been chasing that tail for days. he looked disgusted. finally, he moped over into the woods and let me pass.

zacker
08-04-2006, 14:38
hey all, We're going to Shenandoah in a few weeks to do sme light hiking, we'll be staying in a cabine so no bear fear there... just when were out hiking. What are the chances we will see a Bear? do they usually come up close to the road? I mean, were not experienced hikers and wont be walking too far.. a mile or so, we want to at least do a few short walks per day so I dont think well be hiking in one spot for more than an hour or two. Should we use Bear Bells? Also, I have searched on line and am looking for any Info on Black Bear attacks at the park..if any.. Not because Im scared, just because I am curious.. personally, ill be lugging my camera and a good sized zoom so im hoping i will see a Bear in the wild, Im just hoping he'll be far away.. Im not looking for any intentional close encounters here.. also, what kids of Raptors can I expect to see? and if any of you all have any tips on sights to see, Id appreciate it much..water falls, birding spots, other animals, views... Thanks so much!

zacker
08-07-2006, 11:03
anyone?
please?

jlb2012
08-07-2006, 13:21
zacker - wrt seeing bear(s) in SNP - mostly it depends on luck and how quietly you hike - I've seen a fair number over the years and most of them just run away as soon as they hear you - you may see one near the road but again its just luck if you do - easiest way to see a bear is to hike quietly and then if you hear something crashing through the woods look carefully - most likely all you will be able to photograph is the bear's butt as it heads over the hill - the berry bushes may be ripe in the SNP so if you hang out there you may be able to see a bear feeding on the berries - the last problem bear that I heard of was a few years ago where a turon waas feeding the bear for a few days then left the park - the next person who rented the same spot ended up with a bear coming into the place looking for food - the bear was shot by rangers as I recall too bad they didn't catch the turon AFAIK.

zacker
08-07-2006, 14:17
cool.... Yeah if I do see a berry patch maybe I can set up some distance away... Like I said, I wanna get a shot but Ill use a zoom to get a close up...lol I dont wanna mess with a bear..for any reason! Plus, I actuall dont wanna even disturb wild life.. I wont go crashing through the woods like a freaking hurricane. I look at it this way, im a guest in Their house, not the other way around.
Thanks for the heads up.
Ps. Who the heck in their right mind feeds a Bear? or ANY wild animal for that matter? Sheesh!

Newb
08-15-2006, 13:06
I hike the NoVa AT all year round. This year we have more wild berries than I've seen in quite a while. That should mean we'll have some fat, happy bears this winter.

zacker
08-15-2006, 13:49
Oh Boy, should I take the 600MM lens and shoot from the roof of the truck then?
lol
thanks for the info!

Gray Blazer
08-15-2006, 13:57
believe it or not, i once saw two bears having sex in the morning right on the trail just up from the rock spring hut in the shenandoah. i walked right up to them. they were so engrossed in their passion that they didn't see me until i accidentally kicked a rock. then the female broke free and dashed over a hill. the male just stood there staring at me and scuffing around with his paws on the trail. he was upset. can't imagine why. he'd probably been chasing that tail for days. he looked disgusted. finally, he moped over into the woods and let me pass.

What's the punchline?......maybe you should have offered him a cigarette.....do bears smoke after sex? (Mrs. Bear says, "I don't know, Let me see"....Checks inside panties, smiles and says, "Yes".):banana :rolleyes:

I believe you. That was just too tempting for me to pass up.

Gray Blazer
08-15-2006, 14:06
-- A bear cub drew a crowd of spectators as it munched on barbecue-chicken-and-jalapeno pizza in the back seat of a vintage red Buick convertible.

It also apparently washed it down with a swig of a Jack Daniel's mixer, an Absolut vodka and tonic, and a beer taken from a cooler, the vehicle's owner said.

About 30 people watched before it homed in on the Buick and the spicy pizza on the floor.

The bruin was unfazed by the car's horn the blew nonstop as the cub pressed the seat into the steering wheel.



"People were screaming at him, the horn was going off, but he was completely unaware. He did what he wanted to do and the people didn't matter."



I would classify this one as an opportunist predator! :D

That was Lone Wolf!!

zacker
08-15-2006, 14:06
lol.....:D

Newb
08-15-2006, 15:55
believe it or not, i once saw two bears having sex in the morning right on the trail just up from the rock spring hut in the shenandoah. i walked right up to them. they were so engrossed in their passion that they didn't see me until i accidentally kicked a rock. then the female broke free and dashed over a hill. the male just stood there staring at me and scuffing around with his paws on the trail. he was upset. can't imagine why. he'd probably been chasing that tail for days. he looked disgusted. finally, he moped over into the woods and let me pass.

I think what you saw were two hikers. You know, hikers can get quite hairy after a couple of months in the woods....:D

zacker
08-15-2006, 15:57
now thats a scene i didnt need to imagine...thanks!
lol